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Encyclopedia > Shamshir
A well-used, typical 18th century CE Shamshir.
A well-used, typical 18th century CE Shamshir.

A Shamshir is a type of sabre with a curve that is considered radical for a sword: 5 to 15 degrees from tip to tip. The name is derived from Persian شمشیر shamshīr, which means "sword" (in general). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... “Farsi” redirects here. ...


Typical pre-Islamic Iranian blades used for warfare were straight (for example, see Acinaces). Curved blades in this period were used primarily for hunting, though examples of curved swords used in battle are present in Greek depictions of Achaemenid Persian soldiers. The curved scimitar blades were developed during and after the Mongol invasions. The sword now called "shamshir" was popularized in Persia by the early 16th century, and had "relatives" in Turkey (the kilij), Mughal India (the talwar), and the adjoining Arabian world (the saif). Darius I of Persia holding an acinaces in his lap A member of the Great Kings royal guard, wearing an acinaces at his hip. ... Achaemenid Empire The Achaemenid Dynasty was a dynasty in the ancient Persian Empire, including Cyrus II the Great, Darius I and Xerxes I. At the height of their power, the Achaemenid rulers of Persia ruled over territories roughly emcompassing some parts of todays Iraq, Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Israel, Lebanon... Talwar, 17th Century, from India. ... Honorary guard of Mongolia. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... The kilij (also spelled kilic) is a sword used by the Ottoman Empire starting around the late 15th century. ... The Mughal Empire (alternative spelling Mogul, which is the origin of the word Mogul) of India was founded by Babur in 1526, when he defeated Ibrahim Lodi, the last of the Delhi Sultans at the First Battle of Panipat. ... Talwar with sheath A talwar, talwaar, or tulwar (Devanagari: तलवार) is a type of sword prevalent in medieval India dating back to at least the 13th century. ... The Arabian Peninsula Emirets towers in United Arab Emirates; the eastern part of Arabian Penisula The Arabian Peninsula (in Arabic: شبه الجزيرة العربية, or جزيرة العرب) is a peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia consisting mainly of desert. ... The Arabic word saif (سيف) and variations Saif, Sayf, Seif generally means {{coward)). // As such it does not in and of itself denote anything more specific than saber or back-sword in its parent land. ...


The shamshir is a one-handed, curved sword featuring a slim blade that has almost no taper until the very tip. Instead of being worn upright, it is worn horizontally, with the hilt and tip pointing up. It was normally used for slashing unarmored opponents either on foot or mounted; while the tip could be used for thrusting, the drastic curvature of blade made accuracy difficult. Like Japanese blades, there is no pommel, and its two lengthy quillons form a simple crossguard. The tang of the blade is covered by slabs of bone, ivory, wood, or other material fastened by pins or rivets to form the grip. See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... In a sword, the crossguard (or cross-guard) is a flat bar of metal at right angles to the blade, placed between the blade and the hilt. ... The tang of a sword or fixed-blade knife is that part of the blade extending into and usually through the grip that is fastened to it. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ...


The shamshir was similar in design to its contemporaries, the Indian Talwar and the Saif. Talwar with sheath A talwar, talwaar, or tulwar (Devanagari: तलवार) is a type of sword prevalent in medieval India dating back to at least the 13th century. ... The Arabic word saif (سيف) and variations Saif, Sayf, Seif generally means {{coward)). // As such it does not in and of itself denote anything more specific than saber or back-sword in its parent land. ...


For history see Dao (sword) Chinese Saber (wushu variant used for ceremonial purposes only) Dao (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: tao1) is a category of single-edge Chinese swords primarily used for slashing and chopping (sabers), often called broadswords in English because some varieties have wide blades. ...


Etymology

Although the name has been associated by popular etymology with the city of Shamshir (which in turn means "curved like the lion's claw"[citation needed]) the word has been used to mean "sword" since ancient times, as attested by Middle Persian shamshil (Pahlavi šmšyl), and the Ancient Greek σαμψήρα / sampsēra (glossed as "foreign sword"). Folk etymology is a term used in two distinct ways: A commonly held misunderstanding of the origin of a particular word, a false etymology. ... Pahlavi is a term that refers: (1) to a script used in Iran derived from the Aramaic script, and (2) more broadly, to Middle Persian, the Middle Iranian language written in this script. ... The Pahlavi script was used broadly in the Sasanid Persian Empire to write down Middle Persian for secular, as well as religious purposes. ... Greek ( IPA: or simply IPA: — Hellenic) has a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single language in the Indo-European language family. ...


"Shamshir" is usually taken to be the root of the word scimitar, as scimitar is the latinized version of the word shamshir. Scimitar is now a more inclusive term. Talwar, 17th Century, from India. ... Talwar, 17th Century, from India. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Shamshir: Sabers of Persia and Mughal India (0 words)
Shamshir, which means "curved like the tiger's nail", describes the deeply curved and continuously tapering parabolic saber blade typical of Persia (Iran), Mughal India and the adjoining Arab world from the middle of the 16th century.
Shamshirs are usually regarded as being optimized for mounted combat at close quarters and such use is supported by period illustrations and writings.
The lining of shamshir scabbards is often of wood and the covering may be of leather, velvet, metal or a combination thereof.
Shamshir - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (427 words)
The sword now called "shamshir" was popularized in Persia by the early 16th century, and had "relatives" in Turkey (the kilic), Mughal India (the talwar), and the adjoining Arabian world (the saif).
The shamshir was similar in design to its contemporaries, the Indian Talwar and the Saif.
"Shamshir" is usually taken to be the root of the word scimitar, though the Oxford English Dictionary considers this uncertain.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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