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Encyclopedia > Shewa

Shewa (also spelled Shoa) is a historical region of Ethiopia. Formerly an autonomous kingdom within the Ethiopian Empire, the Ethiopian modern capital Addis Ababa is located at its center. A monarchy, (from the Greek monos, one, and archein, to rule) is a form of government that has a monarch as Head of State. ... Addis Ababa as seen from space. ...


The nucleus of Shewa is a mountainous terrain in what is currently the central area of Ethiopia, but historically it was Ethiopia's southernmost highland. Moreover, the highland of Shewa is separated from highlands to the north by a narrow lowland strip. Shewa was as defensible as any highland, and usually continued its traditional government even in cases when several surrounding lands were lost. In history, all this meant that Shewa could live a life somewhat unconcerned of events in Ethiopian politics. At times, it was a safe haven; at other times it was physically separated from the remainder of Ethiopia by enemies controlling the lowland.


The towns of Debre Berhan, Antsokia, Ankober, Entoto and, lastly, Addis Ababa have all served as the capital of Shewa at various times. Most of northern Shewa, made up of the districts of Menz, Tegulet, Yifat, Minjar, Bulga is populated mostly by Christian Amhara, while southern and eastern Shewa have large Oromo and Muslim populations. The great monastery of Debre Libanos, founded by Saint Takla Haymanot, is located in the district of Selale in northern Shewa. Debre Berhan is a town in the Amhara region of Ethiopia, about 120 kilometers north east of Addis Ababa, on the paved highway to Dessie. ... Ankober is a town of Ethiopia, at one time the capital of the historical Shewa kingdom and later district. ... Amhara (አማራ) is an ethnicity of people in the central highlands of Ethiopia, numbering about 19 million, making up around 26% of the countrys population (estimates differ). ... The Oromo are an African ethnic group found in Ethiopia and to a lesser extent Kenya. ... Ethiopian Muslims are adherents of the Sunni branch of Islam. ... Debre Libanos is a monastery in Ethiopia, lying north west of Addis Ababa in the Oromia region. ... In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. ... This article is in need of attention. ...


History

Shewa first appears in the historical record as a Muslim state, which G.W.B. Huntingford believed was founded in 896, and had its capital at Walalah. This state was absorbed by the Sultanate of Ifat around 1285. A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) (sometimes also spelled Moslem) is an adherent of Islam. ... Events The Bulgarians, under Simeon I, defeat the Byzantine Empire at Bulgarophygon. ... Ifat was a Muslim state of eastern Shewa, located in modern day Ethiopia. ... The 1280s is the decade starting January 1, 1280 and ending December 31, 1289. ...


Unhistorically, certain legends claim that Yekuno Amlak and his forebears had used Shewa as their safe haven when their survival was threatened by Zagwe dynasty and other enemies. This story, however, may be a later fabrication reflecting the similar conduct of Lebna Dengel's family. Yekuno Amlak (throne name Tasfa Iyasus) was negus (1270 - 1285) of Ethiopia and founder of the Solomonid dynasty. ... The Zagwe Dynasty ruled Ethiopia from the end of the Kingdom of Axum to 1270, when Yekuno Amlak defeated and killed the last Zagwe king in battle. ... Dawit II or David II, better known by his throne name Lebna Dengel (1501 - September 2, 1540) was negus (1508 - 1540) of Ethiopia, and a member of the Solomonid dynasty. ...


In the 16th century, Shewa was ravaged and separated from the rest of Ethiopia by the forces of Ahmed Gragn; the region then came under pressure from the Oromo, who succeeded during the first decades of the following century in settling in the depopulated areas and making themselves masters. Because of this destruction and isolation, little is known about the details of the history of Shewa until almost 1800. However, Emperor Lebna Dengel and some of his sons used Shewa as their safe haven when threatened by invaders. Ahmad ibn Ibrihim al-Ghazi (c. ... The Oromo are an African ethnic group found in Ethiopia and to a lesser extent Kenya. ...

King Sahle Selassie
King Sahle Selassie

The Shewan ruling family was founded by Negassie in the late 17th century, who consolidated his control around Yifat. Traditions recorded differ about his ancestry: one tradition, recorded in 1840, claims his mother was the daughter of Ras Faris, a follower of Emperor Sissinios who had escaped into Menz; another tradition told by Serta Wold, a councilor of Sahle Selassie, was that Negassie was a male-line descendant of Yaqob, the youngest son of Lebna Dengel, and thus assert descent from the ancient ruling Solomonid dynasty.1 Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2217x2082, 3900 KB) Summary King Sahla Sellase from Shewa From LIllustration 1845 Colour: Andro96 with Paint Shop Pro 7 Farbe: Andro96 mit Paint Shop Pro 7 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Shewa Sahle Selassie ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2217x2082, 3900 KB) Summary King Sahla Sellase from Shewa From LIllustration 1845 Colour: Andro96 with Paint Shop Pro 7 Farbe: Andro96 mit Paint Shop Pro 7 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Shewa Sahle Selassie ... Negassie or Negasi Krestos was the ruling prince of Shewa (c. ... Sissinios (throne name Malak Sagad III) was negus negust (1607 - September 7, 1632) of Ethiopia. ... Sahle Selassie (c. ... Dawit II or David II, better known by his throne name Lebna Dengel (1501 - September 2, 1540) was negus (1508 - 1540) of Ethiopia, and a member of the Solomonid dynasty. ... The Solomonid dynasty is the traditional royal house of Ethiopia, claming descent from King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba, who is said to have given birth to the traditional first king Menelik I after her Biblically-described visit to Solomon in Jerusalem. ...


Negassie's son, Sebestyanos assumed the title of Meridazmach ("General of the reserve army"), which was unique to Shewa. His descendants continued to bear this title until Sahle Selassie of Shewa was declared king of Shewa in the 1830s. His grandson Sahle Maryam eventually would succeed as Emperor of all Ethiopia at the end of the century under name Menelek II. The title of "King of Shewa" was subsumed into the Imperial title of "Emperor of Ethiopia" when Menelek became Emperor. Sebestyanos (c. ... Emperor Menelek II (August 17, 1844 – December 12, 1913), Conquering Lion of Judah, Elect of God, King of Kings of Ethiopia was negus negust (emperor) of Ethiopia from 1889 to his death. ...


Shewan kings spread their control towards the south and east, through lowland and desert, and succeeded in subjecting some regions under their rule. The kingdom of Shewa that Menelek II brought into the Ethiopian realm had been somewhat expanded, and thus added significantly to the total area of the empire. Ethiopia reached further frontiers through expansion to the east and south, resulting in the Shewan region as the physical center of the modern country.


In recent times, Shewa was a Governorate-General (Province) under the monarchy, and was then an Administrative Region of Ethiopia under the Derg regime until 1984. In that year, upon the proclamation of "The Peoples Republic" under the now civilianized Derg, Shewa was split into four Administrative Regions, North Shewa, Southern Shewa, Eastern Shewa and Western Shewa. Following the fall of the Derg in 1991, the old historic provinces and regions were abolished, and the present modern regions (based on ethnic and linguistic boundaries) were introduced. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ethiopia is divided into 9 ethnically-based administrative regions (kililoch; singular - kilil): Afar Amhara Benishangul-Gumaz Gambela Hariai Oromia Somali Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples Region Tigray Additionally, there are two chartered cities (astedader akababiwach, singular - astedader akabibi): Addis Ababa Dire Dawa These administrative regions replaced the older system of...


See also: Rulers of Shewa List of Rulers of Shewa (Dates in italics indicate de facto continuation of office) See also Ethiopia Lists of incumbents ...


References

  1. Mordechai Abir, Ethiopia: the Era of the Princes (London: Longmans, 1968), pp. 144ff.
Subdivisions of Ethiopia Flag of Ethiopia
Regions
Afar | Amhara | Benishangul-Gumaz | Gambela | Harari | Oromia | Somali | Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples Region | Tigray
Chartered cities
Addis Ababa | Dire Dawa
Provinces prior to 1995
Arsi | Bale | Gamu-Gofa | Gojjam | Begemder | Hararghe | Illubabor | Kaffa | Shoa | Sidamo | Tigray | Welega | Wollo

  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Shewa (792 words)
Shewa was as defensible as any highland, and usually continued its traditional government even in cases when several surrounding lands were lost.
Most of northern Shewa, made up of the districts of Menz, Tegulet, Yifat, Minjar, Bulga is populated mostly by Christian Amhara, while southern and eastern Shewa have large Oromo and Muslim populations.
Shewa first appears in the historical record as a Muslim state, which G.W.B. Huntingford believed was founded in 896, and had its capital at Walalah.
Shewa at AllExperts (848 words)
Moreover, the highland of Shewa is separated from highlands to the north by a narrow lowland strip.
In the 16th century, Shewa was ravaged and separated from the rest of Ethiopia by the forces of Ahmed Gragn; the region then came under pressure from the Oromo, who succeeded during the first decades of the following century in settling in the depopulated areas and making themselves masters.
Thus the ruling family of Shewa were considered the junior branch of the Solomonic dynasty after the senior Gondar branch.
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