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Encyclopedia > Shakespeare in Love
Shakespeare in Love
Directed by John Madden
Produced by David Parfitt
Donna Gigliotti
Harvey Weinstein
Edward Zwick
Marc Norman
Written by Marc Norman
Tom Stoppard
Starring Joseph Fiennes
Gwyneth Paltrow
Geoffrey Rush
Colin Firth
Ben Affleck
Judi Dench
Tom Wilkinson
Imelda Staunton
Rupert Everett
Music by Stephen Warbeck
Cinematography Richard Greatrex
Editing by David Gamble
Christopher Greenbury
Distributed by Miramax Films (USA)
Alliance Atlantis (Canada)
Universal Studios (non-USA/Canada)
Release date(s) Flag of the United States December 3, 1998 (premiere)
Flag of the United States 11 December 1998 (limited)
Flag of Canada 25 December 1998
Flag of the United States 8 January 1999
Flag of the United Kingdom 29 January 1999
Flag of Australia 11 February 1999
Flag of New Zealand 25 February 1999
Running time 137 min.
Language English
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Shakespeare in Love is an award-winning 1998 romantic comedy film. The film was directed by John Madden and co-written by playwright Tom Stoppard, whose first major success was with the Shakespeare-influenced play Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Shakespeare in Love movie poster. ... John Philip Madden (born April 8, 1949) is an English director of theatre, film, television, and radio. ... David Parfitt is a movie producer, originally from Sunderland. ... Donna Gigliotti (b. ... Harvey Weinstein at Cannes, 2002 Harvey Weinstein CBE (Hon) (born March 19, 1952) is an American film producer and movie studio chairman. ... Edward Zwick (born October 8, 1952 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American film director and film producer. ... Marc Norman (born Los Angeles, 1941) is an American screenwriter. ... Marc Norman (born Los Angeles, 1941) is an American screenwriter. ... Sir Tom Stoppard, OM, CBE (born as Tomáš Straussler on July 3, 1937)[1] is an Academy Award winning British playwright of more than 24 plays. ... Joseph Alberic Fiennes (IPA: ) (born May 27, 1970) is an English film and stage actor. ... Gwyneth Kate Paltrow (born September 27, 1972[1]) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ... Geoffrey Roy Rush (born 6 July 1951) is an Academy Award- and Emmy Award-winning Australian actor. ... Colin Andrew Firth (born 10 September 1960) is an English film, television and stage actor. ... Benjamin Géza Affleck (born August 15, 1972) is an American Golden Globe Award-nominated film actor, director, an Academy Award-winning and Golden Globe Award-winning screenwriter. ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... Tom Wilkinson Tom Wilkinson, OBE, born December 12, 1948, is an Oscar nominated English actor. ... Imelda Mary Philomena Bernadette Staunton OBE (born on January 9, 1956) is an Academy Award-nominated English actress. ... Rupert James Hector Everett (born May 29, 1959) is an English actor and a former singer. ... Stephen Warbeck (born 1948) is a British composer, best known for his film and television scores. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Miramax Films is a film production and distribution brand that was a Big Ten film motion picture distribution and production company headquartered in New York City before being bought out by The Walt Disney Company. ... Alliance Atlantis Alliance Atlantis is a Toronto-based media company. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Romantic comedy films are movies with light-hearted, humorous dramatic stories centered around romantic ideals such as a true love able to surmount most obstacles [1] or the perfect couple. ... John Philip Madden (born April 8, 1949) is an English director of theatre, film, television, and radio. ... Sir Tom Stoppard, OM, CBE (born as Tomáš Straussler on July 3, 1937)[1] is an Academy Award winning British playwright of more than 24 plays. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... This article is about the play. ...


The film is largely fictional, although several of the characters are based on real people. In addition, some of the characters, lines, and plot devices are references to Shakespeare's plays.


Shakespeare in Love won a number of Academy Awards in 1999, including Best Picture and Best Actress (for Gwyneth Paltrow). It was the first comedy to win the Best Picture award since Annie Hall (1977). Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... // The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Gwyneth Kate Paltrow (born September 27, 1972[1]) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ... Annie Hall is a 1977 romantic comedy film directed by Woody Allen from a script he co-wrote with Marshall Brickman. ...

Contents

Historical accuracy

The film makes no pretense at historical accuracy and features many comic anachronisms (such as a psychotherapist, a mug marked "A present from Stratford-on-Avon", Shakespeare leaping into a ferry and saying "Follow that boat!", and Henslowe anticipating the phrase "The show must go on!"). Look up Anachronism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Psychotherapy is a set of techniques believed to cure or to help solve behavioral and other psychological problems in humans. ... The show must go on is a well-known phrase in show business, meaning that regardless of what happens (such as the lead performer breaking a leg), the show must still be put on for the waiting patrons. ...


Synopsis

The film opens with the following information onscreen: "London 1593. In the glory days of the Elizabethan theatre, two playhouses were fighting it out for writers and audiences. North of the city was the Curtain Theatre, home to England's most famous actor, Richard Burbage. Across the river was the competition, built by Philip Henslowe, a businessman with a cash flow problem: The Rose ..." Elizabethan theatre is a general term covering the plays written and performed publicly in England during the reign (1558 - 1603) of Queen Elizabeth I. The term can be used more broadly to also include theatre of Elizabeths immediate successors, James I and Charles I, until the closure of public... Playhouse is a common Elizabethan term for a theatre, especially those built in London such as The Globe. ... The Curtain Theatre was an Elizabethan playhouse located in Curtain Close, Shoreditch, just outside the City of London and close to an earlier playhouse known as The Theatre. ... Unknown artist: Portrait of Richard Burbage, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London Richard Burbage (July 7, 1568 – March 13, 1619) was an actor and theatre owner. ... Philip Henslowe (c 1550 - January 6, 1616) was an Elizabethan theatrical entrepreneur. ... , The Rose was an Elizabethan theatre. ...


To settle his debt to businessman Hugh Fennyman, Henslowe offers Fennyman a partnership in the upcoming production of Shakespeare's newest comedy, Romeo and Ethel The Pirate's Daughter which is, according to Henslowe's current understanding, "a crowd tickler; mistaken identities, shipwreck, pirate king, a bit with a dog and love triumphant" and is, he insists, almost finished.


Shakespeare, however, has writer's block. His allegiances are torn between Henslowe, who owes him money, and Burbage, who is offering to let him invest in his troupe, The Chamberlain's Men, which would signal the end of Shakespeare's days as a hired player. Backstage of a performance of The Two Gentlemen of Verona for Queen Elizabeth I at Whitehall Palace, Shakespeare tells Burbage that he is writing a new play for Henslowe, for which he has already received ten pounds. Burbage knows he is lying, and gives him two sovereigns for rights to the unwritten play. Shakespeare is partly helped out of his writer's block by the more successful playwright Christopher Marlowe, who gives him the plot and character names of Romeo and Juliet. For other uses, see Writers block (disambiguation). ... The Lord Chamberlains Men was the playing company that William Shakespeare worked for as actor and playwright throughout most of his career. ... The Two Gentlemen of Verona is a comedy by William Shakespeare from early in his career. ... Elizabeth I Queen of England and Ireland Queen of France, nominal title Elizabeth I (September 7, 1533–March 24, 1603) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from November 17, 1558 until her death. ... The Palace of Whitehall was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698 when all except Inigo Jones 1622 Banqueting House was destroyed by fire. ... Look up Sovereign in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The adjective sovereign is used to refer to the philosophical concept or state of sovereignty. ... This article is about the English dramatist. ...


Meanwhile, Viola De Lesseps, an aristocratic lady, is entranced by The Two Gentlemen of Verona's speeches about love. She is, however, angered by the casting: she tells her nurse that the stage cannot capture true love while the law requires women's parts to be played by "pipsqueak boys in petticoats." Viola dresses as a young man called "Thomas Kent" and auditions at the Rose for Romeo and Ethel the Pirate's Daughter.


Shakespeare is so astonished by "Thomas"'s performance that he follows "him" home to a palatial mansion on the banks of the Thames. He persuades a servant - Viola's nurse - to give a note (a description of the character of Romeo) to "Thomas". Viola vows to continue with her charade while her parents are away. Shakespeare pretends to be a musician and attends a party at the De Lesseps mansion. At the party Lord Wessex negotiates with Viola's father for her hand. Shakespeare meets Viola (in her normal clothes), is immediately taken with her, and dances with her, not realizing that she is the same person as Thomas. When the furious Wessex accosts Shakespeare for "coveting my property", Shakespeare gives his name as "Christopher Marlowe." Leaving, Shakespeare sees Viola on her balcony, and they excitedly reveal their nascent feelings for one another. Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames... °Å#REDIRECT Romeo and Juliet gsgfhasfhhfdhjsehewbbshhhdbfsh ...


Inspired, Shakespeare begins writing feverishly, producing a play more serious than Henslowe and the actors had expected. "Thomas Kent" is introduced to the troupe. Shakespeare, still thinking Thomas is Viola's servant, writes a love sonnet to Viola and asks Thomas to give it to her. Backstage, Viola reads the sonnet with great satisfaction.


Back home, however, Viola is informed by Wessex that they are to wed in two weeks, pending the Queen's permission, and will immediately leave for his plantation in Virginia. Viola is horrified but vows to do her duty. She writes a note to Shakespeare telling him this, and imploring him to forget her and delivers the note as "Thomas" the next day in a boat. Shakespeare is crushed and "Thomas" gives a surprised Shakespeare a lingering kiss. Shakespeare is stunned at being kissed by a man, but the oarsman informs him that "Thomas" is obviously Viola in disguise. Shakespeare chases her, and in her bedroom, they make love for the first time. This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Rehearsals for the play go successfully, but as the days pass, Viola's wedding looms. One day, Shakespeare tells her that the conclusion of the story has come to him in his sleep, and it will be a tragedy. As Wessex takes Viola to Greenwich to seek the Queen's blessing of their union, Shakespeare accompanies them disguised as a servant woman. Suspicious of Viola, Wessex asks "her" whether Christopher Marlowe has been seen at the De Lesseps home. Shakespeare answers that he has. This article is about Greenwich in England. ...


Queen Elizabeth recognizes Viola from the theatre audience at Whitehall and dismisses plays. Viola admits that she loves theater, and, above all, poetry. The Queen says that playwrights teach us nothing about love, "they make it pretty, they make it comical, or they make it lust. They cannot make it true." Viola disagrees, believing that there is one that can. Wessex makes a bet with the still disquised Shakespeare as to whether a play can show the truth and nature of love. The Queen says she will be the judge of the wager as the occasion arises. In an aside with Wessex, she tells him that Viola has lost her virginity since the Queen saw her last, and not to Wessex. Wessex has the final word of the scene: "Marlowe!" A playwright is an author of plays for performance in the theater. ...


Christopher Marlowe finishes "The Massacre at Paris" and negotiates with Burbage to sell it to him. Burbage tells Marlowe that he doesn't really need Marlowe's play, since he has bought one from Shakespeare. Marlowe informs him that Shakespeare has given that play to Henslowe. Burbage is furious, and, with his troupe, marches to The Rose, where a fight ensues, with the Rose troupe victorious.


After the fight, the players retire to a tavern that is also house of ill repute, "but with a good reputation." Shakespeare offers Fennyman a small but vital role in his play, the part of the apothecary. Henslowe is still confused and asks what the story is. "Let us have pirates and clowns and a happy ending or we shall send you back to Stratford with your wife." Viola is shocked at this. She leaves angry and hurt. A moment later, a messenger enters the tavern, and announces that Marlowe is dead, stabbed in a tavern. Shakespeare believes that his lies to Wessex are the cause of Marlowe's death.


Next morning Wessex is riding his horse and singing a happy tune when he meets Viola on the road. He informs Viola that there has been a fight in a tavern, resulting in a great loss to playwriting and to dancing. Viola, of course, believes that Shakespeare has died. They ride off to church together to say a prayer for his soul.


At the church, Wessex spies the distraught Shakespeare in the apse of the church. Wessex believes it is a ghost and runs out of the church screaming. Shakespeare and Viola make eye contact, but he turns away from her. She catches up, and they embrace. She says she thought he was dead. Shakespeare says it is worse than that, he has killed a man. This article is about an architectural feature; for the astronomical term see apsis. ... For other uses, see Ghost (disambiguation). ...


On the bank of the Thames, Shakespeare and Viola sit and talk. Shakespeare allows as how great Marlowe was, and how Marlowe's work was often the basis for his own. Shakespeare says that he would trade all his plays to come, for all of Marlowes that will never come. Viola calls him a liar, and says that he lies on the river like he lied in her bed. Shakespeare counters that "my love is no lie, I have a wife, and I can't marry you but you didn't need a wife come from Stratford to tell you that, yet you let me come to your bed."


Back at rehearsal, Shakespeare hands out the final pages of the play, explaining how it is to end. The tragic ending of love denied is, of course, inspired by the denied love in his real life. Fennyman, almost tearful, describes it: "Sad. Wonderful".


In Viola's home, Shakespeare gives Viola a copy of the completed play, written by the clerk of Bridewell who has "a good fist for lettering." It includes the new scene, which they read to each other. It echoes their earlier exchange where they argue over what bird they have heard, the nightingale, or the lark, the herald of evening, or the herald of morn. The Bridewell Palace was rebuilt for Henry VIII in 1515-1520 on the site of an earlier palace. ... Binomial name Luscinia megarhynchos (Brehm, 1831) This article is about the bird. ... For other uses, see Lark (disambiguation). ...


The scene switches to The Rose, where the lovers continue to speak the lines of the new scene. Shakespeare undresses Viola backstage in the empty theater. Unseen, John Webster observes them, and reports what he has seen to the Master of the Revels.


Wessex appears at The Rose in the middle of rehearsal and challenges Shakespeare to a duel. He does not recognize Viola who stands very near in the guise of Kent. The two men fight and it seems briefly that Shakespeare has won, when it is revealed that his sword is a stage sword without the strength to actual hurt Wessex. The tide of the fight changes, but Shakespeare prevails when he snaps Wessex's sword in half. Shakespeare is about to kill Wessex, announcing to all that Wessex is the murderer of Marlowe. Alleyn interrupts to tell Shakespeare that Marlowe was not murdered, but died by his own clumsy hand in a fight over a bar bill. Shakespeare, surprised and relieved, releases Wessex. The Master of the Revels enters, and Wessex leaves angrily, ordering the Master of the Revels to take The Rose apart stone by stone. The Master of the Revels reveals his knowledge that there is a woman on the stage. He initially believes that Sam is the woman John Webster reported to him, but soon discovers his error. John Webster drops a mouse down Viola's back, causing her to scream and thrash, and to lose her boy's wig. Viola is exposed, and tries to take all the blame, saying that nobody knew. John Webster says that Shakespeare knew, because he "saw 'im kissing her bubbies." The Master of the Revels closes The Rose for sedition and indecency. On Viola's way out, Mr. Wabash stops her to say that she was wonderful. Sedition is a term of law which refers to covert conduct, such as speech and organization, that is deemed by the legal authority as tending toward insurrection against the established order. ...


In the tavern, The Rose players are mourning their lost play when Burbage enters. Fennyman casually instructs one of his henchmen to kill Burbage, but Burbage stays him. He says to the group that the Master of the Revels has no respect for any of them, in spite of the fact that his father, James Burbage had the first license from the Queen to start a company of players, and that "he drew from poets the literature of the age." Together they must show the Master of the Revels that they are "men of parts." He concludes, "Will Shakespeare has a play. I have a theater. The Curtain is yours." James Burbage (d. ...


Quick vignettes follow. Henslowe reminds Shakespeare that they now need a Romeo. Viola dresses for her wedding. Robert De Lesseps pays off Wessex. Shakespeare is nearly run over by Wessex's carriage. Viola and Wessex exit church, obviously having just been married. A flyer announcing the play hits Wessex in the face; he takes it off and hands it to Viola who reads it and hands it to her nurse. The two share a conspiratorial look. Viola gets into the waiting carriage while Wessex makes a final farewell to the assembled crowd, and then is briefly assailed by the nurse. He gets into his carriage only to find that he is alone. Viola has fled to the theater.


Backstage, Sam approaches Shakespeare who suddenly realizes that Sam's voice has dropped an octave and is no longer suitable as Juliet. Henslowe goes into the audience and approaches Burbage and tells Burbage that they have no Juliet. Viola, now seated nearby overhears and volunteers to play Juliet. Henslow and Viola hurry backstage, and just as Sam is about to walk onstage as Juliet, Henslow pulls him off and Viola walks on in the Juliet character, much to the shock of the other players. Wessex shows up at the theater. For other uses, see Octave (disambiguation). ...


The play concludes, and after a brief pause of awe for the play, the theatre erupts in thunderous applause. The Master of the Revels bursts upon the stage and declares that the company are arrested in the name of the Queen for violating his order. Burbage argues that the Master of the Revels closed The Rose, not The Curtain. The Master of the Revels responds by pointing at Viola and yelling, "that woman is a woman!" He is closing the Curtain for public lewdness in the name of the Queen.


Queen Elizabeth (who we did not know was in the audience), calls loudly to Mr. Tilney, whom she informs that "the Queen of England does not attend exhibitions of public lewdness, so something is out of joint." She bids "Master Kent" to come close. Viola comes as bidden, and after a beat, realizes that the Queen is offering her (and her company of players) a way out of trouble, and bows to her as a man would. The Queen examines "Kent" and announces that the illusion is remarkable and that Mr. Tilney can be forgiven his error. The Queen judges that Lord Wessex has lost his wager as to whether a play could reveal the very truth and nature of love.


Wessex asks the Queen how this story is to end. The Queen answers, "as stories must when love's denied. With tears and a journey." She tells Wessex to give the 50 pounds he lost to Mr. Kent, who will see it rightfully home. She instructs "Kent" to go into the theater, make his farewells, and send out Wessex's wife. She also tells Kent to tell Shakespeare to do something more cheerful next time for twelfth night. Twelfth Night has at least three meanings: Twelfth Night (holiday), celebrated by some Christians Twelfth Night, or What You Will, a comedic play by William Shakespeare Twelfth Night (band), a progressive rock band This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share...


Viola approaches Shakespeare backstage. She gives him his winnings and says, "a hired player no longer," referring to the fact that he can now invest in Burbage's troupe.


In their grief they begin to talk about the outline of the comedy that the Queen has commanded. Much of what they speak of is their own story. They speak of a duke, of a heroine sold into marriage and already halfway to America, of the heroine on a vast and empty shore, disguised as a boy.


Shakespeare begins to write Twelfth Night. Shakespeare narrates some scenes from Twelfth Night, and concludes with, "She will be my heroine for all time, and her name shall be Viola." Twelfth Night has at least three meanings: Twelfth Night (holiday), celebrated by some Christians Twelfth Night, or What You Will, a comedic play by William Shakespeare Twelfth Night (band), a progressive rock band This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share...


Casting

  • Ben Affleck was not considered for his role until Paltrow put him forward, supplying an audition tape to the producers that they had prepared together.

Julia Fiona Roberts (born October 28, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former fashion model. ... Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957), is an Academy-Award winning and Golden Globe-award nominated actor. ... Jargon used in the chemical manufacturing and petroleum refining industries. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... Miramax Films is a film production and distribution brand that was a Big Ten film motion picture distribution and production company headquartered in New York City before being bought out by The Walt Disney Company. ... Meg Ryan (born November 19, 1961) is an American actress who specializes in romantic comedies but has also worked in other film genres. ... Alicia Christian Foster (born November 19, 1962), better known as Jodie Foster, is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, director, and producer. ... Winona Ryder (born October 29, 1971) is a two-time Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... Kate Elizabeth Winslet (born October 5, 1975) is a five time Academy Award-nominated Emmy Award-nominated BAFTA, Grammy and Screen Actors Guild Award winning English actress. ... Gwyneth Kate Paltrow (born September 27, 1972[1]) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ... Benjamin Géza Affleck (born August 15, 1972) is an American Golden Globe Award-nominated film actor, director, an Academy Award-winning and Golden Globe Award-winning screenwriter. ...

References to Shakespeare's work

The main source for much of the action in the film is Romeo and Juliet, which the events in the film ultimately inspire Will to write. Will and Viola play out the famous balcony and bedroom scenes; like Juliet, Viola has a witty nurse, and is separated from Will by a gulf of duty (although not the family enmity of the play—the "two households" of Romeo and Juliet are supposedly inspired by the two rival playhouses). In addition, the two lovers are equally 'star-crossed' — they are not ultimately destined to be together (since Viola is of nobility promised to marry Earl of Wessex and Shakespeare himself is already married). Romeo and Juliet in the famous balcony scene by Ford Madox Brown For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... The Earl of Wessex is an Earl in the English and later British nobility. ...


Many other plot devices used in the film are common in various Shakespearean comedies and in the works of the other playwrights of the Elizabethan era: the Queen disguised as a commoner, the cross-dressing disguises, mistaken identities, the swordfight, the suspicion of adultery (or, at least, cheating), the appearance of a 'ghost', and the 'play within a play'. This articles is about cross-dressing in general, that is the act of wearing the clothing of another gender for any reason. ... For other uses, see Ghost (disambiguation). ... A story within a story is a literary device or conceit in which one story is told during the action of another story. ...


The film also features numerous sequences in which Shakespeare and the other characters utter words that will later appear in his plays:

  • On the street, Shakespeare hears a Puritan preaching against the two London stages: "The Rose smells thusly rank, by any name! I say, a plague on both their houses!" Two references in one, both to Romeo and Juliet; first, "A rose by any other name would smell as sweet" (Act II, scene ii, lines 1 and 2); second, "a plague on both their houses" (Act III, scene i, line 94).
  • Backstage of a performance of The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Shakespeare sees William Kempe in full make-up, silently contemplating a skull (a reference to Hamlet).
  • Shakespeare utters the lines "Doubt thou the stars are fire, / Doubt that the sun doth move" (from Hamlet) to Philip Henslowe.
  • As Shakespeare's writer's block is introduced, he is seen crumpling balls of paper and throwing them around his room. They land near props which represent scenes in his several plays: a skull (Hamlet), and an open chest (The Merchant of Venice).
  • At the end of the film, Shakespeare imagines a shipwreck overtaking Viola on her way to America, inspiring the opening scene of his next play, Twelfth Night.
  • Shakespeare writes a sonnet to Viola which begins: "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" (from Sonnet 18).

Christopher Marlowe appears in the film as the master playwright whom everyone in the film considers the greatest English dramatist — this is humorous, since everyone in the audience knows what will eventually happen to Shakespeare. He gives Shakespeare a plot for his next play, "Romeo and Ethel the Pirate's Daughter" ("Romeo is Italian...always in and out of love...until he meets...Ethel. The daughter of his enemy! His best friend is killed in a duel by Ethel's brother or something. His name is Mercutio.") Marlowe's Doctor Faustus is quoted ad nauseam: "Was this the face that launched a thousand ships/ And burned the topless towers of Ilium?" For the record label, see Puritan Records. ... The Two Gentlemen of Verona is a comedy by William Shakespeare from early in his career. ... William Kempe (also spelled Kemp) (fl. ... The American actor Edwin Booth as Hamlet, seated in a curule chair, c. ... Portia and Shylock (1835) by Thomas Sully The Merchant of Venice is one of William Shakespeares best-known plays, written sometime between 1596 and 1598. ... Twelfth Night has at least three meanings: Twelfth Night (holiday), celebrated by some Christians Twelfth Night, or What You Will, a comedic play by William Shakespeare Twelfth Night (band), a progressive rock band This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the English dramatist. ... Mercutio (here portrayed by actor Jonathan Huelman, at right) gives his famous Queen Mab speech to Romeo (Jacob Blumenfeld) in Act I, scene IV of Romeo and Juliet. ... Doctor Faustus could refer to: The character of Faust Christopher Marlowes The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus Thomas Manns Doktor Faustus Ferruccio Busonis opera Doktor Faust A 1967 film directed by Richard Burton and Nevill Coghill, see Doctor Faustus (movie) This is a disambiguation page — a... Look up ad nauseam in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The child John Webster who plays with mice is a reference to the leading figure in the Jacobean generation of playwrights. His plays (The Duchess of Malfi, The White Devil) are known for their blood and gore, which is why he says that he enjoys Titus Andronicus, and why he says of Romeo and Juliet when asked by The Queen "I liked it when she stabbed herself." John Webster (c. ... The Duchess of Malfi is a macabre, tragic play, written by the English dramatist John Webster and first performed in 1614 at the Globe Theatre in London, and published for the first time in 1623. ... Title page of the 1612 edition of The White Devil The White Devil (1612) is a revenge tragedy by the English playwright John Webster (c. ... Title page of the first quarto edition (1594) The Tragedy of Titus Andronicus may be Shakespeares earliest tragedy. ...


When the clown Will Kempe says to Shakespeare that he would like to play in a drama, he is told that "they would laugh at Seneca if you played it," a reference to the Roman tragedian renowned for his sombre and bloody plotlines which were a major influence on the development of English tragedy. William Kempe (also spelled Kemp) (fl. ... Bust, traditionally thought to be Seneca, now identified by some as Hesiod. ...


Will is shown signing a paper repeatedly, with six relatively illegible signatures visible. This is a reference to the fact that several versions of Shakespeare's signature exist — no two alike.


Controversy

After the film's release, publications including Private Eye noted strong similarities between the film and the 1941 novel No Bed for Bacon, by Caryl Brahms and S J Simon, which also features Shakespeare falling in love and finding inspiration for his later plays. Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... This article is about the literary concept. ... Caryl Brahms, born Doris Caroline Abrahams (1901 – 1982) was an English writer. ... S J Simon (Seca Jascha Skidelsky) (born 1904, died 1948) was a British writer. ...


In a foreword to a subsequent edition of No Bed for Bacon (which traded on the association by declaring itself "A Story of Shakespeare and Lady Viola in Love"), Ned Sherrin mentioned that he had lent a copy of the novel to Stoppard after he joined the writing team, but that the basic plot of the film had been independently developed by Marc Norman, who was unaware of the novel. Edward George Sherrin (18 February 1931 – 1 October 2007) was an English broadcaster, author and stage director. ...


Additionally, the writers of Shakespeare in Love were sued in 1999 by Faye Kellerman, author of the book The Quality of Mercy. Ms. Kellerman claimed that the story was lifted from her book.[1] Born in St. ... The Quality of Mercy is the autobiography of American actress Mercedes McCambridge. ...


Awards

Wins

// The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Gwyneth Kate Paltrow (born September 27, 1972[1]) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... Martin Childs, (born July 1, 1954 [1]), is a British production designer. ... This Academy Award was first given for movies made in 1948 when separate awards were given for black-and-white and color movies. ... Sandy Powell (born April 7, 1960) is a British costume designer who has been nominated for several Academy Awards in the 1990s and early 2000s. ... The Academy Award for Original Music Score is presented to the best substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ... Stephen Warbeck (born 1948) is a British composer, best known for his film and television scores. ... // The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... Marc Norman (born Los Angeles, 1941) is an American screenwriter. ... Sir Tom Stoppard, OM, CBE (born as Tomáš Straussler on July 3, 1937)[1] is an Academy Award winning British playwright of more than 24 plays. ... This page lists the winners and nominees for the BAFTA Award for Best Film, BAFTA Award for Best Film not in the English Language and Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film for each year, in addition to the retired earlier versions of those awards. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Geoffrey Roy Rush (born 6 July 1951) is an Academy Award- and Emmy Award-winning Australian actor. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy has been awarded annually since 1952 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1950. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Writers Guild of America (WGA) is the collective bargaining representative, or labor union, for writers in the motion picture and television industries in the United States. ...

Nominations

The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to directors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... John Philip Madden (born April 8, 1949) is an English director of theatre, film, television, and radio. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Geoffrey Roy Rush (born 6 July 1951) is an Academy Award- and Emmy Award-winning Australian actor. ... Charles Rosher the first recipient in 1928 The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... These are the Academy Award for Makeup winners and nominees: 1980s 1982 Quest for Fire Gandhi 1983 none given 1984 Amadeus 2010: The Year We Make Contact Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle 1985 Mask The Color Purple 1986 The Fly The Clan of the Cave Bear... The Academy Award for Sound Mixing is an Academy Award that recognizes the finest or most aesthetic sound mixing or recording, and is generally awarded to the production sound mixers and re-recording mixers of the winning film. ... Gwyneth Kate Paltrow (born September 27, 1972[1]) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ... Joseph Alberic Fiennes (IPA: ) (born May 27, 1970) is an English film and stage actor. ... Tom Wilkinson Tom Wilkinson, OBE, born December 12, 1948, is an Oscar nominated English actor. ... Marc Norman (born Los Angeles, 1941) is an American screenwriter. ... Sir Tom Stoppard, OM, CBE (born as Tomáš Straussler on July 3, 1937)[1] is an Academy Award winning British playwright of more than 24 plays. ... Stephen Warbeck (born 1948) is a British composer, best known for his film and television scores. ... Sandy Powell (born April 7, 1960) is a British costume designer who has been nominated for several Academy Awards in the 1990s and early 2000s. ... Martin Childs, (born July 1, 1954 [1]), is a British production designer. ... Director Guild of America building on Sunset Boulevard. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in 1944 for a performance in a motion picture released in the previous year. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress - Motion Picture was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in 1944 for a performance in a motion picture released in the previous year. ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ...

Cultural influence

'Shakespeare in Love' has since been used as material in the VCE (Victorian Certificate of Education) in Australia. The Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE] is the credential given to students who have completed Year 11 and Year 12 of their secondary schooling, in the state of Victoria, Australia. ...


External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Shakespeare in Love

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

References

  1. ^ http://edition.cnn.com/SHOWBIZ/Movies/9903/23/shakespeare.lawsuit/index.html


Awards
Preceded by
Titanic
Academy Award for Best Picture
1998
Succeeded by
American Beauty
Preceded by
As Good as It Gets
Golden Globe: Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy
1998
Succeeded by
Toy Story 2
Preceded by
The Full Monty
BAFTA Award for Best Film
1999
Succeeded by
American Beauty

  Results from FactBites:
 
Shakespeare in Love - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (703 words)
Shakespeare in Love is a 1998 motion picture.
In this dramatic comedy/romance, William Shakespeare is portrayed as a young, struggling playwright, plagued by money shortages, problems with women, and writer's block.
Shakespeare meets Violet de Lesseps (Gwyneth Paltrow), who lives in the same house as Kent, and promptly falls in love with her, inspiring him to begin writing his play again.
Shakespeare in Love - definition of Shakespeare in Love in Encyclopedia (372 words)
Shakespeare in Love (1998) is a movie (written by Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard, directed by John Madden), starring Joseph Fiennes (as William Shakespeare) and Gwyneth Paltrow.
In this romantic comedy, Shakespeare is portrayed as a young, struggling playwright, plagued by money shortages, problems with women, and writer's block.
Shakespeare meets Viola de Lesseps (played by Gwyneth Paltrow), who lives in the same house as Kent, and promptly falls in love with her, which inspires him to begin writing his play again.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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