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Encyclopedia > Shimer College

Shimer College

Motto "To Serve Rather Than Be Served"
Established 1853
Type Private
President Ronald O. Champagne - Interim President
Undergraduates 125
Postgraduates 25
Location Chicago, Illinois, USA
Campus Urban
Colors Burgundy and Gold
Mascot Pioneers (historical), Flaming Smelts (unofficial)
Website www.shimer.edu

Shimer College is a liberal arts college in Chicago, Illinois, which is best known for its small class sizes and its Great Books curriculum. The college is located on the campus of the Illinois Institute of Technology where Shimer students have the opportunity to cross-register. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Burgundy is a shade of dark red associated with the Burgundy wine of the same name, which in turn is named after the Burgundy region of France. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A family of Russian settlers in the Caucasus region, ca. ... Genera Allosmerus Hypomesus Mallotus Osmerus Spirinchus Thaleichthys Smelts are a family, Osmeridae, of small anadromous fish. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Great Books refers to a curriculum and a book list. ... State Street Village, S.R. Crown Hall, Armour Main Building Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) is a private Ph. ...


Shimer's student body is extremely small. With fewer than 150 students, Shimer is one of the smallest liberal arts colleges in the United States. More than 50 percent of Shimer graduates go on to graduate and professional schools. The Ph.D. rate for Shimer graduates is the third highest in the nation[citation needed]. Shimer is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Accreditation is a process by which a facilitys services and operations are examined by a third-party accrediting agency to determine if applicable standards are met. ... The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA) is one of six regional accreditation organizations recognized by the United States Department of Education. ...

Contents

Curriculum

Shimer College became formally affiliated with the University of Chicago in 1895 and adopted the Chicago "Hutchins Plan" in 1950. The Hutchins Plan refers to American educator Robert Maynard Hutchins who was the president of the University of Chicago from 1929 to 1945 and the chancellor from 1945 to 1951. The Hutchins Plan relies on close readings of original sources rather than textbooks as the basis for its curriculum. For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Robert Maynard Hutchins (January 17, 1899, Brooklyn, New York - May 17, 1977, Santa Barbara, California) was a philosopher. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Three textbooks. ...


Shimer continues to use the Hutchins Plan. It is one of a very small number of "Great Books" colleges—most notable among them St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland, and Santa Fe, New Mexico. Shimer markets itself as "the Great Books college of Chicago". The emphasis at Shimer on Great Books has been broadened and updated in recent curriculum additions to include a scope of contemporary texts and texts by female authors. Great Books refers to a curriculum and a book list. ... St. ... “Annapolis” redirects here. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Nickname: Location in Santa Fe County, New Mexico Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Fe Founded ca. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ...


Shimer's core curriculum generally requires three years of study in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and integrative studies. Electives are generally taken in the junior and senior years, as well as tutorials. A senior thesis is required. Classes are small and are guided by a faculty member, acting as a facilitator. Apart from a very few specific courses, the discussion method is the pedagogical norm. Core readings include the works of Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Shakespeare, Descartes, Nietzsche, Karl Marx, Dostoevsky, Kafka, and Woolf in the humanities; Lucretius, Lavoisier, Galileo, Newton, Darwin, Einstein, and Feynman in the natural sciences; and Machiavelli, Rousseau, De Tocqueville, Weber, Michel Foucault, Freud, DuBois, Wollstonecraft, De Beauvoir, and Arendt in the social sciences. For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Descartes redirects here. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (Russian: Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский, IPA: , sometimes transliterated Dostoyevsky, Dostoievsky, or Dostoevski  ) (November 11 [O.S. October 30] 1821–February 9 [O.S. January 28] 1881) was a Russian novelist and writer of fiction whose works, including Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, have had a profound and lasting effect... Kafka redirects here. ... For the American writer, see Virginia Euwer Wolff. ... Lucretius Titus Lucretius Carus (c. ... Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier (August 26, 1743 – May 8, 1794), the father of modern chemistry [1], was a French nobleman prominent in the histories of chemistry, finance, biology, and economics. ... Galileo redirects here. ... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... “Einstein” redirects here. ... This article is about the physicist. ... Detail of the portrait of Machiavelli, ca 1500, in the robes of a Florentine public official Niccolò Machiavelli (May 3, 1469—June 21, 1527) was an Italian political philosopher during the Renaissance. ... Rousseau redirects here. ... Tocqueville redirects here. ... Weber is a surname of German origin, derived from the noun meaning weaver. The German pronunciation is IPA: , while in English it is more likely to be pronounced IPA: or IPA: . In some cases, following migration to English-speaking countries, it has been anglicised to the English surname Webber or... Michel Foucault (IPA pronunciation: ) (October 15, 1926 – June 25, 1984) was a French philosopher, historian and sociologist. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... W. E. B. Du Bois William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (pronounced ) (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was a civil rights activist, sociologist, educator, historian, writer, editor, poet, and scholar, and socialist. ... Wollstonecraft refers to more than one thing: Mary Wollstonecraft, a 18th century English author. ... Simone de Beauvoir (January 9, 1908 – April 14, 1986) was a French author and philosopher. ... Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a German Jewish political theorist. ...


Shimer College is also notable for its Early Entrant Program, which caters to bright high school students ready for college after their sophomore or junior year not challenged by high school requirements.


Shimer also maintains a weekend college program partly separate from weekday enrollment. In keeping with the proposed Hutchins ideal of lifelong education, the weekend college is tailored to those students balancing a college education with full-time employment.


Additionally, the Shimer-in-Oxford Program offers an academic program in Oxford, England, most years for a subset of Shimer students who take courses from Shimer faculty and tutorials from University of Oxford faculty. This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ...


History

Shimer was founded in 1853 in Mount Carroll, Illinois, by Frances Wood Shimer as a non-denominational co-educational seminary. 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Mount Carroll is a city in Carroll County, Illinois, United States. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...


In the early 1960s, Shimer gained national attention with a Time magazine article about the school. The article cited a survey by the Harvard Educational Review that ranked Shimer as among the top eleven small liberal arts colleges in the United States, along with Carleton College, Reed College, and Swarthmore College. Despite the very traditional Hutchins curriculum, Shimer developed a reputation as a counterculture mecca in the 1960s and 1970s. Mounting debts and bankruptcy forced the college to leave its Mount Carroll campus and move to the northern Chicago suburb of Waukegan, Illinois, in 1979. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... The Harvard Educational Review is an interdisciplinary scholarly journal of opinion and research dealing with education, published by the Harvard Education Publishing Group. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Skinner Memorial Chapel, Carleton College Carleton College is an independent, non-sectarian, coeducational, liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, USA. The school was founded on November 14, 1866, by the Minnesota Conference of Congregational Churches as Northfield College. ... Reed College is a private, independent liberal arts college located in Portland, Oregon. ... Swarthmore College is a private, independent, liberal arts college in the United States with an enrollment of about 1,450 students. ... In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day, the cultural equivalent of political opposition. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Waukegan is a city in Lake County, Illinois, of which it is the county seat. ...


Amid controversy, on January 19, 2006, the Board of Trustees announced that it had accepted an invitation to move the school to the Illinois Institute of Technology campus on the south side of Chicago. The move to Chicago was completed August 19, 2006. is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Board of directors. ... State Street Village, S.R. Crown Hall, Armour Main Building Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) is a private Ph. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Notable alumni

  • Peter Cooley, poet
  • Heather Corinna, sex educator, feminist activist and creator of visual and written erotica
  • Stephen Dobyns, poet and novelist
  • Robert O. Keohane, international relations scholar
  • C. Clark Kissinger, political activist
  • Daniel J. Sandin, computer graphics and visual arts pioneer
  • Laurie Spiegel, composer and computer scientist
  • cat yronwode (née Manfredi), comic book publisher and folklorist (dropped out of Shimer before graduating)

Heather Corinna (1970) is an author, activist and internet publisher with a focus on progressive, affirming sexuality. ... Stephen Dobyns (born February 19, 1941) is an American poet and novelist born in Orange, New Jersey, and residing in Boston. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... C. Clark Kissinger was the National Secretary of Students for a Democratic Society. ... Dan Sandin Daniel J. Sandin (born 1942) is a video and computer graphics artist/researcher. ... American composer Laurie Spiegel was born in Chicago on September 20, 1945. ... catherine (cat) yronwode (born Catherine Manfredi in San Francisco, May 12, 1947 - ) is a writer and editor notable for her extensive career in comic books, in particular for her role as an editor with Will Eisner, Kitchen Sink Press, and Eclipse Comics (where she was the editor-in-chief); she...

See also

The Campbell Center for Historic Preservation Studies is an American museum studies school located in Mount Carroll, Illinois. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

Sources

  • Moran, Dan. "Shimer bolts county", News Sun, 19 Jan 2006. 

External links

  • Official website
  • Unknown, Unsung, and Unusual - TIME Magazine profile of Shimer from April 1963
  • Small Campus, Big Books - November 2007 profile of Shimer from the New York Times

  Results from FactBites:
 
Shimer College (265 words)
In the middle of the nineteenth century, Frances Wood Shimer and Cinderella Gregory journeyed west from New York State with plans to educate the frontier.
In 1896, now 70 years old and seeking to ensure her school's survival, Frances Shimer allied it to the University of Chicago.
Shimer became an autonomous four-year college and began accepting men in 1951.
Shimer College - College and University Profile (255 words)
Shimer College was founded in 1853 in Mount Carroll, Illinois by Francis Wood Shimer as a non-denominational co-educational seminary.
Shimer College is also notable for its extremely small size--with fewer than 150 students, Shimer is one of the smallest liberal arts colleges in the United States.
Shimer also has the unusual practice of having a weekend college separate from the normal weekday enrollment, which is tailored to people who want to balance a college education with a fulltime job.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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