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Encyclopedia > Share (finance)
Securities

Securities
Bond
Equities
Investment Fund
Derivatives
Structured finance
Agency Securities
Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... Voting interest in business and accounting is a percentage of voting stock owned. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... For security (collateral), the legal right given to a creditor by a borrower, see security interest A security is a fungible, negotiable instrument representing financial value. ... Image File history File links Vereinigte_Ostindische_Compagnie_bond. ... For alternative meanings, see bond (a disambiguation page). ... Ownership equity, commonly known simply as equity, also risk or liable capital, is a financial term for the difference between a companys assets and liabilities -- that is, the value that accrues to the owners (sole proprieter, partners, or shareholders). ... Funds financial information A collective investment scheme is a way of investing money with a large number of people to participate in a wider range of investments that may not be feasible for an individual investor hence many investors share the costs of doing so. ... Derivatives traders at the Chicago Board of Trade. ... Structured finance describes any non-standard way of raising money. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Markets
Bond market
Stock market
Futures market
Foreign exchange market
Commodity market
Spot market
Over-the-counter Market (OTC) The bond market, also known as the debit, credit, or fixed income market, is a financial market where participants buy and sell debt securities usually in the form of bonds. ... A stock market is a market for the trading of company stock, and derivatives of same; both of these are securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. ... A futures contract is a form of forward contract, a contract to buy or sell an asset of any kind at a pre-agreed future point in time, that has been standardised for a wide range of uses. ... The foreign exchange (currency or forex or FX) market exists wherever one currency is traded for another. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Template:The Spot Market The Spot Market or Cash Marketis a commodities or securities market in which goods are sold for cash and delivered immediately. ... Over-the-counter (OTC) trading is to trade financial instruments such as stocks, bonds, commodities or derivatives directly between two parties. ...

Bonds by coupon
Fixed rate bond
Floating rate note
Zero coupon bond
Inflation-indexed bond
Commercial paper
Perpetual bond
In finance, a fixed rate bond is a bond with a fixed coupon (interest) rate, as opposed to a floating rate note. ... Floating rate notes (FRNs) are bonds that have a variable coupon, equal to a money market reference rate, like LIBOR or federal funds rate, plus a spread. ... Zero coupon bonds are bonds which do not pay periodic coupons, or so-called interest payments. ... Inflation-indexed bonds (also known as linkers) are bonds whose principal are indexed to inflation, cutting out inflation risk. ... Commercial paper is a money market security issued by large banks and corporations. ... A perpetual bond, which is also known as a Perpetual or just a Perp, is a bond with no maturity date. ...

Bonds by issuer
Corporate bond
Government bond
Municipal bond
Sovereign bonds
A corporate bond is a bond issued by a corporation. ... A government bond is a bond issued by a national government denominated in the countrys own currency. ... In the United States, a municipal bond or muni is a bond issued by a state, city or other local government, or their agencies. ... A sovereign bond is a bond issued by a national government as opposed to a municipal bond which is issued by a subdivision of a national government. ...

Equities (Stocks)
Stock
Share
IPO
Short Selling
For other uses, see Stock (disambiguation). ... “IPO” redirects here. ... In finance, short selling or shorting is a way to profit from the decline in price of a security, such as stock or a bond. ...

Investment Funds
Mutual fund
Index Fund
Exchange-traded fund (ETF)
Closed-end fund
Segregated fund
This article deals with U.S. mutual funds. ... An index fund or index tracker is a collective investment scheme that aims to replicate the movements of an index of a specific financial market, or a set of rules of ownership that are held constant, regardless of market conditions. ... Exchange-traded funds (or ETFs) are open-ended investment companies that can be traded at any time throughout the course of the day. ... A closed-end fund is a collective investment scheme with a limited number of shares. ... Segregated Funds are a classification of funds administered by an insurance company in the form of individual, variable life insurance contracts offering certain guarantees to the policyholder such as reimbursement of capital upon death. ...

Structured Finance
Securitization
Asset-backed security
Collateralized debt obligation
Collateralized mortgage obligation
Credit-linked note
Mortgage-backed security
Commercial mortgage-backed security
Residential mortgage-backed security
Unsecured bond
Agency Securities
This article is about securitization in finance. ... An asset-backed security is a type of bond or note that is based on pools of assets, or collateralized by the cash flows from a specified pool of underlying assets. ... Collateralized debt obligations (CDOs) are a type of asset-backed security or structured finance product. ... A Collateralized Mortgage Obligation (CMO) is a type of Mortgage Backed Security, which has been divided up into tranches. ... A credit linked note is a form of funded credit derivative. ... In finance, a mortgage-backed security (MBS) is an asset-backed security whose cash flows are backed by the principal and interest payments of a set of mortgage loans. ... Commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS) are a type of bond commonly issued in American security markets. ... Residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) are a type of bond commonly issued in American security markets. ... Unsecured debt is a financial term that refers to any type of debt that is not collateralized by any specified assets in the event of default. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Derivatives
Options
Warrants
Futures
Forwards
Swaps
Credit Derivatives
Hybrid Securities
In finance options are types of derivative contracts, including call options and put options, where the future payoffs to the buyer and seller of the contract are determined by the price of another security, such as a common stock. ... For other uses of the term Warrant, see Warrant (disambiguation) In finance, a warrant is a security that entitles the holder to buy stock of the company that issued it at a specified price, which is much higher than the stock price at time of issue. ... In finance, a futures contract is a standardized contract, traded on a futures exchange, to buy or sell a certain underlying instrument at a certain date in the future, at a specified price. ... A forward contract is an agreement between two parties to buy or sell an asset (which can be of any kind) at a pre-agreed future point in time. ... For the Thoroughbred horse racing champion, see: Swaps (horse). ... // A credit derivative is a financial instrument or derivative (finance) whose price and value derives from the creditworthiness of the obligations of a third party, which is isolated and traded. ... Definition A hybrid security, as the name implies, is a security that combines two or more different financial instruments. ...

In financial markets, a share is a unit of account for various financial instruments including stocks, mutual funds, limited partnerships, and REIT's. In British English, use of the word shares in the plural to refer to stock is so common that it almost replaces the word stock itself. And especially in American English, the plural stocks is widely used instead of shares, in other words to refer to the stock (or perhaps originally stock certificates) of even a single company. Traditionalist demands that the plural stocks be used to refer only to stock of more than one company are rarely heard nowadays. Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... A unit of account is a standard numerical unit of measurement for the market value of goods, services, and other transactions. ... For other uses, see Stock (disambiguation). ... This article deals with U.S. mutual funds. ... A limited partnership is a form of partnership similar to a general partnership, except that in addition to one or more general partners (GPs), there are one or more limited partners (LPs). ... // A Real Estate Investment Trust or REIT (rēt, rhymes with treat) is a tax designation for a corporation investing in real estate that reduces or eliminates corporate income taxes. ... British English (BrE, BE, en-GB) is the broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in the United Kingdom from forms used elsewhere in the Anglophone world. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ...


The income received from shares is called a dividend, and a person who owns shares is called a shareholder. It has been suggested that ex-dividend date be merged into this article or section. ... A shareholder or stockholder is an individual or company (including a corporation) that legally owns one or more shares of stock in a joint stock company. ...


A share is one of a finite number of equal portions in the capital of a company, entitling the owner to a proportion of distributed, non-reinvested profits known as dividends and to a portion of the value of the company in case of liquidation. Shares can be voting or non-voting, meaning they either do or do not carry the right to vote on the board of directors and corporate policy. Whether this right exists often affects the value of the share. Voting and Non-Voting shares are also known as Class A and B shares. It has been suggested that ex-dividend date be merged into this article or section. ... Winding up redirects here. ... Vote redirects here. ...

See also

A mutual organization (or society) is a cooperative organization (which is often, but not always, a company or business) based on the principle of mutuality. ...

External links

  • Oldest share—the oldest share in the world (Voc 1606)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Share (finance) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (190 words)
A share is one of a finite number of equal portions in the capital of a company, entitling the owner to a proportion of distributed, non-reinvested profits known as dividends and to a portion of the value of the company in case of liquidation.
Shares can be voting or non-voting, meaning they either do or do not carry the right to vote on the board of directors and corporate policy.
A share entitling to 1/8 of the Stora Kopparberg copper mine.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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