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Encyclopedia > Sherry
A glass of amontillado Sherry
A glass of amontillado Sherry

Sherry is a fortified wine, made in and around the town of Jerez, Spain, and hence in Spanish it is called "Vino de Jerez". According to Spanish law,[1] Sherry must come from the triangular area of the province of Cádiz between Jerez, Sanlúcar de Barrameda, and El Puerto de Santa María. In earlier times, sherry was known as sack (a rendering of the Spanish saca, meaning a removal [from the solera]). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 366 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1798 × 2946 pixel, file size: 298 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 366 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1798 × 2946 pixel, file size: 298 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Sherry is a type of wine. ... A fortified wine is a wine to which additional alcohol has been added, most commonly in the form of brandy (a spirit distilled from wine). ... see: Jerez de la Frontera Jerez was a small independent emirate created c. ... Cádiz province Cádiz is a province of southern Spain, in the southwestern part of the autonomous community of Andalusia, being the southernmost point of continental Western Europe. ... Sanlúcar de Barrameda from the mouth of the Guadalquivir river Sanlúcar de Barrameda is a Spanish city in the northwestern part of the Cádiz province. ... Nickname: Motto: Puerto de Menesteo, Alcanatif Location Coordinates: Country  Spain Autonomous Community Andalusia Province Cádiz Founded XII Century BC[1] Government  - Mayor Area  - City 159 km² km²  (Expression error: Unrecognised word km sq mi) Population  - City 82,306  - Density 479,47 ab. ... Sherry solera A solera is a series of barrels or other containers used for aging liquids such as sherry, Madeira, Marsala, Mavrodafni (a dark-red fortified dessert wine from Greece), muscat, muscadelle, and balsamic vinegar. ...


Sherry differs from other wines because of how it is treated after fermentation. After fermentation is complete, it is fortified with brandy. Because the fortification takes place after fermentation, all natural sherries are dry; any sweetness is applied later. In contrast, port wine is fortified halfway through fermentation, stopping fermentation so not all the sugars are allowed to turn into alcohol and so leaving a sweet wine. Fermenting must. ... For other uses, see Brandy (disambiguation). ... A glass of tawny port. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Sherry

Jerez has been a center of viniculture since wine-making was introduced to Spain by the Phoenicians in 1100 BC. The practice was carried on by the Romans when they took control of Iberia around 200 BC. The Moors conquered the region in 711 AD and introduced distillation, which led to the development of brandy and fortified wine. Amontillado The history of Sherry is closely linked with that of Spanish wine production, particularly the political fortunes of the Cádiz region, where it originated with the early Phoenician settlement of the Iberian peninsular. ... Phoenicia was an ancient civilization in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coastal plain of what is now Lebanon and Syria. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... For other uses, see moor. ... Laboratory distillation set-up: 1: Heat source 2: Still pot 3: Still head 4: Thermometer/Boiling point temperature 5: Condenser 6: Cooling water in 7: Cooling water out 8: Distillate/receiving flask 9: Vacuum/gas inlet 10: Still receiver 11: Heat control 12: Stirrer speed control 13: Stirrer/heat plate...


During the Moorish period the town was called Sherish (a transliteration of the Arabic شريش), from which both Sherry and Jerez are derived. According to some people, however, the city of Shiraz in midsouthern Iran was the birthplace of "sherry" style wine.[2] For other uses, see moor. ... Arabic redirects here. ... For other uses, see Shiraz (disambiguation). ...


Though the drinking of alcohol is prohibited in the Qur'an, wine production continued through five centuries of Islamic rule. In 966, the Caliph of Cordoba Al-Hakam II ordered the destruction of the vineyards, but the inhabitants of Jerez appealed on the grounds that the vineyards also produced raisins to feed the empire's soldiers, and the Caliph spared two-thirds of the vineyards. The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Al-Hakam II was Caliph of Cordoba, in Al-Andalus, and son of Abd_ar_rahman III (al_Nasir). ...


In 1264, Alfonso X of Castile took the city and it was renamed Xeres (over time the spelling was adjusted to Xerez, and finally Jerez). From this point on, the production of sherry and its export throughout Europe increased significantly. By the end of the 16th century, sherry had a reputation in Europe as the world's finest wine. Alfonso X and his court. ...


As a fortified wine, sherry is better equipped than most table wines to survive sea transport. Christopher Columbus brought sherry on his voyage to the New World and as Ferdinand Magellan prepared to sail around the world in 1519, he spent more on Sherry than on weapons. A fortified wine is a wine to which additional alcohol has been added, most commonly in the form of brandy (a spirit distilled from wine). ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator, colonizer, and explorer and one of the first Europeans to explore the Americas after the Vikings. ... For the Presidential railcar named Ferdinand Magellan, see Ferdinand Magellan Railcar. ...


Sherry wine became very popular in Great Britain, especially after Francis Drake sacked Cadiz in 1587. At that time Cadiz was one of the most important Spanish sea ports, and Spain was preparing an armada there to invade England. Among the spoils Drake brought back after destroying the fleet were 2,900 barrels of sherry that had been on shore waiting to be loaded aboard Spanish ships.[3] This article is about the Elizabethan naval commander. ...


Because sherry was a major wine export to the United Kingdom, many English companies and styles developed. Many of the Jerez cellars were founded by British families.


In 1894, the vineyards in the Jerez region were destroyed by phylloxera. Many vineyards replanted with resistant vines, but many smaller vineyards did not survive this infestation. Grape Phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae, family Phylloxeridae, superfamily Aphidoidea) is a serious pest of commercial grapevines worldwide, originally native to eastern North America. ...


As regards availability, once you are further than 20 miles from the Jerez region, it is very difficult to get anything other than the most ordinary main-brand types of sherry. As with many other wines, especially the fortified ones (Port, Sherry, Madeira) the best range is available within the United Kingdom.


Styles

  • Fino ('fine' in Spanish) is the driest and palest of the traditional varieties of Sherry.
  • Manzanilla is a variety of fino Sherry made around the port of Sanlúcar de Barrameda.
  • Amontillado is a variety of Sherry that has been aged first under a cap of flor yeast, and then is exposed to oxygen, which produces a result darker than fino but lighter than oloroso.
  • Oloroso ('scented' in Spanish) is a variety of Sherry aged oxidatively for a longer time than a fino or amontillado, producing a darker and richer wine.
  • Palo Cortado is a rare variety of Sherry that is initially aged under flor like an amontillado, but develops a character similar to oloroso, with some of the richness of oloroso and some of the crispness of amontillado.
  • Sweet Sherry (Jerez Dulce in Spanish) is created when one of the preceding varieties of dry Sherry is sweetened with Pedro Ximénez or Moscatel wine. Cream sherry is a common variety of sweet sherry made from oloroso, with other varieties including pale cream sherry (made from fino) and medium sherry (made from amontillado).

In computer science, FINO is a jocular scheduling algorithm. ... Manzanilla is a variety of sherry made around the port of Sanlucar de Barrameda. ... Sanlúcar de Barrameda from the mouth of the Guadalquivir river Sanlúcar de Barrameda is a Spanish city in the northwestern part of the Cádiz province. ... A glass of amontillado sherry Amontillado is a variety of sherry that is darker than fino but lighter than oloroso. ... Image:Velo de flor. ... Oloroso (scented in Spanish) is a variety of sherry generally produced to be sweeter than fino and amontillado. ... Palo Cortado is a rare variety of sherry that is fortified and aged without flor like an oloroso, but inexplicably develops a character similar to amontillado, with some of the richness of oloroso and some of the crispness of amontillado. ... Pedro Ximénez (also known as PX, Pedro Jiménez, or Pedro) is the name of a white grape grown in certain regions of Spain, and also a varietal wine, an intensely sweet, dark, dessert sherry. ... Muscat of Alexandria is a white wine grape that is a member of the Muscat family of Vitis vinifera. ...

The "Sherry" brand

Spanish producers have registered the names Jerez / Xérès / Sherry and will prosecute producers of similar fortified wines from other places using the same name. In 1933, Article 34 of the Spanish Estatuto del Vino (Wine Law) established the boundaries of Sherry production as the first Spanish wine denominación. Today, Sherry's legal status is further recognized by wider EU legislation. Sherry must come from the triangular area of the province of Cádiz between Jerez, Sanlúcar de Barrameda, and El Puerto de Santa María. However the name 'Sherry' is used as a semi-generic in the United States where it must be labeled with a region of origin such as American Sherry or California Sherry. The Spanish red wine grape Tintilla Spain is the third largest producer of wine in the world, the largest being France and the second Italy [1]. Historically, Spain has been known from the production of fortified wines and the best known Spanish wine is considered by some to be the... Quality Wines Produced in Specified Regions (often abbreviated to QWpsr or simply quality wines) is an EU-sponsored classification regulating and defining the status of quality wines according to production method, management and geographical location. ... Cádiz province Cádiz is a province of southern Spain, in the southwestern part of the autonomous community of Andalusia, being the southernmost point of continental Western Europe. ... Sanlúcar de Barrameda from the mouth of the Guadalquivir river Sanlúcar de Barrameda is a Spanish city in the northwestern part of the Cádiz province. ... Nickname: Motto: Puerto de Menesteo, Alcanatif Location Coordinates: Country  Spain Autonomous Community Andalusia Province Cádiz Founded XII Century BC[1] Government  - Mayor Area  - City 159 km² km²  (Expression error: Unrecognised word km sq mi) Population  - City 82,306  - Density 479,47 ab. ... Semi-generic is a legal term used in Canada and by the United States Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau to refer to wine designations that have essentially no meaning. ...


Production

Climate

The Jerez district has a predictable climate, with approximately 70 days of rainfall and almost 300 days of sun per year. The rain mostly falls between the months of October and May, averaging 600 l/m². The summer is dry and hot, with temperatures as high as 40°C (104°F), but winds from the ocean bring moisture to the vineyards in the early morning and the clays in the soil retain water below the surface. The average temperature across the year is approximately 18°C (64°F).


Soil

There are three types of soil in the Jerez district for growing the grapes for sherry:[4] The soil composition of vineyards is one of the most important viticultural consideration when planting grape vines. ...

  • Albariza: the lightest soil, almost white, and best for growing Palomino grapes. It is approximately 40-50% chalk, the rest being a blend of limestone, clay and sand. Albariza preserves moisture well during the hot summer months.
  • Barros: a dark brown soil, 10% chalk with a high clay content.
  • Arenas: a yellowish soil, also 10% chalk but with a high sand content.

The albariza soil is the best for growing the Palomino grape, and by law 40% of the grapes making up a sherry must come from albariza soil. The barros and arenas soil are mostly used for Pedro Ximénez and Moscatel grapes. The soil composition of vineyards is one of the most important viticultural consideration when planting grape vines. ...


The benefits of the albariza soil is that it can reflect sunlight back up to the vine, aiding it in photosynthesis. The nature of the soil is very absorbent and compact so that it can retain and maximize the use of the little rainfall that the Jerez region receives.[4] The leaf is the primary site of photosynthesis in plants. ...


Grapes

Before the phylloxera infestation in 1894 there were other varieties of grape used in Spain for the production of sherry, but now there are only three white grapes grown for sherry-making: Grape Phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae, family Phylloxeridae, superfamily Aphidoidea) is a serious pest of commercial grapevines worldwide, originally native to eastern North America. ...

  • Palomino: the dominant grape used for the dry sherries. Approximately 90% of the grapes grown for sherry are Palomino. As varietal table wine, the Palomino grape produces a wine of very bland and neutral characteristics. This neutrality is actually what makes Palomino an ideal grape because it is so easily enhanced by the Sherry winemaking style.[4]
  • Pedro Ximénez: used to produce sweet wines. When harvested these grapes are typically dried in the sun for two days to concentrate their sugars.
  • Moscatel: used similarly to Pedro Ximénez, but it is less common.

Sherry-style wines made in other countries often use other grape varieties. Palomino is a white grape widely grown in Spain and South Africa, and best known for its use in the manufacture of sherry. ... Varietal describes wines made from a single named grape variety. ... In the United States, table wine is used as a legal definition to differentiate standard wine from stronger (higher alcohol content) fortified wine or sparkling wine[1]. In the European Union it is meant to designate the lowest quality level of wine produced, one that qualifies for neither an appellation... Pedro Ximénez (also known as PX, Pedro Jiménez, or Pedro) is the name of a white grape grown in certain regions of Spain, and also a varietal wine, an intensely sweet, dark, dessert sherry. ... For other uses, see Muscat (disambiguation). ...


Fermentation

The Palomino grapes are harvested in early September, and pressed lightly to extract the must. Only the must from the first pressing, the mosto de yema, is used to produce sherry; the product of additional pressings is used for lesser wines, distillation and vinegar. The must is then fermented in stainless steel vats until the end of November, producing a dry white wine with 11-12% alcohol content. For must meaning compulsion, see wikt:must. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ...


Fortification

Immediately after fermentation, the wine is sampled and the first classification is performed. The casks are marked with the following symbols according to the potential of the wine:

/ a single stroke indicates a wine with the finest flavour and aroma, suitable for fino or amontillado. These wines are fortified to about 15% alcohol to allow the growth of flor.
/. a single stroke with a dot indicates a heavier, more full-bodied wine. These wines are fortified to about 17.5% alcohol to prevent the growth of flor, and the wines are aged oxidatively to produce oloroso.
// a double stroke indicates a wine which will be allowed to develop further before determining whether to use the wine for amontillado or oloroso. These wines are fortified to about 15% alcohol.
/// a triple stroke indicates a wine that has developed poorly, and will be distilled.

The sherry is fortified using destillado, made by distilling wine, usually from La Mancha. The distilled spirit is first mixed with mature sherry to make a 50/50 blend known as mitad y mitad, and then the mitad y mitad is mixed with the younger sherry to the proper proportions. This two-stage procedure is performed so the strong alcohol will not shock the young sherry and spoil it. Laboratory distillation set-up: 1: Heat source 2: Still pot 3: Still head 4: Thermometer/Boiling point temperature 5: Condenser 6: Cooling water in 7: Cooling water out 8: Distillate/receiving flask 9: Vacuum/gas inlet 10: Still receiver 11: Heat control 12: Stirrer speed control 13: Stirrer/heat plate... Thanks to Miguel de Cervantes, La Mancha is famous for its windmills. ...


Aging

Sherry solera
Sherry solera

The fortified wine is stored in 600-litre casks that are made of North American oak, which is slightly more porous than French or Spanish oak. The casks, or butts, are filled five-sixths full, leaving "the space of two fists" empty at the top to allow flor to develop on top of the wine. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Sherry solera A solera is a series of barrels or other containers used for aging liquids such as sherry, Madeira, Marsala, Mavrodafni (a dark-red fortified dessert wine from Greece), muscat, muscadelle, and balsamic vinegar. ...


Sherry is then aged in the solera system where new wine is put into wine barrels at the beginning of a series of 3 to 9 barrels. Periodically, a portion of the wine in a barrel is moved into the next barrel down, using tools called the canoa (canoe) and rociador (sprinkler) to move the wine gently and avoid damaging the layer of flor in each barrel. At the end of the series only a portion of the final barrel is bottled and sold. Depending on the type of wine, the portion moved may be between 5 and 30 percent of each barrel. This process is called "running the scales," because each barrel in the series is called a scale. Sherry solera A solera is a series of barrels or other containers used for aging liquids such as sherry, Madeira, Marsala, Mavrodafni (a dark-red fortified dessert wine from Greece), muscat, muscadelle, and balsamic vinegar. ... Wine barrels, especially those made of oak, have long been used as containers in which wine is typically aged. ...


So the age of the youngest wine going into the bottle is determined by the number of barrels in the series, and every bottle also contains some much older wine. Sherry is aged in the solera for a minimum of 3 years.


Storing and drinking

Once bottled, sherry does not benefit from further aging and may be drunk immediately though the sherries that have been aged oxidatively may be stored for years without losing their flavor. Bottles should be stored upright to minimize the wine's exposed surface area. As with other wines, sherry should be stored in a cool, dark place.


Fino and Manzanilla are the most fragile of Sherry type while amontillados, olorosos and cream sherry being able to lasting several weeks or even months after opening. Some versions sweetened with Pedro Ximénez can also last a while due to the sugar content acting as preservatives in the wine. In Spain, the more fragile sherry types are often sold as half bottles with any remaining wine being thrown out if it isn't drunk the same day it is opened.[5]


Sherry is traditionally drunk from a copita, a special sherry glass that is tulip shaped. Once opened, sherry will begin to lose its flavor and should be kept corked and refrigerated. Depending on the type, it may last from one week up to a few months after opening. A sherry glass A sherry glass is drinkware generally used for serving aromatic alcoholic beverages, such as sherry, port, aperitifs and liqueurs, and layered shooters. ...


See also

Sherry Vinegar, or more properly Vinagre de Jerez, is a gourmet wine vinegar made from Sherry. ... Cooking wine or Cooking sherry refers to inexpensive grape wine or rice wine (in Chinese and other East Asian cuisine). ... The Ratonero Bodeguero Andaluz (literally, the Andalusian Wine Cellars Ratting Dog) is a Spanish terrier. ...

References

  1. ^ Spanish law
  2. ^ Maclean, Fitzroy. Eastern Approaches. (1949). Reprint: The Reprint Society Ltd., London, 1951, p. 215
  3. ^ The Story of Wine by Hugh Johnson, p. 94. ISBN 1840009721.
  4. ^ a b c K. MacNeil The Wine Bible pg 438 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345
  5. ^ K. MacNeil The Wine Bible pg 447 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
sherry - definition of sherry in Encyclopedia (653 words)
Sherry is then aged in the solera system where new wine is put into wine barrels at the top of a series of 4 to 9 barrels.
In addition, the sherry is often described as having a salty flavour, believed to develop from the fact that it is manufactured on the sea estuary of the Guadalquivir river.
Unlike the fino and amontillado sherries, in oloroso sherries the flor yeast is suppressed by fortification at an earlier stage.
Sherry Shriner - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (435 words)
Sherry Shriner feels the U.S. Government (she calls them omegans [1]), Israeli Zionists, the Kenite serpent seed (she calls them Edomite or Talmudic) Jews, Space aliens, hollow earth dwellers and the Roman Catholic Black Pope and his Jesuit henchmen are all in a nefarious satanic alliance.
Shriner states that Maitreya of Buddhism and that of Benjamin Creme are one and the same, and, along with Saint Germain are false prophets [2] and the Black Pope himself is one Count Hans Van Kolvenbach.
Sherry hosts a weekly talk radio program on Reality Radio Network, which distributes audio programmes via the web; she offers many recorded broadcasts and talks for free via the internet.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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