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Encyclopedia > Shareholder

A shareholder or stockholder is an individual or company (including a corporation) that legally owns one or more shares of stock in a joint stock company. A company's shareholders collectively own that company. Thus, such companies strive to enhance shareholder value. As commonly used, individual refers to a person or to any specific object in a collection. ... The term company may refer to a separate legal entity, as in English law, or may simply refer to a business, as is the common use in the United States. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... In financial markets, a share is a unit of account for various financial instruments including stocks, mutual funds, limited partnerships, and REITs. ... For other uses, see Stock (disambiguation). ... A joint stock company (JSC) is a type of business partnership in which the capital is formed by the individual contributions of a group of shareholders. ... Shareholder value is a term used in many ways: To refer to the market capitalization of a company (rarely used) To refer to the concept that the primary goal for a company is to enrich its shareholders (owners) by paying dividends and/or causing the stock price to increase To...


Stockholders are granted special privileges depending on the class of stock, including the right to vote (usually one vote per share owned, but sometimes this is not the case) on matters such as elections to the board of directors, the right to propose shareholder resolutions, the right to share in distributions of the company's income, the right to purchase new shares issued by the company, and the right to a company's assets during a liquidation of the company. However, stockholder's rights to a company's assets are subordinate to the rights of the company's creditors. This means that stockholders typically receive nothing if a company is liquidated after bankruptcy (if the company had had enough to pay its creditors, it would not have entered bankruptcy), although a stock may have value after a bankruptcy if there is the possibility that the debts of the company will be restructured. Chairman of the Board redirects here. ... Shareholder resolutions are proposals submitted by stockholders for a vote at the companys annual meeting. ... Liquidation, or winding up, refers to a business whose assets are converted to money in order to pay off debt. ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ...


Stockholders or shareholders are considered by some to be a partial subset of stakeholders, which may include anyone who has a direct or indirect equity interest in the business entity or someone with even a non-pecuniary interest in a non-profit organization. Thus it might be common to call volunteer contributors to an association stakeholders, even though they are not shareholders. “Superset” redirects here. ... A corporate stakeholder is a party who affects, or can be affected by, the companys actions. ... The term business entity refers generally to any organization engaged in business activities, regardless of legal structure. ... A non-profit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes, without concern for monetary profit. ... For other uses, see Volunteer (disambiguation). ... A voluntary association (also sometimes called an unincorporated association, or just an association) is a group of individuals who voluntarily enter into an agreement to form a body (or organization) to accomplish a purpose. ...


Although directors and officers of a company are bound by fiduciary duties to act in the best interest of the shareholders, the shareholders themselves normally do not have such duties towards each other. The court of chancery, which governed fiduciary relations prior to the Judicature Acts The fiduciary duty is a legal relationship between two or more parties, most commonly a fiduciary or trustee and a principal or beneficiary, that in English common law is arguably the most important concept within the portion...


However, in a few unusual cases, some courts have been willing to imply such a duty between shareholders. For example, in California, majority shareholders of closely held corporations have a duty to not destroy the value of the shares held by minority shareholders[1]. Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


The largest shareholders (in terms of percentages of companies owned) are often mutual funds, especially passively managed exchange-traded funds[citation needed]. Exchange-traded funds (or ETFs) are Open Ended investment companies that can be traded at any time throughout the course of the day. ...


See also

a share holder owns a part of the compnay A corporate stakeholder is a party who affects, or can be affected by, the companys actions. ... Corporate governance is the set of processes, customs, policies, laws and institutions affecting the way in which a corporation is directed, administered or controlled. ... It is a meeting, usually annual, of all shareholders of a corporation (although in large corporations only a small percentage attend) to elect the Board of Directors and hear reports on the companys business situation. ... For other uses, see Stock (disambiguation). ... A stock trader or a stock investor is an individual or firm who buys and sells stocks or bonds (and possibly other financial assets) in the financial markets. ...


References

  1. ^ JONES v. H. F. AHMANSON & CO. (1969) 1 C3d 93. California Supreme Court (1969-11-07). Retrieved on 2007-10-10.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Shareholder (243 words)
A shareholder may also be referred to as a stockholder.
They have the potential to profit if the company does well, but that comes with the potential to lose if the company does poorly.
Knowing Your Rights As A Shareholder - We delve into common stock owner's privileges and how to be vigilant in monitoring a company.
Shareholder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (340 words)
A shareholder or stockholder is an individual or company (including a corporation) that legally owns one or more shares of stock in a joint stock company.
Stockholders or shareholders are considered by some to be a partial subset of stakeholders, which may include anyone who has a direct or indirect equity interest in the business entity or someone with even a non-pecuniary interest in a non-profit organization.
For example, in California, majority shareholders of closely held corporations have a duty to not destroy the value of the shares held by minority shareholders.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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