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Encyclopedia > Sheet (sailing)
The piece of chain running diagonally up and right from the bottom-left of this picture to the upper of the two yards is the fore-lower-topsail sheet. Some of the lines on Prince William 's larger sails are made of chain to handle the heavy loads while remaining flexible enough to pass through the various blocks on their route to the deck.
The piece of chain running diagonally up and right from the bottom-left of this picture to the upper of the two yards is the fore-lower-topsail sheet. Some of the lines on Prince William 's larger sails are made of chain to handle the heavy loads while remaining flexible enough to pass through the various blocks on their route to the deck.

In sailing, a sheet is a line (rope, cable or chain) used to control the moveable corner(s) of a sail. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (910x1053, 294 KB) Summary Crew stowing the fore-course and fore-lower-topsail on the Prince William. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (910x1053, 294 KB) Summary Crew stowing the fore-course and fore-lower-topsail on the Prince William. ... The fore royal yard on the Prince William. ... Prince William alongside in Fredrikstad at the end of the Tall Ships Race 2005. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... 6 or 15cm outside diameter, oil-cooled cables, traversing the Grand Coulee Dam throughout. ... A broad metal chain made of torus-shaped links. ... A gaff-rigged cutter flying a mainsail, staysail and genoa jib For other uses, see Sail (disambiguation). ...


Fore-and-aft rigs

Fore-and-aft-rigs comprise the vast majority of sailing vessels in use today, including effectively all dinghies and yachts. The sheet on a fore-and-aft sail controls the angle of the sail to the wind, and should be adjusted to keep the sail just filled. Most smaller boats use the Bermuda rig, which has two or three sets of sheets: In sailing, a bermuda rig is: A rig of mainsail or course that consists of a triangular sail set aft of the mast, with its head raised to the top of the mast, its luff running down the mast and normally attached to it for all its length, its tack...

  • The mainsheet is attached to the boom, and is used to control the mainsail. In a rig with no boom on the mainsail, the mainsheet would attach directly to the mainsail clew.A mainsheet is a rope connected to the boom which allows a sailor to control the speed of a boat.
  • The jib sheet attaches to the clew of the jib, and controls it. The jib has a sheet on each side, only one of which (the leeward one) will be in use at one time.
  • The spinnaker sheet attaches to the clew(s) of the spinnaker, if carried. A symmetrical spinnaker has two sheets, an "active" one and a "lazy" one, in the same way as a jib, but they are attached to the sail's two separate clews. On boats larger than around thirty feet, the spinnaker will also be fitted with guys, which are similar to sheets but control the pole instead of the sail. On smaller boats the lazy sheet is used as a guy.

On the smallest boats, a sheet is often a simple rope, pulled by hand; on larger boats, usually on the mainsheet, it is often a system using several blocks to provide mechanical advantage. At one time, headsail sheets on yachts also involved blocks, but the disadvantages of having large amounts of line and loose blocks free to move all over the forward part of the vessel mean that such systems have been almost universally replaced with single-line sheets holding immense forces but controlled by powerful winches. In sailing, a boom is a spar (pole) usually made of aluminum or wood, is connected to the foot of the mainsail and allows the crew to control the angle of the sail to the wind. ... A mainsail is the most important sail raised from the main (or only) mast of a sailing vessel. ... A mainsail is the most important sail raised from the main (or only) mast of a sailing vessel. ... In sailing, the clew is the lower aft corner of the sail. ... A typical jib on a small yacht A jib is a triangular staysail set ahead of the foremost mast of a sailing boat. ... It has been suggested that gennaker be merged into this article or section. ... A guy is a term for a line (rope) attached to and intended to control the end of a spar on a sailboat. ... In sailing, a block is a pulley or a number of pulleys enclosed in sheaves so as to be fixed to the end of a line or to a spar or surface. ... In physics and engineering, mechanical advantage (MA) is the factor by which a mechanism multiplies the force put into it. ... Modern self-tailing winch on a sailing boat. ...


Square rig

Square rigged vessels are much less common, and are usually large ships. Nevertheless, they too have sheets on the moveable corners of their square sails. Unlike fore-and-aft sheets, though, square-rig sheets do not control the angle of the sails (which is performed using braces); instead, they are used to haul the corners of the sails from their stowed positions down towards the tip of the yard below. They are then not adjusted significantly while sailing until the sail is to be handed (put away) again. Square rig is a generic type of sailing vessel in which the main horizontal spars are perpendicular to the keel of the ship. ... The starboard main-brace and main-topsail-braces are clearly visible over the sea in this photo of the Prince Williams bridge and stern deck from her masthead. ...


Three sheets to the wind

The term "three sheets to the wind", meaning "staggering drunk", refers to a ship whose sheets have come loose, causing the sails to flap uncontrolled and the ship to meander at the mercy of the elements.



Sails, Spars and Rigging
Sails
Course | Driver | Extra | Genoa | Gennaker | Jib | Lateen | Mainsail | Moonsail | Royal | Spanker | Spinnaker | Spritsail | Staysail | Studding | Tallboy | Topgallant | Topsail | Trysail
Sail anatomy and materials
Clew | Foot | Head | Leech | Luff | Roach | Tack | Dacron | Kevlar | Twaron
Spars
Boom | Bowsprit | Fore-mast | Gaff | Jackstaff | Jigger-mast | Jury Rig | Main-mast | Mast | Mizzen-mast | Masthead Truck | Spinnaker Pole | Topmast | Yard
Rigging components
Backstay | Block | Boom vang | Braces | Buntlines | Cleat | Clevis Pin | Clewlines | Cunningham | Downhaul | Forestay | Gasket | Gooseneck | Guy | Halyard | Outhaul | Parrell beads | Peak | Preventer | Ratlines | Rigging (Running) | Shackle | Rigging (Standing) | Sheet | Shroud | Stay mouse | Stays | Throat | Topping lift | Trapeze

 
 

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