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Encyclopedia > Sherman's neckties
Creating Sherman's neckties

Sherman's neckties were a phenomenon of the American Civil War. Named after William Tecumseh Sherman, a Union Army general, Sherman's neckties were railway rails destroyed by heating them until they were malleable and twisting them into loops resembling neckties, often around trees. Since the Confederacy had limited supplies of iron, and few foundries to roll the rails, this destruction was very difficult to repair. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 744 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1650 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 744 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1650 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article is becoming very long. ... “General Sherman” redirects here. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Malleability is a physical property of metals and metalloids, or generally of any kind of matter. ... For the grappling position, see double collar tie. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (traditional) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government Republic President...


The neckties were created in accordance with an explicit order from Sherman in his Atlanta Campaign, dated July 18, 1864: Palisades and chevaux-de-frise in front of the Potter House, Atlanta, Georgia, 1864. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...

...twisting the bars when hot. Officers should be instructed that bars simply bent may be used again, but if when red hot they are twisted out of line they cannot be used again. Pile the ties into shape for a bonfire, put the rails across and when red hot in the middle, let a man at each end twist the bar so that its surface becomes spiral.

After three days, only one Confederate railroad line leading into Atlanta remained intact. This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ...


Sherman's neckties were also a feature of Sherman's March to the Sea, a campaign designed to bring total war, serious destruction, to the Confederate States of America. Sherman implemented "scorched earth" policies; he and Union Army commander Ulysses S. Grant believed that the Civil War would end only if the Confederacy's strategic, economic, and psychological capacities for warfare were decisively broken. Engraving by Alexander Hay Ritchie depicting Shermans March Shermans March to the Sea is the name commonly given to the Savannah Campaign, conducted in late 1864 by Major General William Tecumseh Sherman of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... Total war is a military conflict in which nations mobilize all available resources in order to destroy another nations ability to engage in war. ... A scorched earth policy is a military tactic which involves destroying anything that might be useful to the enemy while advancing through or withdrawing from an area. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Ulysses S. Grant[2] (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American general and the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ...


References

  • Sherman's Neckties

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sherman's neckties at AllExperts (294 words)
Sherman's neckties were a phenomenon of the American Civil War.
Sherman's neckties were also a feature of Sherman's March to the Sea, a campaign designed to bring total war, serious destruction, to the Confederate States of America.
Sherman implemented "scorched earth" policies; he and Union Army commander Ulysses S. Grant believed that the Civil War would end only if the Confederacy's strategic, economic, and psychological capacities for warfare were decisively broken.
Sherman's March to the Sea - Wikipedia Mirror (2224 words)
Sherman's March to the Sea is the name commonly given to the Savannah Campaign, conducted in late 1864 by Major General William Tecumseh Sherman of the Union Army during the American Civil War.
The campaign began with General Sherman's troops leaving the captured city of Atlanta, Georgia, on November 15 1864, and ended with the capture of the port of Savannah on December 22.
Sherman was blocked from linking up with the U.S. Navy as he had planned, so he dispatched cavalry to Fort McAllister, guarding the Ogeechee River, in hopes of unblocking his route and obtaining supplies awaiting him on the Navy ships.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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