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Encyclopedia > Shark fin soup
Shark fin soup

ImageMetadata File history File links From Arthur Hungry. ...

Shark fin soup
Traditional Chinese:
Literal meaning: Fish fin

Shark fin soup (or shark's fin soup) is a Cantonese cuisine delicacy commonly served as part of a Chinese feast, usually at special occasions such as weddings and banquets as a symbol of wealth and prestige. The "finning" of sharks required to make this soup has been highly controversial. Some have called the practice brutal, and it is also named as a primary contributing factor in the global decline of many shark species. China's booming economy has resulted in a large increase in demand for shark fins, and this, combined with the importance of this predator in oceanic ecosystems, has exacerbated the problems that the practice is said to perpetuate. Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... This article is about all of the Cantonese (Yue) dialects. ... Jyutping (sometimes spelled Jyutpin) is a romanization system for Standard Cantonese developed by the Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK) in 1993. ... Yue cuisine Chinese: Cantonese (Yue) cuisine originates from Guangdong Province in Southern China, or more precisely, the area around Guangzhou (Canton). ... This is a List of delicacies. ... Chinese cuisine (Chinese: 中國菜) originated from different regions of China and has become widespread in many other parts of the world — from East Asia to North America, Australasia and Western Europe. ... Nuptial is the adjective of wedding. It is used for example in zoology to denote plumage, coloration, behavior, etc related to or occurring in the mating season. ... For the business meaning, see Wealth (economics). ... Prestige means good reputation or high esteem. ... For other uses, see Shark (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Soup

Genuine shark fin soup or stew is made with shark fins obtained from any of a variety of shark species. Raw shark fins are processed by first removing the skin, trimming them to shape, and thoroughly drying them. They may be bleached with hydrogen peroxide before drying to make their colour more appealing. Shark fins are the cartilaginous pectoral and dorsal fins of a shark. Shark's fins are sold in two forms - frozen and dried. Both need to be softened before they can be used to prepare soup. The frozen form is ready to use as it has been pre-prepared and therefore only requires about an hour of soaking. There are two types of the dried form, skinned (shredded) or un-skinned (whole) which require more preparation.[1] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses, see Shark (disambiguation). ... // Sharks belong to the superorder Selachimorpha in the subclass Elasmobranchii in the class Chondrichthyes. ... R-phrases , , , , S-phrases , , , , , , , , Flash point Non-flammable Related Compounds Related compounds Water Ozone Hydrazine Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a very pale blue liquid which appears colorless in... Cartilage is a type of dense connective tissue. ... Fish anatomy is primarily governed by the physical characteristics of water, which is much denser than air, holds a relatively small amount of dissolved oxygen, and absorbs light more than does air. ... Dorsal fin of an orca A dorsal fin is a fin located on the backs of fishes, whales, dolphins, and porpoises, as well as the (extinct) ichthyosaurs. ...


Shark fins, in common with other costly east Asian delicacies such as Bird's nest soup and sea cucumber, have very little flavor of their own. Their appeal lies more in their texture and their ability to absorb flavors from other soup ingredients, and also for the simple fact of their expense and supposed "rarity", as in many luxury goods.[2] Genera Hydrochous Collocalia Aerodramus Schoutedenapus The birds called Swiftlets or Cave Swiftlets are contained within the four genera of Aerodramus, Hydrochous, Schoutedenapus and the remaining species left in Collocalia. ... Hoi sam is the name given to sea cucumber or sea slugs when used as an ingredient in a number of Chinese cuisines. ... A Lincoln Town Car luxury sedan is an example of a luxury good. ...


There is an imitation version that is usually sold in cans that may be labelled as shark fin soup; it sells for around US$1.50 per bowl and does not contain shark fins, but is instead made of mung bean vermicelli shaped to resemble shark fins. It is not equivalent to genuine shark fin soup in either texture or colour. It is commonly served in chicken broth, with mushrooms and pork to enhance the texture and taste. Also known as bean thread noodles. ...


Market

Shark fins and other shark parts for sale in a Chinese pharmacy
Shark fins and other shark parts for sale in a Chinese pharmacy

Shark fin soup is a popular delicacy in China, and is eaten in Chinese restaurants around the world.[3][4] A survey carried out in China in 2006 by WildAid and the Chinese Wildlife Conservation Association found that 35% of participants said they had consumed shark fin soup in the last year,[3] while 83% of participants in an online survey conducted by the World Wide Fund for Nature, said that they had consumed shark fin soup at some time.[5] In Hong Kong restaurants, where the market has traditionally been strong, demand from Hong Kong natives has reportedly dropped, but this has been more than balanced by an increase in demand from the Chinese mainland,[6] as the economic growth of China has put this expensive delicacy within the reach of a growing middle class.[7] Based on information gathered from the Hong Kong trade in fins, the market is estimated to be growing by 5% a year.[8] The high price of the soup means that is often used as a way to impress guests or at celebrations,[6] 58% of those questioned in the WWF survey said they ate the soup at a celebration or gathering.[5] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 927 KB) Collection of different body parts of sharks, including fins and tongues. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 927 KB) Collection of different body parts of sharks, including fins and tongues. ... WildAid is an organization that seeks to end the illegal trade in wild animals. ... The World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) is an international non-governmental organization for the conservation, research and restoration of the natural environment, formerly named the World Wildlife Fund, which remains its official name in the United States and Canada. ...


A third of all fins imported to Hong Kong come from Europe.[9] Spain is by far the largest supplier, providing between 2000 and 5000 metric tonnes a year.[10][11] Norway supplies 39 metric tonnes, but Britain, France, Portugal and Italy are also major suppliers.[12] Hong Kong handles at least 50% and possibly up to 80% of the world trade in shark fin, with the major suppliers being Europe, Taiwan, Indonesia, Singapore, United Arab Emirates, United States, Yemen, India, Japan, and Mexico.[13]


Controversy

A dried shark fin prepared for cooking
A dried shark fin prepared for cooking

According to wildlife conservationists, much of the trade in sharks' fins is derived from fins cut from living sharks; this process is called finning.[14] Because shark meat is worth very little, the finless and often still-living sharks are thrown back into the sea to make room on board the ship for more of the valuable fins.[14] When returned to the ocean, the finless sharks, unable to move, die from suffocation or are eaten by other sharks or animals. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 274 KB) 中式食品材料天九翅, 是魚翅之一種, 很名貴的. by Sun Tung Lok BOZZ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Shark fin soup ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 274 KB) 中式食品材料天九翅, 是魚翅之一種, 很名貴的. by Sun Tung Lok BOZZ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Shark fin soup ... cheese ... Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ...


However, according to Giam Choo Hoo, the longest serving member of the CITES Animals Committee, "The perception that it is common practice to kill sharks for only their fins - and to cut them off whilst the sharks are still alive - is wrong.... The vast majority of fins in the market are taken from sharks after their death."[15] However, this discounting of an international phenomena is facile, and refuted through extensive examination of fin sourcing and fisheries data as reported by Dr. Shelly Clarke in Ecology Letters The first real-data study of sharks harvested for their valuable fins estimates as few as 26 million and as many as 73 million sharks are killed each year worldwide—three times higher than was reported originally by the United Nations, according to a paper published as the cover story in the October 2006 edition of Ecology Letters. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is an international agreement between Governments, drafted as a result of a resolution adopted in 1963 at a meeting of members of the World Conservation Union (IUCN). ...


Finning of living sharks on an industrial scale does occur and has been witnessed and photographed within the protected marine area of Costa Rica's Cocos Island National Park by the crew of the conservation vessel Ocean Warrior.[16] The practice is featured in the documentary Sharks: Stewards of the Reef which contains footage from W. Australian waters and Central America and also examines the cultural, financial and ecological impacts of shark finning <a www.sharkstewards.com/>. This incident was also recorded by underwater photographer Richard Merritt who has witnessed finning of living sharks in Indonesia where he saw the immobile finless sharks lying still alive on the sea bed under the fishing boat.[17] Finning has been witnessed and filmed within a protected marine area in the Raja Ampat islands of Indonesia.[18]


Finning is vigorously opposed by animal welfare groups; both on moral grounds and also because it is listed as one of the causes for the rapid decline of global shark populations.[14] On the IUCN red list there are 39 species of elasmobranches (sharks and rays) listed as threatened species (Critically Endangered, Endangered or Vulnerable).[19] The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) lists three sharks in Appendix II: the basking shark, the great white shark and the whale shark. Appendix II lists those species that are not in danger of extinction, but which require controls on international trade to maintain their populations. It is estimated that 10–100 million sharks are slaughtered each year for their fins, with a median figure of 38 million.[20] The industry is valued at US$1.2 billion; because of the lucrative profits, there are allegations of links to organized crime.[21][22] They also raise questions on the medical harm from the consumption of high levels of toxic mercury reportedly found in shark fins. Animal welfare is the viewpoint that animals, especially those under human care, should not suffer. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... . ... The Siberian Tiger is a subspecies of tiger that are critically endangered. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name (Gunnerus, 1765) Range (in blue) The basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, is the second largest fish, after the whale shark. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range (in blue) For other uses, see Great White (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Smith, 1828) Range of whale shark The whale shark, Rhincodon typus, is a slow filter feeding shark that is the largest living fish species. ...


Numbers of some shark species have dropped as much as 80% over the last 50 years.[23] Some organizations claim that shark fishing or bycatch (the unintentional capture of species by other fisheries) is the reason for the decline in the populations of some species and that the market for fins has very little impact - bycatch accounts for an estimated 50% of all sharks taken[14] - others that the market for shark fin soup is the main reason for the decline.[23] Tommy Cheung, the legislator representing Hong Kong's catering sector, said: "I don't believe sharks are an endangered species. Some species of shark may be, but not all shark's fin comes from certain species. There are a lot of species that are plentiful."[24] Since many countries do not allow shark finning there is no reliable count for the numbers taken in the shark fin trade and thus it is hard to prove the claims on either side of the argument.[14] Sharks are caught for their fins and meat all over the world.


According to Giam's article, "sharks are caught virtually all parts of the world. Despite the strongly declared objectives of the Fisheries Commission in Brussels, there are very few restrictions on fishing for sharks in European waters. The meat of dogfishes, smoothhounds, catsharks, skates and rays is in high demand by European consumers...The situation in Canada and the United States is similar: the blue shark is sought after as a sport fish while the porbeagle, mako and spiny dogfish are part of the commercial fishery...the truth is this: Sharks will continue to be caught and killed on a wide scale by the more organized and sophisticated fishing nations...targeting shark's fin soup will not stop this accidental catch. The fins from these catches will be thrown away or turned into animal feed and fertilizers if shark's fin soup is shunned."


New laws have been passed to prevent finning; though much of the international waters continue to be unregulated. The United States recently issued a ban on finning, applicable only to U.S.-registered vessels, even in U.S. territorial waters; and shark fins cannot be imported into the USA without entire carcasses. International fishing authorities are in the process of banning shark fishing (and finning) in the Atlantic ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Finning is banned in the Eastern Pacific,[25] but shark fishing and finning continues unabated in the rest of the Pacific and Indian ocean.[14] The terms international waters or trans-boundary waters apply where any of the following types of bodies of water (or their drainage basins) transcend international boundaries: oceans, large marine ecosystems, enclosed or semi-enclosed regional seas and estuaries, rivers, lakes, groundwater systems (aquifers), and wetlands [1]. Oceans and seas, waters... The Atlantic Ocean, not including Arctic and Antarctic regions. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... Pacific redirects here. ... This article is about the water body. ...


Hong Kong Disneyland dropped the dish from its wedding banquet menu after international pressure from environmental groups, who threatened to boycott its parks worldwide despite the high demand for the delicacy in China.[26] The University of Hong Kong has banned shark fin being served on campus.[27] 97% of respondents in the WWF Seafood Awareness survey said if fish species were threatened they would stop eating them (39%) or reduce the amount they ate (58%).[5] The fountain featuring Mickey Mouse in the Park Promenade next to Hong Kong Disneyland Hong Kong Disneyland (traditional Chinese: ) is the first theme park inside the Hong Kong Disneyland Resort, which is owned and managed by the Hong Kong International Theme Parks, an incorporated company jointly owned by The Walt... The University of Hong Kong (HKU ; Chinese: 香港大學; Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2 daai6 hok6; Mandarin Pinyin: ) is the oldest tertiary institution in Hong Kong, China. ...


NBA All-Star Yao Ming pledged to stop eating shark fin soup at a news conference on August 2, 2006. Yao's comments were largely unreported in the Chinese media and drew a reproach from Chinese seafood industry associations. Ironically, one of the items on Yao Ming's wedding dinner menu was shark fin soup.[7][28] Australian naturalist Steve Irwin was known to walk out of Chinese restaurants if he saw shark fin soup on the menu.[29] US basketball player Tracy McGrady reportedly said that he was impressed by the soup when he tried it for the first time, but was criticized by the Hong Kong branch of the WWF for his remark.[30] The Chinese-American chef, Ken Hom, sees double standards from the West, with little being done to protect stocks of cod and caviar-producing sturgeon while there is outcry over shark-finning, but he also stresses the wastefulness of harvesting only the fins.[2] The National Basketball Association (NBA) holds an All-Star Weekend every February, with a variety of basketball-related events, exhibitions, and performances culminating in the NBA All-Star Game held on Sunday night. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Yao (姚) Yao Ming (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (born September 12, 1980, in Shanghai, China) is a Chinese professional basketball player and is arguably the best center in the National Basketball Association (NBA) today. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rugby league footballer of the same name, see Steve Irwin (rugby league). ... Tracy Lamar McGrady, Jr. ... Ken Hom is a notable British celebrity chef. ... COD may refer to many different topics, including: Cash on delivery Completion of discharge, shipping College of DuPage, a public Junior College with campuses in the suburbs of Chicago Call of Duty (series), a series of computer games Canadian Oxford Dictionary Carrier onboard delivery Catastrophic optical damage, a failure mode... For the band of the same name, see Caviar (band). ... Sturgeon is a term for a genus of fish (Acipenser) of which 26 species are known. ...


On September 15, 2007, Malaysia's Natural Resources and Environment Ministry Azmi Khalid banned shark's fin soup from official function menus as commitment to the Malaysian Nature Society (for conservation of sharks species).[31] is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... An official is someone who holds an office (function or mandate, regardless whether it carries an actual working space with it) in an organisation or government and participates in the exercise of authority (either his own or that of his superior and/or employer, public or legally private). ... MENUS is the planet discovered by the scientific called Dr.Sunem who developed the -Neutronic Centre of Desmolecularitazion of Particules- in the Novel Trip to MENUS. A new world ... Malaysian Nature Society (MNS; Persatuan Pencinta Alam Malaysia in Malay) is one of the most prominent environmental not for profit, non-governmental organizations in Malaysia. ... cheese ... Sharks may refer to: sharks Sharks, a group of cartilaginous fishes Cronulla Sharks, an Australian rugby league team East Fremantle Sharks, an Australian rules football team Los Angeles Sharks, a former U.S. ice hockey team Orlando Sharks, a U.S. Indoor Soccer team Sale Sharks, a UK rugby union... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ...


See also

Also known as bean thread noodles. ... Shark cartilage is a popular dietary supplement used to combat and/or prevent a variety of illnesses, most notably cancer. ... Hoi sam is the name given to sea cucumber or sea slugs when used as an ingredient in a number of Chinese cuisines. ... Jia Baoyu (賈寶玉) is the name of one of the principal characters of the classic Chinese novel Dream of the Red Chamber, also known as the Story of the Stone. ... Buddha jumps over the wall (Chinese: 佛跳牆; Pinyin: fó tiào qiáng) is an umbrella term for a type of highly-complex Chinese soup, consisting of many ingredients and requiring one to two days to create. ...

References

  1. ^ Shark's Fin in Chinese Cooking. chinesefood-recipes.com. Retrieved on 6 January, 2007.
  2. ^ a b Ken Hom (2005-06-09). A shark's tale. The Guardian. Retrieved on 8 January, 2006.
  3. ^ a b Laura Marquez (2006-10-30). Decimating Shark Population for Some Soup. ABC News. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  4. ^ Stephen Khan (2006-06-25). Fins for sale. The Independent. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  5. ^ a b c WWF Marine Awareness Survey: Seafood consumption. WWF (2005-10-13). Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  6. ^ a b Yao Ming unlikely to curb China's shark fin appetite. Tapei Times (2006-05-03). Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  7. ^ a b Media silent on shark fin soup affair. The Standard (2006-09-01). Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  8. ^ Julie Chao (2004-05-19). Chinese Taste For Endangered Seafood Growing. Cox News Service. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  9. ^ Shark fisheries and trade in Europe. Shark Alliance. Retrieved on 6 January, 2007.
  10. ^ EU faces shark fin ban call. BBC (2001-06-25). Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  11. ^ Ian Sample (2006-08-31). Sharks pay high price as demand for fins soars. The Guardian. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  12. ^ Steve Connor (2006-08-31). Growth in shark fin trade could lead to species extinction. The Independent. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  13. ^ Sarah Fowler and Dr John A Musick (2006-06-02). Shark Specialist Group Finning Statement. IUCN Shark Specialist Group. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  14. ^ a b c d e f Sharks. WildAid. Retrieved on 6 January, 2007.
  15. ^ Giam Choo Hoo (2006-12-01). Shark's fin soup - eat without guilt. The Straits Times. Retrieved on 6 January, 2007.
  16. ^ Disaster off the coast of the Cocos Islands. Shark Info. Retrieved on 5 December, 2007.
  17. ^ shark conservation. Blue Sphere Media. Retrieved on 5 December, 2007.
  18. ^ 16 January 2007: Encountering Shark Finners inside our Marine Protected Area. Misool Eco Resort. Retrieved on 5 December, 2007.
  19. ^ List of endangered sharks. The Shark Trust. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  20. ^ Nicholas Bakalar (2006-10-12). 38 Million Sharks Killed for Fins Annually, Experts Estimate. National Geographic. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  21. ^ Peter Gastrow (2001). Triad Societies and Chinese Organised Crime in South Africa. Institute for Security Studies. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  22. ^ Geoffrey York (2003-08-27). Shark Soup. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  23. ^ a b Laura Marquez (2006-10-30). Rising Demand For Fins Contributes To Decline In Shark Population, Critics Charge. ABC News. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  24. ^ Disney Hong Kong insists on shark's fin-soup meals. Taipei Times (2005-05-29). Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  25. ^ Shark Finning Banned in Eastern Pacific Ocean. Environment News Service (2005-06-09). Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  26. ^ Chester Yung and Teddy Ng (2005-06-25). Disney ditches shark's fin. The Standard. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  27. ^ Doug Crets and Mimi Lau (2005-11-03). HKU bans shark fin dishes. The Standard. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  28. ^ David Barboza (2006-08-13). Waiter, There’s a Celebrity in My Shark Fin Soup. The New York Times. Retrieved on 8 January, 2006.
  29. ^ Mike Dolan (2006-09-04). Death of the crocodile hunter. The First Post. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  30. ^ Basketball star berated for shark fin dinner. Bangkok Post. Retrieved on 8 January, 2007.
  31. ^ ChannelNewsAsia.com, Malaysian ministry bans shark's fin soup

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

General references

  • Baum J.K., Myers R.A., Kehler D.G., Worm B., Harley S.J., Doherty P.A. (2003) — Collapse and Conservation of Shark Populations in the Northwest Atlantic. Science, 5605: 389–392.

External links

  • Decline of Big Sharks Lets Small Predators Decimate Shellfish, Washington Post. March 2007
  • Triple Threat: World Fin Trade May Harvest up to 73 Million Sharks per Year, research published in Ecology Letters, September 2006
  • Shark Finning Fact sheet
  • Extremists Make Poor Champions of Sharks or of The World
  • In Search of Credibility & Cooperation in Shark Conservation
  • Decimating Shark Population for Some Soup

  Results from FactBites:
 
shark fin soup: Information from Answers.com (1088 words)
Shark fins are the cartilaginous pectoral and dorsal fins of a shark.
Shark fin is the third-most prized ingredient of the four treasures of the sea in Chinese cuisine.
Finning is vigorously opposed by animal welfare groups; both on moral grounds and also because it is purportedly a major cause for the rapid decline of global shark populations, in some cases by 99% over the last 50 years, leading conservation ecologists and fishery experts to predict widespread shark extinction in 10 or 20 years.
Shark Fin Soup - support the ban and stop the killing of sharks worldwide (1299 words)
Shark fin provides gelatinous bulk in shark fin soup, but it has no taste – the soup has to be flavoured with chicken or other stock.
SHARKS around the world, including those in Thai waters, are threatened with unsustainable exploitation due to increasing demand for sharkfin soup and indiscriminate fishing, a wildlife conservation group warned yesterday.
Two of the three major shark fin soup restaurants in the Bangkok area said the campaign has had no effect on their income, while one restaurant at a five-star hotel said that only a few customers had declined to eat the soup, citing the campaign as the reason.
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