FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Seville" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Seville
Seville / Sevilla
The Cathedral of Seville is one of the largest in the world
Flag of Sevilla Coat of arms of Sevilla
Flag Coat of Arms
NO8DO
("From Andalusian: "No ma dejado" - I was not abandoned")
Location
Coordinates : (Coordinates: 37°22′38″N 5°59′13″W / 37.37722, -5.98694)
Time zone : CET (GMT +1)
- summer : CEST (GMT +2)
General information
Native name Sevilla (Spanish)
Spanish name Sevilla
Founded 8th-9th century BC
Postal code 41001-41080
Website http://www.sevilla.org
Administration
Country Spain
Autonomous Community Andalucía
Province Sevilla
Mayor Alfredo Sánchez Monteseirín (PSOE)
Geography
Land Area 140 km²
Altitude 7 m AMSL
Population
Population 699,145 (about 1.5 millions in metro area) (2007)
Density 4,947.6 hab./km² (2007)

Seville (Spanish: Sevilla [se'bi.ʝa], see also different names) is the artistic, cultural, and financial capital of southern Spain. It is the capital of Andalusia and of the province of Sevilla. It is situated on the plain of the River Guadalquivir, with an average elevation of 7 metres (23 ft) above sea level. The inhabitants of the city are known as Sevillanos (feminine form: Sevillanas) or Hispalenses. The population of the city of Seville was 699,145 as of 2007 (INE estimate). The population of the metropolitan area (urban area plus satellite towns) was 1,450,214 as of 2007 (INE estimate), ranking as the fourth largest metropolitan area of Spain. Seville can refer to: Seville, a city in in Andalusia, Spain Sevilla (province), a province in Andalusia, Spain The Seville Orange: A tart orange used in making marmalade. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1200, 453 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Cathedral of Seville was begun in 1402, with construction continuing into the 16th century. ... Image File history File links BanderaSevilla1. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (605x601, 175 KB) Sumario Escudo de la ciudad de Sevilla, fotografiado de la Plaza de España de Sevilla. ... Image File history File links ES_Sevilla,_location_map_. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... GMT redirects here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... Postcodes are generally clearly visible outside Australia Post offices. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... The term Administration, as used in the context of government, differs according to jurisdiction. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... Spains fifty provinces (provincias) are grouped into seventeen autonomous communities (comunidades aut nomas), in addition to two African autonomous cities (ciudades aut nomas) (Ceuta and Melilla). ... Motto: Dominator Hercules Fundator Andaluc a por s , para Espa a y la humanidad (Andalusia for herself, for Spain, and for humanity) Capital Seville Area  - total  - % of Spain Ranked 2nd 87 268 km 17,2% Population  - Total (2003)  - % of Spain  - Density Ranked 1st 7 478 432 17,9% 85,70... In addition to its seventeen autonomous communities, Spain is divided into fifty provinces. ... Sevilla province Sevilla is a province of southern Spain, in the western part of the autonomous community of Andalusia. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Altitude is the elevation of an object from a known level or datum. ... The term above mean sea level (AMSL) refers to the elevation (on the ground) or altitude (in the air) of any object, relative to the average sea level. ... For other uses, see Density (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x733, 121 KB) Photograph © Andrew Dunn, 07 May 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x733, 121 KB) Photograph © Andrew Dunn, 07 May 2006. ... Alamillo Bridge The Alamillo Bridge at night The Alamillo Bridge in Seville, Spain spans the Guadalquivir River and was completed in 1992 by Santiago Calatrava. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Andalusia (disambiguation). ... Sevilla province Sevilla is a province of southern Spain, in the western part of the autonomous community of Andalusia. ... The Guadalquivir is the second longest river in Spain (after the Tagus). ... Instituto Nacional de Estadística (INE) Statistics National Institute, is the official organisation in Spain that collects statistics about demography, economy, and spanish society. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

History

Seville is more than two thousand years old. The passage of the various people instrumental in its growth has left the city with a distinct personality, and a large and well-preserved historical centre.


The city was known from early Roman times as Hispalis. The nearby Roman city of Italica is well-preserved and gives an impression of how Hispalis may have looked in the later Roman period. Existing Roman features in Seville include the remnants of an aqueduct. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Iberian Peninsula. ... The Roman amphitheatre at Italica seated 25,000 Italicas amphitheatre pit Pits were filled with water for the naumachia A walkway in Italica A hallway that circles the ampitheatre The House of the Birds complete with mosaic floor The House of the Planetarium The city of Italica (north of... For other uses, see Aqueduct (disambiguation). ...


After successive conquests of the Roman province of Hispania Baetica by the Vandals and Visigoths, in the 5th and 6th centuries, the city was taken by the Moors in 712 and became an important centre in Muslim Andalusia. It remained under Muslim control, under the authority of the Umayyad, Almoravid and Almohad dynasties, until falling to Fernando III in 1248. The city retains many Moorish features, including large sections of the city wall. Roman province of Hispania Baetica, 120 CE In Hispania, which in Greek is called Iberia, there were three Imperial Roman provinces, Hispania Baetica in the south, Lusitania, corresponding to modern Portugal, in the west, and Hispania Tarraconensis in the north and northeast. ... Vandal and Vandali redirect here. ... A votive crown belonging to Reccesuinth (653–672) The Visigoths (Latin: ) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe, the Ostrogoths being the other. ... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... For other uses, see moor. ... Al-Andalus is the Arabic name given the Iberian Peninsula by its Muslim conquerors; it refers to both the Caliphate proper and the general period of Muslim rule (711–1492). ... The Courtyard of the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, one of the grandest architectural legacies of the Umayyads. ... Almoravides (From Arabic المرابطون sing. ... The Almohad Dynasty (From Arabic الموحدون al-Muwahhidun, i. ... United arms of Castile and León which Ferdinand first used. ...


Following the Reconquest, the city's development continued, with the construction of public buildings including churches, many in Mudéjar style. Later, the city experienced another golden age of development brought about by wealth accumulating from the awarding of a monopoly of trade with the Spanish territories in the New World. After the silting up of the Guadalquivir, the city went into relative economic decline. For other uses, see Reconquista (disambiguation). ... Teruel: Tower of the Cathedral, one of ten Mudéjar monuments of Aragón that comprise the World Heritage Site The Courtyard of the Dolls in the Alcázar of Seville Tower of the Santa maría church in Calatayud Las Ventas, Madrids Neo-Mudéjar bullfighting ring Mud... An anachronous map of the overseas Spanish Empire (1492-1898) in red, and the Spanish Habsburg realms in Europe (1516-1714) in orange. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ...


Seville's development in the 19th and 20th centuries was characterised by population growth and increasing industrialisation. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A factory in Ilmenau (Germany) around 1860 Industrialisation (also spelt Industrialization) or an Industrial Revolution is a process of social and economic change whereby a human group is transformed from a pre-industrial society (an economy where the amount of capital accumulated per capita is low) to an industrial one...


Seville fell very quickly to General Franco's troops near the beginning of the Spanish Civil War in 1936 due to its proximity to the invasion force coming from Morocco. After the initial takeover of the city, resistance continued amongst the working class areas for some time, until a series of fierce reprisals took place.[1][2] Generalísimo Francisco Franco, caudillo de España por la gracia de Dios Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco y Bahamonde Salgado Pardo de Andrade (December 4, 1892 - November 20, 1975), abbreviated Francisco Franco Bahamonde and sometimes known as Generalísimo Francisco Franco, was dictator of Spain from 1939 until... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Main city sights

Monuments

The city's cathedral was built from 14011519 after the Reconquista on the former site of the city's mosque. It is amongst the largest of all medieval and Gothic cathedrals, in terms of both area and volume. The interior is the longest nave in Spain, and is lavishly decorated, with a large quantity of gold evident. The Cathedral reused some columns and elements from the mosque, and, most famously, the Giralda, originally a minaret, was converted into a bell tower. It is topped with a statue, known locally as El Giraldillo, representing Faith. The tower's interior was built with ramps rather than stairs, to allow the Muezzin and others to ride to the top. Cathedral from the Patio of Oranges Interior of the Cathedral Façade of the Cathedral The Cathedral of Seville, formally Catedral de Santa María de la Sede (Cathedral of Saint Mary of the See) was begun in 1402, with construction continuing into the 16th century. ... The Lollards, a religious sect taught by John Wycliffe, were persecuted for their beliefs. ... Events March 4 - Hernán Cortés lands in Mexico. ... For other uses, see Reconquista (disambiguation). ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... For the food company, see Alimentos La Giralda. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Bell Tower is an office tower in Edmonton, Canada. ... For other uses, see Faith (disambiguation). ... The müezzin (the word is pronounced this way Turkish, Urdu, etc. ...

Torre del Oro
Torre del Oro

The Alcázar facing the cathedral has developed from the city's old Moorish Palace; construction was begun in 1181 and continued for over 500 years, mainly in Mudéjar style, but also in Renaissance. Its gardens are a blend of Moorish, Andalusian, and Christian traditions. The Alcázar of Seville (Spanish Alcázares Reales de Sevilla or Royal Alcazars of Seville) is a royal palace in Seville, Spain. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... Events Jayavarman VII assumes control of the Khmer kingdom. ... Teruel: Tower of the Cathedral, one of ten Mudéjar monuments of Aragón that comprise the World Heritage Site The Courtyard of the Dolls in the Alcázar of Seville Tower of the Santa maría church in Calatayud Las Ventas, Madrids Neo-Mudéjar bullfighting ring Mud... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ...


The Torre del Oro was built by the Almohad dynasty as watchtower and defensive barrier on the river. A chain was strung through the water from the base of the tower to prevent boats from traveling into the river port. The Torre del Oro The Torre del Oro at night View from the riverside The Torre del Oro (Spanish for Gold Tower) is a military watchtower built in Seville, Spain during the Almohad dynasty in order to control access to the city via the Guadalquivir river. ... Almohad Dynasty in its Greatest Extent, IN WRONG MAP The Almohad Dynasty (From Arabic الموحدون al-Muwahhidun, i. ... A watchtower is a type of fortification. ...


The Town Hall, built in the 16th century in Plateresque Style by Diego de Riaño. The Façade to Plaza Nueva was built in the 19th century in Neoclassical style. City Hall is a 1996 film directed by Harold Becker. ... Plateresque refers to the 15th and 16th century art form in Spain, characterized by an ornate style of architecture. ... Façade of Seville Town Hall, by Diego de Riaño Diego de Riaño (Valladolid ?-1534) was a Spanish architect of the Renaissance. ... The Cathedral of Vilnius (1783), by Laurynas Gucevičius. ...


The University of Sevilla is housed in the original site of the first tobacco factory in Europe, La Antigua Fabrica de Tabacos. The University of Seville or sometimes Seville University, in Spanish Universidad de Sevilla, is a university in Seville, Spain. ...

Parks and gardens
  • Parque Maria Luisa was built for the 1929 Exposición Ibero-Americana World's Fair, and remains landscaped with attractive monuments and museums.
  • The Alcázar Gardens, arranged to the back of the palace. They were planted and developed alongside the Alcázar throughout the centuries. Sheltered within the walls of the palace, they are laid out in terraces, and present variations of influences, styles and plants in each sector.
  • The Gardens of Murillo and the Gardens of Catalina de Ribera: alongside the wall of the Alcázar and next to the district of Santa Cruz.

Other prominent parks and gardens include: Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ibero-American Exposition of 1929 was a worlds fair held in Seville, Spain. ... Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ... For other uses, see Museum (disambiguation). ...

  • Parque de los Príncipes
  • Parque del Alamillo
  • Parque Amate
  • Parque Metropolitano de la Cartuja
  • Jardines de las Delicias
  • Jardín Americano
  • Jardín Este
  • Jardines de Cristina
  • Jardines Chapina
  • Jardines de la Buhaira
  • Jardines de San Telmo
  • ardines del Guadalquivir
  • Jardines del Valle

Climate

Climate chart for Seville
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
66
 
15
6
 
 
61
 
17
7
 
 
90
 
20
9
 
 
61
 
24
11
 
 
41
 
27
13
 
 
8
 
32
17
 
 
1
 
36
20
 
 
5
 
36
20
 
 
19
 
32
18
 
 
70
 
26
14
 
 
67
 
20
10
 
 
79
 
16
7
temperatures in °Cprecipitation totals in mm
source: BBC Weather

The climate of Seville is Mediterranean, with oceanic influences. The annual average temperature is 18.6 °C (65 °F), which makes this city one of the warmest in Europe.  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is a climate that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin. ...

  • Winters are mild: January is the coolest month, with average maximum temperatures of 15.9 °C (61 °F) and minimum of 5.2 °C (41 °F).
  • Summers are very warm: August is the warmest month, with average maximum temperatures of 35.5 °C (96 °F) and minimum temperatures of 19.4 °C (67 °F) and every year the temperature exceeds 40 °C (104 °F) on several occasions. The registrated extreme temperatures by the weather station at Seville Airport are −5.5 °C (22 °F) on 12 February 1956, and 46.6 °C (116 °F) on 23 July 1995. There is a non-accredited record by the National Institute of Meteorology which is 47.2 °C (117 °F) on 1 August during the 2003 heat wave, according to a weather station (83910 LEZL) located in the southern part of Seville Airport, near the abandoned military zone. This temperature would be one of the highest ever recorded in Spain and Europe.
  • Precipitation varies from 600 to 800 mm (23.5–31.5 in) per year, concentrated in the period October to April. December is the wettest month, with an average rainfall of 95 millimetres (4 in). On average there are 52 days of rain, 2,898 hours of sun and four days of frost per year.

San Pablo Airport (IATA: SVQ, ICAO: LEZL) is the main airport for Seville and is Andalucia’s second airport, behind Malaga. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 European heat wave was one of the hottest summers on record in Europe; this heat wave led to a health crisis in certain countries and had a considerable impact on crops. ...

Culture

Festivals

A man playing the accordion in the Old Quarters of Seville.
A man playing the accordion in the Old Quarters of Seville.

Semana Santa and the Seville Fair, La Feria de Sevilla (also Feria de Abril, "April Fair") are the two most well-known of Seville's festivals. Seville is internationally renowned for the solemn but beautiful processions during Holy Week and the colourful and lively fair held two weeks after. During Feria, families, businesses and organisations set up casetas, marquees, in which they spend the week dancing, drinking, and socialising. Traditionally, women wear elaborate flamenco dresses and men dress in their best suits. The marquees are set up on a permanent fairground in which each street is named after a famous bullfighter. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 446 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,709 × 2,297 pixels, file size: 808 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) An accordion player in Seville, Spain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 446 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,709 × 2,297 pixels, file size: 808 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) An accordion player in Seville, Spain. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... The Holy Week in Seville (Semana Santa en Sevilla) is one of the most important religious and traditional events of the city. ... The Seville Spring Fair, Feria de abril de Sevilla, is held in the Andalusian capital of Seville, Spain. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... The word marquee can refer to several things: Marquee (tent), its use in British English for a large, open-sided tent installed outdoors for temporary functions. ... Flamenco is a Spanish musical genre with strong, rhythmic undertones and is often accompanied with a similarly impassioned style of dance characterized by its powerful yet graceful execution, as well as its intricate hand and footwork. ...


Gastronomy

Seville is a gastronomic centre, with a cuisine based on the products of the surrounding provinces, including seafood from Cádiz, olive oil from Jaén, and sherry from Jerez de la Frontera. Cádiz province Cádiz is a province of southern Spain, in the southwestern part of the autonomous community of Andalusia, being the southernmost point of continental Western Europe. ... For the Popeye character, see Olive Oyl. ... Jaén Province may refer to Jaén Province, Spain Jaén Province, Peru This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A glass of amontillado Sherry For other uses, see Sherry (disambiguation). ... “Jerez” redirects here. ...


The tapas scene is one of the main cultural attractions of the city: people go from one bar to another, enjoying small dishes called tapas (literally "lids" or "covers" in Spanish, referring to their probable origin as snacks served in small plates used to cover drinks.) Puntillitas, battered and fried baby squid Tapas (IPA: ) is the name for a wide variety of appetizers in Spanish cuisine. ...


Local specialities include fried and grilled seafood (including squid, cuttlefish, swordfish and dogfish), grilled meats in sauces, spinach and chickpeas, Andalusian ham (Jamón ibérico), lamb's kidneys in a sherry sauce, snails, and gazpacho. For other uses, see Squid (disambiguation). ... Orders and Families †Vasseuriina †Vasseuriidae †Belosepiellidae Sepiina †Belosaepiidae Sepiadariidae Sepiidae Cuttlefish are marine animals of the order Sepiida belonging to the Cephalopoda class (which also includes squid, octopuses, and nautiluses). ... This article is about a type of fish. ... Note the fisherman carefully avoiding the venomous spine near the rear dorsal fin The name dogfish, derived from a compound of dog and fish, is applied to a number of small sharks found in the northeast Atlantic, Pacific, and Mediterranean, especially to those in the three families Scyliorhinidae, Dalatiidae and... Binomial name Spinacia oleracea L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Binomial name Cicer arietinum L. The chickpea, garbanzo bean or bengal gram (Cicer arietinum) is an edible pulse of the Leguminosae or Fabaceae family, subfamily India. ... Black leg Jamón Ibérico . ... Giant African Snail (Achatina fulica) The name snail applies to most members of the molluscan Class Gastropoda that have coiled shells. ... Gazpacho with blended ingredients. ...


Typical sweet cakes of this province are polvorones and mantecados from the town of Estepa, a kind of shortcake made with almonds, sugar and lard; Pestiños, a honey-coated sweet fritter; Roscos fritos, deep-fried sugar-coated ring doughnuts; magdalenas or fairy cakes; yemas de San Leandro, which provide the city's convents with a source of revenue, and Tortas de aceite, a thin sugar-coated cake made with olive oil. Estepa possesses the most ancient past and preserves remains that like that it testify and date back to the prehistoric times, with remains of sílex, axes of stone, etc. ... Strawberry shortcake Shortcake is a sweet biscuit (in the American sense: that is, a crumbly, baking soda- or baking powder-leavened bread), and a dessert made with that biscuit. ... This article refers to the plant. ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely-traded commodity. ... This article is about the fat. ... A Beguine convent in Amsterdam. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Except for polvorones and mantecados, which are traditional Christmas products, all of these are consumed throughout the year.


The Seville oranges that dot the city landscape, too sour for modern tastes, are commonly used to make marmalade. A popular bitter orange grown in the Mediterranean. ... For other uses, see Marmalade (disambiguation). ...


Flamenco and Sevillana

The Sevillana dance, commonly presented as flamenco, is not thought to be of Sevillan origin. But the folksongs called Sevillanas are authentically Sevillan, as is the four-part dance that goes with them. Sevillana is a popular flamenco dance from Seville. ... Flamenco is a Spanish musical genre with strong, rhythmic undertones and is often accompanied with a similarly impassioned style of dance characterized by its powerful yet graceful execution, as well as its intricate hand and footwork. ... Sevillanas is a type of folk music, sung and written in Seville (Andalusia)in Spain. ...


Seville, and most significantly the traditionally gypsy barrio, Triana, was a major centre in the development of flamenco. Language(s) Romani language Caló (Spanish Romani) Spanish language Catalan language Religion(s) Predominantly Roman Catholic Church Related ethnic groups Roma people Indo-Aryans Spanish people The Romani people (also called Romany or Gypsies) are a diverse ethnic group who until recently lived primarily in Southern and Eastern Europe, Western... The iconic Puente de Triana (Triana Bridge) Triana is a neighborhood in the city of Seville, Spain, across the river Guadalquivir from the center, and in fact the majority, of the city. ... Flamenco is a Spanish musical genre with strong, rhythmic undertones and is often accompanied with a similarly impassioned style of dance characterized by its powerful yet graceful execution, as well as its intricate hand and footwork. ...

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixels, file size: 187 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixels, file size: 187 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... For the food company, see Alimentos La Giralda. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ...

Motto

The motto of Seville is "NO8DO". The "8" is shaped like a skein of wool, or, madeja in Spanish. The motto, therefore, is a rebus, reading "NO madeja DO," a play on the sentence, "No me ha dejado," or "she [the city] has not abandoned me [the king]". For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Look up Skein in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Rebus Principle (Linguistics) is using the existing symbols, such as pictograms, purely for their sounds regardless of their meaning, to represent new words. ...


The motto, according to one legend, refers to the city's support of King Alphonse X in a 13th-century war with his son, Don Sancho. Another places the phrase in the mouth of Ferdinand III while riding into the city after expelling the Moors in 1248. This motto is seen in the city flag and throughout Seville, inscribed on manhole covers, and on some street signs. Alfonso X and his court. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Statue of Sancho IV of Castile and León Sancho IV the Brave (1257/58 – April 25, 1295) was a king of Castile and León (1284 - 1295). ... United arms of Castile and León which Ferdinand first used. ... For broader historical context, see 1240s and 13th century. ... Princeton University manhole cover, Princeton, NJ, USA Pick holes in manhole cover, Palo Alto, CA, USA Kraków manhole cover (note integral hinge) Painted manhole cover in Matsumoto, Japan. ...


Sister cities

Seville has three sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI): Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Dominican_Republic. ... For other uses, see Santo Domingo (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...

Economy

The economic activity of Seville cannot be detached from the geographical and urban context of the city; the capital of Andalusia is the centre of a growing metropolitan area. Aside from traditional neighborhoods such as Santa Cruz, Triana and La Macarena, those further away from the centre, such as Nervión, Sevilla Este, and El Porvenir have seen recent economic growth. Over the past twenty years, this urban area has seen significant population growth and the development of new industrial and commercial parks. Santa Cruz, is the primary tourist neighborhood of Seville, Spain, and the former Jewish quarter of the medieval city. ... The iconic Puente de Triana (Triana Bridge) Triana is a neighborhood in the city of Seville, Spain, across the river Guadalquivir from the center, and in fact the majority, of the city. ... La Macarena is a neighborhood of Seville, Spain, as well as a District, although the two are not entirely coterminous. ... Nervión is a large, modern neighborhood in the eastern zone of Seville, Spain. ...


Due to its size and location, Seville is economically the strongest of the Andalusian cities. The infrastructure available in the city contributes to the growth of an economy dominated by the service sector, but in which industry still holds a considerable place.


Economic infrastructure

The economic development of the city and its urban area is supported by good transport links to other Spanish cities, including a high-speed AVE railway link to Madrid, and an international airport. For other uses, see AVE (disambiguation). ...


In addition:

  • Seville has the only river port of the Iberian peninsula, located 80 km (50 mi) from the mouth of the River Guadalquivir. This harbor complex offers access to the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, and allows trade in goods between the south of Spain (Andalusia, Extremadura) and Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. The port has undergone reorganisation. Annual tonnage rose to 5.3 million tonnes of goods in 2006.
  • Seville has conference facilities, including the Congress Palace.
  • The city and its surrounding province have a number of large industrial parks and technology centres: Dos Hermanas accommodates the largest Andalusian industrial park, while Alcalá de Guadaíra has the largest industrial complex by surface area in Andalusia; the Parque Científico Tecnológico Sevilla Tecnopolis, gathers companies, research centres and university departments directed towards the development of new technologies; the Parque Tecnológico y Aeronáutico Aerópolis is focused on the aircraft industry.

The Guadalquivir is the second longest river in Spain (after the Tagus). ... Capital Mérida Official language(s) Spanish; Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 5th  41,634 km²  8. ... Tonnage is a measure of the size or cargo capacity of a ship. ... Dos Hermanas is a city 6. ...

Characteristics by sector

The town of Seville and its agglomeration have, by their situation in the heart of the plain of the Guadalquivir, maintained dynamic agricultural activity. Agroalimentary industry is flourishing there. Nevertheless, for a long time the area has been looking to the future, while investing massively in industrial activities, supported by the existing infrastructures. The service sector and new technologies are increasingly important. Seville concentrated, in 2004, 31% of large Andalusian companies and 128 of the 6,000 largest national companies. In 2005, the metropolitan area counted a working population of 471,947 people, of which 329,471 (69.81%) worked within the city centre.

  • Agriculture represents less than 1.3% of the workers of the city. Cereal, fruit and olive-growing constitute the principal agricultural activities in this area of Andalusia.
  • Industry contributes up to 28% of the economic output of Seville. It employed in 2005 15.2% of workers in the city. It is well established in the metropolitan area, stimulated by the various industrial parks, the presence of good infrastructure and the proximity of the complexes of the Bays of Cádiz, Algeciras, and Huelva.
  • The service sector employs 83.5% of the working population of Seville. It represents a significant share of the local economy and is centred on tourism, trade and financial services.

Research and development

The city of Seville makes a significant contribution to scientific research, as it houses the first and largest DNA bank in Spain, through the local company Neocodex. Neocodex stores 20,000 DNA samples and is recognised internationally. In addition, Seville is also considered an important technological and research centre for renewable energies and the aeronautics industry. A DNA bank is a repository of DNA, usually used for research or criminal investigation. ...


Through its high-tech centres and its fabric of innovating companies, the Andalusian capital has risen to among the most important Spanish cities in term of development and research. Moroever, the scientific and technological activity of the three Seville universities has to be added, whose certain laboratories and research centres work in close connection with the local socio-economic power. Thus, the Parque Científico Tecnológico Sevilla Tecnopolis gathers private and public actors in various fields of research.


The principal innovation and research orientations are telecommunications, new technologies, biotechnologies (in relation to local agricultural specificities), environment and renewable energy.


Transportation

Sevilla is served by the TUSSAM (Transportes Urbanos de Sevilla) bus network which runs buses throughout the city as well as outlying areas surrounding Sevilla. El Metrocentro Tranvia is a tram line consisting of four stops, running from el Prado bus station, past the University and the Cathedral, and stopping at Plaza Nueva where the direction of service reverses. A Volvo articulated bus in contract service for Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, operated by Virginia Overland Transportation, an urban-suburban bus line, in 2003 A transit bus (also known as a commuter bus) in the United States is usually operated by an urban-suburban bus line, a governmental...


By the end of 2008, the city hopes to see completion of its first metro line, almost 28 months later than originally planned. The project experienced several delays caused by various reasons, including the relocation of archaeological findings and the need for a deeper tunnel under the Guadalquivir River, to avoid possible water leakages.


The Santa Justa train station is served by the AVE high-speed rail system, and is operated by the Spanish state-owned rail company Renfe. For other uses, see AVE (disambiguation). ... French-designed Eurostar and Thalys TGVs side-by-side in the Paris-Gare du Nord. ... RENFE is Spains national railway operator. ...


Currently in progress as well is the Sevici community bicycle program which has integrated bicycles into the public transport network. Across the city, bicycles are available for hire at low cost and green bicycle lanes can be seen on most major streets. This network of lanes (carriles) is also currently being expanded. White bicycles for free use, in Hoge Veluwe national park, the Netherlands Community bicycle programs (also known as Yellow bicycle programs, White bicycle programs, bike sharing, public bike or free bike) are one variation on an international movement to provide environmentally friendly transportation options to citizens. ...


Education

  • University of Seville
  • Universidad Pablo de Olavide
  • Fernando III-CEU University, the first private university in Andalusia, situated in the suburb of Aljarafe.

The University of Seville or sometimes Seville University, in Spanish Universidad de Sevilla, is a public university in Seville, Spain. ... The Universidad Pablo de Olavide (University of Pablo de Olavide) is a public university in Seville, Spain. ...

Famous people born in Seville and Seville province

Ibn Zuhr (Avenzoar, Abumeron, ibn-Zohr) (1090? - 1162) was an Arab (Spanish-born) physician. ... For the Maliki scholar, see Ibn al-Arabi. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 –– July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was emperor of Rome from 117 A.D. to 138 A.D., as well as a Stoic and Epicurean philosopher. ... The Roman amphitheatre at Italica seated 25,000 Italicas amphitheatre pit Pits were filled with water for the naumachia A walkway in Italica A hallway that circles the ampitheatre The House of the Birds complete with mosaic floor The House of the Planetarium The city of Italica (north of... Cristóbal de Morales (c. ... Francisco Guerrero (October 4 (?), 1528 – November 8, 1599) was a Spanish composer of the Renaissance. ... Mateo Alemán Mateo Alemán y de Enero (Seville, Spain, 1547 - Mexico, ¿1615?), Spanish novelist and man of letters. ... Lope de Rueda (1510? - 1565) was a Spanish dramatist and author, quite possibly the best of his era. ... Serafín Álvarez Quintero (March 26, 1871 – April 12, 1938) and Joaquín Álvarez Quintero (January 20, 1873 – June 14, 1944) were Spanish dramatists. ... Bartolomé de las Casas This article is about a Spanish priest in the 16th century. ... Juan Díaz de Solís, (Lebrija, Seville, 1470 – Rio de la Plata, 1516), Spanish navigator and explorer. ... Location of Lebrija within the Province of Seville Province Seville Mayor Jerónimo Pérez Méndez (PA) Area    - City 372 km²  - Land 372 km²  - Water 0. ... Statue of Antonio de Nebrija, outside of the Biblioteca Nacional de España, in Madrid. ... Location of Lebrija within the Province of Seville Province Seville Mayor Jerónimo Pérez Méndez (PA) Area    - City 372 km²  - Land 372 km²  - Water 0. ... For others named Velázquez, see Velazquez (disambiguation). ... Juan de Valdés Leal Juan de Valdés Leal (4 May 1622 – 1690) was a Spanish painter of the Baroque era. ... Murillo Bartolom Est ban Murillo (January 1, 1618 - April 3, 1682) was a Spanish painter from Seville. ... Antonio de Ulloa (January 12, 1716 _ July 3, 1795) was a Spanish general, explorer, author, astronomer, colonial administrator and the first Spanish governor of Louisiana. ... Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer Gustavo Adolfo Domínguez Bastida, better known as Bécquer, (Seville February 17, 1836 – Madrid December 22, 1870) was a Spanish post-romanticist writer of poetry and short stories, now considered one of the most important figures in Spanish literature. ... Cover of Time Magazine (January 5, 1925 Juan Belmonte y García (April 14, 1892-April 8, 1962) was considered the greatest matador of all time, and he revolutionised the art of bullfighting. ... Curro Romero on a Spanish stamp Francisco Romero López ( December 1, 1933) Spanish bullfighter, known as Curro Romero. ... Ignacio Sánchez Mejías (June 6, 1891, Seville—August 13, 1934, Madrid) was a Spanish bullfighter, one of the greatest in history. ... Joselito and Juan Belmonte. ... Vicente Aleixandre Vicente Pío Marcelino Cirilo Aleixandre y Merlo (April 26, 1898 – December 14, 1984) Spanish poet, born in Sevilla. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... // Antonio Machado y Ruiz (July 26, 1875 – February 22, 1939) was a Spanish poet and one of the leading figures of the Spanish literary movement known as the Generation of 98. ... Manuel Machado y Ruiz (Seville, 1874 – Madrid, 1947) was a Spanish poet and a prominent member of the Generation of 98. ... Luis Cernuda (1902 - 1963), is widely recognized as one of the great Spanish poets of the 20th century. ... Joaquín Turina (December 9, 1882 – January 14, 1949) was a Spanish composer of classical music. ... For the actor, see Juan Diego (actor). ... Paco León (born October 4, 1974) is a Spanish comic actor born in Seville. ... Carmen Sevilla (born 1930, Seville) is popular Spanish actress and singer. ... Paz Vega (born Paz Campos Trigo January 2, 1976) is a Spanish actress. ... Soledad Rendón Bueno, (Sevilla July 9, 1943 - Lisbon August 18, 1970), better known under the pseudonym Soledad Miranda was a Spanish actress who frequently starred in the films of Jess Franco. ... Isabel Pantoja (María Isabel Pantoja Martín b. ... Juana Reina Castrillo, Juanita Reina , alias La Reina de la Copla (Copla Queen) (Seville, August 25, 1925-Seville, March 19, 1999) was a a Spanish actress and copla singer. ... NASH, is a Spanish boyband. ... Manuel Summers Rivero (July 4, 1935 - June 12, 1993) was a Spanish film director and screenwriter. ... José Antonio Reyes Calderón (born September 1, 1983 in Utrera, Seville) is a Spanish footballer who currently plays for Spanish club Atlético Madrid. ... Ricardo Serna Orozco (born January 21, 1964 in Sevilla) is a former Spanish footballer with 6 international caps to his name. ... For other persons named Ramos, see Ramos (disambiguation). ... Jesús Navas González (born in Los Palacios, Seville on November 21, 1985) is a Spanish footballer. ... Antonio José Puerta Pérez (26 November 1984 – 28 August 2007) was a Spanish international football midfielder. ... Fátima Madrid Calancha (born December 28, 1979 in Sevilla, Andalusia) is a former freestyle swimmer from Spain, who competed for her native country at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Felipe González Márquez (born March 5, 1942) is a Spanish socialist politician. ... The President of the Government (Spanish: Presidente del Gobierno), or Prime Minister, of Spain is the Spanish head of government. ... Alfonso Guerra González (born May 31, 1940 in Sevilla) is a Spanish politician. ...

Sport

  • Sevilla FC stadium Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán hosted the 1982 World Cup Semi-Finals in which Germany beat France in the penalty shoot-outs after a 3-3 tie.
  • Seville FC stadium Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán hosted the 1986 European Cup Final, in which Steaua Bucharest (Romania) unexpectedly defeated FC Barcelona (Spain).
  • Seville also hosted in 2003 the UEFA Cup Final in the new Olympic stadium. The final was between Celtic F.C. (Scotland) and Futebol Clube do Porto (Portugal). The match finished in extra time 3–2 to Porto after a 2-2 draw at 90 minutes.
  • Sevilla FC won the 2006 UEFA Cup, their first European trophy, with an emphatic 4-0 victory over Middlesbrough FC of England in the final, played at the Philips Stadion in Eindhoven on May 10, 2006. Sevilla retained the UEFA Cup in 2007 against fellow Spaniards Espanyol in 3-1 on penalties, after a 2-2 draw at Hampden Park, Glasgow. They are also the holders of the European Supercup which they won with a 0-3 defeat of F.C. Barcelona (Spain) in Stade Louis II in Monaco on August 26, 2006. On June 23, 2007 Sevilla FC won the King's Cup (Copa del Rey) beating Getafe 1-0 in the Santiago Bernabeu Stadium. Real Betis are the 2005 King's Cup (Copa del Rey) Champions, and were the first team from Andalusia to compete in the UEFA Champion's League competition in 2005-2006.

Soccer redirects here. ... Real Betis Balompié is a Spanish football club in Seville founded in 1907. ... Sevilla Fútbol Club is a Spanish professional football club that plays in the top-flight Spanish La Liga championship. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Peking redirects here. ... London 2012 redirects here. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... The great Australians Lew Hoad and Ken Rosewall with the Cup in 1953 The Davis Cup is the premier international team event in mens tennis. ... The 7th World Championships in Athletics, under the auspices of the International Association of Athletics Federations, were held at the Olympic Stadium, Seville, Spain, between the August 20 and August 29. ... Sánchez Pizjuán stadium Tottenham in training in the Sánchez Pizjuán prior to their UEFA Cup tie with Sevilla The Estadio Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán is a stadium in Seville, Spain. ... Sánchez Pizjuán stadium Tottenham in training in the Sánchez Pizjuán prior to their UEFA Cup tie with Sevilla The Estadio Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán is a stadium in Seville, Spain. ... The season 1985-86 of the European Cup football club tournament was won by Steaua BucureÅŸti on penalties in a final against FC Barcelona. ... Categories: Romanian football clubs | Stub | Bucharest ... Futbol Club Barcelona, known familiarly as Barça (pronounced ), is a sports club based in Barcelona, Spain. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Estadio Olímpico de Sevilla or Estadio Olímpico de la Cartuja is a multi-use stadium situated in Seville, Spain. ... Current season Celtic Football Club are a football club from Glasgow, Scotland, who currently play in the Scottish Premier League, the highest form of competition in Scotland. ... Futebol Clube do Porto (pron. ... Sevilla Fútbol Club is a Spanish professional football club that plays in the top-flight Spanish La Liga championship. ... For the current season, see UEFA Cup 2007-08. ... Middlesbrough F.C. are an English football team, commonly known as Boro. ... Country Province Government  - Mayor G.Braks (CDA) Area (2006)  - Municipality 88. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the current season, see UEFA Cup 2007-08. ... For other uses, see Hampden Park (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... FC Barcelona, also known as Barça, is a sports club in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain with sections in many different sports. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Sevilla Fútbol Club is a Spanish professional football club that plays in the top-flight Spanish La Liga championship. ...

Seville in fiction

Literature, television's inspired

Cervantes redirects here. ... La Femme et le pantin is a novel by Pierre Louÿs that was adapted for film several times. ... Pierre Louys (1870 - 1925) was a French author, writer and poet. ... For other uses, see Don Juan (disambiguation). ... Georges Bizet Georges Bizet (October 25, 1838 – June 3, 1875) was a French composer and pianist of the romantic era. ... Poster from the 1875 premiere of Carmen Carmen is a French opera by Georges Bizet. ... Prosper Mérimée Prosper Mérimée (September 28, 1803–September 23, 1870) was a French dramatist, historian, archaeologist, and short story writer. ... Cover incorporating part of Mérimées own watercolor Carmen Carmen is a novella by Prosper Mérimée written and first published in 1845. ... Gioachino Rossini. ... For the Beaumarchais play, see The Barber of Seville (play). ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... La forza del destino (The Force of Destiny) is an Italian opera by Giuseppe Verdi. ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... Fidelio (Op. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... Don Giovanni (K.527; complete title: Il dissoluto punito, ossia il Don Giovanni, literally The Rake Punishd, or Don Giovanni) is an opera in two acts with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte. ... Le nozze di Figaro ossia la folle giornata (Trans: ), K. 492, is an opera buffa (comic opera) composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, with libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, based on a stage comedy by Pierre Beaumarchais, Le mariage de Figaro (1784). ... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Серге́й Серге́евич Проко́фьев) (April 271, 1891 – March 5, 1953) was one of the Soviet Unions greatest composers. ... Betrothal in a Monastery (Obrucheniye v monastïrein in transliteration) is an opera in four acts by Sergei Prokofiev to a Russian libretto by the composer and his second wife Mira Mendelson, based on Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s comic opera libretto The Duenna. ... Standalone copy of the chapter The Grand Inquisitor Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Grand Inquisitor The Grand Inquisitor is a parable told by Ivan to Alyosha in Fyodor Dostoevskys novel, The Brothers Karamazov (1879-1880). ... Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (Russian: , Russian pronunciation: , sometimes transliterated Dostoyevsky, Dostoievsky, Dostojevskij or Dostoevski  ) (November 11 [O.S. October 30] 1821 – February 9 [O.S. January 28] 1881) was a Russian novelist and writer of fiction whose works, including Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, have had a profound and... For other uses, see The Brothers Karamazov (disambiguation). ... Spanish stamp (2002) tribute to Captain Alatriste, Pérez-Revertes most famous character. ... Ringworld is a Hugo and Nebula award-winning 1970 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the television series. ... The Two Doctors is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in three weekly parts from February 16 to March 2, 1985. ... Digital Fortress is a novel by American author Dan Brown and published in 1998 by St. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... The University of Seville or sometimes Seville University, in Spanish Universidad de Sevilla, is a public university in Seville, Spain. ... Arthur Koestler (September 5, 1905, Budapest – March 3, 1983, London) was a Hungarian polymath who became a naturalized British subject. ... Spanish Testament is a 1937 book by Arthur Koestler, describing Koestlers recent (at the time of writing) experiences during the Spanish Civil War, where he went as a correspondent for the British News Chronicle, and especially his traumatic period of incarceration by Francos forces under a sentence of... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... Robert Wilson (born 1957) is a British crime-writer currently resident in Portugal. ...

In movies

Plaza de España was Spains showroom at the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, designed by Aníbal González. ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones (2002) is the fifth Star Wars science fiction movie released and the second part of the prequel trilogy which began with Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. ... Lawrence of Arabia is an award-winning 1962 film based on the life of T. E. Lawrence. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Anthony Mann (June 30, 1906 - April 29, 1967), was an American actor and film director. ... Statue of El Cid in Burgos. ... Vladek Sheybal (born 12 March 1923 in Zgierz, Poland, died 16 October 1992 in London, England) is an actor. ... The Wind and the Lion is a 1975 adventure film. ... Mission: Impossible II, or M:I-2 as it is also known, is the 2000 John Woo-directed sequel to Brian De Palmas 1996 Mission: Impossible motion picture, based on the TV series of the same name. ... For the 1958 novel of the same name by Louis Aragon, see La Semaine Sainte. ... This article is about the film. ... My Fair Lady is an Academy Award-winning 1964 film adaptation of the stage musical, My Fair Lady, based in turn on the play Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw. ... The Rain in Spain is a popular song. ...

Gallery

References

  1. ^ worldspin360: Seville & Malaga
  2. ^ http://books.google.com/books?id=-ncWULEubPQC&pg=PA93&lpg=PA93&dq=seville+fell+1936&source=web&ots=6GMvQVt4EY&sig=XAVObPeB8A3ChkDoOLEdTPpbiOk#PPA93,M1

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, published in 1854, was the last a series of classical dictionaries edited by the english scholar William Smith (1813–1893), which included as sister works the Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and the Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. ... Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. ...

See also

The Seville metro (Metro de Sevilla in Spanish) is a light metro network currently under construction in the city of Seville, Spain and its metropolitan area. ... The Seville Statement on Violence is a statement on violence that was adopted by an international meeting of scientists, convened by the Spanish National Commission for UNESCO, in Seville, Spain, on 16 May 1986. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:



Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
About Sevilla - Seville Travel Guide, Andalusia, Spain (578 words)
The city of Seville is located on the plain of the Guadalquivir river which crosses the city from North to South.
In the past the port of Seville played an important role in commerce between Spain and the Americas and it remains today one of the most active river ports of the Iberian peninsula.
The 17th century was a period of artistic splendour in Seville.
Seville Travel Information | Lonely Planet Destination Guide (294 words)
One of the first people to fall in love with Seville was the poet-king Al-Mutamid, and the city's ability to dazzle has not abated since.
Culturally, spring festivals present Seville at its prime, but room rates rise like the mercury does in summer.
Bluelist it › If you want your list to be considered for the Seville book, use the keyword 'highlight'.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m