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Encyclopedia > Shannon Airport
Shannon International Airport
Aerfort na Sionnainne

IATA: SNN – ICAO: EINN
Summary
Airport type Commercial
Operator Dublin Airport Authority
Serves Shannon, County Clare
Elevation AMSL 46 ft / 14 m
Coordinates 52°42′N, 8°55′W
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
06/24 10,496 3,200 Asphalt
13/31 5,642 1,720 Asphalt

Shannon International Airport (IATA: SNN, ICAO: EINN), or Aerfort na Sionna in Irish is one of Ireland's primary three airports (along with Dublin Airport and Cork Airport). It is the second busiest airport in the Republic of Ireland (after Dublin) with 3.62 million passengers in 2007. The airport is located in Shannon, County Clare, around 24 km (15 mi) from Ennis and 25 km (16 mi) from Limerick City. An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ... Dublin Airport Authority plc (known until 1st October 2004 as Aer Rianta cpt1) is the state owned airport authority in the Republic of Ireland. ... The term above mean sea level (AMSL) refers to the elevation (on the ground) or altitude (in the air) of any object, relative to the average sea level. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... The term asphalt is often used as an abbreviation for asphalt concrete. ... An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ... Private spiral ramp access to the main terminal building of Dublin (Áth Cliath) Airport Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. ... Cork Airport, (Irish: Aerfort Chorcaí) (IATA: ORK, ICAO: EICK) is one of the three principal international airports in the Republic of Ireland (along with Dublin and Shannon). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52. ... For people named Ennis, see Ennis (surname). ... This article is about the city in Ireland. ...


The largest operator at the airport is low-fares airline Ryanair, which will base a total of five aircraft at the airport in 2008 operating over 30 routes during the summer season. Around 60% of passengers at Shannon travel on Ryanair. The airport has U.S. border preclearance services, enabling US Bound passengers to have their paperwork dealt with before their flight, saving time upon arrival. Dublin and Shannon are the only two European airports with such facililties. Ryanair (ISEQ: RYA, LSE: RYA, NASDAQ: RYAAY) is an Irish airline headquartered in Dublin, with its biggest operational base at London Stansted Airport in the UK. It is Europes largest low-cost carrier and is one of the worlds largest and most successful airlines (whether in terms of... The United States maintains border preclearance facilities at a number of ports and airports in foreign countries. ...


The airport has the longest runway in Ireland, and was used as a training airfield for Concorde. The airport continues to be used regularly for training purposes by several airlines, and is listed as an emergency landing site for the NASA Space Shuttle. [1] [2] For other uses, see Concorde (disambiguation). ... This article is about the space vehicle. ...

Contents

History

In the late 1930s, transatlantic air traffic was dominated by Flying Boats and the 'European Terminal' was at Foynes on the south side of the Shannon Estuary. However, it was realised that changing technology would require a runway and airport. The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the [[. In East Asia, the rise of militarism occurred. ... Boeing 314 A flying boat is an aircraft that is designed to take off and land on water, in particular a type of seaplane which uses its fuselage as a floating hull (instead of pontoons mounted below the fuselage). ... Foynes (Faing in Irish) is a small town and major port in County Limerick in the midwest of Ireland, located at the edge of hilly land on the southern bank of the Shannon Estuary. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In 1936 the Irish Government confirmed that it would develop a 760 acre (3.1 km²) site at Rineanna for the country's first transatlantic airport. Allegations persist that the placement of the airport on the North bank of the Shannon river rather than the South close to where the Foynes terminal was established was due to the fact that the then Taoiseach (Prime Minister) Eamon DeValera represented Clare (on the North bank) in the Dail (Irish Parliament) and the subsequent jobs created during the construction phase and in the operation of the facility would benefit the Taoiseach's constituents and assist in increasing his vote in any election. The Government (Irish: ) [ral̪ˠt̪ˠəs̪ˠ n̪ˠə heːɼən̪ˠ] is the cabinet that exercises executive authority in the Republic of Ireland. ... The Taoiseach (IPA: , phonetic: TEE-shock — plural: Taoisigh ( or ), also referred to as An Taoiseach [1], is the head of government or prime minister of the Republic of Ireland . ... Eamon de Valera (born Edward George de Valera, Irish name Éamonn de Bhailéara (October 14, 1882 – August 29, 1975), was an Irish politician, best known as a leader of Irelands struggle for independence from Britain in the early 20th Century, and the Republican anti-Treaty opposition in the... Dáil Éireann is the lower house of the Oireachtas (parliament) of the Republic of Ireland1. ... This article is about the legislature abolished in 1801. ...


The land on which the airport was to be built was boggy, and on October 8, 1936 work began to drain the land. By 1942 a serviceable airport had been established, named Shannon Airport. By 1945 the existing runways at Shannon were extended to allow transatlantic flights to land. When World War II ended the airport was ready to be used by the many new post-war commercial airlines of Europe and North America. On September 16, 1945 the first transatlantic proving flight, a Pan Am DC-4, landed at Shannon from New York. On October 24, the first scheduled commercial flight passed through Shannon Airport. It was a Douglas DC-4 which belonged to American Overseas Airlines. Trans World Airways (TWA), Pan American Airways (Pan Am) and BOAC (British Overseas Airways Corporation) also began operations in 1945. is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Pan Ams seaplane terminal at Dinner Key in Miami, Florida, was a hub of inter-American travel during the 1930s and 1940s. ... The designation DC-4 was used by Douglas Aircraft Company when developing the DC-4E as a large, four-engined type to complement its forthcoming DC-3 design. ... This article is about the state. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The designation DC-4 was used by Douglas Aircraft Company when developing the DC-4E as a large, four-engined type to complement its forthcoming DC-3 design. ... American Overseas Airlines (AOA) was an airline that flew between the USA and Europe between 1945 and 1950. ... The Twa, also known as Batwa, are a pygmy people who were the oldest recorded inhabitants of the Great Lakes region of central Africa. ... Pan Ams seaplane terminal at Dinner Key in Miami, Florida, was a hub of inter-American travel during the 1930s and 1940s. ... After technical problems with the Comet, BOAC resumed jet service with imported Boeing 707s. ...


The number of international carriers rose sharply in succeeding years as Shannon became well known as the gateway between Europe and the Americas. Limitation of aircraft range necessitated refuelling stops on many journeys. Shannon became the most convenient and obvious stopping point before and after the trip across the Atlantic. In 1947 the Customs Free Airport Act established Shannon as the world's first Duty Free Airport, where transit and embarking passengers were exempt from normal customs procedures. Shannon became a model for other Duty Free facilities throughout the world. In the same year, the airport was finally completed. World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... This article is about a tax measure. ...


In 1947 Aer Lingus decided to begin its own transatlantic service. Five Lockheed Constellation aircraft were delivered with the inaugural flight due to take place on March 17, 1948. However financial difficulties and the election of a new government in Ireland meant the plan had to be dropped. Over the next ten years even more new airlines and aircraft still continued to operate out of Shannon. In 1958 Aer Lingus finally began services to the United States using Lockheed Constellations. Aer Lingus is the flag carrier of Ireland. ... The Lockheed Constellation, affectionately known as the “Connie”, was a four-engine propeller-driven airliner built by Lockheed between 1943 and 1958 at its Burbank, California, USA, facility. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aer Lingus is the flag carrier of Ireland. ... The Lockheed Constellation, affectionately known as the “Connie”, was a four-engine propeller-driven airliner built by Lockheed between 1943 and 1958 at its Burbank, California, USA, facility. ...


The 1960s proved to be a tough decade for Shannon Airport. Transit traffic fell sharply as there was no longer the need for planes crossing the Atlantic to re-fuel at Shannon because they could now reach their European destinations non-stop with longer-range jets. Alitalia, Sabena, Lufthansa and KLM all ended their transit stops at Shannon. However, while some airlines were ending their Shannon services Aer Lingus expanded its transatlantic routes with Boeing 720s and later Boeing 707 aircraft. Airbus A321-100 lands at London Heathrow airport Alitalia - Linee Aeree Italiane (Italian for Alitalia - Italian Air Lines) (BIT: AZA10) is the flag carrier airline of Italy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Deutsche Lufthansa AG (ISIN: DE0008232125) (pronounced ) is the largest airline in Europe in terms of overall passengers carried (second is Air France - KLM), and the flag carrier of Germany. ... KLM can also refer to KLM (Human Computer Interaction) KLM Royal Dutch Airlines (Dutch: Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij, literally Royal Aviation Company; usual English: Royal Dutch Airlines) is an airline subsidiary of Air France-KLM based in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ... Aer Lingus is the flag carrier of Ireland. ... Pan Am 707 The Boeing 707 is a four engined commercial passenger jet aircraft developed by Boeing in the early 1950s. ... The Boeing 707 is an American four-engine commercial passenger jet airliner developed by Boeing in the early 1950s. ...


In 1969 it was announced that Aer Rianta would be given responsibility for Shannon Airport as well as for Cork Airport. Passenger numbers at the airport reached 460,000 that same year and it was decided that a new enlarged terminal would have to be built. Introduction of the Boeing 747 Jumbo Jet also meant that better facilities were needed. The first commercial operation of a Boeing 747 took place in April 1971 while the new terminal officially opened in May of that year. Dublin Airport Authority plc (known until 1st October 2004 as Aer Rianta cpt1) is the state owned airport authority in the Republic of Ireland. ... Cork Airport, (Irish: Aerfort Chorcaí) (IATA: ORK, ICAO: EICK) is one of the three principal international airports in the Republic of Ireland (along with Dublin and Shannon). ... The Boeing 747, sometimes nicknamed the Jumbo Jet,[4][5] is a long-haul, widebody commercial airliner manufactured by Boeing in the United States. ... The Boeing 747, sometimes nicknamed the Jumbo Jet,[4][5] is a long-haul, widebody commercial airliner manufactured by Boeing in the United States. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ...


In 1974 a major increase in fuel prices had a dramatic effect on transit traffic. Pan Am ended all its scheduled operations at Shannon. It did however continue charter services through the airport. Other airlines also pulled out of Shannon. Pan Ams seaplane terminal at Dinner Key in Miami, Florida, was a hub of inter-American travel during the 1930s and 1940s. ...


The 1980s saw a number of new airlines arrive at Shannon. Aeroflot of Russia used the airport as a fuel stop while Delta Air Lines began new services to Atlanta and New York. In 1986 a US Immigration pre-clearance facility was opened at Shannon, thus cutting down on the time spent queueing on arrival in the United States. 1986 saw Pan Am return to Shannon operating scheduled services. JSC Aeroflot - Russian Airlines (Russian: ) (MICEX:AFLT RTS:AFLT), or Aeroflot (Russian: ) as the airline is commonly known, is the Russian flag carrier and the largest airline in Russia. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... This article is about the state. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Pan Ams seaplane terminal at Dinner Key in Miami, Florida, was a hub of inter-American travel during the 1930s and 1940s. ...


Recent Years

In 2004, a separate airport authority for Shannon, the Shannon Airport Authority, was set up in shadow form. Under the State Airports Act 2004, this company must prepare a business plan for Shannon Airport before taking over operation of the airport (from Dublin Airport Authority) not earlier than May 2005. Dublin Airport Authority plc (known until 1st October 2004 as Aer Rianta cpt1) is the state owned airport authority in the Republic of Ireland. ...

Shannon Airport taken from an Aer Lingus plane.
Shannon Airport taken from an Aer Lingus plane.

On 27 September 2006 an Airbus A380 landed at Shannon as part of its testing prior to commercial launch making Shannon one of the first airports in the world to have facilitated the aircraft. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Airbus A380 is a double-deck, wide-body, four-engine airliner manufactured by the European corporation Airbus, an EADS subsidiary. ...


During 2006 passenger numbers increased to 3.7 million, a record level for the airport and a 12% increase on the 2005 total of 3.3 million. Freight carried increased by 5% in 2006, a reversal of the previous downward trend in freight throughput at the airport. Transatlantic traffic increased 10% during the year, a significant increase on the 2005 increase of 1%.


In August 2007, Aer Lingus announced it was to end its 4 daily direct flights from Shannon to London Heathrow Airport. The airline will use these Heathrow slots to serve its new hub at Belfast International Airport. The move promoted considerable controversy, as recorded in the Irish media. [3] Heathrow redirects here. ... BFS redirects here. ...


This will leave Ryanair as the only airline operating direct flights from the airport to London. However, as of February 2008, CityJet provides a twice daily service to Paris-Charles de Gaulle, maintaining worldwide transfer connectivity from Shannon. Ryanair (ISEQ: RYA, LSE: RYA, NASDAQ: RYAAY) is an Irish airline headquartered in Dublin, with its biggest operational base at London Stansted Airport in the UK. It is Europes largest low-cost carrier and is one of the worlds largest and most successful airlines (whether in terms of... CityJet is an airline based in Dublin, Ireland. ...


In 2007 Delta Airlines also announced that they are to recommence the Atlanta service from the airport. Delta Air Lines (NYSE: DAL) is an airline based in Atlanta, Georgia, operating a large domestic network within the USA, as well as an international network that spans Europe, Asia, and Latin America. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ...


The "Shannon Stopover"

The United States - Ireland bilateral or Air Services Agreement requires that air carriers operating between the United States and Ireland must provide capacity into Dublin Airport and Shannon. The rule came from the days when aircraft did not have a long range and were forced to stop at Shannon. The rule used to require a stop in both directions but was relaxed to require one direct Shannon flight for each direct Dublin flight. Accordingly some services are operated US-Dublin-Shannon-US. A similar bilateral rule exists between Ireland and Canada. There are exceptions for some charter services. A bilateral Air Transport Agreement (also sometimes called a bilateral Air Service Agreement) is an agreement which two nations sign to allow civil aviation between their territories. ... Private spiral ramp access to the main terminal building of Dublin (Áth Cliath) Airport Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. ...


The first Air Services Agreement with the US in 1945 only permitted flights to Shannon and only permitted Irish airlines to serve Boston, Chicago and New York Idlewild (now JFK). At the end of 1971 the US Civil Aeronautics Board announced that unless US planes were allowed to operate into Dublin Airport they proposed to ban Aer Lingus from landing in New York. This provoked an instant reaction from the Shannon staff. Eventually an agreement was reached which allowed one US carrier to service Dublin Airport through Shannon. TWA was the designated airline. Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Governments have played an important part in shaping air transportation. ... Private spiral ramp access to the main terminal building of Dublin (Áth Cliath) Airport Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. ... Aer Lingus is the flag carrier of Ireland. ... This article is about the state. ... Private spiral ramp access to the main terminal building of Dublin (Áth Cliath) Airport Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. ... The Twa, also known as Batwa, are a pygmy people who were the oldest recorded inhabitants of the Great Lakes region of central Africa. ...


In 1990, the U.S.-Ireland bilateral agreement was changed to allow Irish airlines to serve Los Angeles and additional US airlines to serve Dublin via Shannon. The most recent amendment in 1993 allowed airlines to provide direct transatlantic services to Dublin. For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ...


The Shannon lobby were outraged at the loss of the Stopover Status; however, in reality little has changed. The September 11th terrorist attacks in New York severely threatened the future of Shannon Airport. Aer Lingus and Delta Air Lines reduced their services while other airlines pulled out completely. However, since then a number of additional airlines have started new services, including US Airways and Air Canada. September 11 is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years). ... This article is about the state. ... Aer Lingus is the flag carrier of Ireland. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... US Airways is a low-cost carrier[2][3] owned by US Airways Group, Inc. ... Air Canada (TSX: AC.A, TSX: AC.B) is Canadas largest airline and flag carrier. ...


A dispute with the European Commission is holding up any further renegotiation of the bilateral agreements, since in their consultation document on the "third package" for liberalisation of air transport the Commission proposes (at point 33) the removal of existing prohibitions on non-Irish EU airlines from operating transatlantic services in accordance with judgements of the European Court of Justice. It is also believed the Commission requires the "Shannon stopover" to be fully removed rather than further relaxed, because of the Commission's desire (at point 34) to take over negotiations with non-EU countries as it does in other areas of trade, which would remove the stopover as a matter for the Irish Government to control directly. Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... Official emblem of the ECJ The Court of Justice of the European Communities, usually called the European Court of Justice (ECJ), is the highest court in the European Union (EU). ...


Politicians, unions and business groups in the Shannon area believe the EU Commission would use its mandate to sacrifice the Shannon stop, fearing most existing services would relocate to Dublin if not required to serve Shannon. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] The powerful Dublin Chamber of Commerce called for the end of the stopover in 2003. Aer Lingus, Ireland's sole scheduled transatlantic carrier as of 2005, is in favour of air service liberalisation, believing that the ability to serve more US markets would be more advantageous to its future than the current regime. Chambers of commerce are business advocacy groups which are usually not associated with government. ... Aer Lingus is the flag carrier of Ireland. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On November 11, 2005 an agreement was reached between Norman Mineta, the United States Secretary of Transportation and Martin Cullen, the Irish Minister of Transport regarding a transitional deal beginning in November 2006 and ending in April 2008 which eliminates restriction on cargo services and for passenger services reduces the stopover requirement and increases the number of US ports Irish airlines can serve by three. At the end of this period, no restrictions will be placed on scheduled services between any airport in one country to any airport in the other. is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Norman Yoshio Mineta (born November 12, 1931) is a United States politician of the Democratic Party. ... The United States Secretary of Transportation is the head of the United States Department of Transportation. ... Martin Cullen (born 2 November 1954) is a senior Irish Fianna Fáil politician. ... The Minister for Transport is the senior minister at the Department of Transport (An Roinn Iompair) in the Irish Government. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


In March 2007 the EU and USA announced that an agreement had been reached on an open skies aviation policy, which will come into effect from March 30th 2008. This will effectively lead to the complete abolition of the Shannon Stopover from this date. However, as part of the transitional deal agreed between Ireland and the United States on November 11th 2005, the restriction on cargo services is abolished and the restriction on passenger services reduces from a 1/1 basis to a 1/3 basis with immediate effect, and the number of US ports Irish airlines can serve increases by three. This situation will remain in place until March 30th 2008. So far, American Airlines and Air Canada have pulled out of Shannon as a result of the ending of the stopover. American Airlines flew from Boston (2005-2006) and Chicago (2006-2007). Air Canada served Toronto. Continental Airlines and Delta Air Lines have also reduced their operations at the airport with Continental re-routing one of the two daily flights to Newark to Dublin and Delta reducing its Atlanta flight to a seasonal basis. On 10th March 2008 Aer Lingus warned that, due to poor load factors on its winter transatlantic flights it may have no option but to reduce the services to Boston, Chicago and New York to summer only in the future. American Airlines, Inc. ... Air Canada (TSX: AC.A, TSX: AC.B) is Canadas largest airline and flag carrier. ...


Foreign military aircraft at Shannon

Shannon Airport also has a history of foreign military use. A large part of its business is military stopovers, currently almost all American; however the airport was also frequently used by the Soviet military until the 1990s. There were some official restrictions, such as no weaponry being allowed and uniformed foreign soldiers remaining out of public areas. However they were rarely enforced, and uniformed U.S. soldiers can be seen occasionally in the public areas of the airport[citation needed]. Shannon saw military transports throughout the Cold War and during both Gulf Wars. Recently the airport has been the subject of protests, direct actions and High Court actions over such usage. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... There have been three conflicts in the late 20th century and early 21st century called Persian Gulf War or The Gulf War, all of which refer to conflicts in the Persian Gulf region: Iran-Iraq War (1980–1988) (aka First Persian Gulf War). ... For the Canadian urban guerrilla group Direct Action, see Squamish Five. ...


In April 2003 the High Court noted in Horgan v Ireland that for Ireland to be a Neutral Power under international law, it must prevent "belligerents from making use of neutral territories and neutral resources for their military purposes". The Irish Government however expressly invited the United States to use Ireland's airports and airspace for its "long campaign against terrorism", waiving all previous restrictions regarding foreign military aircraft. The provisions of Bunreacht na hÉireann (Constitution of Ireland) which affirm Ireland's commitment to the rule of international law were stated by the government as being only "aspirational". The High Court of the Republic of Ireland is a court which deals at first instance with the most serious and important civil and criminal cases, and also acts as a court of appeal for civil cases in the Circuit Court. ... A neutral country takes no side in a war between other parties, and in return hopes to avoid being attacked by either of them. ... The Constitution of Ireland (Irish: Bunreacht na hÉireann)[1] is the founding legal document of the state known today both as Ireland and as the Republic of Ireland. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


A further High Court judicial review (Dubsky vs Ireland) relating to Shannon Airport and the U.S.-led attack against Afghanistan was heard in February 2005. After much delay, Mrs. Justice Fidelma Macken (since appointed to the Supreme Court) re-scheduled judgement for December 13, 2005. She turned down the legal challenge. Though her written judgement is still not available, the judge did say this in court: "I have found that on the current materials before the court that the applicant has not satisfied me that the events occurring in Afghanistan constitute a war for purposes of Article 28.3.1." Judicial review is the power of a court to review the actions of public sector bodies in terms of their legality or constitutionality. ... The Supreme Court (Irish: Chúirt Uachtarach) is the highest judicial authority in the Republic of Ireland. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On 29th January 2003 an Irishwoman, Mary Kelly, took an axe to the nosecone and fuel lines of a US Navy jet. After her arrest and trial she was acquitted by a jury (arguably a case of jury nullification) however the Irish Director of Public Prosecutors sought a retrial in a higher court. A group of Catholic Worker activists to become known as the Pitstop Ploughshares were tried in March 2005 for damaging a United States Navy C-40 Clipper aircraft at the airport in February 2003 but the trial was stopped by Judge Frank MacDonnell on the sixth day for reasons the media were ordered not to disclose. A second trial beginning in October 2005 was ended without a verdict on the tenth day due to links between the trial judge, Donagh MacDonagh, and President of the United States George W. Bush. The third trial ended on July 25, 2006 with an acquittal for all five defendants on all charges. Jury nullification refers to a rendering of a not guilty verdict by a trial jury, disagreeing with the instructions by the judge concerning what is the law, or whether such law is applicable to the case, taking into account all of the evidence presented. ... The Catholic Worker Movement is a Catholic organization founded by the Servant of God Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin in 1933. ... The Pitstop Ploughshares are a group of five pacifist Catholic Worker members who made their way into Shannon Airport and disarmed a US Navy war plane in the early hours of 3 February 2003. ... ← - 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in March • 31 – Terri Schiavo • 30 – Mitch Hedberg • 29 – Johnnie Cochran • 27 – Wilfred Bigelow • 26 – Paul Hester • 26 – James Callaghan • 21 – Jeff Weise • 21 – Bobby Short • 19 – John De Lorean • 18 – Gary Bertini • 17 – George F... USN redirects here. ... A C-40B VIP transport taking off. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in October 28: Richard Smalley 26: Emil Kyulev 24: José Azcona del Hoyo 24: Rosa Parks 23: Stella Obasanjo 22: Liam Lawlor 22: Shirley Horn 20: Endon Mahmood 17: Ba Jin 10: Milton Obote 7: Charles... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Financial figures released in April 2005 show that the airport lost €2.5m, whilst the transport of US troops made an income of €18m for the airport. In May 2005 the Minister for Transport revealed that the state pays the €10m annual cost to air-traffic control due to US military aircraft in Irish airspace [7], under the Eurocontrol agreement. During 2005, over 330,000 US troops stopped over at Shannon en route to or from Afghanistan or Iraq, leading to concern [8] in Ireland about this apparent breach of its policy of neutrality. EUROCONTROL is the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation, an international organisation whose primary objective is the development of a seamless, pan-European Air Traffic Management (ATM) system. ... Irish neutrality has been a policy of the Irish Free State and its successor, Ireland, since independence from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in 1922. ...


Rendition flights

On 6 December 2005, the BBC programme Newsnight alleged that Shannon was used on at least 33 occasions by United States Central Intelligence Agency flights, thought to be part of a US policy called extraordinary rendition, referring to the non-judicial transfers of prisoners to other jurisdictions, including those where interrogation routinely uses torture. The New York Times reported the number to be 33, though referring to "Ireland" rather than Shannon, while Amnesty International has alleged the number of flights to be 50, a figure they published in response to Irish Minister for Foreign Affairs Dermot Ahern, who had pledged to investigate rendition if presented with evidence. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Newsnight is a British daily news analysis, current affairs and politics programme broadcast between 22:40 and 23:20 on weekdays on BBC Two. ... CIA redirects here. ... Extraordinary rendition and irregular rendition are terms used to describe the extrajudicial transfer of a person from one state to another with the intent of legally torturing them outside of the jurisdiction of a state which prohibits it. ... For other uses, see Torture (disambiguation). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Amnesty international Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization which defines its mission as to undertake research and action focused on preventing and ending grave abuses of the rights to physical and mental integrity, freedom of conscience... The Minister for Foreign Affairs is the senior minister at the Department of Foreign Affairs (An Roinn Gnóthaí Eachtracha) in the Irish Government. ... Dermot Ahern (born 2 February 1955) is a senior Irish Fianna Fáil politician who currently serves as the Minister for Foreign Affairs. ...


United States Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice denied [9] that the US transfers prisoners knowing that they will be tortured. Her statement (transcript) included the following: The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ...

The United States does not transport, and has not transported, detainees from one country to another for the purpose of interrogation using torture. The United States does not use the airspace or the airports of any country for the purpose of transporting a detainee to a country where he or she will be tortured. The United States has not transported anyone, and will not transport anyone, to a country when we believe he will be tortured. Where appropriate, the United States seeks assurances that transferred persons will not be tortured.

However, Rice refuses to give confirm or deny reports of secret detention facilities. A week earlier, Dr. Rice assured Foreign Minister Ahern that the airport had not been used for "untoward" purposes, or as a transit point for terror suspects.


Allegations of State Aid

The Irish Sunday Independent newspaper reported in October 2005 that Shannon Airport is the subject of an investigation by the European Commission into incentives given to Ryanair to operate a base at the airport. Incentives provided by State owned airports such as Shannon are mandated by EU legislation to be reported to the Commission by the Irish Department of Transport. A similar case is ongoing in the European Courts regarding a deal between Ryanair and Brussels South Charleroi Airport in Wallonia (Belgium). The Sunday Independent is a broadsheet Sunday newspaper published in the Republic of Ireland by Independent News and Media plc. ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... Ryanair (ISEQ: RYA, LSE: RYA, NASDAQ: RYAAY) is an Irish airline headquartered in Dublin, with its biggest operational base at London Stansted Airport in the UK. It is Europes largest low-cost carrier and is one of the worlds largest and most successful airlines (whether in terms of... The Minister for Transport is the chief person at the Department of Transport in the Irish Government. ... Charleroi Brussels South, also called Brussels South Airport or Brussels South Charleroi Airport (BSCA), is located near Charleroi, 46 km from central Brussels, Belgium. ... Wallonia (French: Wallonie, German: Wallonien, Walloon: Walonreye, Dutch: Wallonië) or the Walloon Region (French: Région Wallonne, Dutch: Waals Gewest) is the predominantly French-speaking region that constitutes one of the three federal regions of Belgium, with its capital at Namur. ...


Facilities

The current airport terminal was opened in the year 1999 by the then Minister of Transport Mary O'Rourke. This facility has 40 check-in desks, 5 baggage belts, 16 boarding gates and 9 air-bridges.There are nearly 40 aircraft parking stands. The car-parks can hold over 5000 cars. As mentioned above, the airport expects to have full US Customs and Border Protection facilities by the end of 2008.


Ground Transportation

Shannon Airport is the end destination of the N19 national route, which connects to the N18 LimerickEnnisGalway route. A new dual-carriageway section of the N19 was finished in 2004, bypassing Shannon Town, and a new interchange and dual-carriageway north to Ennis were completed in 2007 on the N18. The N19 road is a National Primary Route in Ireland, connecting from the N18 Limerick–Ennis–Galway road to Shannon Airport. ... A typical Irish road sign in Mullingar, County Westmeath Ireland, both north and south of the border, has an extensive network of roads. ... The N18 road is a National Primary Route in Ireland, connecting the cities of Limerick and Galway. ... For other uses, see Limerick (disambiguation). ... For people named Ennis, see Ennis (surname). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference M300256 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Dáil Éireann: Galway West European Parliament: North-West Dialling Code: 091 Postal District(s): G Area: 50. ... Shannon Town or Shannon (Irish: An tSionna) is located in County Clare and is the only new town in the Republic of Ireland. ... For people named Ennis, see Ennis (surname). ...


Regular bus services connect the airport to Limerick, Ennis and Galway. Like most airports in Ireland, Shannon currently has no rail connection. Recently, discussions took place regarding the possibility of a rail link to Shannon Airport. However, the Irish Government ruled it out due to the high cost which they estimated at €800million. [10] For people named Ennis, see Ennis (surname). ...


Accidents and incidents

On 5 September 1954, KLM Flight 633 from Amsterdam to New York, which was using Shannon as a refueling stop, crashed just after take-off into a mudbank just next to the airport. 28 people on board died. is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... KLM Flight 633 was a passenger flight from Amsterdam to New York. ...


On 14 August, 1958, another KLM Flight also en route from Amsterdam to New York crashed into the Atlantic Ocean, after a refueling stop at Shannon. is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... On the night of August 14, 1958 KLM Flight 607-E, a Super Constellation, named Hugo de Groot, departed Shannon Airport in Ireland for Gander, Newfoundland on its continuation of a transatlantic flight that originated in Amsterdam and was bound for New York. ...


Various minor incidents have led to flights making emergency landings at Shannon, as it is usually the closest airport for flights from eastern North America to western Europe.


Airlines and destinations

Scheduled passenger airlines

  • Air France
    • operated by CityJet (Paris-Charles de Gaulle)
  • Aer Lingus (Boston, Chicago-O'Hare, Dublin, New York-JFK)
  • Centralwings (Katowice, Warsaw)
  • Continental Airlines (Newark)
  • Delta Air Lines (Atlanta [seasonal], New York-JFK)
  • Ryanair (Alicante, Berlin-Schonefeld [begins 30 May], Biarritz, Birmingham, Bristol, Brussels-Charleroi, Carcassonne, East Midlands, Edinburgh, Faro, Fuertuventura, Girona, Glasgow-Prestwick, Kaunas, Krakow, Leeds-Bradford, Liverpool, London-Gatwick, London-Luton, London-Stansted, Málaga, Manchester, Milan-Bergamo, Murcia, Nantes, Palma de Mallorca, Paris-Beauvais, Riga, Tenerife-South, Venice-Treviso, Weeze, Wrocław)
  • US Airways (Philadelphia) [seasonal]

Air France (formally Société Air France) is Europes largest airline company. ... CityJet is an airline based in Dublin, Ireland. ... Aer Lingus is the flag carrier of Ireland. ... Centralwings is a low-cost airline based in Łódź, Poland. ... Continental Airlines (NYSE: CAL) is a U.S. certificated air carrier. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... Ryanair (ISEQ: RYA, LSE: RYA, NASDAQ: RYAAY) is an Irish airline headquartered in Dublin, with its biggest operational base at London Stansted Airport in the UK. It is Europes largest low-cost carrier and is one of the worlds largest and most successful airlines (whether in terms of... US Airways is a low-cost carrier[2][3] owned by US Airways Group, Inc. ...

Charter passenger airlines


Details correct as per 2008 Summer Schedule Air Europa Boeing 737-800 landing Boeing 737-85P at Madrid Barajas International Airport Air Europa Líneas Aéreas, S.A. is an airline based in Palma, Majorca, Spain. ... Air Transat is an airline based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, operating scheduled and charter flights and serving 90 destinations in 25 countries. ... Dubrovnik Airline is a charter airline based in Dubrovnik, Croatia. ... Futura Gael is an airline based in Dublin, Ireland, wholly owned by Futura International Airways, operating charter flights to Mediterranean countries, Eastern Europe and Egypt. ... Futura Boeing 737 at Funchal (Madeira) in February 2003. ... Iberworld Airlines is an airline based in Palma de Mallorca, Spain. ... Boeing 757-200 in the old livery, Alicante Airport, Spain. ... Onur Air (Onur Air Taşımacılık AŞ) is an airline based in İstanbul, Turkey. ...


Cargo airlines

  • DHL (East Midlands)
  • TNT (Cork, Dublin, Liege Bierset)
  • UPS (Cologne/Bonn, Dublin) Operated by Star Air Europe
  • Air Contractors Ireland (Dublin, Paris-Charles De Gaulle)

FedEx DC-10 Cargo airlines (or airfreight carriers, and derivatives of these names) are airlines dedicated to the transport of cargo. ... A DHL Boeing 757 at Cologne/Bonn Airport. ... TNT Airways is a cargo and passengers charter airline based in Liege airport, Belgium. ... United Parcel Service, Inc. ... Air Contractors ATR-72 Air Contractors is a freight airline based in Dublin, Ireland. ...

External links

Aviation Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ...

References

Cork Airport, (Irish: Aerfort Chorcaí) (IATA: ORK, ICAO: EICK) is one of the three principal international airports in the Republic of Ireland (along with Dublin and Shannon). ... Donegal Airport (IATA: CFN, ICAO: EIDL) or Aerfort Dhún na nGall in Irish, is located at Carrickfinn on the west coast of County Donegal in Ireland. ... Private spiral ramp access to the main terminal building of Dublin (Áth Cliath) Airport Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. ... Galway Airport (IATA: GWY, ICAO: EICM), or Aerphort na Gaillimhe in Irish, is located at Carnmore about 6. ... Kerry Airport (IATA: KIR, ICAO: EIKY), or Aerphort Chiarraí in Irish, often called Farranfore Airport, is an airport in County Kerry, Republic of Ireland. ... Ireland West Airport Knock (IATA: NOC, ICAO: EIKN) or Aerfort na Connacht in Irish, is located near Charlestown, County Mayo, Ireland. ... Sligo Airport (IATA Airport Code: SXL) is located in Strandhill, near Sligo in the Republic of Ireland. ... Waterford Airport or Aerphort Phort Láirge in Irish (IATA: WAT, ICAO: EIWF), also known as the South East Regional Airport, is located near Waterford on the south-east coast of the Republic of Ireland. ... Aerfort na Minna (IATA: NNR, ICAO: EICA), often known as Connemara Regional Airport in English, is the base for Aer Arann Islands, a division of Aer Arann. ... Weston Airport is a private airport located 13km west of Dublin, in Ireland. ... Casement Aerodrome or Baldonnel Aerodrome (IATA: N/A, ICAO: EIME) is an airfield to the south west of Dublin, Ireland situated off the N7 main road route to the south and south west. ... Belfast City Airport (IATA: BHD, ICAO: EGAC) is an airport in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... BFS redirects here. ... City of Derry Airport Entrance. ... Enniskillen/St Angelo Airport (IATA: ENK, ICAO: EGAB) is located 5. ... Newtownards Airport (IATA: N/A, ICAO: EGAD) is located 15. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Malone Car Hire Shannon Airport - Car Hire at Shannon Airport (232 words)
Shannon Airport is the second busiest airport in the Republic of Ireland and in 2005 carried 3.2 million people safely to their destination.
The airport is only 15km from Limerick although it is located in County Clare.
Both Shannon and Dublin Airports are the only airports in Europe with US b order preclearance.
Shannon Airport - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2431 words)
Shannon Airport is situated in County Clare in the mid-west region of Ireland, 15km from Limerick City.
Shannon Airport is the end destination of the N19 national route, which connects to the N18 Limerick–Galway route.
Shannon airport is one of the hubs of Irish flag carrier, Aer Lingus.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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