FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Sheffield" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Sheffield
City of Sheffield
Official logo of City of Sheffield
Coat of Arms of the City Council
Nickname: "The Steel City"
Motto: "Deo Adjuvante Labor Proficit" "With God's help our labour is successful"
Sheffield shown within England
Coordinates: 53°23′09″N 1°28′10″W / 53.38583, -1.46944
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent country England
Region Yorkshire and the Humber
Ceremonial county South Yorkshire
Admin HQ Sheffield City Centre
Founded ~8th century
Town charter 10 August 1297
City status 1893
Government
 - Type Metropolitan borough, City
 - Governing body Sheffield City Council
 - Lord Mayor Arthur Dunworth
 - MPs: Clive Betts (L)
David Blunkett (L)
Richard Caborn (L)
Nick Clegg (LD)
Meg Munn (L)
Angela Smith (L)
Area
 - Borough & City 142.1 sq mi (367.94 km²)
Population (2006 est.)
 - Borough & City 525,800 (Ranked 3rd)
 - Density 3,701.1/sq mi (1,429/km²)
 - Urban 640,720
(Sheffield urban area)
 - Urban Density 10,228.4/sq mi (3,949.2/km²)
 - City Region 1,819,500
 - County 1,292,900
Time zone Greenwich Mean Time (UTC+0)
Postcode S
Area code(s) 0114
ISO 3166-2 GB-SHF
ONS code 00CG
OS grid reference SK352878
NUTS 3 UKE32
Demonym Sheffielders
Website: www.sheffield.gov.uk

Sheffield (pronunciation ) is a city and metropolitan borough in South Yorkshire, England. It is so named because of its origins in a field on the River Sheaf that runs through the city. Sheffield is the name of several places in the world: In Australia: Sheffield, Tasmania In England: Sheffield In the United States of America: Sheffield, Alabama Sheffield, Illinois Sheffield, Iowa Sheffield, Massachusetts Sheffield, Ohio Sheffield, Pennsylvania Sheffield, Vermont (There is also Sheffield Lake, Ohio) Sheffield is also the surname of many... Image File history File links Sheffieldarms. ... Sheffield City Council is the city council for the metropolitan borough of Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... File links The following pages link to this file: Sheffield Categories: GFDL images ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... Yorkshire and the Humber is one of the regions of England. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... South Yorkshire is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in the Yorkshire and the Humber Government Office Region of England, in the United Kingdom. ... Shown within Sheffield Urban Area Sheffield City Centre—often just referred to as town—is a district of the City of Sheffield, and part of the Sheffield Central ward. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 8 January - Monaco gains independence. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... Sheffield City Council is the city council for the metropolitan borough of Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. ... The Lord Mayor of Sheffield is a ceremonial post held by a member of Sheffield City Council. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Clive James Charles Betts (born January 13, 1950, Sheffield) is a politician in the United Kingdom, and member of Parliament for Sheffield Attercliffe since 1992. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... David Blunkett (born 6 June 1947) is a British Labour Party politician and has been Member of Parliament for Sheffield Brightside since 1987. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Richard Caborn, PC (born October 6, 1943) is a British politician for the Labour Party, and member of Parliament for Sheffield Central. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Nicholas William Peter Clegg, known as Nick Clegg, (born 7 January 1967) is the British Member of Parliament for Sheffield Hallam and Liberal Democrat Home Affairs Spokesman. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in Great Britain formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long after... Margaret Patricia Munn (born 24 August 1959, Sheffield), is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Angela Christine Smith (born 16 August 1961, Grimsby) is a Labour Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Panorama from Meersbrook Park. ... The term city region has been in use since about 1950 by urbanists, economists and urban planners to mean not just the administrative area of a recognisable city or conurbation but also its hinterland that will often be far bigger. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to administrative counties of England. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... GMT redirects here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... The S postcode area, also known as the Sheffield postcode area[1], is a group of postal districts around Barnsley, Chesterfield, Dronfield, Hope Valley, Mexborough, Rotherham, Sheffield and Worksop in England. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... The city of Sheffield has a large multi-cultural population and had an estimated population of 516,100 in 2004. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... South Yorkshire is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in the Yorkshire and the Humber Government Office Region of England, in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The River Sheaf is a river in South Yorkshire, England. ...


The city has grown from its largely industrial roots to encompass a wide economic base. The population of the City of Sheffield is estimated at 525,800 people (2006),[1] and it is one of the eight largest English cities outside London, which form the English Core Cities Group. The wider Sheffield Urban Area, which extends beyond the city proper, has a population of 640,720. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The English Core Cities Group is an association of eight large regional cities in England: Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle upon Tyne, Nottingham and Sheffield. ... Panorama from Meersbrook Park. ...


Sheffield obtained world-wide recognition during the 19th century for its production of steel. Many innovations in the industry were developed locally, including crucible and stainless steel. This fuelled an almost tenfold increase in the population during the Industrial Revolution. It gained its city charter in 1893 and became officially titled the City of Sheffield. International competition caused a decline in local industry during the 1970s and 1980s, and at the same time the nearby national coal industry collapsed, affecting Sheffield's population. For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... Crucible steel describes a number of different techniques for making steel alloy by slowly heating and cooling iron and carbon (typically in the form of charcoal) in a crucible. ... The 630 foot (192 m) high, stainless-clad (type 304) Gateway Arch defines St. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... A city charter or town charter (generically, municipal charter) is a legal document establishing a municipality such as a city or town. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Sheffield

The area that is now the City of Sheffield has been occupied since at least the last ice age,[2] but the settlements that grew to form Sheffield date from the second half of the 1st millennium, and are of Anglo-Saxon and Danish origin.[3] In Anglo-Saxon times the Sheffield area straddled the border between the kingdoms of Mercia and Northumbria. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle reports that King Eanred of Northumbria submitted to King Egbert of Wessex at the hamlet of Dore (now a suburb of Sheffield) in 829.[4] This event made Egbert the first Saxon to claim to be king of all of England. After the Norman conquest, Sheffield Castle was built to control the local settlements, and a small town developed that is the nucleus of the modern city. A 1736 map of Sheffield The history of Sheffield, a city in England, can be traced back to the founding of a settlement in a clearing beside the River Sheaf in the second half of the 1st millennium AD.[1] The area had seen human occupation since at least the... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... The initial page of the Peterborough Chronicle. ... Eanred was king of Northumbria from c. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... Egbert (also Ecgbehrt or Ecgbert, means roughly The shining edge of a blade) (c. ... For the helicopter, see Westland Wessex. ... Dore (grid reference SK311812) is a village in South Yorkshire. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... Sheffield Castle was a castle in Sheffield, England, constructed at the confluence of the River Sheaf and the River Don on the site of a former Saxon long house, and dominating the early town. ...


By 1296 a market had been established at what is now known as Castle Square,[5] and Sheffield subsequently grew into a small market town. In the 14th century Sheffield was already noted for the production of knives, as mentioned in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales,[6] and by 1600 it had become the main centre of cutlery production in England, overseen by The Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire. From 1570 to 1584 Mary, Queen of Scots was held as a prisoner in Sheffield Castle and Sheffield Manor.[3] Sheffield Supertram at Castle Square Castle Square is the name given to the plaza at the intersection of High Street, Angel Street, and Arundel Gate in the City of Sheffield, England. ... Chaucer redirects here. ... For other uses, see The Canterbury Tales (disambiguation). ... The Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire is a trade guild of steelworkers based in Sheffield. ... Mary, Queen of Scots redirects here. ... Sheffield Manor, also known as the Manor Lodge or Manor Castle, is a lodge built about 1510 in what then was a large deer park east of Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK, to provide a country retreat for the fourth Earl of Shrewsbury. ...

Portrait of Chaucer as a Canterbury pilgrim in the Ellesmere manuscript of The Canterbury Tales
Portrait of Chaucer as a Canterbury pilgrim in the Ellesmere manuscript of The Canterbury Tales

In the 1740s a form of the crucible steel process was discovered that allowed the manufacture of a better quality of steel than had previously been available. At about the same time a technique for fusing a thin sheet of silver onto a copper ingot to produce silver plating was invented and became widely known as Sheffield plate. These innovations spurred the growth of Sheffield as an industrial town. However, the loss of some important export markets led to a recession in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The resulting poor conditions culminated in a cholera epidemic that killed 402 people in 1832.[3] The Industrial Revolution saw a resurgence of Sheffield through the 19th century. As a result of its growing population, the town was incorporated as a borough in 1842 and granted a city charter in 1893.[7] The influx of people also led to demand for better water supplies, and a number of new reservoirs were constructed on the outskirts of the town. The collapse of the dam wall of one of these reservoirs in 1864 resulted in the Great Sheffield Flood, which killed 270 people and devastated large parts of the town. The growing population also led to the construction of a large number of back-to-back slums, which, along with severe pollution from the factories, inspired George Orwell, writing in 1937, to declare, "Sheffield, I suppose, could justly claim to be called the ugliest town in the Old World".[8] Download high resolution version (806x631, 118 KB)Portrait of Chaucer as a Canterbury pilgrim, Ellesmere manuscript of The Canterbury Tales The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of... Download high resolution version (806x631, 118 KB)Portrait of Chaucer as a Canterbury pilgrim, Ellesmere manuscript of The Canterbury Tales The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of... The beginning of The Knights Tale from the Ellesmere manuscript. ... Crucible steel describes a number of different techniques for making steel alloy by slowly heating and cooling iron and carbon (typically in the form of charcoal) in a crucible. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... Sheffield plate is a layered combination of silver and copper that was used for many years to produce larger silver goods such as serving trays and teapots. ... Cholera (or Asiatic cholera or epidemic cholera) is an extreme diarrheal disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... The Great Sheffield flood, also known as the Great Inundation, was a disaster that devastated parts of Sheffield, England on March 11, 1864. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ...

A recession in the 1930s was only halted by the increasing international tension as World War II loomed. The steel factories of Sheffield were set to work making weapons and ammunition for the war. As a result, once war was declared, the city became a target for bombing raids, the heaviest of which occurred over the nights of 12 December and 15 December 1940 (now known as the Sheffield Blitz). More than 660 lives were lost and numerous buildings were destroyed.[9] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Beauchief Abbey is an abbey in Sheffield, England. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sheffield Blitz is the name given to the worst nights of bombing in Sheffield, England during the Second World War. ...


In the 1950s and 1960s, many of the slums were demolished and replaced with housing schemes such as the Park Hill flats. Large parts of the city centre were also cleared to make way for a new system of roads.[3] Increased automation and competition from abroad resulted in the closure of many steel mills. The 1980s saw the worst of this run-down of Sheffield's industries (along with those of many other areas in the UK). The 1984/5 miners' strike affected the coal mining areas to the east and north east of Sheffield, though it is unlikely to have had a major impact upon Sheffield's economy. The building of the Meadowhall shopping centre on the site of a former steelworks in 1990 was a mixed blessing, creating much needed jobs but speeding the decline of the city centre. Attempts to regenerate the city were kick-started when the city hosted the 1991 World Student Games, WSG, which saw the construction of new sporting facilities such as the Sheffield Arena, Don Valley Stadium and the Ponds Forge complex.[3] Park Hill from Sheffield City Centre. ... The miners strike of 1984-5 was a major piece of industrial action affecting the British coal industry. ... Meadowhall is a large shopping centre located three miles northeast of central Sheffield, England. ... The Universiade is an International multi-sport event, organized for university athletes by the International University Sports Federation (FISU). ... The arena in ice hockey mode The Hallam FM Arena, originally named the Sheffield Arena, is an arena hosting concerts and sporting events in Sheffield in England. ... Don Valley Stadium The Don Valley Stadium is an athletics stadium in Sheffield, England. ... Ponds Forge is a leisure complex situated in the centre of Sheffield. ...


The city is now changing rapidly as new projects aim to regenerate some of the more run-down parts of the city. One such project, the Heart of the City Project, has seen a number of public works in the city centre: the Peace Gardens were renovated in 1998, the Millennium Galleries opened in April 2001, the Winter Gardens were opened on 22 May 2003, and a public space to link these two areas, the Millennium Square, was opened in May 2006. Further developments included the remodelling of Sheaf Square in front of the recently refurbished railway station. The new square contains The Cutting Edge a sculpture designed by Si Applied Ltd[10] made of Sheffield steel. Sheffield Town Hall is a building in the city of Sheffield in the north of England. ... The Millennium Galleries is a new gallery opened in Sheffield City Centre located near the city library, Sheffield Hallam University, the citys theatre complex and the new Heart of the City complex. ... Sheffield Winter Gardens // The Sheffield Winter Gardens is one of the largest temperate glasshouses to be built in the UK during the last hundred years, and the largest urban glasshouse anywhere in Europe. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sheaf Square is a municipal square lying immediately east of the city centre of Sheffield, England. ...


Governance

The city currently returns six Members of Parliament to the House of Commons, but this will be reduced to five at the next election as one constituency, Hillsborough, will be abolished and merged with three other constituencies[11]. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... Sheffield Hillsborough is a Parliamentary constituency in the City of Sheffield. ...

Sheffield Town Hall and the Peace Gardens

Sheffield is governed by the elected Sheffield City Council. For most of the council's history it has been controlled by the Labour Party, and has historically been noted for its leftist sympathies; during the 1980s administration under David Blunkett, the area earned the sarcastic and rather derogatory appellation "People's Republic of South Yorkshire" from the British Right. However, the Liberal Democrats controlled the Council briefly at the turn of the 21st century. There are 84 councillors; the current council leader is Jan Wilson. The city also has a Lord Mayor. In the past the Office of Mayor had considerable authority, and carried with it executive powers over the finances and affairs of the city council. Today it is simply a ceremonial role. The current (2007/08) Lord Mayor is Arthur Dunworth.[12] During the English Local Election 2007 the Labour Party lost the council to NOC, with the Liberal Democrats gaining enough seats to make it a joint control council, one of 80 that year. The tacit support of the Green party ensured Labour remains in control. Sheffield Town Hall and the Peace Gardens Photo of Sheffield, the original image was taken on 27th July 2002 by User:ChrisCroome, this image is © Chris Croome 2002 and it has been made available under the GNU Free Documentation License. ... Sheffield City Council is the city council for the metropolitan borough of Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Left wing redirects here. ... David Blunkett (born 6 June 1947) is a British Labour Party politician and has been Member of Parliament for Sheffield Brightside since 1987. ... The Peoples Republic of South Yorkshire or The Socialist Republic of South Yorkshire, is a satirical reference to Sheffield. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in Great Britain formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long after... Jan Wilson is a Labour councillor for Sheffield. ... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ... Entrance to a polling station in the market town of Haverhill, Suffolk on 3 May 2007. ... NOC can refer to: National Olympic Committee, a group eligible to enter athletes and teams into an Olympic Games. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in Great Britain formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long after...


The majority of council-owned facilities are now operated by independent charitable trusts. Sheffield International Venues runs many of the cities sporting and leisure facilities, including Sheffield Arena and Don Valley Stadium. Sheffield Galleries and Museums Trust and the Sheffield Industrial Museums Trust take care of galleries and museums owned by the council. These include the Millennium Galleries, Lyceum Theatre and the Crucible Theatre. Sheffield International Venues (SIV) is a company charged with running venues owned by the Sheffield City Council. ... The arena in ice hockey mode The Hallam FM Arena, originally named the Sheffield Arena, is an arena hosting concerts and sporting events in Sheffield in England. ... Don Valley Stadium The Don Valley Stadium is an athletics stadium in Sheffield, England. ... Sheffield Galleries and Museums Trust is a charity that runs council owned art galleries and museums in Sheffield, England. ... The Sheffield Industrial Museums Trust is an independent charitable trust that runs the Sheffield City Council-owned Kelham Island, Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet, and Shepherd Wheel museums. ... The Millennium Galleries is a new gallery opened in Sheffield City Centre located near the city library, Sheffield Hallam University, the citys theatre complex and the new Heart of the City complex. ... The Lyceum is a 1068-seat theatre in the City of Sheffield, England. ... The Crucible Theatre, located in the city centre of Sheffield, England is known for being a producing theatre, meaning shows are designed and rehearsed in-house. ...


International links

Sheffield is formally twinned with Anshan in China, Bochum in Germany, Donetsk in Ukraine, and Esteli in Nicaragua. There are more informal links with Kawasaki in Japan, Kitwe in Zambia, and Pittsburgh in the United States.[13] Sheffield has also had close links with Poland, since Polish ex-servicemen who had fought alongside British forces during the Second World War settled in the city. As a result a Polish consulate was opened in the City in 1997 (now closed), the first new Polish consulate to open in the UK for over 60 years.[14] Anshan (Chinese: ; pinyin: Ä€nshān; lit. ... Bochum is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. ... For Donetsk in Russia, see Donetsk, Russia. ... Estelí is the second largest town in northern Nicaragua (after Matagalpa). ... This article is about the Japanese city. ... Kitwe is the third-largest town in Zambia, with a population of 363,734 (2000 census). ... City nickname: The Steel City Location in the state of Pennsylvania Founded 1758 Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The rule of Napoleon Bonaparte after his coup detat in France had conducted the manners of French governmant under dictatorship and in a consulate. ...


Geography

Sheffield is located at 53°23′N, 1°28′W. It lies directly beside Rotherham, from which it is separated by the M1 motorway. Although Barnsley Metropolitan Borough also borders Sheffield to the north, the town itself is a few miles further away. The southern and western borders of the city are shared with Derbyshire; in the first half of the 20th century Sheffield extended its borders south into Derbyshire, annexing a number of villages,[15] including Totley, Dore and the area now known as Mosborough Townships. Directly to the west of the city is the Peak District National Park and the Pennine hill range. Panorama from Meersbrook Park Sheffield is the most geographically diverse city in England. ... There is also a Rotherham, New Zealand , Rotherham is a town in South Yorkshire, England. ... The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ... Barnsley is a metropolitan borough in South Yorkshire, England. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... Totley (Grid reference SK309799) is a suburb on the extreme southwest of Sheffield, next to the Yorkshire/Derbyshire boundary. ... Dore (grid reference SK311812) is a village in South Yorkshire. ... Mosborough ward—which includes the districts of Halfway, Mosborough village, Waterthorpe, and Westfield—is one of the 28 electoral wards in City of Sheffield, England. ... The Peak District National Park is a national park in the north of England. ... Typical Pennine scenery. ...


Sheffield is a geographically diverse city.[16] The city nestles in a natural amphitheatre created by several hills[17] and the confluence of five rivers: Don, Sheaf, Rivelin, Loxley and Porter. As such, much of the city is built on hillsides with views into the city centre or out to the countryside. The city's lowest point is just 33 feet (10 m) above sea level, while some parts of the city are at over 1,640 feet (500 m). However, 89% of the housing in the city is between 330  and  660 feet (100-200 m) above sea level. The River Don (also called Dun in some stretches) is a river in South Yorkshire, England. ... The River Sheaf is a river in South Yorkshire, England. ... The River Rivelin is a river in South Yorkshire, England. ... The River Loxley is a river in South Yorkshire, England. ... The Porter Brook is a river in Sheffield, England. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ...

Panorama from Meersbrook Park.
Panorama from Meersbrook Park.

With an estimated total of over two million trees,[18] Sheffield has more trees per person than any other city in Europe. It has over 170 woodlands (covering 10.91 sq mi/28.3 km² ), 78 public parks (covering 7.07 sq mi/18.3 km²) and 10 public gardens. Added to the 52.0 square miles (134.7 km²) of national park and 4.20 square miles (10.9 km²) of water this means that 61% of the city is greenspace. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (7000x1373, 1249 KB) author: Lewis Skinner source: self-made I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (7000x1373, 1249 KB) author: Lewis Skinner source: self-made I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Greenspace is a term used to describe the areas in a city or dense suburb where plants are growing. ...


Sheffield also has a very wide variety of habitat, comparing favourably with any city in the United Kingdom: urban, parkland and woodland, agricultural and arable land, moors, meadows and freshwater-based habitats. Large parts of the city are designated as sites of special scientific interest including several urban areas. Habitat (which is Latin for it inhabits) is the place where a particular species live and grow. ... A Site of Special Scientific Interest or SSSI is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom. ...


The present city boundaries were set in 1974 (with slight modification in 1994), when the former county borough of Sheffield merged with Stocksbridge Urban District and two parishes from the Wortley Rural District. This area includes a significant part of the countryside surrounding the main urban region. Roughly a third of Sheffield lies in the Peak District National Park (no other English city includes parts of a national park within its boundary), and Sheffield often boasts of being Europe's greenest city, a claim that was reinforced when it won the 2005 Entente Florale competition. This was helped by the fact that Sheffield contains over 150 woodland spaces and 50 public parks.[19] County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... Stocksbridge is a small town in the metropolitan borough of Sheffield, England, with a population of around 14,000. ... In the British Isles an urban district was a type of local government district which covered an urbanised area. ... Wortley was a rural district in the West Riding of Yorkshire from 1894 to 1974, situated to the north-west of the county borough of Sheffield. ... The Peak District National Park is a national park in the north of England. ... This article is about national parks. ... The Entente Florale is an international horticultural competition. ... Limber Pine woodland, Toiyabe Range, central Nevada Biologically, a woodland is a treed area differentiated from a forest. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


Subdivisions

Sheffield Compared[20][21]
UK Census 2001 Sheffield South Yorkshire England
Total population 513,234 1,266,338 49,138,831
Foreign born 6.4% 8.9% 9.2%
White 91% 95% 91%
Asian 4.6% 2.6% 4.6%
Black 1.8% 0.9% 2.3%
Christian 69% 75% 72%
Muslim 4.6% 2.5% 3.1%
Hindu 0.3% 0.2% 1.1%
No religion 18% 14% 15%
Over 75 years old 8.0% 7.6% 7.5%
Unemployed 4.2% 4.1% 3.3%

Sheffield is made up of numerous suburbs and neighbourhoods, many of which developed from villages or hamlets that were absorbed into Sheffield as the city grew. These historical areas are largely ignored by the modern administrative and political divisions of the city; instead it is divided into 28 electoral wards, with each ward generally covering 4–6 areas.[22] The electoral wards are grouped into six parliamentary constituencies, although because of a different review cycle, the ward and constituency boundaries are currently not all conterminous. Sheffield is largely unparished, but Bradfield and Ecclesfield have parish councils, and Stocksbridge has a town council. UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... South Yorkshire is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in the Yorkshire and the Humber Government Office Region of England, in the United Kingdom. ... Sheffield is a city and metropolitan borough in the north of England. ... A hamlet is (usually — see below) a small settlement, too small or unimportant to be considered a village. ... A ward is an electoral district used in local politics, most notably in England, Scotland, and Wales, as well as Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa and many cities in the United States and the federal district of Washington, DC. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods... In the United Kingdom each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elects one or more members to a parliament or assembly. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... Bradfield is a village in the borough of Sheffield, England and is situated in the Peak District. ... Ecclesfield is a northern suburb of Sheffield, England. ... Stocksbridge is a small town in the metropolitan borough of Sheffield, England, with a population of around 14,000. ...


Demography

People from Sheffield are called Sheffielders. They are also colloquially known to people in the surrounding towns of Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Chesterfield as "dee-dars" (which derives from the traditional pronunciation of the "th" in the dialectal words "thee" and "thou", which is now extremely rare to hear).[23] Many Yorkshire dialect words and aspects of pronunciation derive from old Norse[24] due to the Viking influence in this region. The city of Sheffield has a large multi-cultural population and had an estimated population of 516,100 in 2004. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ...


At the time of the 2001 UK census, the ethnic composition of Sheffield's population was 91.2% White, 4.6% Asian, 1.8% Black, and 1.6% mixed. Sheffield also has large Polish, Somali, Slovak, Yemeni and Albanian populations. In terms of religion, 68.6% of the population are Christian and 4.6% Muslim. Other religions represent less than 1% each. The number of people without a religion is above the national average at 17.9%, with 7.8% not stating their religion.[25] The largest quinary group is 20- to 24-year-olds (9.4%), mainly because of the large university population (45,000+).[26] UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...


Population change

Below is a table outlining population change of the city since 1801. The total population of Sheffield peaked in 1951 at 577,050, and has since seen a steady decline. Recently the city's population has been growing however and the city has absorbed 12,500 new residents since 2001.

Year 1801 1851 1901 1921 1941 1951 1961 1971 1981 1991 2001
Population 60,095 161,475 451,195 543,336 569,884 577,050 574,915 572,794 530,844 528,708 513,234
Source: A Vision of Britain through Time[27]

Economy

Labour Profile[28]
Total employee jobs 255,700
Full-time 168,000 65.7%
Part-time 87,700 34.3%
Manufacturing 31,800 12.4%
Construction 8,500 3.3%
Services 214,900 84.1%
Distribution, hotels & restaurants 58,800 23.0%
Transport & communications 14,200 5.5%
Finance, IT, other business activities 51,800 20.2%
Public admin, education & health 77,500 30.3%
Other services 12,700 5.0%
Tourism-related 18,400 7.2%
See also: Economy of Sheffield and List of companies in Sheffield

After many years of decline, the Sheffield economy is going through a strong revival. The 2004 Barclays Bank Financial Planning study[29] revealed that, in 2003, the Sheffield district of Hallam was the highest ranking area outside London for overall wealth, the proportion of people earning over £60,000 a year standing at almost 12%. A survey by Knight Frank[30] revealed that Sheffield was the fastest-growing city outside of London for office and residential space and rents during the second half of 2004. Some £250 million was also invested in the city during 2005. The Sheffield economy is worth £7.4 billion (2003 GVA).[31] This can be seen by the current surge of redevelopments, including the City Lofts Tower and accompanying St. Pauls Place, Velocity Living, and the Moor redevelopment,[32] the forthcoming NRQ and the recently completed Winter Gardens, Peace Gardens, Millennium Galleries, many project under the Sheffield One redevelopment agency. Sheffield has an international reputation for metallurgy and steel-making. ... The following companies are either headquartered or have significant bases in Sheffield, UK. Abbeydale Brewery Arm Arnold Laver - timber merchants Barclays - bank Border and Immigration Agency, an executive agency of the Home Office Bradfield Brewery Braun - electrical manufacturer Brownill Vickers & Platt - Chartered Surveryors Capita - financial services Company of Cutlers in... Barclays Bank headquarters One Churchill Place, Canary Wharf Barclays plc (LSE: BARC, NYSE: BCS, TYO: 8642 ) is the fourth largest bank in the United Kingdom. ... Sheffield Hallam is a Parliamentary constituency covering the south west portion of the City of Sheffield, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... St Pauls Tower, also referred to as City Lofts Tower or the Conran Tower, is the title commonly given to a major development proposal in Sheffield City Centre. ... Part of Sheffields Heart of the City project, this encompasses the new office blocks surrounding the Peace Gardens, the car park and is linked to the Conran Tower External Articles http://www. ... The Moor is one of the main shopping streets of Sheffield, England. ... The New Retail Quarter is the term for the demolition of a huge area of Sheffield, England between the Devonshire Quarter and The Moor Gateway. ... Sheffield Winter Gardens // The Sheffield Winter Gardens is one of the largest temperate glasshouses to be built in the UK during the last hundred years, and the largest urban glasshouse anywhere in Europe. ... The Peace Gardens, before the demolishion of the eggbox Town Hall Extension The Peace Gardens are an inner city square in Sheffield, England. ... The Millennium Galleries is a new gallery opened in Sheffield City Centre located near the city library, Sheffield Hallam University, the citys theatre complex and the new Heart of the City complex. ... Sheffield One is an Urban redevelopment company created in 2000 to regenerate Sheffield city centre. ...


Sheffield has an international reputation for metallurgy and steel-making.[33] Many innovations in these fields have been made in Sheffield. Benjamin Huntsman discovered the crucible technique in the 1740s at his workshop in Handsworth. This process was made obsolete in 1856 by Henry Bessemer's invention of the Bessemer converter. Thomas Boulsover invented Sheffield Plate (silver-plated copper) in the early 18th century. Stainless steel was invented by Harry Brearley in 1912, and the work of F. B. Pickering and T. Gladman throughout the 1960s, '70s, and '80s was fundamental to the development of modern high-strength low-alloy steels. Further innovations continue, with new advanced manufacturing technologies and techniques being developed on the Advanced Manufacturing Park by Sheffield's universities and other independent research organisations. Organisations currently located on the AMP include; the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC, a research partnership between The Boeing Company and The University of Sheffield), Castings Technology International (Cti) and TWI. For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... Benjamin Huntsman (1704 - 1776), English inventor and steel-manufacturer, was born in Lincolnshire. ... Crucible steel describes a number of different techniques for making steel alloy by slowly heating and cooling iron and carbon (typically in the form of charcoal) in a crucible. ... Handsworth is a suburb of south eastern Sheffield, in South Yorkshire, England. ... Henry Bessemer (1813-1898) Sir Henry Bessemer (January 19, 1813 – March 15, 1898), English engineer and inventor, was born at Charlton near Hitchin in Hertfordshire. ... Bessemer Converter, Schematic Diagram The Bessemer process was the first inexpensive industrial process for the mass-production of steel from molten pig iron. ... Thomas Boulsover (1705–1788), Sheffield cutler and the inventor of Sheffield Plate, was born in what is now the Ecclesfield district of the city and died at his home at Whiteley Wood Hall, on the River Porter. ... Sheffield plate is a layered combination of silver and copper that was used for many years to produce larger silver goods such as serving trays and teapots. ... The 630 foot (192 m) high, stainless-clad (type 304) Gateway Arch defines St. ... Monument to Harry Brearley at the former Brown Firth Research Laboratories Harry Brearley (February 18, 1871 – August 12, 1948) was the inventor of rustless steel (later to be called stainless steel). He was born in Sheffield, England. ... Frederick Brian Pickering is a leading British metallurgist. ... The Advanced Manufacturing Park (AMP) is a 100 acre manufacturing technology park on the Rotherham – Sheffield border at Waverley in South Yorkshire, facing the Sheffield Business Park across the Parkway. ...


While iron and steel have long been the main industries of Sheffield, coal mining has also been a major industry, particularly in the outlying areas, and the Palace of Westminster in London was built using limestone from quarries in the nearby village of Anston. Other areas of employment include call centres, the City Council, universities and hospitals. Sheffield currently produces more steel per year than at any other time in its history.[34] However, the industry is now less noticeable as it has become highly automated and employs far fewer staff than in the past. Surface coal mining in Wyoming. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Quarry (disambiguation). ... The villages of North Anston and South Anston are the principal constituents of the civil parish of North and South Anston, in the metropolitan borough of Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. ... A very large collections call centre in Lakeland, FL. A call centre or call center (see spelling differences) is a centralised office used for the purpose of receiving and transmitting a large volume of requests by telephone. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ...

High Street, Central Sheffield
High Street, Central Sheffield

Sheffield is also a major retail centre, and home to many High Street and department stores as well as designer boutiques. The main city centre shopping areas are on The Moor precinct, Fargate, Orchard Square and the Devonshire Quarter. Department stores in Sheffield City centre include John Lewis, Marks and Spencer, Atkinsons, Castle House Co-op, Debenhams and Woolworths . Sheffield's main market is the Castle Market, built above the remains of the castle. Shopping areas outside the city centre include the Meadowhall shopping centre and retail park, Ecclesall Road, London Road, Hillsborough and the Crystal Peaks shopping centre. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1544x1158, 119 KB) Personal photograph taken by Mick Knapton on September 29th 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1544x1158, 119 KB) Personal photograph taken by Mick Knapton on September 29th 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version... Drawing of a self-service store. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Main Street. ... The interior of a typical Macys department store. ... The Moor is one of the main shopping streets of Sheffield, England. ... Fargate is a pedestrian precinct and shopping area in Sheffield, England. ... Orchard Square, with the clock in sight. ... The Devonshire Quarter is an area in the centre of Sheffield, England. ... The interior of a typical Macys department store. ... For the former (1856-1991) unrelated UK department store, see Lewiss. ... Marks and Spencer plc (known also as M&S and sometimes colloquially as Marks and Sparks) is the largest retailer in the United Kingdom by sales. ... Atkinsons is a family-owned department store located on The Moor in Sheffield, England which sells retail items of clothing, furnishings, lightings, gifts, jewelry, toys, cookers and televisions. ... See also Cooperative Supermarkets in the United Kingdom External link The Co-operative Group Categories: Corporation stubs | British supermarkets | Cooperatives ... Debenhams plc (LSE: DEB) is a retailer with a chain of department stores based in the United Kingdom, and franchised stores in a number of other countries. ... The F. W. Woolworth Company (often referred to as Woolworths) was a retail company that was one of the original American five-and-dime stores. ... Look up Market in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Castle Market is an indoor market in Sheffield, England. ... Meadowhall is a large shopping centre located three miles northeast of central Sheffield, England. ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see mall. ... Ecclesall today is a suburb and a parish in the City of Sheffield, England. ... London Road is a shopping street in Sheffield, England. ... Hillsborough is a suburb in northwest Sheffield, England. ... Crystal Peaks is a shopping centre in Sheffield, England. ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see mall. ...


Sheffield has a District Energy system which exploits the city's domestic waste, converting it to electricity. It also provides hot water, which is distributed through over 25 miles (40 km) of pipes under the city, via two networks. These networks supply heat and hot water for many buildings throughout the city. These include not only cinemas, hospitals, shops, and offices, but also universities (Sheffield Hallam University and the University of Sheffield), residential properties[35]. Energy generated in a waste plant produces 36MW of thermal energy and up to 6.8MW electrical energy from 115,000 tonnes of waste. It is claimed [36] that for every 100,000MWh of energy supplied by district energy 31,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide is displaced and that for every 100,000MWh of useful energy delivered 154,000MWh of fossil fuel energy is displaced. Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) is a university in Sheffield, England. ... The University of Sheffield is a research university, located in Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. ...


In a 2005 survey on spending potential, Meadowhall came 16th (third in out-of-town shopping centres behind Bluewater(7th) and The Trafford Centre(15th)) with £977 million while Sheffield city centre came 18th with £953 million.[37] In a 2004 survey on the top retail destinations, Meadowhall was 20th while Sheffield was 35th.[38] Meadowhall is a large shopping centre located three miles northeast of central Sheffield, England. ... , Bluewater interior This article is about a shopping mall. ... The Trafford Centre is a large indoor shopping centre or mall, in the Trafford area of Manchester, England. ...


Transport

There are two main interchanges for all public transport modes (national and local rail, tram, local buses and coaches) at Meadowhall and in the city centre. Transport in Sheffield, England is developed around the citys unusual topography and medieval street plan. ... Inter-city rail services are express train passenger services which cover longer distances than commuter trains. ... A Connex commuter train stands by the platform in Melbourne, Australia Regional rail systems, or commuter rail systems, usually provide a rail service through a central business district area into suburbs or other locations that draw large numbers of people on a daily basis. ... The Sheffield Supertram is a tram network in Sheffield, England, operated by Stagecoach Group under contract to the South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive. ... Autobus redirects here. ... For other uses, see Coach. ... Meadowhall is a large shopping centre located three miles northeast of central Sheffield, England. ... Shown within Sheffield Urban Area Sheffield City Centre—often just referred to as town—is a district of the City of Sheffield, and part of the Sheffield Central ward. ...


National and international travel

Sheffield is linked into the national motorway network via the M1 and M18 motorways. The M1 skirts the north-east of the city, linking Sheffield with London to the south and Leeds to the north and crosses Tinsley Viaduct near Rotherham; the M18 branches from the M1 close to Sheffield, linking the city with Doncaster, Robin Hood Doncaster Sheffield Airport and the Humber ports. The Sheffield Parkway connects the city centre with the motorways. The A57 and A61 roads are the major trunk roads through Sheffield, linking Sheffield with Manchester, Worksop, Barnsley, and Chesterfield. Sheffield is an important hub in the national network of long-distance buses (coaches), and there are direct services from distant cities such as Plymouth and Edinburgh. The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ... The M18 northdown during the Winter 2005-2006 roadworks The M18 is a motorway in Yorkshire, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... Tinsley Viaduct is a two-tier road bridge in Sheffield, England; the first of its kind in the country. ... For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield is a new international airport due to open in April 2005. ... River Hull tidal barrier. ... The Sheffield Parkway is a major dual-carriageway that connects Sheffield City centre with the M1 motorway, junction 33. ... The A57 is a major road in England. ... The A61 is a major road in England, running from Alfreton in Derbyshire to Thirsk in North Yorkshire. ...

The Midland Main Line railway south from Sheffield links the city to the East Midlands and London: providing direct services to Nottingham, Derby, Leicester, Bedford (the fastest train Sheffield to London is two hours). Also running through Sheffield is the main NE/SW cross-country line which links the East of Scotland and Northeast of England directly with West and South Yorkshire, the West Midlands, and the Southwest: providing direct services to Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Newcastle, Darlington, York, Leeds, Birmingham, Bristol, Taunton, and Exeter. Sheffield also lies on the line linking Liverpool and Manchester with Hull and East Anglia: providing direct services to Liverpool, Manchester, Hull, Lincoln, Ely and Norwich. Sheffield also has good links with its neighbouring towns and cities, Barnsley, Doncaster and Rotherham. The main station for all these services is Sheffield Midland station on the south-eastern edge of the city centre. The station at Meadowhall serves all trains travelling northeast except the fastest. Passenger rail services through Sheffield are provided by East Midlands Trains, Cross Country, TransPennine Express, and Northern Rail.[39] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Sheffield Midland station, now called simply Sheffield, is the railway station in central Sheffield, in Yorkshire, northern England. ... The Midland Main Line is a main railway line in the United Kingdom, part of the British railway system. ... Curiositykc 15:34, 9 September 2007 (UTC) For other uses, see Barnsley (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... There is also a Rotherham, New Zealand , Rotherham is a town in South Yorkshire, England. ... Sheffield Midland station, now called simply Sheffield, is the railway station in central Sheffield, in Yorkshire, northern England. ... Shown within Sheffield Urban Area Sheffield City Centre—often just referred to as town—is a district of the City of Sheffield, and part of the Sheffield Central ward. ... Meadowhall Interchange is a railway station, Sheffield Supertram stop, and bus station located in the north of Sheffield, South Yorkshire. ... Norwich will be at the eastern tip of the franchise area. ... The term cross-country, when used by itself, can refer to: Sports Cross-country running, a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain Cross-country skiing, a winter sport for skiing Fell running also known as hill running and mountain running... TransPennine Express (TPE) is a train operating company in the United Kingdom. ... Northern Rail is a train operating company that has operated local services in the north of England since 2004. ...


The closest international airport to Sheffield is Doncaster Sheffield Airport, which is located 18 miles (29 km) from the city centre. The airport opened on April 28, 2005 and is served mainly by budget airlines. It currently handles around one million passengers a year. Sheffield City Airport opened in 1997 but, due in part to its short runway and lack of radar, has been unable to capitalise on the boom in low cost air travel. Manchester Airport, Leeds Bradford International Airport and East Midlands Airport: Nottingham, Leicester, Derby all lie within a one hour's drive of the city. Manchester Airport is connected to Sheffield by a direct train every hour. Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield (IATA: DSA, ICAO: EGCN) is an international airport located at the former RAF Finningley airbase in Finningley, South Yorkshire, England. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Cebu Pacific Airbus A319 parked on the apron at Ninoy Aquino International Airport. ... Sheffield City Airport is a small airport located in Sheffield. ... For City Airport Manchester, UK, see City Airport Manchester. ... Leeds Bradford International Airport (IATA: LBA, ICAO: EGNM) is located between the cities of Leeds and Bradford in West Yorkshire, England. ... Nottingham East Midlands Airport (IATA: EMA, ICAO: EGNX) is an airport in the East Midlands of England, near Castle Donington in Leicestershire. ... South TransPennine is one of the three rail services provided by TransPennine Express, running in Northern England. ...


Local travel

The A57 and A61 roads are the major trunk roads through Sheffield. These run east-west and north-south, respectively, crossing in the city centre. Other major roads generally radiate spoke-like from the city centre. An inner ring road, mostly constructed in the 1970s and recently (2007) extended to form a complete ring,[40] allows traffic to avoid the city centre, and an outer ring road runs to the east, south-east and north, nearer the edge of the city, but does not serve the western side of Sheffield. The A57 is a major road in England. ... The A61 is a major road in England, running from Alfreton in Derbyshire to Thirsk in North Yorkshire. ... Sheffield Inner Ring Road is a dual-carriageway circling central Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. ...


The hilly topography of Sheffield and its former nature as a centre of industry rather than commerce meant that the city did not develop as extensive a suburban and inter-urban railway network as other comparable British cities. However, there are several busy local rail routes running along the city's valleys and beyond, connecting it with other parts of South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Lincolnshire and Derbyshire. These local routes include the Penistone Line, the Dearne Valley Line, the Hope Valley Line, and the Hallam Line. As well as the main stations of Sheffield and Meadowhall, there are four suburban stations at Chapeltown, Darnall, Woodhouse and Dore. South Yorkshire is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in the Yorkshire and the Humber Government Office Region of England, in the United Kingdom. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... The Penistone Line is the name given to one of the rail services, operated by Northern Rail, in the West Yorkshire Metro/ South Yorkshire PTE area of northern England. ... The Dearne Valley Line is one of the named British railway lines in the north of England. ... The Hope Valley Line is a railway line in England linking Sheffield with Manchester. ... The Hallam Line is the name given to one of the rail services, operated by Northern Rail, in the West Yorkshire Metro area of northern England. ... Sheffield Midland station, now called simply Sheffield, is the railway station in central Sheffield, in Yorkshire, northern England. ... Meadowhall Interchange is a railway station, Sheffield Supertram stop, and bus station located in the north of Sheffield, South Yorkshire. ... Chapeltown railway station is a railway station in the Sheffield district of Chapeltown. ... Darnall railway station serves the Darnall suburb of Sheffield in South Yorkshire. ... Woodhouse railway station serves the Woodhouse suburb of Sheffield in South Yorkshire. ... Dore Railway Station The small, 1 plaform halt at Dore now serves as a stop for local stopping trains between Manchester, The Hope Valley and Sheffield. ...

Sheffield Supertram at Castle Square
Sheffield Supertram at Castle Square

The light rail system Sheffield Supertram (Operated by Stagecoach Sheffield), opened in 1994, serves the city. Its network consists of three lines, from Halfway to Malin Bridge, from Meadowhall to Middlewood, and from Meadowhall to Herdings Park, with all three lines running via the city centre.[41] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1219x589, 153 KB) Summary Personal photograph taken by Mick Knapton 14:44, 7 December 2005 (UTC) on 7th December 2005 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1219x589, 153 KB) Summary Personal photograph taken by Mick Knapton 14:44, 7 December 2005 (UTC) on 7th December 2005 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Sheffield Supertram is a tram network in Sheffield, England, operated by Stagecoach Group under contract to the South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive. ... The Sheffield Supertram is a tram network in Sheffield, England, operated by Stagecoach Group under contract to the South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive. ... Stagecoach Sheffield Limited is a major operator of bus services in the English city of Sheffield. ...


A sizeable bus infrastructure operates from a main hub at Pond Street bus station. Other bus stations lie at Halfway, Hillsborough and Meadowhall. A flurry of new operators were created after deregulation in 1986,[42] though a series of mergers have reduced the number. First South Yorkshire, part of FirstGroup, became by far the largest bus operator and in recent years implemented a series of fare rises and service cuts which saw bus ridership drop.[43][44]. Recent developments have seen Stagecoach Sheffield taking over Yorkshire Terrier and expanding their bus services in the city. This has resulted in increased competition, and price drops on certain routes. Autobus redirects here. ... Pond Street bus station is a bus station in Sheffield, England. ... Hillsborough is a suburb in northwest Sheffield, England. ... Meadowhall is a large shopping centre located three miles northeast of central Sheffield, England. ... First South Yorkshire is a large bus operator in South Yorkshire, England. ... FirstGroup plc (LSE: FGP) is a Scottish transport company operating in the United Kingdom, Ireland and North America, with headquarters in Aberdeen. ... Stagecoach Sheffield Limited is a major operator of bus services in the English city of Sheffield. ...


Sheffield also offers a free bus service - the FreeBee. This service is operated by TM Travel, and runs every seven minutes between the station and the city centre.


Although hilly, Sheffield is compact and has few major trunk roads running through it. It is on the Trans-Pennine Trail, a National Cycle Network route running from Southport in the north-west to Hornsea in the East Riding, and has a developing Strategic Cycle Network within the city. The Peak District National Park, an area of outstanding natural beauty popular with both on- and off-road cyclists, is so close to Sheffield that part of the park lies within the city boundary, and there are green routes into the park almost from the city centre. The Trans Pennine Trail is a long distance path in England, running largely along disused railway lines and canal towpaths, entirely on surface paths and only gentle gradients. ... The first section of the NCN to be built was the Bristol and Bath Railway Path, opened in 1984. ... For other uses, see Southport (disambiguation). ... , Hornsea is a small seaside resort town and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England at the eastern end of the Trans Pennine Trail. ... The East Riding of Yorkshire is a local government district with unitary authority status, and a ceremonial county of England. ... The Peak District National Park is a national park in the north of England. ...


Sport

Main article: Sport in Sheffield

Sheffield has a long sporting heritage. In 1857 a collective of cricketers formed the world's first-ever official football club, Sheffield F.C., and by 1860 there were 15 football clubs in Sheffield. There are now two local clubs in the Football League and play in the Football League Championship: Sheffield United and Sheffield Wednesday, both of which formed from cricket clubs, and two major non-league sides: Sheffield F.C. and Hallam F.C., which also formed from cricket clubs. These are the two oldest club sides in the world and, in addition, Hallam F.C. still play at the world's oldest football ground near the suburb of Crosspool. Sheffield and Hallam contest what has become known as the Sheffield derby, whilst United and Wednesday contest the Steel City derby. Sheffield has a long history of involvement in sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Sheffield F.C. are an amateur English football club, whose main claim to fame is the fact that they are the worlds oldest club, having been established in 1857. ... This is a list of football clubs located in England and the leagues and divisions they play in (though note that not all play in the English football league system). ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... Sheffield United Football Club is a professional English football club based in the City of Sheffield, South Yorkshire. ... SWFC redirects here. ... Hallam Football Club are a football club in Sheffield, England, who currently play in the Northern Counties East League Premier Division. ... Sandygate Road is a football and cricket stadium in the Sheffield suburb of Crosspool, Yorkshire. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Steel City Derby is a local derby in the city of Sheffield, England. ...


In April 1989, tragedy struck when 96 Liverpool FC fans died in a crush during their FA Cup semi final at Sheffield Wednesday's Hillsborough Stadium. {{Football club infobox | clubname = Liverpool FC | image = fullname = Liverpool FC | nickname = The Reds | founded = 1892 | ground = Anfield | capacity = 45,000 | chairman = D.R.Moores | Chief Executive Officer = R.N.Parry | manager = Rafael Benitez | league = FA Premiership | season = 2005-06 | position = FA premiership, 5th | pattern_la1=|pattern_b1=|pattern_ra1=| leftarm1=FFFFFF|body1=FF0000... The Memorial at Hillsborough. ... Hillsborough Stadium is the home of Sheffield Wednesday Football Club in Sheffield, England. ...

Don Valley Stadium during the World Student Games in 1991
Don Valley Stadium during the World Student Games in 1991

Sheffield also has close ties with snooker, due to the fact that the city's Crucible Theatre is the venue for the World Snooker Championships. The English squash open is also held there every year. The International Open Bowls tournament is held in Sheffield at Ponds Forge.[45] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (939x559, 128 KB) This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its creator, AJB83. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (939x559, 128 KB) This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its creator, AJB83. ... Snooker is a cue sport that is played on a large baize-covered table with pockets in each of the four corners and in the middle of each of the long side cushions. ... The Crucible Theatre, located in the city centre of Sheffield, England is known for being a producing theatre, meaning shows are designed and rehearsed in-house. ... The World Championship is the climax of snookers annual calendar and the most important snooker event of the year in terms of prestige, prize money and world ranking points. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... Swifts Creek Bowls Club Bowls (also known as Lawn Bowls or Lawn Bowling) is a precision sport in which the goal is to roll slightly radially asymmetrical balls (called bowls) closer to a smaller white ball (the jack or kitty) than ones opponent is able to do. ... Ponds Forge is a leisure complex situated in the centre of Sheffield. ...


The city also boasts the Sheffield Eagles rugby league, Sheffield Tigers Rugby Union, Sheffield Sharks basketball, Sheffield Steelers ice hockey and Sheffield Tigers Speedway teams. Sheffield is home to 2004 and 2007 World Superbike champion James Toseland and of climber Joe Simpson. Former athlete and world record holder, Sebastian Coe grew up in the city and began his career as a member of the Hallamshire Harriers. England Cricket captain Michael Vaughan also grew up in Sheffield. Sheffield Eagles RLFC are a rugby league team based in the South Yorkshire city of Sheffield. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Sheffield Tigers Rugby Football Club Categories: | | | ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... The Sheffield Sharks (officially known as Westfield Sharks Sheffield after their sponsors) are a basketball club in Sheffield, England. ... This article is about the sport. ... Sheffield Steelers are one of the most successful clubs in British ice hockey, from Sheffield, England. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Founded Closed Track Address Owlerton Stadium Penistone Road Sheffield South Yorkshire Country England Track Size 361 metres Club Colours Yellow and Blue Honours Premier League Play off winners: 1999, 2002 Premier League winners: 1999, 2000, 2002 Premier Trophy winners: 2001 British League/Premier League KO Cup winners: 1974, 2002 Premier... Motorcycle speedway, normally referred to as Speedway, is a motorcycle sport that involves usually 4 and sometimes up to 6 riders competing over 4 laps of an oval circuit. ... Up until the late 1960s, motorcycles came in three basic formats: Working Bikes: Generally below 250cc, low powered for the average working gentleman to get to work General Bikes: Generally below 500cc/650cc, as working bikes but as they had higher power could also be used for fun at... James Toseland is an English motorcycle racer, from Kiveton Park, Sheffield, who won the 2004 World Superbike championship on a Ducati. ... Joe Simpson (born 13 August 1960) is a mountaineer and author. ... Sebastian Newbold Coe, Baron Coe KBE (born 29 September 1956 in Chiswick, London) is a politician and former top-level athlete from England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Alias, see Michael Vaughn. ...


Many of Sheffield's extensive sporting facilities were built for the World Student Games, which the city hosted in 1991. They include the Don Valley International Athletics Stadium which is the largest athletics stadium in the UK with a capacity of 25,000,[46] Sheffield Arena, and Ponds Forge international diving and swimming complex, where Olympic medallist Leon Taylor trains. There are also facilities for golf, climbing and bowling, as well as a newly inaugurated (2003) national ice-skating arena (IceSheffield). The Sheffield Ski Village is the largest artificial ski resort in Europe, and is due to undergo a major expansion soon.[19] The city also has three indoor climbing centres. Sheffield was the UK's first National City of Sport and is now home to the English Institute of Sport (EIS). The Universiade is an International multi-sport event, organized for university athletes by the International University Sports Federation (FISU). ... Don Valley Stadium The Don Valley Stadium is an athletics stadium in Sheffield, England. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... The arena in ice hockey mode The Hallam FM Arena, originally named the Sheffield Arena, is an arena hosting concerts and sporting events in Sheffield in England. ... Ponds Forge is a leisure complex situated in the centre of Sheffield. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Leon Taylor (born 2 November 1977) is a British athlete. ... iceSheffield is a ice arena in the Lower Don Valley, Sheffield. ... Sheffield Ski Village is an dry ski slope resort in Sheffield, England. ... A shaped, twin-tip alpine ski. ... For other uses, see Climbing (disambiguation). ... English Insitute of Sport (EIS) is a nationwide network of support services, aimed at improving the standard of english athletes. ...


Sheffield is home to Steve Peat who is a World Cup champion in Mountain Bike World Championships in 2002, 2004, 2006. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The first professional Mountain Bike World Championships took place in Durango (USA) in 1990. ...


Culture and attractions

Main article: Culture of Sheffield
Ponds Forge from Park Square
Ponds Forge from Park Square

7.2% of Sheffield's working population are employed in the creative industries, well above the national average of 4%.[19] Open Up Sheffield is an annual event over the first two weekends in May where local visual artists and fine craft workers invite the public to their studios and other venues. Sheffield has a growing cultural reputation. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ponds Forge is a leisure complex situated in the centre of Sheffield. ... A commercial art show held in Sheffield usually on the first weekend in July every year at the Octagon Centre centre in the City. ... Many times, the term art is used to refer to the visual arts. ... For other uses, see Craft (disambiguation). ...


Music

See also: List of musicians from Sheffield

Sheffield has been the home of several well-known bands and musicians, with an unusually large number of synth pop and other electronic outfits hailing from there. These include The Human League, Heaven 17, ABC, the Thompson Twins, Wavestar, and the more industrially inclined Cabaret Voltaire and Clock DVA. This electronic tradition has continued: techno label Warp Records was a central pillar of the Yorkshire Bleeps and Bass scene of the early 1990s, and has gone on to become one of Britain's oldest and best-loved dance music labels. There was a thriving goa trance scene in the early 1990s. Moloko and Autechre, one of the leading lights of so-called intelligent dance music, are also based in Sheffield. Current electronic music labels in the city include Dust Science Recordings and Audiobulb, a more recent addition is R8 Records, a dubstep and nichestep label based in the flats of Sharrow and the suburbs of The Groves. The city has a number of nightclubs - Gatecrasher One was one of the most popular nightclubs in the north of England until its destruction in a fire on 18 June 2007. The following is a list of bands and musicians from Sheffield, Yorkshire, England This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Synth pop is a style of popular music in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... The Human League are an award winning, Grammy nominated British synthpop/New Wave band formed in 1977 who, after a key change in line up, achieved great popularity in the 1980s. ... Heaven 17 are an English synthpop band originating in Sheffield in the early 1980s. ... ABC is an English New Romantic band that charted eleven Top 40 singles between 1981 and 1990. ... The Thompson Twins were an English New Wave/pop band normally associated with the 1980s. ... Wavestar is a British New Age Music Synthesizer band. ... Cabaret Voltaire was a British music group from Sheffield, England. ... Clock DVA is an electronic music group from Sheffield, England. ... Techno is a form of electronic dance music that became prominent in Detroit, Michigan during the mid-1980s with influences from electro, New Wave, Funk and futuristic fiction themes that were prevalent and relative to modern culture during the end of the Cold War in industrial America at that time. ... Warp Records is a pioneering independent UK record label, founded in Sheffield in 1989, notable for discovering some of the most enduring artists in electronic music. ... Yorkshire Bleeps and Bass or Yorkshire Techno was a short-lived and very localised musical movement centred on the northern English cities of Bradford & Leeds in West Yorkshire and Sheffield in South Yorkshire in 1989-1991. ... Goa trance (often referred as Goa or by the number 604) is a form of electronic music and is a style of trance music which originated in the Indian state of Goa, as opposed to most other forms of trance music which appeared in Europe. ... Moloko is an electronic/pop group from Sheffield, England, consisting of Róisín Murphy and Mark Brydon. ... Autechre is an English electronic music group consisting of Rob Brown (born c. ... Intelligent dance music (commonly IDM) is a genre of electronic music derived from dance music of the 1980s and early 1990s which puts an emphasis on novel processing and sequencing. ... Gatecrasher may mean: Gatecrasher (person), someone who enters an event without a ticket or invitation. ... Laser lights illuminate the dance floor at a Gatecrasher dance music event in Sheffield, England A nightclub (or night club or club) is a drinking, dancing, and entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ...


Current club nights include techno and breakbeat events such as Urban Gorilla, drum and bass events, The Tuesday Club & Bass Bar, Dubcentral (dub and reggae), Threads. at DQ, Razor Stiletto, Headcharge (hard techno), Off The Rails, C90 (dubstep, techno and electronica), Uprising (Hardcore and Hard Trance) based at Plug, electro night Club Pony and Future Funk. There are many smaller nights such as Lights Down Low, Dirty Cheese, Rough Disko, Death By Shoes and Dark Crystal, the cities dedicated dubstep night. Sheffield is also the spiritual home of Gatecrasher. For the comic book character previously known as Techno, see Fixer (comics). ... This article is about breakbeat, the electronic dance music genre. ... Drum and bass (commonly abbreviated to d&b, DnB, dnb, dnb, drum n bass and drum & bass) is a type of electronic dance music also known as jungle. ... For other uses, see Dub. ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... Dubstep is a genre of electronic dance music which has its roots in Londons early 2000s UK garage scene. ... Electronica refers to a wide range of contemporary electronic music designed for a wide range of uses, including foreground listening, some forms of dancing, and background music for other activities; but unlike electronic dance music, is not specifically focused on the dance floor. ... Electro is either (a) a prefix used to indicate a relationship to electricity, as in electro-mechanical, or electro-magnet, or (b) a stand-alone word. ... Gatecrasher may mean: Gatecrasher (person), someone who enters an event without a ticket or invitation. ...


Sheffield has also seen the birth of Little Man Tate, Pulp, Def Leppard, Joe Cocker, Richard Hawley, The Longpigs, Arctic Monkeys, Milburn, The Long Blondes, Reverend and the Makers, 65daysofstatic, Bring Me The Horizon, Derek Bailey and Tony Oxley. The highly influential post-punk group the Comsat Angels hail from Sheffield. 1998 Mercury Music Prize award winners Gomez are also connected to Sheffield, as some of the founding members went to Sheffield University. Along with many other popular and alternative musicians, the city is the base for a well developed and thriving unsigned music scene. Little Man Tate are a four-piece indie band from Sheffield, England and formed in 2005. ... Pulp were a rock band, formed in Sheffield, England in 1978, by then 15-year-old school boy Jarvis Cocker (vocals, guitar). ... Def Leppard are an English hard rock band from Sheffield who formed in 1977 as part of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement. ... Joe Cocker OBE (born 20 May 1944) is an English rock/blues singer who came to popularity in the 1960s, and is most known for his gritty voice and his cover versions of popular songs. ... Richard Hawley portrait by Gareth James. ... Longpigs were a British band who rose to fame on the fringe of Britpop in the 1990s; comprising Crispin Hunt (vocals), Richard Hawley (guitar), Simon Stafford (bass) and former Cabaret Voltaire member Dee Boyle (drums). ... Arctic Monkeys are a Mercury Prize winning English indie rock band from High Green, a suburb of Sheffield. ... Milburn is an indie rock band from Sheffield, England that consists of Joe Carnall, Louis Carnall, Tom Rowley, and Joe Green. ... The Long Blondes are a 5-piece English indie rock band from Sheffield. ... Reverend and The Makers are an Indie Funk Electro band based in Sheffield, England and signed to Wall of Sound. ... 65daysofstatic (also known by the abbreviations 65dos, 65days, or simply 65) are an instrumental post-rock band from Sheffield, England. ... Oliver Sykes Bring Me the Horizon (or BMTH as often referred to) is a deathcore band from Sheffield, Yorkshire. ... Derek Bailey pictured at the Vortex Club, Stoke Newington, 1991. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... Comsat Angels were a highly influential but commercially overlooked post-punk band from Sheffield, UK. Active (in various incarnations) from 1978 to 1995, the band were responsible for some of the most atmospheric music of the first half of the 80s. ... The Mercury Music Prize, now officially known as the Nationwide Mercury Prize, is a music award given annually for the best British or Irish album of the previous 12 months. ... Gomez is an English indie rock band from Southport, England. ... University of Sheffield Rerum Cognoscere Causas (To discover the causes of things) Shield image © University of Sheffield The University of Sheffield is a university located in Sheffield, England. ...


The Arctic Monkeys are particularly notable for their heavy use of a Sheffield accent in their songs. Hailing from the High Green suburb, their lyrics are often written in a Yorkshire dialect and contain references to local places such as Rotherham, Hunter's Bar, Hillsborough and Shiregreen. They were one of several indie bands to emerge from the city as part of the New Yorkshire movement. Arctic Monkeys are a Mercury Prize winning English indie rock band from High Green, a suburb of Sheffield. ... High Green is the northernmost suburb of Sheffield, England and is often referred to as the Florence of the North (of Sheffield). This pleasant, welcoming area is one of the nicer areas Sheffield has to offer. ... There is also a Rotherham, New Zealand , Rotherham is a town in South Yorkshire, England. ... Hunters Bar is an area in Western Sheffield named after the toll bar on Ecclesall Road that was active up to the late 19th Century. ... Hillsborough is a suburb in northwest Sheffield, England. ... Shiregreen and Brightside ward—which includes the districts of Brightside, Shiregreen, and Wincobank—is one of the 28 electoral wards in City of Sheffield, England. ... In popular music, indie music (from independent) is any of a number of genres, scenes, subcultures and stylistic and cultural attributes, characterised by perceived independence from commercial pop music and mainstream culture and an autonomous, do-it-yourself (DIY) approach. ... New Yorkshire is a musical movement identified by UK music magazine NME in 2005, in response to the success of Yorkshire bands such as Arctic Monkeys, The Cribs and Kaiser Chiefs. ...

Former National Centre for Popular Music
Former National Centre for Popular Music

The city's ties with music were acknowledged in 1999, when the National Centre for Popular Music, a museum dedicated to the subject of popular music, was opened. It was not as successful as was hoped, however, and later evolved to become a live music venue; then in February 2005, the unusual steel-covered building became the students' union for Sheffield Hallam University. Live music venues in the city include the Leadmill, Corporation, the Boardwalk, the Plug, the City Hall, the University of Sheffield, the Studio Theatre at the Crucible Theatre, and The Grapes. A new venue, Carling Academy Sheffield will open in April 2008. Image File history File linksMetadata National_Centre_for_Popular_Music. ... Image File history File linksMetadata National_Centre_for_Popular_Music. ... The National Centre for Popular Music was a museum in Sheffield, England for contemporary music and culture that was built largely with contributions from the National Lottery. ... For the music genre, see Pop music. ... A students union, student government, student leadership, student council, or students association is a student organization present in many elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities. ... Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) is a university in Sheffield, England. ... The Leadmill is a live music venue and nightclub in Sheffield, lying on the south east edge of the city centre. ... The Corporation is a nightclub in Sheffield, England. ... The Boardwalk is a bar/nightclub based on the corner of Snig Hill and Bank Street, Sheffield. ... Sheffield City Hall is a building containing several venues, ranging from auditoria to a ballroom, in Sheffield, England. ... The University of Sheffield is a research university, located in Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. ... The Crucible Theatre, located in the city centre of Sheffield, England is known for being a producing theatre, meaning shows are designed and rehearsed in-house. ... The Grapes is a public house and music venue on Trippett Lane in Sheffield City Centre. ...


Sheffield has a number of local orchestras including the Hallam Sinfonia, Sheffield Symphony Orchestra, the Sheffield Chamber Orchestra, the Sheffield Philharmonic Orchestra and the City of Sheffield Youth Orchestra. The city is also home to a strong brass band tradition, with bands associated with factories and villages. The Sheffield Symphony Orchestra is an orchestra based in Sheffield, England. ... The Sheffield Philharmonic Orchestra is an amateur symphonic orchestra based in Sheffield, England. ... The City of Sheffield Youth Orchestra is an orchestra in Sheffield, England. ... A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ...


Attractions

See also: Visitor Attractions in Sheffield
The Lyceum & Crucible Theatres
The Lyceum & Crucible Theatres

Sheffield has two major theatres, the Lyceum Theatre and the Crucible Theatre, which together with the smaller Studio Theatre make up the largest theatre complex outside London.[47] There are four major art galleries, including the modern Millennium Galleries and the Site Gallery, which specialises in multimedia. The Sheffield Walk of Fame in the City Centre honours famous Sheffielders like the Hollywood version. As a large city, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England has many visitor attractions from performing arts centres to museums, shopping centres and public parks. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Lyceum_theatre_sheffield. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Lyceum_theatre_sheffield. ... The Lyceum is a 1068-seat theatre in the City of Sheffield, England. ... The Crucible Theatre, located in the city centre of Sheffield, England is known for being a producing theatre, meaning shows are designed and rehearsed in-house. ... Broadway Theatre Center The Broadway Theatre Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, houses two distinct theatres and is host to a dynamic collaboration of theatre companies. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... The Millennium Galleries is a new gallery opened in Sheffield City Centre located near the city library, Sheffield Hallam University, the citys theatre complex and the new Heart of the City complex. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... The Sheffield Walk of Fame is a Walk of Fame located outside Sheffield Town Hall honouring famous people from or connected to Sheffield. ... Shown within Sheffield Urban Area Sheffield City Centre—often just referred to as town—is a district of the City of Sheffield, and part of the Sheffield Central ward. ... ...


The Sheffield Arena is located in the Don Valley area just outside the city centre and it is one of the major arenas in the UK hosting big music acts of the world. The arena in ice hockey mode The Hallam FM Arena, originally named the Sheffield Arena, is an arena hosting concerts and sporting events in Sheffield in England. ...


Valley Centertainment is an entertainment park on the outskirts of the city centre and features Cineworld Cinemas, Hollywood Bowl and lots of restaurants and bars. It is located next to the Sheffield Arena and Meadowhall shopping centre. Valley Centertainment is a large entertainment complex in the Don Valley in Sheffield. ... The arena in ice hockey mode The Hallam FM Arena, originally named the Sheffield Arena, is an arena hosting concerts and sporting events in Sheffield in England. ... Meadowhall is a large shopping centre located three miles northeast of central Sheffield, England. ...

Sheffield Winter Gardens
Sheffield Winter Gardens

The city also has a number of other attractions such as the Sheffield Winter Gardens and the Peace Gardens. The Botanical Gardens recently underwent a £6.7-million-pound restoration. There is also a city farm at Heeley City Farm and a second animal collection in Graves Park that is open to the public. The city also has several museums, including the Weston Park Museum, the Kelham Island Museum, the Sheffield Fire and Police Museum, Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet and Shepherd Wheel. Victoria Quays is also a popular canal-side leisure and office quarter. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixels Full resolution (1536 × 1024 pixel, file size: 318 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sheffield Sheffield Winter Gardens User... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixels Full resolution (1536 × 1024 pixel, file size: 318 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sheffield Sheffield Winter Gardens User... Sheffield Winter Gardens // The Sheffield Winter Gardens is one of the largest temperate glasshouses to be built in the UK during the last hundred years, and the largest urban glasshouse anywhere in Europe. ... Sheffield Town Hall is a building in the city of Sheffield in the north of England. ... The Glass Houses, Sheffield Botanical Gardens The Sheffield Botanical Gardens are botanical gardens situated off Ecclesall Road in Sheffield, England, with 5,000 species of plant in 19 acres (77,000 m²) of land. ... Graves Park ward is one of the 28 electoral wards in City of Sheffield, England. ... The Sheffield City Museum and Mappin Art Gallery were contained within one building, one mile west of the centre of Sheffield, England, edged to one side by parkland and surrounded by Sheffield University. ... The Kelham Island Industrial Museum occupies the site of a former steelworks on an island in the River Don in Sheffield, England. ... Sheffield Fire and Police Museum is a museum in Sheffield, England. ... Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet in Sheffield, England is a steel working site with a very long history. ... Shepherd Wheel is a working museum in a former water-powered grinding workshop situated on the River Porter to the south-west of the City of Sheffield, England. ... Victoria Quays (formerly Sheffield Canal Basin) is a large canal basin in Sheffield, England. ...


There are about 1,000 listed buildings in Sheffield (including the whole of the Sheffield postal district). Of these, only five are Grade I listed. 42 are Grade II*, the rest being Grade II listed. Compared with other English cities Sheffield has few Grade I buildings. Liverpool, for example, has 26 Grade I listed buildings. This situation led the noted architecture historian Nikolaus Pevsner, writing in 1959, to comment that the city was "architecturally a miserable disappointment" with no pre-19th century buildings of any distinction.[48] There are about 1,000 listed buildings in Sheffield (including the whole of the Sheffield postal district). ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... Partial and incomplete lists of listed buildings in Liverpool, England. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ... Sir Nikolaus Pevsner CBE (January 30, 1902 – August 18, 1983) was a German-born British historian of art and, especially, architecture. ...


The city has many large parks such as Millhouses Park, Endcliffe Park and Graves Park. Millhouses Park is a large park in the south of Sheffield. ... The woods of Endcliffe Park. ... Graves Park ward is one of the 28 electoral wards in City of Sheffield, England. ...


Large parts of the city are designated as sites of special scientific interest (areas of land which the British Government considers to be of special interest by virtue of its fauna, flora, geological or physiographical features) including several urban areas. A Site of Special Scientific Interest or SSSI is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom. ...


Media and film

The Arts Tower, located on the campus of the University of Sheffield
The Arts Tower, located on the campus of the University of Sheffield

The films The Full Monty, Threads, When Saturday Comes and Whatever Happened to Harold Smith? were based in the city. F.I.S.T. also included several scenes filmed in Sheffield. Besides the story of The History Boys is set in Sheffield at Cutler's Grammar School. Sheffield's daily newspaper is the Sheffield Star, complemented by the weekly Sheffield Telegraph. Sheffield also has many free publications such as Sandman, Go Sheffield, Exposed, Clunge and Radio Coma. The BBC's Radio Sheffield and the independent Hallam FM and sister station Magic AM broadcast to the city. The Sheffield International Documentary Festival, the UK's leading documentary festival, has been run annually since 1994 at the Showroom Cinema. The annual Lovebytes digital arts festival takes place in Sheffield across a variety of venues. A song by The Clash (who played their first ever gig in Sheffield at the Black Swan - now known as The Boardwalk), titled " This Is England " features the lyric: "This is England / This knife of Sheffield steel / This is England / This is how we feel." Sheffield hosted the Awards of the International Indian Film Academy in 2007 which was a big success and raised awareness of global warming by having an unconventional green carpet. Internationally recognised design agency The Designers Republic is based in Sheffield, as well as Universal Everything, Tado and Dust. Download high resolution version (922x1229, 84 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (922x1229, 84 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Arts Tower is a building in Sheffield, England that is part of the University of Sheffield. ... This article is about the film. ... For other uses, see Thread. ... When Saturday Comes is a film starring Sean Bean and Emily Lloyd. ... Whatever Happened to Harold Smith? is a film written by Ben Steiner, directed by Peter Hewitt and released in 1999. ... F.I.S.T. is a 1978 movie directed by Norman Jewison and starring Sylvester Stallone. ... The History Boys is a six-time Tony Award winning play (and later movie) by English playwright Alan Bennett. ... Sheffield Star is a newspaper of the city Sheffield, England. ... Sheffield Telegraph is Sheffields weekly newspaper, there is also the Sheffield Star daily newspaper. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... BBC Radio Sheffield is the BBC Local Radio service for English metropolitan county of South Yorkshire and the North Midlands. ... Hallam FM, formerly known as Radio Hallam, is a Sheffield-based Independent Local Radio station. ... Magic AM is a commercial local radio station in South Yorkshire owned by Magic Radio as part of the EMAP group. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... The Showroom Cinema is an independent arthouse cinema in Sheffield, England. ... This article is about the English rock band. ... Photograph of the boardwalk in Atlantic City, NJ, USA, taken August 2003. ... This is England is the 19th single by influential British rock band The Clash. ... The Awards of the International Indian Film Academy (commonly known as the IIFA Awards) is an award ceremony, celebrating and honouring Indian cinema around the world. ... Incunabula by Autechre, cover design by TDR Appetite for Disctruction by Funkstörung, cover design by TDR WipEout for the Playstation, logo and interface design by TDR The Designers Republic (TDR or miTDR for short) is a group of graphic designers, founded on July 14, 1986 by Ian Anderson, and...


Education

Sheffield has two universities, the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Hallam University. The two combined bring 55,000 students to the city every year, including many from the Far East. As a result of its large student population, Sheffield has many bars, cafes, clubs and shops as well as student housing to accommodate them. The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... The University of Sheffield is a research university, located in Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. ... Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) is a university in Sheffield, England. ... The far east as a cultural block includes East Asia, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia and South Asia. ...


Sheffield has two further education colleges. Sheffield College is organised on a collegiate basis and was originally created from the merger of six colleges around the city, since reduced to just four: Castle in the city centre, Hillsborough, Crystal Peaks on the outskirts and Norton, each operating as semi-autonomous constituents of Sheffield College. Longley Park Sixth Form College, managed by the Local Education Authority opened in 2004. Further education (often abbreviated FE) is post-secondary, post-compulsory education (in addition to that received at secondary school). ... A college (Latin collegium) can be the name of any group of colleagues; originally it meant a group of people living together under a common set of rules (con-, together + leg-, law). As a consequence members of colleges were originally styled fellow and still are in some places. ... The Sheffield College is a college in Sheffield, England. ... Graves Park ward is one of the 28 electoral wards in City of Sheffield, England. ... Longley Park Sixth Form College (LPSFC) is a further education college in the Longley area of Sheffield, England. ... A Local Education Authority (LEA) is the part of a council in England or Wales that is responsible for education within that councils jurisdiction. ...


There are also 141 primary schools and 27 secondary schools - of which seven have sixth forms e.g. Tapton School - and seven private schools, most notably Birkdale School and the Sheffield High School for Girls. A primary school in Český Těšín, Poland Primary education is the first stage of compulsory education. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... England, Wales, Northern Ireland The sixth form, in the English, Welsh and Northern Irish education systems, is the term used to refer to the final two years of secondary schooling (when students are about sixteen to eighteen years of age), during which students normally prepare for their GCE A-level... Tapton School is a secondary school located in Crosspool, Sheffield in the UK. It is a state school, sited next to another secondary King Edward VII School, and near to Lydgate Junior School, Lydgate Infant School and Notre Dame High School. ... Birkdale School is a Christian public school for boys in the city of Sheffield, Yorkshire in England. ... Sheffield High School (SHS) is a girls school in Sheffield, United Kingdom, part of the Girls Day School Trust (GDST). ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Look up Sheffield in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... This is a list of the largest metropolitan areas of Europe. ... Shown within Sheffield Urban Area Sheffield City Centre—often just referred to as town—is a district of the City of Sheffield, and part of the Sheffield Central ward. ... There are about 1,000 listed buildings in Sheffield (including the whole of the Sheffield postal district). ... This article is intended to show a timeline of notable events in the History of Sheffield, England, with a particular focus on the events, people or places that are covered in Wikipedia articles. ... This is a list of notable people who were born in or near, or have been residents of the City of Sheffield, England. ... People who wish to be identified as coming from Sheffield call themselves Sheffielders. ...

References and notes

  1. ^ The mid-2006 population estimate for the City of Sheffield was 525,800 according to the Office for National Statistics. It should be noted that this figure includes the whole area included in the city. Some population figures, for example those given at List of English cities by population use just the urban core of the city and therefore are lower. The Neighbourhood profiles given by the Sheffield Health Authority estimates the figure at 547,631.
  2. ^ "Experts put date to UK rock art", BBC News Online, BBC, 2007-04-03. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Vickers, J. Edward (1999). Old Sheffield Town. An Historical Miscellany, 2nd, Sheffield: The Hallamshire Press Limited. ISBN 1-874718-44-X. 
  4. ^ In an entry dated 827 the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states "Egbert led an army against the Northumbrians as far as Dore, where they met him, and offered terms of obedience and subjection, on the acceptance of which they returned home" (transcription). Most sources (for example Vickers, Old Sheffield Town) state that the date given in the chronicle is incorrect, and that 829 is the more likely date for this event.
  5. ^ History of Sheffield Castle and Markets. Sheffield Markets. Retrieved on 2005-12-27.
  6. ^ Geoffrey Chaucer in The Reeve’s Tale from his book The Canterbury Tales wrote: "Ther was no man, for peril, dorste hym touche. A Sheffeld thwitel baar he in his hose. Round was his face, and camus was his nose"
  7. ^ History of the Lord Mayor. Sheffield City Council. Retrieved on 2007-09-19.
  8. ^ Orwell, George (1937). "Chapter 7", The Road to Wigan Pier. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. 
  9. ^ The Story of the Sheffield Blitz, 12th & 15th December 1940. Sheffield Genealogy Family & Social History. Retrieved on 2006-12-30.
  10. ^ SI (Chris Knight, Keith Tyssen and Brett Payne) with Keiko Mukaide 'Cutting Edge', 2006. Public Art Research Archive, Sheffield Hallam University. Retrieved on 2007-03-15.
  11. ^ [1]
  12. ^ The Lord Mayor. Sheffield City Council. Retrieved on 2007-09-19.
  13. ^ Sheffield City Council: International Links (Accessed 19 September 2007)
  14. ^ Polish Consulate in Sheffield. The University of Sheffield. Retrieved on 2005-12-27.
  15. ^ Harston, Jonathan G. (2005). The borders of Sheffield from 1843 to 1994. Retrieved on 2005-12-26.
  16. ^ Case Study - Sheffield, UK. Greenstructures and Urban Planning. European Cooperation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research. Retrieved on 2005-09-26.
  17. ^ It is often stated that Sheffield is built on seven hills (for an example see Sheffield Hallam University's guide to the city for new students). However, a study by J.G.Harston found there to be eight.
  18. ^ Trees & Woodlands in Sheffield. Sheffield City Council. Retrieved on 2006-08-11.
  19. ^ a b c Facts & Figures. Sheffield City Council. Retrieved on 2005-12-27.
  20. ^ United Kingdom Census 2001 (2001). South Yorkshire (Met County). statistics.gov.uk. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  21. ^ United Kingdom Census 2001 (2001). Sheffield (Local Authority). neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  22. ^ Sheffield's Ward Boundaries. Sheffield City Council. Retrieved on 2005-12-29.
  23. ^ Alexander, Don (2001). Orreight Mi Ol': observations on dialect, humour and local lore of Sheffield & District. Sheffield: Northern Map Distributors. ISBN 1-901587-18-5.  It had largely died out by the time of the Survey of English Dialects however.
  24. ^ Yorkshire Dialect Words of Old Norse Origin. The Vikings. The Viking Network. Retrieved on 2005-01-05.
  25. ^ Sheffield. Census 2001. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved on 2005-12-21.
  26. ^ Mid-2005 Population Estimates; Quinary age groups and sex for Primary Care Organisations (PCOs) for England; estimated resident population (experimental). On boundaries as at 1 October 2006. National Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  27. ^ Sheffield District: Total Population. A Vision of Britain Through Time. Great Britain Historical GIS Project. Retrieved on 2005-12-04.
  28. ^ Labour Market Profile: Sheffield. Nomis official labour market statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved on 2007-04-05. Data is taken from the ONS annual business inquiry employee analysis and refers to 2005
  29. ^ "Wealth hotspots 'outside London'", BBC News Online, BBC, 7 July 2004. 
  30. ^ "Sheffield 'hotbed' for investment", BBC News Online, BBC, 6 October 2005. 
  31. ^ Headline GVA by NUT3 area at current basic prices 1995 to 2003 (XLS). Office for National Statistics. Retrieved on 2005-12-22.
  32. ^ MoorSheffield Consultation Panels (PDF). MoorSheffield. RREEF. Retrieved on 2007-04-06.
  33. ^ There are numerous sources showing the international reputation of Sheffield for metallurgy, and in particular steel and cutlery manufacture. Some examples are: the Oxford English Dictionary, which begins its entry for Sheffield, "The name of a manufacturing city of Yorkshire, famous for cutlery"; and the Encyclopaedia Britannica, which in its entry for Sheffield states that by 1830 Sheffield had earned "recognition as the world centre of high-grade steel manufacture". David Hey in the preface to his 1997 book Mesters to Masters: A History of the Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire. (Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-828997-9) states "It (Sheffield) was known for its cutlery wares long before the incorporation of the Cutlers' Company in 1624, and long before it acquired an international reputation as the steel capital of the world."
  34. ^ About Yorkshire and Humber. Government News Network. Retrieved on 2005-10-23.
  35. ^ http://www.energy.rochester.edu/uk/sheffield/
  36. ^ http://www.greenenergy.co.uk/ab_facts.asp
  37. ^ Retail Footprint 2005. CACI Ltd. Retrieved on 2005-10-05.
  38. ^ Results of the Experian 2004 Retail Ranking. Expirian. Retrieved on 2005-10-05.
  39. ^ UK rail network map (PDF) showing which train companies operate on each route. Provided by National Rail Enquiries (Accessed 28 December 2005)
  40. ^ [2] Sheffield City Council, 19 September 2007
  41. ^ Stagecoach Supertram:About Us (Accessed 28 December 2005)
  42. ^ Bus Privatisation in the United Kingdom World Bank
  43. ^ Call for action to halt fall in bus passengers. Sheffield Star, 16 August 2005
  44. ^ Next stop in bus protest campaign. Sheffield Star, 31 January 2006
  45. ^ Report on International Open bowls 2006
  46. ^ Main page of Don Valley Stadium
  47. ^ Sheffield Theatres (accessed 26 December 2005)
  48. ^ Harman, R. & Minnis, J. (2004) Pevsner City Guides: Sheffield p3. New Haven & London: Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-10585-1

This is a list of the largest cities and towns of England ordered by population. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The initial page of the Peterborough Chronicle. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Chaucer redirects here. ... The Reeves Prologue and Tale is the third story to be told in Geoffrey Chaucers The Canterbury Tales. ... For other uses, see The Canterbury Tales (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... The Road to Wigan Pier was written by George Orwell and published in 1937. ... A Gollancz edition of The Door Into Summer, displaying the distinctive yellow dust jacket style. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Survey of English Dialects was undertaken between 1950 and 1961 under the direction of Professor Harold Orton of the English department of the University of Leeds. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Office for National Statistics logo The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is the United Kingdom government executive agency charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the United Kingdom at national and local levels. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Office for National Statistics logo The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is the United Kingdom government executive agency charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the United Kingdom at national and local levels. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CACI NYSE: CAI is a United States-based private military contractor. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sheffield City Council is the city council for the metropolitan borough of Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ... Sheffield Star is a newspaper of the city Sheffield, England. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sheffield Star is a newspaper of the city Sheffield, England. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Coordinates: 53°23′09″N, 1°28′10″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sheffield - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5119 words)
Sheffield is a city and metropolitan borough in South Yorkshire in the north of England.
From 1570 to 1584 Mary, Queen of Scots was held as a prisoner in Sheffield Castle and Sheffield Manor.
Sheffield also has close ties with snooker, due to the fact that the city's Crucible Theatre is the venue for the World Snooker Championships.
A History of Sheffield (1631 words)
Sheffield was founded in the early 12th century by the Lord of the manor, William de Lovetot.
Sheffield was given the right to have a weekly market and an annual fair.
By 1600 Sheffield was the main town in England (apart from London) for cutlery.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     

PeckLeigh
20th July 2010
I took my first loans when I was 20 and it supported my family very much. However, I need the car loan once more time.

Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m