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Encyclopedia > Shedu
Image:Iraq; Nimrud - Assyria, Lamassus Guarding Palace Entrance.jpg
Iraq - Nimrud, Human-headed winged bulls and lions in situ, otherwise known as Lamassus

The Sumerian word lama, which is rendered in Akkadian as lamassu, refers to a beneficient protective female deity. The corresponding male deity was called alad, or in Akkadian, šêdu.[1] Shaidu is a town of about 50,000 people, in the Nowshera district of the North-West Frontier Province, Pakistan. ... Nimrud is an ancient Assyrian city located south of Nineveh on the river Tigris. ...


In art they were depicted as winged bulls and lions; both forms had the heads of human males. There are still surviving figures of šêdu in bas-relief and some statues in museums. Notable examples of šêdu/lamassu held by museums include those at the British Museum, Musée du Louvre, Metropolitan Museum of Art and one extremely large example kept at the Oriental Institute, Chicago. They are generally attributed to the ancient Assyrians.[2] [3] Bulls may refer to several things: Male cattle Blue Bulls, a rugby club in South Africa Belfast Bulls, an american football team in Northern Ireland Belleville Bulls, a junior ice hockey team in Ontario, Canada Bulldog, of which there are many different breeds Bulls, a rugby club in South Africa... Binomial name Panthera leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The Lion (Panthera leo) is a mammal of the family Felidae. ... Bas relief is a method of sculpting which entails carving or etching away the surface of a flat piece of stone or metal. ... The British Museum in London, England is one of the worlds greatest museums of human history and culture. ... The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre) in Paris, France, is one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as The Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... The Art-Deco doors of the Oriental Institute, sculpture by Ulric Ellerhusen Head of a bull that once guarded the entrance to the Hundred-Column Hall in Persepolis The Oriental Institute (OI), established in 1919, is the University of Chicagos archeology museum and research center for ancient Near Eastern... It has been suggested that Assyrian people be merged into this article or section. ...


To protect houses the shedu were engraved in clay tablets, which were buried under the door's threshold[citation needed]. At the entrance of palaces often placed as a pair. At the entrance of cities they were sculpted in colossal size, and placed as a pair, one at each side of the door of the city, that generally had buttdoors in the surrounding wall, each one looking towards one of the cardinal points[citation needed]. The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Lamassu

The bull man is a demon from Mesopotamian mythology. He is a human above the waist and a bull below the waist. He also has the horns and the ears of a bull. “Fiend” redirects here. ... Mesopotamian mythology is the collective name given to Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian mythologies from the land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in Iraq. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ...


The bull man helps people fight evil and chaos. He holds the gates of dawn open for the sun god Shamash and supports the sun disc. He is often shown on Cylinder Seals.[citation needed] Shamash or Sama, was the common Akkadian name of the sun-god in Babylonia and Assyria, corresponding to Sumerian Utu. ...


It appears frequently in Mesopotamian art, sometimes with wings. Statues of the bull-man were often used as gatekeepers. Over time it evolved into a friendly, protective demon. [citation needed]


In Akkadian, he is called Gud-elim, or "The Horned Bull". Akkadian (lišānum akkadītum) was a Semitic language (part of the greater Afro-Asiatic language family) spoken in ancient Mesopotamia, particularly by the Assyrians and Babylonians. ...


Lamassu in fiction

Lamassu are a type of good-aligned creature in the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons and in the Magic: The Gathering trading card game as the white card Hunted Lammasu in the Ravnica: City of Guilds expansion. In the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, alignment is a categorisation of the moral and ethical perspective of people, creatures and societies. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... This article is about the role-playing game. ... Magic: The Gathering (colloq. ... Magic: The Gathering (colloq. ...


In Demon: The Fallen the Lamassu are a house of fallen angels; see Houses in Demon: The Fallen. Lammasu is also a large bull-like creature in service of the Chaos Dwarfs in Warhammer Fantasy Battle. This articles content is specific to the fictional setting known as the World of Darkness. ... It has been suggested that Evil Angels be merged into this article or section. ... Chaos Dwarfs are an off-shoot of the Dwarfs of the Warhammer Fantasy setting who have been corrupted by Chaos. ... It has been suggested that Armies of warhammer be merged into this article or section. ...


Gallery

British Museum Collection

Musée du Louvre Collection

Metropolitan Museum of Art Collection

Oriental Institute of Art Collection

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 705 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 1088 pixel, file size: 95 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (853 × 1280 pixel, file size: 241 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...

See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In Greek mythology, the Minotaur (Greek: Μινόταυρος, Minótauros) was a creature that was said to be part man and part bull. ...

References

  1. ^ An illustrated dictionary, Gods, Demons and Symbols of Ancient Mesopotamia. (2003; Jeremy Black and Anthony Green, The British Museum Press; ISBN 0-7141-1705-6)
  2. ^ http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/cultures/mesopotamia_gallery_09.shtml
  3. ^ http://www.ancientneareast.net/religion_mesopotamian/lamassu.html

  Results from FactBites:
 
Shedu (201 words)
In Akkadian mythology the shedu were a type of demons, but they were demons of a benevolent nature, protective spirits of the houses, palaces and cities.
To protect houses the shedu were engraved in clay tablets, which were buried under the door's threshold.
At the entrance of palaces they were sculpted in natural size, and often placed as a pair, one at each side of the stairs that led to the door.
Shedu - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (369 words)
In Akkadian mythology the shedu were a type of demon, but they were demons of a benevolent nature, protective spirits of the houses, palaces and cities.
At the entrance of palaces they were sculpted in natural size, and often placed as a pair, one at each side of the stairs that led to the door.
Shedu, Lammasu: winged lions, Lammasu in fiction, Articles to be merged and Legendary creatures.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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