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Encyclopedia > Sharpey's fibres

Sharpey's fibres (bone fibres, or perforating fibres) are a matrix of connective tissue consisting of bundles of strong collagenous fibres connecting periosteum to bone. They are part of the outer fibrous layer of periosteum, entering into the outer circumferential and interstitial lamellae of bone tissue. [1] In biology, the word matrix is used for the material between animal or plant cells, or generally the material (or tissue) in which more specialized structures are embedded, and also specifically for one part of the mitochondrion. ... In the human body there are four types of tissue: (1) Epithelial, (2) Connective, (3) Muscle, and (4) Nervous Tissue. ... Tropocollagen triple helix. ... Fiber or fibre[1] is a class of materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. ... The periosteum is an envelope of fibrous connective tissue that is wrapped around the bone in all places except at joints (which are protected by cartilage). ... Grays illustration of a human femur, a typically recognized bone. ... Lamellae are gill-shaped structures: fine sheets of material held near one another, with open space between. ...


In the teeth, Sharpey's fibres are the ends of principal fibres that insert into the cementum. A study on rats suggests that the three-dimensional structure of Sharpey's fibres intensifies the continuity between the periodontal ligament fibre and the alveolar bone (tooth socket), and acts as a buffer medium against stress. [2] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cementum is a specialized bony substance covering the root of a tooth. ... Species 50 species; see text *Several subfamilies of Muroids include animals called rats. ... // Headline text The periodontal ligaments are considered part of the periodontium, as they are supporting tissue of a tooth. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


In the skull the main function of Sharpey's fibres is to bind the cranial bones in a firm but moveable manner; they are most numerous in areas where the bones are subjected to the greatest forces of separation. [3] Each fibre is accompanied by an arteriole and one or more nerve fibres. A hippopotamus skull A skull, or cranium, is a bony structure of Craniates which serves as the general framework for a head. ... A Hippopotamuss skull A skull, or cranium, is a bony structure of vertebrates which serves as the general framework for a head. ... An arteriole is a blood vessel that extends and branches out from an artery and leads to capillaries. ... An axon, or nerve fiber, is a long slender projection of a nerve cell, or neuron, that conducts electrical impulses away from the neurons cell body or soma. ...

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External links

  • Histological photograph of Sharpey's fibres from Dalhousie University Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology
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References

  1. ^ Histology study guide (332 Kb PDF). University of Limpopo (Aug 2 2006).See p.7
  2. ^ Kuroiwa, M, Chihara K, Higashi S (1994). "Electron microscopic studies on Sharpey's fibers in the alveolar bone of rat molars". Kaibogaku Zasshi 69 (6): 776-82. PMID 7887126.
  3. ^ Retzlaff, EW, Mitchell FL, Upledger JE (1982-3). "Efficacy of Cranial Sacral Manipulation: The Physiological Mechanism of the Cranial Sutures". J Soc. Osteopaths (12). ISSN 0308-8766.
Bone and cartilage - edit
cartilage: chondroblast, chondrocyte, perichondrium, types (hyaline, elastic, fibrous), fibrocartilage callus, metaphysis

bone: ossification (intramembranous, endochondral, epiphyseal plate), cycle (osteoblast, osteoid, osteocyte, osteoclast), types (cancellous, cortical), regions (epiphysis, diaphysis), structure (osteon/Haversian system, Haversian canals, periosteum, Sharpey's fibres, lacunae, canaliculi, trabeculae, medullary cavity, bone marrow), shapes (long, short, flat, irregular, sesamoid) Grays illustration of a human femur, a typically recognized bone. ... Cartilage is a type of dense connective tissue. ... Cartilage is a type of dense connective tissue. ... A chondroblast is a cell, which originates from a mesenchymal stem cell and forms Chondrocytes, commonly known as cartilage cells. ... Chondrocytes (< Greek chondros cartilage + kytos cell) are the only cells found in cartilage. ... The perichondrium is a layer of dense connective tissue which surrounds the cartilage. ... Cartilage is type of dense connective tissue. ... Cartilage is type of dense connective tissue. ... Cartilage is type of dense connective tissue. ... A fibrocartilage callus is a temporary fibrocartilage callus which forms as bone attemps to heal a fracture. ... The metaphysis is the body of cartilage that separates the epiphyses and the diaphysis of long bones during growth. ... Grays illustration of a human femur, a typically recognized bone. ... Ossification is the process of bone formation, in which connective tissues, such as cartilage are turned to bone or bone-like tissue. ... Osteoblasts and osteoclasts on trabecula of lower jaw of calf embryo. ... Section of fetal bone of cat. ... The long bones are those that are longer than they are wide, and grow primarily by elongation of the diaphysis at an epiphysis at one end of the growing bone. ... An osteoblast (from the Greek words for bone and to build) is a mononucleate cell which produces a protein that produces osteoid. ... Osteoid is a protein mixture which is secreted by osteoblasts. ... An osteocyte, a star-shaped cell, is the most abundant cell found in bone. ... An osteoclast is a multinucleated cell that degrades and reabsorbs bone. ... Cancellous bone (or trabecular bone, or spongy bone) is a spongy type of bone with a very high surface area, found at the ends of long bones. ... Cortical bone is one of two main types of bone. ... For other uses of the word bone, see bone (disambiguation). ... The diaphysis is the main or mid section (shaft) of a long bone. ... Osteons (cross section) Osteons (also called Haversian system in honor of Clopton Havers) are predominant structures found in some lamellar or compact bone. ... Haversian canals are a series of tubes around narrow channels formed by lamellae. ... The periosteum is an envelope of fibrous connective tissue that is wrapped around the bone in all places except at joints (which are protected by cartilage). ... In histology, a lacuna is a small space containing an osteocyte in bone or chondrocyte in cartilage. ... Canaliculi are small, microscopic canals between the various lacunae of ossified bone. ... Definition and etymology trabeculae. ... The medullary cavity is the central cavity of bone shafts where yellow marrow (adipose) is stored. ... Grays Anatomy illustration of cells in bone marrow. ... The long bones are those that grow primarily by elongation at an epiphysis at one end of the growing bone. ... Flat Bones. ... The irregular bones are such as, from their peculiar form, cannot be grouped as long bone, short bone, or flat bone. ... In anatomy, a sesamoid bone is a bone embedded within a tendon. ...


 
 

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