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Encyclopedia > Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band cover
Studio album by The Beatles
Released June 1, 1967 (UK)
June 2, 1967 (U.S.)
Recorded 6 December 196621 April 1967 at Abbey Road Studios
Genre Psychedelic rock, art rock, experimental rock
Length 39:42
Label Parlophone
Capitol
Producer George Martin
Professional reviews
The Beatles UK chronology
Revolver
(1966)
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
(1967)
The Beatles
(1968)
The Beatles U.S. chronology
Revolver
(1966)
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
(1967)
Magical Mystery Tour
(1967)
Back cover
The back cover of the original 1967 UK LP. This release featured (for the first time on a Beatles album) complete lyrics. Also, the photo of Paul McCartney, standing with his back to camera, helped fuel "clues" during the infamous Paul is dead hoax.
The back cover of the original 1967 UK LP. This release featured (for the first time on a Beatles album) complete lyrics. Also, the photo of Paul McCartney, standing with his back to camera, helped fuel "clues" during the infamous Paul is dead hoax.

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band is the eighth album by The Beatles. It is often cited as their magnum opus and one of the most influential albums of all time by prominent critics and publications, ranking number 1 on Rolling Stone's The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time in 2003.[1] It was recorded by the Beatles over a 129-day period beginning on December 6, 1966.[2] The album was released on June 1, 1967 in the United Kingdom and the following day in the United States. The album has had a large influence on many artists. Sgt. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (721x721, 220 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A studio album is a collection of studio-recorded tracks by a recording artist. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... Experimental rock or Avant rock is a type of art music based on rock and roll which experiments with the basic elements of the genre, and/or which pushes the boundaries of common composition and performance technique. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Parlophone is a record label, founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindström Company. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Image File history File links 5_stars. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Image File history File links 5_stars. ... Mojo is a popular music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links 5_stars. ... Robert Christgau (born April 18, 1942), is an American essayist, music journalist, and the self-declared Dean of American Rock Critics.[1] In print, his name is sometimes abbreviated as Xgau. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1966 U.S. LP Back cover Back cover of the original 1966 UK LP. The main photo was edited in separate parts for the booklet of the 1988 Compact Disc release. ... The White Album redirects here. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1966 U.S. LP Back cover Back cover of the original 1966 UK LP. The main photo was edited in separate parts for the booklet of the 1988 Compact Disc release. ... Magical Mystery Tour is an album by British rock band The Beatles, first released in late November 1967. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Paul McCartney Dead: The Great Hoax, a magazine reporting on the rumours concerning McCartney. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Magnum opus (sometimes Opus magnum, plural magna opera), from the Latin meaning great work,[1] refers to the best, most popular, or most renowned achievement of an author, artist, or composer, and most commonly one who has contributed a very large amount of material. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Promotional Book Cover The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time was the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2003. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


Upon release the album was an immediate critical and popular sensation. Innovative in every sense, from structure to recording techniques to the cover artwork, the artistic effect was felt immediately.

Contents

Overview

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was recorded as Beatlemania was waning. The Beatles had grown tired of touring and had quit the road in August 1966. After one particular concert, while being driven away in the back of a small van, the four of them—even Paul McCartney, who was perhaps the most in favour of continuing to tour—decided that enough was enough. From that point on the Beatles became an entirely studio based band (save the the 1969 rooftop performance during the Get Back sessions). The Beatles arrival at Americas JFK Airport in 1964 has proved a particularly enduring image of Beatlemania. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an Academy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... For the Taiwanese film whose foreign title translates to the same name, see 無米樂 Let It Be is a 1970 film about the Beatles rehearsing and recording songs for the album Let It Be in January 1969. ... “Let It Be” redirects here. ...


For the first time in their careers, the band had more than ample time with which to prepare their next record. As EMI's premier act and Britain's most successful pop group they had almost unlimited access to the state of the art technology of Abbey Road Studios. All four band members had already developed a preference for long late night sessions, although they were still extremely efficient and highly disciplined in their studio habits. For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


By the time the Beatles recorded the album their musical interests had grown from their simple R&B, pop, and rock and roll beginnings to incorporate a variety of new influences. They had become familiar with a wide range of instruments such as the Hammond organ and electric piano; their instrumentation now covered a wider range including strings, brass, woodwind, percussion, and even some exotic instruments such as the sitar. McCartney, although unable to read music, had scored a recent British film The Family Way (see The Family Way soundtrack) with the assistance of producer/arranger George Martin, which earned him a prestigious Ivor Novello award. McCartney came to be greatly influenced by the avant garde composer Karlheinz Stockhausen, whom he wanted to include on the cover. For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... For the music genre, see Pop music. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The Hammond organ is an electric organ which was invented by Laurens Hammond in 1934 and manufactured by the Hammond Organ Company until the 1970s. ... An electric piano (e-piano) is an electric musical instrument whose popularity started in the late 1960s, was at its greatest during the 1970s and still is big today. ... A string instrument (or stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ... Image of a trumpet, foreground, a piccolo trumpet behind, and a flugelhorn in background. ... A woodwind instrument is an instrument in which sound is produced by blowing against an edge or by a vibrating with air a thin piece of wood known as a reed. ... Percussion redirects here. ... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... The Family Way is a 1966 movie by Roy and John Boulting starring father and daughter John Mills and Hayley Mills. ... The Family Way is the first album by Paul McCartney, a soundtrack from the same name film released in 1967. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ... The Ivor Novello Awards, named after the entertainer Ivor Novello, are awards awarded for songwriting and composing. ... Karlheinz Stockhausen (born August 22, 1928) is a German composer, and one of the most important and controversial composers of the 20th century (Barret 1988, 45; Harvey 1975b, 705; Hopkins 1972, 33; Klein 1968, 117; Power 1990, 30). ...


The Beatles also used new modular effects units like the wah-wah pedal and fuzzbox, which they augmented with their own experimental ideas, such as running voices and instruments through a Leslie speaker. Another important sonic innovation was McCartney's discovery of the direct injection (DI) technique, in which he could record his bass by plugging it directly into an amplifying circuit in the recording console. While the still often-used technique of recording through an amplifier with a microphone sounds more natural, this setup provided a radically different presence in bass guitar sound versus the old method. But the most frequently used method was to record the bass last, after all the other recording was done, by placing the amplifier in the centre of the studio and placing the microphone several inches from the source. This article is about the effect pedal, also known as a Wah. ... A 1965 Gibson Maestro Fuzz-Tone FZ-1A, one of the first commercially available fuzzboxes. ... The Leslie speaker is a specially constructed amplifier/loudspeaker used to create special audio effects utilizing the Doppler effect. ... A DI unit or DI box is an electronic device designed for connecting a piece of equipment with an electronic audio output to a standard microphone or line level input. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ...


The Sgt. Pepper period also coincided with the introduction of some important musical innovations, both from within the band and the rest of the musical industry. The work of Bob Dylan, Frank Zappa, Jimi Hendrix, Phil Spector, and Brian Wilson was radically redefining what was possible for pop musicians in terms of both songwriting and recording. Studio and recording technology had already reached a high degree of development and was poised for even greater innovation. The old rules of pop songwriting were being abandoned, as complex lyrical themes were explored for the first time in popular music, and songs were growing longer (such as Dylan's "Desolation Row," "Like a Rolling Stone," and "Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands"). This article is about the recording artist. ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Harvey Philip Spector (born December 26, 1939) is an American musician, songwriter and record producer. ... For other persons named Brian Wilson, see Brian Wilson (disambiguation). ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Highway 61 Revisited track listing Like a Rolling Stone (1) Tombstone Blues (2) Music sample: Bob Dylan - Like a Rolling Stone 30 seconds (of 6:10) Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Technical innovation

Since the introduction of magnetic recording tape in 1949, multitrack recording had been developed. By 1967 all of the Sgt. Pepper tracks could be recorded at Abbey Road using mono, stereo and 4-track recorders. Although 8-track tape recorders were already available in the U.S., the first 8-tracks were not operational in commercial studios in London until late 1967, shortly after Sgt. Pepper was released. Magnetic storage is a term from engineering referring to the storage of data on a magnetised medium. ... The Tascam 85 16B analogue tape recorder can record 16 tracks of audio on 1 inch (2. ...


Like its predecessors, the recording made extensive use of the technique known as bouncing down (also called multing), in which a number of tracks were recorded across the four tracks of one recorder, which were then mixed and dubbed down onto one track of the master 4-track machine. This enabled the Abbey Road engineers to give the Beatles a virtual multi-track studio. However the build-up of noise during repeated dubbing was a major problem for engineers. The Abbey Road album was one of the first to use the Dolby noise reduction system. The album remains a landmark in the history of sound recording and is remarkable for the clarity, fidelity and quietness of the transfers. In sound recording, dubbing is the transfer of recorded audio material from one medium to another of the same or a different type. ... Back cover The back cover of the original 1969 UK LP. Note that Her Majesty is not listed, unlike later reissues and the compact disc version—originally making it a hidden track. ... Dolby NR is a noise reduction system developed by Dolby Laboratories for use in analogue magnetic tape recording. ... Methods and media for sound recording are varied and have undergone significant changes between the first time sound was actually recorded for later playback until now. ...


Magnetic tape had also led to innovative use of instruments and production effects, notably the tape-based keyboard sampler, the Mellotron, effects like flanging (a term coined by Lennon and an effect used as early as 1959 on Toni Fisher's "The Big Hurt") and phasing, as well as a greatly improved system for creating echo and reverberation. Compact audio cassette Magnetic tape is a non-volatile storage medium consisting of a magnetic coating on a thin plastic strip. ... A tape replay keyboard is a musical instrument that uses pre-recorded analog tapes to produce sound when a key is pressed. ... The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ... Flanging is a time-based audio effect that occurs when two identical signals are mixed together, but with one signal time-delayed by a small and gradually changing amount, usually smaller than 20 ms (milliseconds). ... Toni Fisher (born 1931 - February 12 , 1999 in Los Angeles, California) was an American singer. ... In music the compositional technique phasing, popularized by composer Steve Reich, is that while the same part is played on two musical instruments, one instrumentalist keeps playing in steady tempo, while the other gradually moves ahead of the first until it becomes out of and then back in phase (the...


Several then-new production effects feature extensively on the recordings. One of the most important was automatic double tracking (ADT), a system that used tape recorders to create an instant and simultaneous doubling of a sound. Although it had long been recognised that using multitrack tape to record 'doubled' lead vocals produced a greatly enhanced sound (especially with weaker singers), it had always been necessary to record such vocal tracks twice, a task which was both tedious and exacting. Automatic double tracking (ADT) was an electronic system designed to augment the sound of voices and instruments during the recording process. ... Sony reel-to-reel tape recorder. ...


ADT was invented specially for the Beatles by EMI engineer Ken Townsend in 1966, mainly at the behest of Lennon, who hated tracking sessions and regularly expressed a desire for a technical solution to the problem. ADT quickly became a near-universal recording practice in popular music. Ken Townsend is a renowned sound engineer who played an important role at Abbey Road Studios. ...


Also important was varispeeding, the technique of recording various tracks on a multi-track tape at slightly different tape speeds. The Beatles use this effect extensively on their vocals in this period. The speeding up of vocals (also known as 'tweaking') also became a widespread technique in pop production. The Beatles also used the effect on portions of their backing tracks (as on "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds") to give them a 'thicker' and more diffuse sound. Pitch shift is a sound recording technique, in which the normal pitch or tone of a sound is altered (shifted), for effect or for other purposes. ... Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds is a song written mainly by John Lennon (credited to Lennon/McCartney) and recorded by The Beatles for their 1967 album Sgt. ...


In another innovation, non-US pressings of the album (in its original LP form that was later released on CD) end in an unusual way, beginning with a 15-kilohertz high-frequency tone (put on the album at Lennon's suggestion and said to be "especially intended to annoy your dog"), followed by an endless loop of laughter and gibberish made by the runout groove looping back into itself. The loop (but not the tone) made its U.S. debut on the 1980 Rarities compilation, titled "Sgt. Pepper Inner Groove". However, it is only featured as a 2-second fragment at the end of side 2 rather than an actual loop in the runout groove. The CD version of Sgt. Pepper's Inner Groove is actually a bit shorter than that one found on the original UK vinyl pressing. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Radio waves. ...


The sound in the loop is also the subject of much controversy, being widely interpreted as some kind of secret message. McCartney later told his biographer Barry Miles that in the summer of 1967 a group of kids came up to him complaining about a lewd message hidden in it when played backwards. He told them, "You're wrong, it's actually just It really couldn't be any other." He took them to his house to play the record backwards to them, and it turned out that the passage sounded very much like "We'll fuck you like superman". McCartney recounted to Miles that his immediate reaction had been, "Oh my god!"[3] Barry Miles (commonly known as, and called, simply Miles) is an author who has written biographies of Paul McCartney, William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg as well as books about John Lennon, the Beatles and Frank Zappa. ...


However, it seems that in reality it is nothing more than a few random samples and tape edits played backwards. The loop is recreated on the CD version which plays for a few seconds, then fades out. Although most of the content of the runout groove is impossible to decipher, it is possible to distinguish a sped-up voice (possibly McCartney's) actually reciting the phrase "never could see any other way". Played backwards, the last element of the original LP loop that is Sgt. Pepper's Inner Groove appears to be George Harrison saying "Epstein" (obviously missing from the CD version).


Instrumentation

Sgt. Pepper features elaborate arrangements — for example, the clarinet ensemble on "When I'm Sixty-Four" — and extensive use of studio effects including echo, reverberation and reverse tape effects. Many of these effects were devised in collaboration with producer George Martin and his team of engineers. Two soprano clarinets: a Bâ™­ clarinet (left, with capped mouthpiece) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... When Im Sixty-Four is a love song by The Beatles, written by Paul McCartney[1][2] (but co-credited to John Lennon) and released in 1967 on their album Sgt. ... Reverse tape effects are special effects created by recording sound onto magnetic tape and then physically reversing the tape so that when the tape is played back, the sounds recorded on it are literally heard in reverse. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ...


One of the few moments of discord came during the recording of "She's Leaving Home", when an impatient McCartney, frustrated by Martin's unavailability, hired freelance arranger Mike Leander to arrange the string section — the first of only two occasions during the group's entire career that he worked with another arranger (the other was in connection with some backing orchestration used in the Magical Mystery Tour film (12 October 1967 session; see Lewisohn), which were also arranged by Leander). Shes Leaving Home is a song, written and sung by Paul McCartney, and released in 1967 on The Beatles album Sgt. ... Mike Leander (30 June 1941 – 18 April 1996) was an arranger and record producer for Decca Records in the 60s and worked with such artists as Marianne Faithful, Billy Fury, Marc Bolan, Joe Cocker, The Small Faces, Van Morrison, Alan Price, Peter Frampton, Keith Richards, Shirley Bassey, Lulu, Jimmy Page... Magical Mystery Tour is an album by British rock band The Beatles, first released in late November 1967. ...


Another example of the album's unusual production is John Lennon's song "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!", which closes side 1 of the album. The lyrics were adapted almost word for word from an old circus poster which Lennon had bought at an antique shop in Kent the day the Beatles had been filming the promotional clip for Strawberry Fields Forever there. The flowing sound collage that gives the song its distinctive character was created by Martin and his engineers, who collected recordings of calliopes and fairground organs, which were then cut into strips of various lengths, thrown into a box, mixed up and edited together in random order, creating a long loop which was mixed in during final production. John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Being for the Benefit of Mr. ... Sound collage is the production of songs, musical compositions, or recordings using portions, or samples, of previously made recordings. ...


The opening track of side two, "Within You Without You", is unusually long for a 'pop' recording of the day, and features only George Harrison, on vocals, sitar and acoustic guitar, with all other instruments being played by a group of London-based Indian musicians. These deviations from the traditional rock and roll band formula were facilitated by the Beatles' decision not to tour, by their ability to hire top-rate session musicians, and by Harrison's burgeoning interest in India and Indian music, which led him to take lessons from sitar maestro Ravi Shankar. Harrison's fascination with Indian music is further evidenced by the use of a tamboura on several tracks, including "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" as well as "Getting Better". Within You Without You is a song written by George Harrison and recorded with a group of Indian musicians, without any input from his fellow Beatles. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... Acoustic guitar can refer to the following musical instruments: Nylon and gut stringed guitars: Renaissance guitar Baroque guitar Romantic guitar Classical guitar, the modern version of the original guitar, with nylon strings Flamenco guitar Steel stringed guitars: Steel-string acoustic guitar, also known as western, folk or country guitar Twelve... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Indian music is: The music of India or Native American music This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Pandit Ravi Shankar, Sitar Maestro © www. ... The tambura is a musical instrument used in various places around the world. ...


This album also makes heavy use of keyboard instruments. Grand piano is used on tracks such as "A Day in the Life," along with Lowrey organ on "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds." A harpsichord can be heard on "Fixing a Hole," and a harmonium was played by George Martin on "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite". Electric piano, upright piano, Hammond organ, glockenspiel and mellotron are all heard on the record. To this day, the album remains a milestone in the history of music. A keyboard instrument is a musical instrument played with a musical keyboard. ... A grand piano from Schiedmayer & Söhne, Stuttgart. ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. ... A Harmonium is a free-standing musical keyboard instrument similar to a Reed Organ or Pipe Organ. ...


Mono version

The Beatles were present during the mixing of the album in mono and the LP was originally released as such alongside a stereo mix prepared by Abbey Road engineers led by Geoff Emerick, the Beatles themselves did not attend the mixing of the stereo version. (The mono version is now out-of-print on vinyl and was not officially released on CD.) The two mixes are fundamentally different. For example, the stereo mix of "She's Leaving Home" was mixed at a slower speed than the original recording and therefore plays at a slower tempo and at a lower pitch than the original recording. Conversely, the mono version of "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" is considerably slower than the stereo version and features much heavier gating and reverb effects. McCartney's yelling voice in the coda section of "Sgt. Pepper (Reprise)" (just before the segue into "A Day in the Life") can plainly be heard in the mono version, but is nearly inaudible in the stereo version. The mono version of the song also features drums that open with much more presence and force, as they are turned well up in the mix. Also in the stereo mix, the famous segue at the end of "Good Morning Good Morning" (the chicken-clucking sound which becomes a guitar noise) is timed differently and a crowd noise tape comes in later during the intro to "Sgt. Pepper (Reprise)". Label for 1. ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... Label for 2. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Audio engineering is the branch of engineering dealing with the production of sound through mechanical means. ... Engineer Geoff Emerick. ... Look up coda in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In music, segue is a direction to the performer. ... For other uses, see A Day in the Life (disambiguation). ... In music, segue is a direction to the performer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Other variations between the two mixes include louder laughter at the end of the mono mix of "Within You Without You" and a colder, echoless ending on the mono version of "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!"


Themes and structure

With Sgt. Pepper, the Beatles wanted to create a record that could, in effect, tour for them — an idea they had already explored with the promotional film-clips made over the previous years, intended to promote them in the United States when they were not touring there.


McCartney decided that they should create fictitious characters for each band member and record an album that would be a performance by that fictitious band. The idea of disguise or change of identity was one in which the Beatles, naturally enough, had an avid interest — they were four of the most recognizable and widely known individuals of the 20th century.


The Beatles' recognition was the motivation for their growing moustaches and beards and even longer hair, and was an inspiration for the disguise of their flamboyant Sgt. Pepper costumes. McCartney was well known for going out in public in disguise and all four had used aliases for travel bookings and hotel reservations.


Thus, the album starts with the title song, which introduces Sgt. Pepper's band itself; this song segues seamlessly into a sung introduction for bandleader "Billy Shears" (Starr), who performs "With a Little Help from My Friends". A reprise version of the title song was also recorded, and appears on side 2 of the original album (just prior to the climactic "A Day in the Life"), creating a "bookending" effect. In music, segue is a direction to the performer. ... Sgt. ... Reprise is also the name of a record label, see Reprise Records In music a reprise is the repetition or return of the opening material later in a composition such as occurs in the recapitulation of sonata form, though it originally (18th century) was simply any repeated section, such as...


However, the Beatles essentially abandoned the concept after recording the first two songs and the reprise. Lennon was unequivocal in stating that the songs he wrote for the album had nothing to do with the Sgt. Pepper concept. Since the other songs on the album are actually unrelated, one might be tempted to conclude that the album does not express an overarching theme. However, the cohesive structure and careful sequencing of and transitioning between songs on the album, as well as the use of the Sgt. Pepper framing device, have led the album to be widely acknowledged as an early and ground-breaking example of the concept album. In popular music, a concept album is an album which is unified by a theme, which can be instrumental, compositional, narrative, or lyrical (Shuker 2002, p. ...


Prior to beginning work on Sgt. Pepper, the Beatles had begun to work on a series of songs that were to form an album thematically linked to childhood and everyday life. The first fruits of this exercise - "Penny Lane" and "Strawberry Fields Forever" were released as singles under pressure from EMI to meet their traditional release structure of one album and four singles a year. Once the singles were released the concept was abandoned in favour of 'Pepper'. However, traces of this initial idea survive in the lyrics to several songs on the album ("Day in the Life", "Lovely Rita", "Good Morning, Good Morning", "She's Leaving Home" and "When I'm Sixty-Four") and it could be argued provide more of a unifying theme for the album than that of the Pepper concept itself. Music sample Penny Lane ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... Music sample Strawberry Fields Forever Problems? See media help. ...


Drugs

There is much speculation as to the use of drugs in the creation of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and the Beatles' other music. The album features many effects and themes that appear to be psychedelic. At points there seem to be many explicit references to drugs. The album's closing track, "A Day in the Life", which is one of the last major Lennon-McCartney collaborations, includes the phrase "I'd love to turn you on". "Turning on" was a common drug culture colloquialism at the time for taking LSD, referring to the mantra coined by drug advocate Timothy Leary "turn on, tune in, & drop out", though this interpretation was later denied by Lennon and McCartney. They supposedly meant that they'd love to turn you on to the truth.[citation needed] For psychedelics, see psychedelic drug. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The songwriting credit Lennon/McCartney appears on all Beatles songs that were written by John Lennon and/or Paul McCartney. ... Look up Colloquialism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... LSD redirects here. ... For the American baseball player, see Tim Leary (baseball player). ...


According to Peter Brown in his biography of the Beatles, The Love You Make: An Insider's Story of The Beatles, when McCartney sings, "Found my way upstairs and had a smoke. Somebody spoke and I went into a dream", was quite obviously about marijuana. However, in the same song, "four thousand holes in Blackburn, Lancashire" had nothing to do with the needle tracks in a junkie's arm. Likewise, the hole McCartney was fixing in "Fixing a Hole" was not in the arm of a heroin addict, nor was "Henry the Horse" in "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite" a code for heroin. Lennon took the title from a Victorian circus poster he purchased in an antique shop. Peter Brown is an American businessman, born and educated in England. ...


Also when Starr sings "With a Little Help From My Friends", he repeatedly declares that he gets high with a little help from his friends. Phrases such as "Take some tea" (a slang term for cannabis) in "Lovely Rita" and "digging the weeds" in "When I'm Sixty-Four" have also been cited as possible drug references, although in both of these instances the lines are almost certainly meant to be taken literally. In fact, it is almost certain that the one in "When I'm Sixty-Four" was meant to be literal, because Paul wrote the song in the 1950s when he was 16. Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa L. subsp. ...

The picture by Lennon's son Julian that is said to have inspired the song "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds".

The song "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" became the subject of much speculation regarding its meaning. John Lennon maintained that the song describes a surreal dreamscape inspired by a picture drawn by his son Julian. (One of Julian's classmates at this time was a girl named Lucy.) However, the song became controversial as many believed that the words of the chorus were code for LSD, a claim Lennon consistently denied. The BBC used this as their basis for banning the song from British radio. Julian, McCartney, Harrison and Starr backed up Lennon's story (Starr even said he saw the picture at the time), and the picture itself has appeared in the media. However, during a newspaper interview in 2004, McCartney was quoted as saying, "Lucy In The Sky, that's pretty obvious. ...but the writing was too important for us to mess it up by getting off our heads all the time."[4] from Hey Jules This work is copyrighted. ... from Hey Jules This work is copyrighted. ... Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds is a song written mainly by John Lennon (credited to Lennon/McCartney) and recorded by The Beatles for their 1967 album Sgt. ... John Charles Julian Lennon known universally as Julian Lennon, (born April 8, 1963 in Liverpool, England) is an English singer, songwriter, musician, and first son of Beatle John Lennon and the only child of his first wife Cynthia Lennon. ... LSD redirects here. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


Debate continues among critics and fans about the meaning, extent, and depth of the drug references. Some interpretations of the album have focused on the use of drugs as central to the meaning of the entire album. Some critics, such as Sheila Whiteley, have claimed that the experience of LSD use is fundamental and infused into the album. Most critics acknowledge some drug references, but believe that the album cannot be simply reduced to these references. George Melly, for example, points out that many songs, such as "A Day in the Life", can easily be interpreted as rejections of drug culture, and that the culture is portrayed in a "desperate light." George Melly (born: 17 August 1926 in Liverpool, England) is a British jazz and blues singer. ... Drug subcultures are examples of countercultures, primarily defined by recreational drug use. ...


While the Beatles admitted to the occasional drug reference in their songs, these instances are surprisingly rare and usually they had other explanations for their lyrics. For instance, McCartney's "somebody spoke and I went into a dream" section of "A Day in the Life" was inspired by McCartney's taking the bus during his school years and sometimes falling asleep on the way there, while the "had a smoke" line refers to a Woodbine cigarette, rather than marijuana as is often assumed. Woodbine are a brand of Irish cigarette made by Gallaghers. ...


Critical reception

Upon release, Sgt. Pepper received both popular and critical acclaim. Various reviews appearing in the mainstream press and trade publications throughout June 1967, immediately after the album's release, were generally quite positive. In The Times prominent critic Kenneth Tynan described Sgt. Pepper as "a decisive moment in the history of Western civilization." Others including Richard Poirier, and Geoffrey Stokes were similarly expansive in their praise, Stokes noting, "listening to the Sgt. Pepper album one thinks not simply of the history of popular music but the history of this century." The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Kenneth Peacock Tynan (April 2, 1927 - July 26, 1980), was an influential and often controversial British theatre critic and writer. ... The history of western civilization traces its roots back to the fall of the Roman Empire and continues to the present era in Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand // In 476 A.D. the western Roman Empire, which had ruled modern-day Italy, France, Spain, Portugal and England for... Richard Poirier (born Gloucester, Massachusetts, 1925) is an American literary critic. ...


One notable critic who did not like the album was Richard Goldstein, a critic for The New York Times, who wrote, "Like an over-attended child, "Sergeant Pepper" is spoiled. It reeks of horns and harps, harmonica quartets, assorted animal noises, and a 41-piece orchestra," and added that it was an "album of special effects, dazzling but ultimately fraudulent" [5]. On the other hand, Goldstein called "A Day in the Life" "a deadly earnest excursion in emotive music with a chilling lyric," and that "it stands as one of the most important Lennon-McCartney compositions, and it is a historic Pop event."[6] The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


One rock musician who apparently did not like the album was Frank Zappa, who accused the Beatles of co-opting the flower power aesthetic for monetary gain, saying in a Rolling Stone article that he felt "they were only in it for the money." That criticism later became the title of the Mothers of Invention album (We're Only in It for the Money), which mocked Sgt. Pepper with a similar album cover. (The original cover, featuring Zappa and his bandmates in drag against a yellow background, was a spoof of the inside cover of Sgt. Pepper's; the original outer cover of the album, featuring Zappa and his band standing before a Sgt. Pepper-like collage and fronted by a flowerbed lettered "MOTHERS", was withdrawn by MGM Records and never officially issued until the album's CD release. The original LP issue nevertheless included a "cut-outs" card featuring facsimiles of Zappa's trademark moustache and of a button with a nipple on it.) Ironically, when recording of Sgt. Pepper was completed, McCartney said, "This is going to be our Freak Out!", referring to Zappa's 1966 debut album, which is considered by many as the first rock concept album.[7] Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... A bus covered with Hippie slogans and flowers Flower power was a slogan used by hippies in the late 1960s and early 1970s as a symbol of the non-violence ideology. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The Mothers of Invention chronology Alternate cover Zappas intended cover was changed to this portion of the inside sleeve. ... Freak Out!, released June 27, 1966 on MGM/Verve Records, is the debut album of The Mothers of Invention, led by Frank Zappa. ... In popular music, a concept album is an album which is unified by a theme, which can be instrumental, compositional, narrative, or lyrical (Shuker 2002, p. ...


Within days of its release, Jimi Hendrix was performing the title track in concert, first for an audience that included Harrison and McCartney, who were greatly impressed by his unique version of their song and his ability to learn it so quickly. Also, Australian band the Twilights — who had obtained an advance copy of the LP in London — wowed audiences in Australia with note-perfect live renditions of the entire album, weeks before it was even released there. Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... The Twilights were a leading Australian pop music group of the late 1960s. ...


The chart performance of the album was even stronger than critical reception. In the UK it debuted at #8 before the album was even released (on June 1, 1967) and the next week peaked at #1 where it stayed for 23 consecutive weeks. Then it was knocked off the top for The Sound of Music on the week ending November 18, 1967. Eventually it spent more weeks at the top, including the competitive Christmas week. When the CD edition was released on June 1, 1987, it made #3. In June 1992, the CD was re-promoted to commemorate its 25th Anniversary, and charted at #6. In 2007, commemorating 40 years of its release, Sgt. Pepper again re-entered the charts at #47 in the UK. In all, the album spent a total of 198 weeks on the UK charts. is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Sound of Music (disambiguation). ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ...


The album won the Grammy Award for Album of the Year, the first rock album to do so, and Best Contemporary Album in 1968. U.S. sales for the album totalled 11 million units, with 30 million worldwide. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Album of the Year is the most prestigious award category. ... The Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album was awarded in 1968 and since 1995. ...


It has been on many lists of the best rock albums,[8] including Rolling Stone, Bill Shapiro, Alternative Melbourne, Rod Underhill and VH1. In 1997 Sgt. Pepper was named the number 1 greatest album of all time in a 'Music of the Millennium' poll conducted by HMV, Channel 4, The Guardian and Classic FM. In 1998 Q magazine readers placed it at number 7, while in 2003 the TV network VH1 placed it at number 10;[9] In 2003, the album was ranked number 1 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.[1] In 2006, the album was chosen by Time Magazine as one of the 100 best albums of all time.[10] In 2002, Q magazine placed it at number 13 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever.[11] In 2003, it was one of 50 recordings chosen by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry.[12] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the British television station. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Classic FM is the United Kingdoms first national commercial radio station, broadcasting classical music in a popular and accessible style. ... Q is a music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom, with a circulation of 140,282 and a readership of 731,000. ... A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ... VH1 (VH-1: Video Hits One until 1994) is an American cable television channel that was created in January 1985 by Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, at the time a division of Warner Communications and owners of MTV. VH1 and sister channel MTV are currently part of the MTV Networks division... This article is about the magazine. ... The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time is the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2003. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... Q is a music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom, with a circulation of 140,282 and a readership of 731,000. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The National Recording Registry is a list of sound recordings which are culturally, historically or aesthetically important, and/or inform or reflect life in the United States. ...


Historical relevance

A period of experimentation in the Beatles' music had begun with the album Rubber Soul in late 1965. During this period, new influences and instruments from as far afield as India were incorporated in their recordings. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1965 U.S. LP, with a different colour saturation (see below) Back cover Back cover of the original 1965 UK LP Rubber Soul is the sixth album by The Beatles, first released in December 1965. ...


Two songs dropped from Sgt. Pepper, "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane", were both recorded in late 1966 and early 1967. The unusually long gap between Beatles releases, combined with the group's withdrawal from touring, resulted in producer George Martin's being placed under increasing pressure by EMI and Capitol to deliver new material. He reluctantly issued the two songs as a double-A-sided single in February 1967. In keeping with the group's usual practice, the single tracks were not included on the LP (a decision Martin maintains he regrets to this day). They were released only as a single in the UK at the time, but were included as part of the American LP version of Magical Mystery Tour (which was issued as a 6-track EP in Britain). The Harrison composition "Only a Northern Song" was also recorded during the Pepper sessions but did not see release until January 1969 when the soundtrack album for the animated feature Yellow Submarine was issued. Music sample Strawberry Fields Forever Problems? See media help. ... Music sample Penny Lane ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... // Extended play (EP) is the name typically given to vinyl records or CDs which contain more than one single but are too short to qualify as albums. ... Only A Northern Song is a song by British rock band The Beatles, written by George Harrison. ... For the song, see Yellow Submarine (song). ...


It is arguable that Sgt. Pepper was the last Beatles album where the band were consistently working together as a group rather than as separate members, and without any fear of conflict or ego domination. Much of this was due to Brian Epstein and his ability to resolve any petty differences between them. When he died a couple of months after the album was released, the band began the slow path towards breaking up, having no one to guide them and give them something to do. It is notably the last time where the band are unified in their look, all having long hair, moustaches and day-glo suits. After this, their individual appearances varied widely. McCartney appeared to take up the leadership role, something which the other Beatles saw as controlling. Brian Samuel Epstein (IPA: ) (born in Liverpool, England; 19 September 1934 – 27 August 1967) was the manager of The Beatles. ...


Their follow up, Magical Mystery Tour, contained songs that were stylistically similar to those of Sgt. Pepper. After a three month break, the Beatles returned to more conventional musical expression in February 1968 with the Fats Domino-influenced, piano-based "Lady Madonna". Magical Mystery Tour is an album by British rock band The Beatles, first released in late November 1967. ... Antoine Dominique Fats Domino (born February 26, 1928) is a classic R&B and rock and roll singer, songwriter and pianist. ... Lady Madonna is a song by the The Beatles, written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon/McCartney). ...


Album cover

See also: List of images on the cover of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

The Grammy Award-winning album packaging was created by art director Robert Fraser, mostly in collaboration with McCartney, designed by Peter Blake, his wife Jann Haworth, and photographed by Michael Cooper. It featured a colourful collage of life-sized cardboard models of famous people on the front of the album cover and lyrics printed on the back cover, the first time this had been done on an English pop LP.[citation needed] The Beatles themselves, in the guise of the Sgt. Pepper band, were dressed in eye-catching custom-made military-style outfits made of satin dyed in day-glo colours. The suits were designed by Manuel Cuevas.[13] Among the insignia on their uniforms are: Sgt. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The term art director, is an overall title for a variety of similar job functions in advertising, publishing, film and television, the Internet, and video games. ... Robert Fraser (1937-1986) was a noted London art dealer of the 1960s and beyond. ... Blakes album cover Sir Peter Thomas Blake (born June 25, 1932, in Dartford, Kent) is an English pop artist, best known for his design of the sleeve for The Beatles album Sgt. ... Michael Cooper (1951-1973) was a British photographer who is best known for his photographs of leading rock musicians of the 1960s and early 1970s, most notably the many photos he took of The Rolling Stones in the mid-1960s. ... Blacklight paint or blacklight-reactive paint is paint that glows under a blacklight. ... Manuel Arturo José Cuevas Martinez (born on April 23, 1938 in Michoacán, Mexico) or just Manuel is a designer for Rock and Roll and Country and Western singers. ...

Art director Robert Fraser was a prominent London art dealer who ran the Indica Gallery. He had become a close friend of McCartney's and it was at his strong urging that the group abandoned their original cover design, a psychedelic painting by The Fool. The Fool's design for the inner sleeve was, however, used for the first few pressings. Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions, in order of seniority: Knight or Dame Grand Cross... The Royal Arms as used in England, Wales and Northern Ireland The Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom is the official coat of arms of the British monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch, and are officially... The Ontario Provincial Police (O.P.P.) is the provincial police force for the province of Ontario, Canada. ... Robert Fraser (1937-1986) was a noted London art dealer of the 1960s and beyond. ... The Indician art gallery is located in London, England. ... The cover of The 5000 spirits or the layers of the onion, designed by The Fool The Fool were a Dutch design collective who were influential in the psychedelic style of art in British popular music at the end of the 1960s. ...


Fraser was one of the leading champions of modern art in Britain in the 1960s and after. He argued strongly that the Fool artwork was not well-executed and that the design would soon be dated. He convinced McCartney to abandon it, and offered to art-direct the cover; it was Fraser's suggestion to use an established fine artist and he introduced the band to a client, noted British 'pop' artist Peter Blake, who, in collaboration with his wife, created the famous cover collage, known as "People We Like".

The couch gag for The Simpsons episode "Bart After Dark", which is a homage to the album cover.
The couch gag for The Simpsons episode "Bart After Dark", which is a homage to the album cover.[14]

According to Blake, the original concept was to create a scene that showed the Sgt. Pepper band performing in a park; this gradually evolved into its final form, which shows the Beatles, as the Sgt. Pepper band, surrounded by a large group of their heroes, rendered as lifesized cut-out figures. Also included were wax-work figures of the Beatles as they appeared in the early '60s, borrowed from Madame Tussauds. The wax figures appear to be looking down on the word "Beatles" spelled out in flowers as if it were a grave, and it has been speculated that this symbolises that the innocent mop-tops of yesteryear were now dead and gone.[citation needed] At their feet were several affectations from the Beatles' homes including small statues belonging to Lennon and Harrison, a small portable TV set and a trophy. A young delivery boy who provided the flowers for the photo session was allowed to contribute a guitar made of yellow hyacinths. Although it has long been rumoured that some of the plants in the arrangement were cannabis plants, this is untrue. Also included is a Shirley Temple doll wearing a sweater in homage to the Rolling Stones (who would return the tribute by having the Beatles hidden in the cover of their own Their Satanic Majesties Request LP later that year). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bart After Dark is the fifth episode of The Simpsons eighth season, first aired by the Fox network on November 24, 1996. ... “Tussauds” redirects here. ... Genera Hyacinthus litwinowii Hyacinthus orientalis Hyacinthus transcaspicus A Hyacinth is any plant of genus Hyacinthus, which are bulbous herbs formerly placed in the lily family Liliaceae but now regarded as the type genus of the separate family Hyacinthaceae. ... Shirley Jane Temple (born April 23, 1928) is an American former child actress. ... Their Satanic Majesties Request is a psychedelic rock album by The Rolling Stones recorded and released in 1967. ...


The collage depicted more than 70 famous people, including writers, musicians, film stars and (at Harrison's request) a number of Indian gurus. Starr reportedly made no contribution to the design. The final grouping included Marlene Dietrich, W.C. Fields, Diana Dors, Bob Dylan, Marilyn Monroe, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Sigmund Freud, Aleister Crowley, Edgar Allan Poe, Karl Marx, Oscar Wilde, William S. Burroughs, Marlon Brando, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, and controversial comedian Lenny Bruce. Also included was the image of the original Beatles bass player, the late Stuart Sutcliffe. Pete Best said in a later NPR interview that Lennon borrowed family medals from his mother Mona for the shoot, on condition he not lose them. Adolf Hitler was requested by Lennon, but ultimately he was left out. It can, however, be seen in place as well as leaning against the wall in several photographs taken on the set. For other uses, see Guru (disambiguation). ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer, and entertainer. ... W. C. Fields (January 29, 1880 - December 25, 1946) was an American comedian and actor. ... Diana Dors (October 23, 1931 – May 4, 1984) was an English actress and sex symbol. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson; June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe award winning American actress, model and sex symbol. ... Karlheinz Stockhausen (born August 22, 1928) is a German composer, and one of the most important and controversial composers of the 20th century (Barret 1988, 45; Harvey 1975b, 705; Hopkins 1972, 33; Klein 1968, 117; Power 1990, 30). ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... William Seward Burroughs II (February 5, 1914) - August 2, 1997; pronounced ), more commonly known as William S. Burroughs, was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Stan Laurel (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson; 16 June 1890 – 23 February 1965) was an English comic actor, writer and director, famous as part of the comedy double act Laurel and Hardy, whose career stretched from the silent films of the early 20th Century until post-World War II. // Stan Laurel... Oliver Hardy (born Norvell Hardy; January 18, 1892 – August 7, 1957) was an American actor, most remembered for his role in one of the worlds most famous double acts, Laurel and Hardy, with his friend Stan Laurel. ... Lenny Bruce (October 13, 1925 – August 3, 1966), born Leonard Alfred Schneider, was a controversial American stand-up comedian, writer, social critic and satirist of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Stuart Fergusson Victor Sutcliffe (23 June 1940 – 10 April 1962) was a British musician and artist who, until his early death, worked in a style related to Abstract Expressionism. ... “Peter Best” redirects here. ... NPR redirects here. ... Mona Best was born in India. ... Hitler redirects here. ...

The gatefold
The gatefold

A photo also exists of a rejected cardboard printout with a cloth draped over its head; its identity is unknown, but may possibly be Elvis Presley. Even now, co-creator Jann Haworth regrets that so few women were included.[15] The entire list of people on the cover can be found at List of images on the cover of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Elvis redirects here. ... Sgt. ...


The package was a 'gatefold' album cover, that is, the album could be opened like a book to reveal a large picture of the Fab Four in costume against a yellow background. The reason for the gatefold was that the Beatles originally planned to fill two LPs for the release. The designs had already been approved and sent to be printed when they realized they would only have enough material for one LP. A gatefold cover or gatefold LP is a form of packaging for LP records which was popular in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ...

The cut-out page that came with the original LP

Originally the group wanted the album to include a package with pins, pencils and other small Sgt. Pepper goodies but this proved far too cost-prohibitive. Instead, the album came with a page of cut-outs, with a description in the top left corner: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

SGT. PEPPER
CUT-OUTS
  1. Moustache
  2. Picture card of Sgt. Pepper
  3. Stripes
  4. Badges
  5. Stand-up of the band

The special inner sleeve, included in the early pressings of the LP, featured a multi-coloured psychedelic pattern designed by the Fool.

The inner sleeve
The inner sleeve

The collage created legal worries for EMI's legal department, which had to contact the people who were still living to obtain their permission. Mae West initially refused — famously asking "What would I be doing in a lonely hearts club?" — but she relented after the Beatles sent her a personal letter. Actor Leo Gorcey requested payment for inclusion on the cover, so his image was removed. An image of Mohandas Gandhi was also removed at the request of EMI (it was actually just obscured by a palm tree), who had a branch in India and were fearful that it might cause offence there. Lennon had, perhaps facetiously, asked to include images of Jesus Christ and Adolf Hitler, but these were rejected because they would almost certainly have generated enormous controversy. Most of the suggestions for names to be included came from McCartney, Lennon and Harrison, with additional suggestions from Blake and Fraser (Starr demurred and let the others choose). Beatles manager Brian Epstein (who died just after the album's release) had serious misgivings, stemming from the scandalous U.S. Butcher Cover controversy the previous year, going so far as to give a note reading “Brown paper bags for Sgt. Pepper” to Nat Weiss as his last wish. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... MAE-West is a major Internet peering point located in San Jose, California. ... Leo Gorcey (June 3, 1917 - June 2, 1969) is an American actor. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948) (Devanagari: मोहनदास करमचन्द गांधी), called Mahatma Gandhi, was the charismatic leader who brought the cause of Indias independence from British colonial rule to... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Brian Samuel Epstein (IPA: ) (born in Liverpool, England; 19 September 1934 – 27 August 1967) was the manager of The Beatles. ... Yesterday . ...


The collage was assembled by Blake and his wife during the last two weeks of March 1967 at the London studio of photographer Michael Cooper, who took the cover shots on March 30, 1967 in a three-hour evening session. The final bill for the cover was £2,868 5s/3d, a staggering sum for the time — it has been estimated that this was 100 times the average cost for an album cover in those days.[citation needed] is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...

The Rutles album cover.
The Rutles album cover.

The cover has been parodied several times: Image File history File links The Rutles Promotional Album Image This image is of a music album or single cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the album or the artist(s) which produced the music in question. ... Image File history File links The Rutles Promotional Album Image This image is of a music album or single cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the album or the artist(s) which produced the music in question. ... The Rutles are a parody of The Beatles, jointly created by Eric Idle and Neil Innes. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ...

  • By the Rutles on their only 'real' album, showing four redesigns of Beatles covers, including Sgt. Pepper.
  • By Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention on the cover art of their album We're Only in It for the Money (although McCartney initially refused permission for the Mothers parody cover to be released, he later relented).
  • By Dutch comic artist Koen Hottentot as Sgt Croppers Yearly Fairport Band for a Fairport Convention festival programme and subsequent poster.
  • In the opening credits of an episode of The Simpsons. Homer turns around at the end, mimicking McCartney's appearance on the album's back cover. In the bottom right-hand corner, there is a Be Sharps album, which is a parody of another Beatles album cover, Abbey Road.
  • By Swedish artist David Liljemark for a magazine, depicting a hypothetical future for the band Sven-Ingvars.
  • By The Sporting News, whose 13 August 2001 issue featured a version of this album when New York City was selected as their best sports city during the period 1 July 200030 June 2001.
  • By Mad magazine in its August 2002 issue (#420), featuring "The 50 Worst Things About Music."
  • By the American death metal band Macabre, with their second full-length studio album Sinister Slaughter.
  • Mad had earlier printed a short poem about the album:

Your "Sergeant Pepper" is a smash;
Your loyal fans defend it;
We've even heard a few of them
Maintain they comprehend it.
It's great of you to want to build
Goodwill between our nations;
But just the same, could you provide
American translations?
The Rutles (The pre-fab four), a parody of the Beatles, was created by Eric Idle with songs composed by Neil Innes. ... Frank Vincent Zappa (December 21, 1940 - December 4, 1993) was an American rock/jazz fusion musician, composer, and satirist. ... The Mothers of Invention chronology Alternate cover Zappas intended cover was changed to this portion of the inside sleeve. ... Fairport Convention are often credited with being the first English electric folk band. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Abbey Road can refer to: Abbey Road (street), a street in London, England Abbey Road Studios, a recording studio complex owned by the EMI company Abbey Road (album), by The Beatles, 1969 The Abbey Road E.P., by Red Hot Chili Peppers Abbey Road (unreleased b side) , by Tori Amos... David Dayw Liljemark (born in 1973) is a Swedish comic creator, artist, and musician. ... Sven-Ingvars is a Swedish pop band from Slottsbron, Sweden. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Mad is an American humor magazine founded by editor Harvey Kurtzman and publisher William Gaines in 1952. ... This article is about the musical genre. ... Macabre are a death metal band from the USA. They were formed in 1985 in Chicago, Illinois, and ever since have never had a line-up change. ... Sinister Slaughter is the second full-length album by American heavy metal band Macabre and was released in 1993 by Nuclear Blast Records. ...

  • By Rolling Stone magazine, whose 1,000th issue (May 18June 1, 2006) consisted of a lenticular, 3-D cover with 154 rock & roll and pop cultural figures including, prominently, the Beatles themselves, arranged in a style reminiscent of the Sgt. Pepper cover.
  • By Brazilian singer Zé Ramalho on the cover of his album Nação Nordestina.
  • By Oakland, CA designer Dan Krewson for the cover of his compilation "The 20 Greatest Hip-Hop Albums Of All-Time". [1]

There were also variations of the cover for different countries. On the Soviet Union cover, the writing on the bass drum was translated into cyrillic, Karl Marx was replaced by Rasputin and a photo of the director of the record company was added in the back row between Edgar Allan Poe and Fred Astaire. Some countries had coloured vinyl such as a yellow LP in the Netherlands and a red one in Japan. This article is about the magazine. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Zé Ramalho (born José Ramalho Neto on October 03, 1949 - Brejo do Cruz - Paraiba, Brazil) is a Brazilian composer and performer. ... The Cyrillic alphabet (or azbuka, from the old name of the first two letters) is an alphabet used for several East and South Slavic languages; (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Rusyn, Serbian, and Ukrainian) and many other languages of the former Soviet Union, Asia and Eastern Europe. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Grigori Rasputin Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin (Russian: ) (22 January [O.S. 10 January] 1869 – 29 December [O.S. 16 December] 1916) was a Russian mystic with an influence in the later days of Russias Romanov dynasty. ...


Celebrities on the cover

Aldous Leonard Huxley (July 26, 1894 – November 22, 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... “Einstein” redirects here. ... Albert Stubbins (July 17, 1920 - 28 December 2002) was an English football player. ... Alberto Vargas (1896–1982) was a noted painter of pin-up girls and erotica. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... Aubrey Beardsley Aubrey Vincent Beardsley (August 21, 1872 – March 16, 1898) was an influential English illustrator, and author, best known for his erotic illustrations. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Bobby Breen (born November 4, 1927) was a Canadian-born singer and actor of the 1930s. ... Carl Gustav Jung Carl Gustav Jung (July 26, 1875 – June 6, 1961) was a Swiss psychiatrist and founder of the neopsychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Diana Dors (October 23, 1931 – May 4, 1984) was an English actress and sex symbol. ... Dion DiMucci (born Dion Francis DiMucci, 18 July 1939), better known as Dion, is an American singer-songwriter, now widely recognized as one of the top singers of his era, blending the best elements of doo-wop, pop, and R&B styles. ... David Livingstone (19 March 1813 – 4 May 1873) was a Scottish Presbyterian pioneer medical missionary with the London Missionary Society and explorer in central Africa. ... Dylan Marlais Thomas (27 October 1914 – 9 November 1953) was a Welsh poet. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was a world-renowned Irish author. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Henry Huntz Hall, (August 15, 1919 - January 30, 1999) was a radio, theatrical and motion picture performer perhaps best known for his portrayal of the Dead End Kids in movies such as Angels with Dirty Faces (1938). ... Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 – August 13, 1946), better known as H. G. Wells, was an English writer best known for such science fiction novels as The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon and The Island of Doctor Moreau. ... H. C. Westermann (Horace Clifford Cliff Westermann) (11 December 1922 (Los Angeles, California)-3 November 1981 (Danbury, Connecticut)) was an American printmaker and sculptor whose art constituted a scathing commentary on militarism and materialism. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Johnny Weissmuller as Tarzan in Tarzan and His Mate. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Karlheinz Stockhausen (born August 22, 1928) is a German composer, and one of the most important and controversial composers of the 20th century (Barret 1988, 45; Harvey 1975b, 705; Hopkins 1972, 33; Klein 1968, 117; Power 1990, 30). ... Lawrence D. Bell (aka Larry Bell) was born in 1894 in Indiana. ... Lenny Bruce (October 13, 1925 – August 3, 1966), born Leonard Alfred Schneider, was a controversial American stand-up comedian, writer, social critic and satirist of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... MAE-West is a major Internet peering point located in San Jose, California. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson; June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe award winning American actress, model and sex symbol. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer, and entertainer. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Max Miller, the Cheeky Chappie, was a 1930s English music hall comedian famous for his daringly risqué (for the period) repertoire (see Censorship), and gaudy suits. ... Oliver Hardy (born Norvell Hardy; January 18, 1892 – August 7, 1957) was an American actor, most remembered for his role in one of the worlds most famous double acts, Laurel and Hardy, with his friend Stan Laurel. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an Academy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... Born in 1901 at Hamburg. ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... For other people named Robert Peel, see Robert Peel (disambiguation). ... Shirley Jane Temple (born April 23, 1928) is an American former child actress. ... Sabato Simon (or Sam to his friends) Rodia was an Italian immigrant to the United States who spent much of his adulthood living in Los Angeles, California. ... Charles L. Sonny Liston (May 8?, 1932–December 30?, 1970) was a formidable boxer who became world heavyweight champion in 1962 by knocking out Floyd Patterson in the first round. ... Shyama Charan Lahiri, best known as Lahiri Mahasaya (September 30, 1828 - September 26, 1895) was an Indian yogi and the guru of Sri Yukteswar Giri. ... Mahavatar Babaji - a drawing from Autobiography of a Yogi, commissioned by Yogananda and based on his own meeting with Babaji Mahavatar Babaji is the name given to an Indian yogi and holy man by Lahiri Mahasaya and several of his disciples[1] who met Mahavatar Babaji between 1861 and 1935. ... Mukunda Lal Ghosh (January 5, 1893 in Gorakhpur, in northern India - March 7, 1952), better known as Paramahansa Yogananda, was a Bengali yogi and guru. ... Sri Yukteswar Giri (also spelled Sriyukteswar Giri and Sriyukteshvar Giri) (May 10, 1855-March 9, 1936) is the monastic name of Priyanath Karar, the guru of Paramahansa Yogananda. ... Stan Laurel (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson; 16 June 1890 – 23 February 1965) was an English comic actor, writer and director, famous as part of the comedy double act Laurel and Hardy, whose career stretched from the silent films of the early 20th Century until post-World War II. // Stan Laurel... For the U.S. Continental Congress delegate, see Stephen Crane (delegate). ... Stuart Fergusson Victor Sutcliffe (23 June 1940 – 10 April 1962) was a British musician and artist who, until his early death, worked in a style related to Abstract Expressionism. ... Terry Southern (May 1, 1924 – October 29, 1995) was a highly influential American short story writer, novelist, essayist, screenwriter and university lecturer. ... Time magazine cover, 1941-11-10, with portrait of Rita Hayworth by George Petty George Petty (1894-04-27-1975) was an American pin-up artist. ... Thomas Edward Lawrence (August 16, 1888 – May 19, 1935), also known as Lawrence of Arabia, and (apparently, among his Arab allies) Aurens or El Aurens, became famous for his role as a British liaison officer during the Arab Revolt of 1916–1918. ... Thomas Edwin Mix (born Thomas Hezikiah Mix; January 6, 1880 – October 12, 1940) was an American film actor and the star of many early Western movies. ... Tommy (Thomas Reginald) Handley (1892 -1949) was a British comedian mainly known for the BBC radio program ITMA (Its That Man Again). He was born at Toxteth Park, (Liverpool) on 17 January 1892 and died on 9 January 1949 from a brain hemorrhage. ... For other persons named Tony Curtis, see Tony Curtis (disambiguation). ... Tyrone Edmund Power, Jr. ... Wallace Berman (1926 -1976) was an American West Coast visual /assemblage artist. ... William Seward Burroughs II (February 5, 1914) - August 2, 1997; pronounced ), more commonly known as William S. Burroughs, was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. ... W. C. Fields (January 29, 1880 – December 25, 1946) was an American juggler, comedian, and actor. ...

Billy Shears

Ringo Starr is introduced on Sgt. Pepper as Billy Shears. Billy Shears is only mentioned in the title song and, implicitly, as the singer of the segued-into "With a Little Help from My Friends". Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Music sample Sgt. ... Sgt. ...


Billy Shears was later mentioned in Starr's 1973 hit "I'm the Greatest", written by John Lennon: "Yes, my name is Billy Shears / You know it has been for so many years." John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ...


In the 1978 RSO movie Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, a character called Billy Shears is played by Peter Frampton. RSO Records was a record label, formed in partnership with Polydor Records by rock and roll and musical theatre impresario Robert Stigwood in the late 1960s, after the death of his business partner and mentor Brian Epstein. ... Sgt. ... Peter Kenneth Frampton (born April 22, 1950 in Beckenham, Kent) is an English musician, best known today for his solo work in the mid-1970s and as one of the original members of the band Humble Pie. ...


In the 1968 animated movie Yellow Submarine, the Lennon character asks Jeremy "Who in the Billy Shears are you?", and later, the Billy Shears line from the song is played, but introducing Lennon rather than Starr. For the song, see Yellow Submarine (song). ... Music sample Sgt. ...


Planned TV movie

On 10 February 1967, during the orchestral recording sessions for "A Day in the Life", six cameramen filmed the chaotic events with the purpose of using the footage for a planned but unfinished Sgt. Pepper television special. The TV special was to have been written by Ian Dallas and directed by Keith Green. If the project had proceeded, it would have been the first full-length video album (that claim would later go to Blondie's Eat to the Beat in 1979). The shooting schedule included all the songs from the album set to music video style scenes: for example; "Within You Without You" scenes would have been set throughout offices, factories and elevators. There were even production numbers planned involving "meter maids" and "rockers". Although production was canceled, the "A Day in the Life" footage was edited down with stock footage into a finished clip. This clip was not released to the public until the John Lennon documentary Imagine: John Lennon was released in 1988. A more complete version was later aired on The Beatles Anthology series. is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Blondie is the name of an American rock band that first gained fame in the late 1970s, and which has sold over 40 million records. ... Eat to the Beat was Blondies fourth studio album. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... The definitive Wild One. ... The Beatles Anthology is the name of a documentary series, a series of three albums and a book, all of which focus on the history of one of the worlds most popular rock band The Beatles. ...


Track listing

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was the first Beatles album to be released with identical track listings in the United Kingdom and the United States (although the American release did not contain the side two runout groove and inner groove sound effects). All songs written by Lennon-McCartney, except where noted. The songwriting credit Lennon/McCartney appears on all Beatles songs that were written by John Lennon and/or Paul McCartney. ...


Side one

  1. "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" – 2:04
  2. "With a Little Help from My Friends" – 2:46
  3. "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" – 3:30
  4. "Getting Better" – 2:49
  5. "Fixing a Hole" – 2:38
  6. "She's Leaving Home" – 3:37
  7. "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!" – 2:39

Music sample Sgt. ... Sgt. ... Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds is a song written mainly by John Lennon (credited to Lennon/McCartney) and recorded by The Beatles for their 1967 album Sgt. ... Getting Better is a song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney based on an original idea by McCartney. ... Fixing a Hole is a song written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon/McCartney) and performed by The Beatles on the 1967 album Sgt. ... Shes Leaving Home is a song, written and sung by Paul McCartney, and released in 1967 on The Beatles album Sgt. ... Being for the Benefit of Mr. ...

Side two

  1. "Within You Without You" (George Harrison) – 5:07
  2. "When I'm Sixty-Four" – 2:37
  3. "Lovely Rita" – 2:44
  4. "Good Morning Good Morning" – 2:43
  5. "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)" – 1:20
  6. "A Day in the Life" – 5:33

Within You Without You is a song written by George Harrison and recorded with a group of Indian musicians, without any input from his fellow Beatles. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... When Im Sixty-Four is a love song by The Beatles, written by Paul McCartney[1][2] (but co-credited to John Lennon) and released in 1967 on their album Sgt. ... Lovely Rita is a song by the Beatles off of the album Sgt. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Music sample Sgt. ... For other uses, see A Day in the Life (disambiguation). ...

Alternative side one

The 1987 Compact Disc release for Sgt. Pepper includes additional notes mentioning an alternative track listing for the album's A side. The running order below is shown as the album was originally conceived. CD redirects here. ...

  1. "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"
  2. "With a Little Help from My Friends"
  3. "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!"
  4. "Fixing a Hole"
  5. "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds"
  6. "Getting Better"
  7. "She's Leaving Home"

Other recordings of the period

Four other tracks were recorded during the timespan of the Sgt. Pepper recording sessions but not incorporated on the album:

  • "Strawberry Fields Forever": The first song recorded for the album, written by Lennon with the title referring to a Salvation Army orphanage near where he lived during his childhood in Liverpool.
  • "Penny Lane": A McCartney song written as a counterpoint to Lennon's "Strawberry Fields" - it was McCartney's own nostalgic take on the Liverpool of his youth.
Though "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" had originally been intended for the new album, in January 1967 producer George Martin responded to EMI Records' pressure for a new single (the Beatles had not released a single since August 1966) and called the two tracks for issue in February 1967. In common with UK music industry practice at that time, which did not duplicate recent singles on new albums, both tracks were subsequently left off the Sgt. Pepper album. The tracks were issued on the US Magical Mystery Tour album in late 1967 and on a UK compilation album in 1973. Martin later described the decision to extract the two songs from the album as the biggest mistake of his career.[16]
  • "Only a Northern Song": A George Harrison song that offered a sarcastic commentary on his music publishing contract with the Beatles' publishing company "Northern Songs". After completing the song, Harrison decided to record another track for the album, "Within You Without You", and that song about spirituality was deemed a more suitable choice for the album. "Only a Northern Song" was shelved and then given to the makers of the animated feature film Yellow Submarine. It was used in the 1968 film and then incorporated on the soundtrack album released the following year.
  • "Carnival of Light": A McCartney sound collage reportedly lasting ten to fifteen minutes, the piece was commissioned and recorded for use at a psychedelic London event in early 1967 - the "Carnival of Light Rave" - and expanded on the use of tape loops that the Beatles had explored on "Tomorrow Never Knows". [2] "Carnival of Light" has not yet appeared on any release, be it official or a bootleg recording. However, a minute-long track claimed to be an excerpt from the song containing backwards, sped up electric guitar noises has appeared on various filesharing networks.

Music sample Strawberry Fields Forever Problems? See media help. ... Music sample Penny Lane ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... “Magical Mystery Tour” redirects here. ... Only A Northern Song is a song by British rock band The Beatles, written by George Harrison. ... For the song, see Yellow Submarine (song). ... Carnival of Light was an unreleased experimental piece by The Beatles. ... Tape loops are loops of prerecorded magnetic tape used to create repetitive, rhythmic musical patterns. ... Tomorrow Never Knows is the final track of The Beatles 1966 studio album Revolver, but it was the first to be recorded for the album. ...

Singles

At the time of its release, Sgt. Pepper was not accompanied by a single. Contrary to popular belief, this was not the first album to be handled this way; the Beatles' own Rubber Soul, from 1965, had no singles taken from it, to cite one prior example. Nonetheless, the practice was rare. The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1965 U.S. LP, with a different colour saturation (see below) Back cover Back cover of the original 1965 UK LP Rubber Soul is the sixth album by The Beatles, first released in December 1965. ... See also: // January 4 - Fender Guitars is sold to CBS for $13 million. ...


In the wake of the release of the movie Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band in 1978, Capitol issued the medley of "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" and "With a Little Help from My Friends" on the A-side of a 45, with "A Day in the Life" as the B-side. Even though the recordings were 11 years old, the single made the Billboard Hot 100, and peaked at #71. Sgt. ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ... The Billboard Hot 100 is the main singles chart used by Billboard magazine. ...


Release history

Country Date Label Format Catalog
United Kingdom June 1, 1967 Parlophone mono LP PMC 7027
stereo LP PCS 7027
stereo cassette TC-PCS 7027
United States June 2, 1967 Capitol Records mono LP MAS 2653
stereo LP SMAS 2653
Worldwide reissue June 1, 1987 Apple, Parlophone, EMI CD CDP 7 46442 2
Japan March 11, 1998 Toshiba-EMI CD TOCP 51118
Japan January 21, 2004 Toshiba-EMI Remastered LP TOJP 60138

is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Parlophone is a record label, founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindström Company. ... Label for 1. ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... Label for 2. ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... Label for 2. ... The Compact Cassette, often referred to as audio cassette, cassette tape, cassette, or simply tape, is a magnetic tape sound recording format. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... CD redirects here. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Toshiba-EMI - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...

Charts

Album

Year Country Chart Position
1967 United States Billboard 200 1 (15 weeks)
1967 United Kingdom UK Albums Chart 1 (27 weeks)
1967 Australia Australian ARIA Albums Chart 1 (30 weeks)
1967 Norway[17] Norwegian Album Chart 1 (22 weeks)

The album entered the UK Albums Chart on 3 June 1967 and has remained there for a total of 201 weeks as at 1 July 2007. In the USA the album stayed in the Billboard 200 chart for 175 weeks. The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ... The UK Albums Chart is a chart of the sales positions of albums in the United Kingdom. ... The ARIA charts are the main Australian music sales charts, issued weekly by the Australian Recording Industry Association. ... The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) is the organisation that represents the interests of the recording industry worldwide. ... The UK Albums Chart is a chart of the sales positions of albums in the United Kingdom. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ...


Singles

Year Single Chart Position
1978 "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"/"With a Little Help from My Friends"/"A Day in the Life" Pop Singles 71

Awards

Grammy awards

Year Winner Award
1967 Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band Album of the Year
1967 Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band Best Album Cover, Graphic Arts
1967 Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band Best Engineered Recording, Non-Classical
1967 Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band Contemporary Album

The Grammy Award for Album of the Year is the most prestigious award category. ... The Grammy Award for Best Album Cover, Graphic Arts was awarded from 1966 to 1968, alongside the award for Best Album Cover, Photography. ... The Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical has been awarded since 1959. ... The Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album was awarded in 1968 and since 1995. ...

Grammy Award nominations

Year Nominee Award
1967 Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band Group Vocal Performance
1967 Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band Contemporary Vocal Group
1967 "A Day in the Life" Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s)

The Grammy Award for Best Performance by a Vocal Group was awarded from 1961 to 1968. ... The Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal has been awarded since 1966. ... The Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s) has been awarded since 1963. ...

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Year Award
1988 Inducted
2007 Most Definitive Rock and Roll Album

Works directly inspired by Sgt. Pepper

Stage musical and film

The LP was adapted as a stage musical in the mid-1970s, which would itself provide the partial basis for a widely-panned 1978 film version, produced by Robert Stigwood and starring Peter Frampton as Billy Shears and the Bee Gees as the Hendersons, with an all-star supporting cast including George Burns and Steve Martin. (Billy Preston also appears performing "Get Back.") The long-disbanded Beatles did not appear in the film and none of their recordings were used on the soundtrack. Despite the fact that The Bee Gees were among the hottest stars in music at the time, the movie was a critical and commercial flop. // Events February 1 - Bob Dylans film Renaldo and Clara, a documentary of the Rolling Thunder Revue tour premieres in Los Angeles, California March 1 - Charlie Chaplins coffin is stolen from a Swiss cemetery 3 months after burial March - Leigh Brackett completes the first draft for Star Wars Episode... Sgt. ... Robert Stigwood (born April 16, 1934 in Adelaide, Australia) is an Australian-born entertainment entrepreneur. ... Peter Kenneth Frampton (born April 22, 1950 in Beckenham, Kent) is an English musician, best known today for his solo work in the mid-1970s and as one of the original members of the band Humble Pie. ... The Bee Gees: Maurice, Barry and Robin The Bee Gees were a British and Australian band, originally a pop singer-songwriter combination, reborn as funk and disco. ... George Burns[1], born Nathan Birnbaum (January 20, 1896 – March 9, 1996), was an American comedian and actor. ... For other uses, see Steve Martin (disambiguation). ...


Sgt. Pepper Knew My Father

In 1988 the New Musical Express released a tribute album called Sgt. Pepper Knew My Father, in aid of the charity Childline. It featured cover versions of all the Sgt. Pepper tracks by various artists. The track list is: The New Musical Express (better known as the NME) is a weekly magazine about popular music published in the UK. It is unlike many other popular music magazines due to its intended focus on guitar-based music and indie rock bands, instead of mainstream pop acts. ... A tribute album is a recorded collection of cover versions of a specific artists songs. ... ChildLine is a UK-based childrens helpline. ...

  1. Three Wize Men - "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"
  2. Wet Wet Wet - "With a Little Help from My Friends"
  3. The Christians - "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds"
  4. The Wedding Present with Amelia Fletcher - "Getting Better"
  5. Hue and Cry - "Fixing a Hole"
  6. Billy Bragg with Cara Tivey - "She's Leaving Home"
  7. Frank Sidebottom - "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite"
  8. Sonic Youth - "Within You Without You"
  9. Courtney Pine - "When I'm Sixty-Four"
  10. Michelle Shocked - "Lovely Rita"
  11. The Triffids - "Good Morning Good Morning"
  12. Three Wize Men - "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)"
  13. The Fall - "A Day in the Life"

A double A-sided single featuring the Wet Wet Wet and Billy Bragg tracks was released and reached No. 1 in the UK charts. Wet Wet Wet are a successful Scottish pop band of the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Wedding Present is a rock group based in Leeds, England, that was formed in 1985 from the ashes of the Lost Pandas. ... Amelia Fletcher (born 1966) is a British singer and guitarist. ... Hue and Cry is a pop group formed in Coatbridge, Scotland by brothers Pat Kane (vocals) and Greg Kane (keyboards). ... Stephen William Bragg (born December 20, 1957 in Essex, England), better known as Billy Bragg, is an English musician who blends elements of folk music, punk rock and protest songs. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sonic Youth is an American alternative rock band formed in New York City in 1981. ... Courtney Pine (born 18 March 1964) is a British jazz musician. ... Michelle Shocked (born Karen Michelle Johnston, 24 February 1962, in Dallas, Texas) is a U.S. singer-songwriter whose music and performances are influenced by her Texas roots, her political activism, and a self-assured style that her first major label producer likened to troubadours such as Joni Mitchell, Spider... The Triffids were an Australian rock band who achieved some international success in the 1980s. ... This article is about the band. ... “B-Sides” redirects here. ...


Big Daddy

A Los Angeles-based comedic pop group that emerged in 1983 on Rhino Records, Big Daddy released their version of Sgt. Pepper on June 2, 1992 (UPC: 081227037123), performing the entire LP, song-by-song, in the styles of 1950s and early '60s rock & roll. Rhino Entertainment Company is an American specialty record label. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


The Beachles

The Beachles Sgt. Petsound's Lonely Hearts Club Band is a track-for-track mash-up of Sgt. Pepper's and the Beach Boys' Pet Sounds by Clayton Counts, released in 2006. It is less a traditional mash-up than a work of noise music. The Beachles Sgt. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... The Beach Boys, originally the Beech Boys, a small team of four brothers from the south of Poland, emigrated to America in the early 1950s in search of a fortune to be made in the Arizonian logging industry. When it soon became evident they had been the victims of... Pet Sounds is a 1966 album recorded by American pop group the Beach Boys. ... Clayton Counts (born August 19, 1973 in Midland, Texas) is an American writer, composer, and musician, best known for a mash-up collection he released under the pseudonym The Beachles, which combined The Beatles Sgt. ... Noise music is music composed of non-traditional musical elements, and lacks the structure associated with Western Music. ...


Sgt. Pepper...With a Little Help From His Friends

Mojo Magazine included a track-for-track recording of Sgt. Pepper with its March 2007 tribute issue celebrating the 40th anniversary of the album's release that June. The recording features contemporary alternative rock artists. For other uses, see Mojo (disambiguation). ... Alternative music redirects here. ...

  1. Simple Kid - "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"
  2. Puerto Muerto - "With a Little Help from My Friends"
  3. Circulus - "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds"
  4. Fionn Regan - "Getting Better"
  5. 747s - "Fixing a Hole"
  6. Unkle Bob - "She's Leaving Home"
  7. Bikeride - "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite"
  8. Stephanie Dosen - "Within You Without You"
  9. Chin Up Chin Up - "When I'm Sixty-Four"
  10. Dave Cloud & The Gospel of Power - "Lovely Rita"
  11. The M's - "Good Morning Good Morning"
  12. Simple Kid - "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)"
  13. Captain - "A Day in the Life"
  14. Echo & The Bunnymen - "All You Need Is Love" (Additional Track)

Simple Kid, real-name Ciaran McFeely, is an Irish born solo musical artist known for his catchy melodies, Lo fi country / hip hop / 60s pop crossover sound and his deliberately simple approach to making and performing his music. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Circulus are a psychedelic folk/progressive rock band from South London, England, founded by vocalist and songwriter Michael Tyack. ... Fionn Regan is an Irish singer-songwriter, poet and artist from Bray, Ireland. ... The 747s are a indie band. ... Unkle Bob is a band based in the UK. The band was formed in and around Glasgow University. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Chin Up Chin Up is an indie pop band formed in 2001 by Jeremy Bolen and Nathan Snydacker in their hometown of Chicago. ... Captain are an English band from London, who formed in early 2005. ... Echo & the Bunnymen are an English post-punk group, formed in Liverpool in 1978. ...

40th anniversary re-recording

June 1, 2007 marked the fortieth anniversary of the release of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. The BBC marked the occasion by organising for the following biggest current rock acts to re-record the album. This was done using the same one-inch four-track equipment which recorded the original (borrowed from Mark Knopfler), and was supervised by the original engineer, Geoff Emerick. The recordings aired on BBC Radio 2 as part of a documentary following the process on Saturday June 2 and June 16. is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Mark Freuder Knopfler OBE (born August 12, 1949, Glasgow, Scotland) is a guitarist, singer, songwriter, and film score composer. ... Engineer Geoff Emerick. ...


It is presumed but not confirmed that this will be released as an album by the BBC. It was announced on the Russell Brand Radio Show that EMI are in talks with regards to royalties with all involved and that the monophonic mix is also to be released on CD on a date not yet announced. The final tracks covered were as follows:

  1. "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" – Bryan Adams
  2. "With A Little Help From My Friends" – Razorlight
  3. "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds" - Athlete
  4. "Getting Better" – Kaiser Chiefs
  5. "Fixing A Hole" – The Fray
  6. "She’s Leaving Home" – The Magic Numbers
  7. "Being For The Benefit Of Mr Kite" - Jamie Cullum
  8. "Within You Without You" - Oasis
  9. "When I'm Sixty Four" - Russell Brand
  10. "Lovely Rita" – Travis
  11. "Good Morning Good Morning" - The Zutons
  12. "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)" – Stereophonics
  13. "A Day in the Life" - Pete Doherty and Carl Barât

For other persons of the same name, see Brian Adams. ... Razorlight are an English rock band formed in 2002 by singer-songwriter Johnny Borrell. ... Athlete is an indie rock band formed in Deptford, London, comprising Joel Pott (lead vocals and guitar), Carey Willetts (bass and backing vocals), Stephen Roberts (drums and backing vocals) and Tim Wanstall (keyboards and backing vocals). ... This article is about the band. ... The Fray is a four-piece piano rock band from Denver, Colorado. ... The Magic Numbers are a four-piece band from England comprising two pairs of brother and sister who previously went to The Cardinal Wiseman Roman Catholic High School in Greenford. ... Jamie Cullum (born August 20, 1979) is an English jazz/pop pianist and singer-songwriter. ... Oasis are an English rock band, formed in Manchester in 1991, led by lead guitarist and primary songwriter Noel Gallagher and his younger brother, lead vocalist and songwriter Liam Gallagher. ... Russell Edward Brand [1] (born June 4, 1975 in Grays, Essex)[2] is an English radio and television personality, comedian, actor, and newspaper columnist. ... Travis are a Scotish rock band from Glasgow, comprising Fran Healy (lead vocals, guitar, piano), Dougie Payne (bass, backing vocals, occasional lead vocals), Andy Dunlop (lead guitar, banjo, keyboards, backing vocals) and Neil Primrose (drums, percussion). ... The Zutons are an English indie rock band from Liverpool. ... Stereophonics are a rock band from Wales with members Kelly Jones, Richard Jones (no relation to Kelly) and Javier Weyler. ... Peter Doherty (born March 12, 1979) is an English musician, artist and poet. ... Carl Ashley Raphael Barât (born June 6, 1978) is an English musician. ...

Classical rendition

Although numerous classical renditions of Sgt. Pepper songs were made, in December 2004 the first full classical rendition of Sgt. Pepper was released (Beatles Unlimited Magazine, Issue 189, December 2006). All instrumentals on Sgt. Pepper for Classical Guitar (UPC: 702987021428) were arranged for classical guitar and played, in the original order, by concert artist and composer Branimir Krstic [2].


Personnel

  • John Lennon – acoustic guitar, electric guitar, organ, piano, percussion, vocals
  • Paul McCartney – electric bass, electric guitar, piano, organ, percussion, vocals
  • George Harrison – acoustic guitar, electric guitar, sitar, tamboura, percussion, harmonica, Wurlitzer organ, vocals
  • Ringo Starrdrums, percussion, piano, harmonica, vocals
  • George Martin – harpsichord, organ, piano, harmonium
  • Geoff Emerick – recording engineer
  • Mal Evans – piano, harmonica, harmonium, percussion, vocals
  • Neil Aspinall – harmonica, tamboura
  • John Oedry – piano on "With a Little Help from My Friends"
  • Brian Jones - harmonium, tamboura and cello on "Within You Without You" , glockenspiel on "(Being) For the Benefit of Mister Kite", trombone on "Good Morning Good Morning"
  • James Buck, Tony Randall, John Burden – horn on "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"
  • Neil Sanders - horn on "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" and on "A Day in the Life"
  • Alan Civil - horn on "A Day in the Life"
  • Erich Gruenberg, Derek Jacobs, Trevor Williams, Jose Luis García – violin on "She's Leaving Home" and "A Day in the Life"
  • Granville Jones, Bill Monro, Jurgen Hess, Hans Geiger, D. Bradley, Lionel Bentley, David McCallum, Donald Weekes, Henry Datyner, Sydney Sax, Ernest Scott - violin on "A Day in the Life"
  • John Underwood, Stephen Shingles – viola on "She's Leaving Home" and "A Day in the Life"
  • Gwynne Edwards, Bernard Davis, John Meek - viola on "A Day in the Life"
  • Dennis Vigay, Alan Dalziel – cello on "She's Leaving Home" and "A Day in the Life"
  • Francisco Gabarro, Alex Nifosi - cello on "A Day in the Life"
  • Gordon Pearce – double bass on "She's Leaving Home" and "A Day in the Life"
  • Cyril MacArther - double bass on "A Day in the Life"
  • Sheila Bromberg – harp on "She's Leaving Home"
  • John Marson - harp on on "A Day in the Life"
  • Erich Gruenberg, Alan Loveday, Julien Gaillard, Paul Scherman, Ralph Elman, David Wolfsthal, Jack Rothstein, Jack Greene – violin on "Within You Without You"
  • Reginald Kilbey – cello on "Within You Without You"
  • Allen Ford, Peter Beavan – cello on "Within You Without You"
  • Robert Burns, Henry Mackenzie – clarinet on "When I'm Sixty-Four" and "A Day in the Life"
  • Basil Tschaikov, Jack Brymer - clarinet on "A Day in the Life"
  • Frank Reidy – bass clarinet on "When I'm Sixty-Four"
  • Roger Lord - oboe on "A Day in the Life"
  • N. Fawcett, Alfred Waters - bassoon on "A Day in the Life"
  • Clifford Seville, David Sandeman - flute on "A Day in the Life"
  • David Mason, Monty Montgomery, Harold Jackson - trumpet on "A Day in the Life"
  • Barrie Cameron, *David Glyde – saxophon on "Good Morning Good Morning"
  • Ian Holmes, John Lee - trombone on "Good Morning Good Morning"
  • Raymond Brown, Raymond Premru, T. Moore - trumpet on "A Day in the Life"
  • Michael Barnes - tuba on "A Day in the Life"
  • Tristan Fry - percussion on "A Day in the Life"
  • Natvel Soni - Tabla on "Within You Without You"
  • P.D. Joshi - Swarmandel on "Within You Without You"
  • Amrat Gajjar - dilruba on "Within You Without You"
  • Stuart Eltham - special effects

John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an Academy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... The Rudolph Wurlitzer Company is a brand of organ, and Jukeboxes and was first famous for manufacturing the finest quality band organs with self arranged music rolls which played at amusments such as carousels and skating rinks. ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ... Engineer Geoff Emerick. ... Malcolm Mal Evans (27 May 1935 – 5 January 1976) is best known as the road manager, assistant, and a friend of the Beatles. ... Neil Aspinall (born in Prestatyn, North Wales, October 13, 1942) was the road manager and personal assistant for the Beatles. ... For other persons named Brian Jones, see Brian Jones (disambiguation). ... Most orchestral glockenspiels are mounted in a case. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ... The tabla (Hindi: तब्ला, tablā, Urdu: تبلہ) is a popular Indian percussion instrument used in the classical, popular and religious music of the Indian subcontinent and in Hindustani classical music. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The esraj (also called israj or dilruba) is a string instrument found in two forms throughout the north, central, and east regions of India. ...

See also

The following tracks recorded by The Beatles were co-written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, jointly known as Lennon/McCartney. In most cases, a song was written by either Lennon or McCartney and then credited jointly. ... The following tracks recorded by The Beatles were written or co-written by George Harrison. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Rolling Stone. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  2. ^ a b Lewisohn, Mark (1988). The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions: The Official Story of the Abbey Road Years. London: Hamlyn. ISBN 0-600-55784-7. 
  3. ^ Miles, Barry (1997), Paul McCartney: Many Years From Now, Secker & Warburg, London
  4. ^ The Associated Press. "Paul McCartney got no thrill from heroin", MSNBC, 2004-06-02. Retrieved on 2007-03-15. 
  5. ^ Goldstein, Richard, "We Still Need the Beatles, but..." in The New York Times, 1967-06-18.
  6. ^ ibid.
  7. ^ Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band: The first concept album?. Its Influence. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  8. ^ List of Sgt. Peppers Accolades. Acclaimed Music. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  9. ^ 2001 VH1 Cable Music Channel All Time Album Top 100. VH1. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  10. ^ The All-Time 100 Albums. Time. Retrieved on 2007-11-20.
  11. ^ The 100 Greatest British Albums Ever. Q. Retrieved on 2007-11-20.
  12. ^ The National Recording Registry 2003. Library of Congress. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  13. ^ Transcript: Glenn Beck. CNN (2006-05-08). Retrieved on 2007-03-15.
  14. ^ Homer's Enemy. BBC.co.uk. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  15. ^ Arts: Sgt Pepper: take two; In 1967, Jann Haworth co-designed the iconic cover for Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band with her then husband, Peter Blake. Now she has revisited the idea - and this time women get a proper look-in
  16. ^ DeRogotis, Jim: Kill Your Idols. Barricade Books, 2004
  17. ^ THE BEATLES - SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND (ALBUM) Norwegiancharts.com. Retrieved November 10, 2007.

This article is about the magazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mark Lewisohn (born 1958) is one of the worlds foremost experts on The Beatles. ... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... VH1 (VH-1: Video Hits One until 1994) is an American cable television channel that was created in January 1985 by Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, at the time a division of Warner Communications and owners of MTV. VH1 and sister channel MTV are currently part of the MTV Networks division... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Q is a music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom, with a circulation of 140,282 and a readership of 731,000. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

References

  • Sorgenfrei, Lars Rosenblum. Inkblot Magazine. [3]. Retrieved October 26, 2004.
  • Rolling Stone magazine. RS 507 - 27 August 1987. [4] Retrieved October 26, 2004.
  • Haber, David. The Sgt. Pepper's Album. [5] Retrieved October 26, 2004.
  • Spitz, Bob (2005). The Beatles. Little Brown. ISBN 0-316-80352-9. 
  • Lewisohn, Mark The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions. Hamlyn. ISBN 0-681-03189-1

External links

Singles from Taking the Long Way Released: September 2005 Released: March 2006 Released: July 2006 Released: Mid 2006 Released: Late 2006 Taking the Long Way is the multiple Grammy Award-winning seventh studio album by the American country/rock female band Dixie Chicks. ...


 
 

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