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Encyclopedia > Severn Estuary
The location of the Bristol Channel
The location of the Bristol Channel
The Severn Bridge and Bristol Channel, looking northwestward from England towards Wales
The Severn Bridge and Bristol Channel, looking northwestward from England towards Wales
The Bristol Channel coast at Ilfracombe, North Devon, looking west towards Lee Bay
The Bristol Channel coast at Ilfracombe, North Devon, looking west towards Lee Bay

The Bristol Channel is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from South West England and extending from the lower estuary of the River Severn to that part of the North Atlantic Ocean known as the Celtic Sea. It takes its name from the English city of Bristol. Map showing location of bristol channel File links The following pages link to this file: Bristol Channel Categories: CIA World Factbook images ... Map showing location of bristol channel File links The following pages link to this file: Bristol Channel Categories: CIA World Factbook images ... The Severn Bridge seen from the English side of the river. ... The Severn Bridge seen from the English side of the river. ... The Bristol Channel coast at Ilfracombe, North Devon, England, looking west towards Lee Bay. ... The Bristol Channel coast at Ilfracombe, North Devon, England, looking west towards Lee Bay. ... South Wales is an area of Wales bordered by England and the Bristol Channel to the East and South, and Mid Wales and West Wales to the North and West. ... South West England is one of the regions of England. ... Estuaries and coastal waters are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth, providing numerous ecological, economic, cultural, and aesthetic benefits and services. ... This article is about the British river. ... For other uses, see Atlantic (disambiguation) The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one-fifth of its surface. ... Coccoliths in the Celtic Sea. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... Bristol is an English city and county and one of the two administrative centres of South West England (the other being Plymouth). ...

Contents


Ecology

At low tide large parts of the channel may become mud flats, as the estuary has a tidal range of 15 metres, the second largest in the world. The estuary is an important area for wildlife, in particular waders, and has protected areas, including National Nature Reserves. Various development schemes have been proposed along the channel, including an airport and a tidal barrier for electricity generation, but the conservation issues have always blocked such schemes. The tide is the regular rising and falling of the oceans surface caused by changes in gravitational forces external to the Earth. ... Mudflats are relatively flat, muddy regions found in intertidal areas. ... The metre (or meter in American English), symbol: m, is the basic unit of distance or length, in the International System of Units. ... Families Charadridae Jacanidae Rostratulidae Ibidorhynchidae Recurvirostridae Haematopodidae Scolopacidae Dromadidae Burhinidae Glareolidae Thinocoridae Waders, called Shorebirds in North America (where wader is used to refer to long-legged wading birds such as storks and herons), are members of the order Charadriiformes, excluding the more marine web-footed seabird groups. ... National Nature Reserve is a United Kingdom government conservation designation for a nature reserve of national significance. ...


Major islands in the Bristol Channel are Lundy, Steep Holm and Flat Holm. The islands and headlands provide some shelter for the upper reaches of the channel from storms. These islands are mostly uninhabited and protected as nature reserves, and are home to some unique wild flower species. The Old Light, Lundy For a map, see the end of this article Lundy is an island in the Bristol Channel of Great Britain, administered as part of Torridge district of the English county of Devon. ... Categories: UK geography stubs | English islands ... Flat Holm (Welsh: Ynys Hafren) is a Welsh island lying in the Bristol Channel approximately 3. ...


Coastal towns

There are many towns along the coast of the Bristol Channel, particularly in the industrial areas of South Wales. The sheltered upper reaches of the channel protect a number of ports.


On the English coast is the city of Bristol, and associated ports at Avonmouth and Portishead, and the towns of Clevedon, Weston-Super-Mare and Minehead in Somerset, and Ilfracombe and Barnstaple in Devon. Bristol is an English city and county and one of the two administrative centres of South West England (the other being Plymouth). ... Categories: Stub | Bristol | Ports and harbours of the UK ... Beth Gibbons, Portishead Portishead is a trip hop band from Bristol, United Kingdom, named after the small town of Portishead, 12 miles west of Bristol. ... Map sources for Clevedon at grid reference ST3971 Clevedon Village - circa 1907 Clevedon is a town in Somerset, England. ... Weston-super-Mare is an English seaside resort town in North Somerset, population 65,000 (1991 estimate). ... Map sources for Minehead at grid reference SS9646 Minehead is a coastal town in West Somerset, England with a population of around 10,000. ... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ... Location within the British Isles. ... Location within the British Isles. ... Devon is a county in South West England, bordering on Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ...


On the Welsh coast are the port cities of Swansea, Cardiff and Newport and the town of Chepstow. Swansea (Welsh: Abertawe - aber river-mouth + river Tawe) is a city and county in South Wales, situated on the coast immediately to the east of the Gower peninsula. ... Cardiff (Welsh: Caerdydd, from caer, fort, and dydd, Aulus Didius) is the capital and largest city of Wales. ... Newport (Welsh: Casnewydd) is the third largest city in Wales (after Cardiff and Swansea). ... Chepstow (Welsh language: Cas-gwent) is a border town straddling the Monmouthshire—Gloucestershire border, situated at the confluence of the River Wye and River Severn on the Severns west bank. ...


Crossings

At two of the narrower parts, near Bristol and Chepstow, the channel is crossed by the Severn Bridge and the Second Severn Crossing carrying, respectively, the M48 and M4 motorways. Previous to the contruction of the first bridge in 1966, the channel was crossed by the Aust ferry. The Severn Tunnel carries a railway line under the channel, situated near the second road bridge. The Severn Bridge (Welsh: Pont Hafren) and the Second Severn Crossing (Welsh: Ail Groesfan Hafren) are two large bridges crossing the River Severn between England and Wales. ... The Severn Bridge (Welsh: Pont Hafren) and the Second Severn Crossing (Welsh: Ail Groesfan Hafren) are two large bridges crossing the River Severn between England and Wales. ... The United Kingdoms M48 motorway is a small motorway that includes the original Severn Bridge. ... The M4 motorway is a motorway in the UK, which links London and Wales via Bristol. ... A motorway (Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and some Commonwealth nations) is both a type of road and a classification. ... The concrete path, with the Severn Bridge in the background. ... The approach to the tunnel. ...


1607 flood

On 30 January 1607 (New style) thousands of people were drowned, houses and villages swept away, farmland inundated and flocks destroyed when a flood hit the shores of the channel. The devastation was particularly bad on the Welsh side from Laugharne in Carmarthenshire to above Chepstow on the English border. Cardiff was the most badly affected town. There remain plaques up to 8ft above sea level to show how high the waters rose on the sides of the surviving churches. It was commemorated in a contemporary pamphlet "God's warning to the people of England by the great overflowing of the waters or floods." January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events January 20 - Tidal wave swept along the Bristol Channel, killing 2000 people. ... In Britain and countries of the British Empire, Old Style or O.S. after a date means that the date is in the Julian calendar, in use in those countries until 1752; New Style or N.S. means that the date is in the Gregorian calendar, adopted on 14 September... Look up Flood in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English(100%), Welsh(20. ... Laugharne (Welsh: Talacharn) is a town in Carmarthenshire, Wales, lying on the estuary of the River Taf. ... Carmarthenshire (Welsh: Sir Gaerfyrddin) is a county in Wales. ... Chepstow (Welsh language: Cas-gwent) is a border town straddling the Monmouthshire—Gloucestershire border, situated at the confluence of the River Wye and River Severn on the Severns west bank. ... Cardiff (Welsh: Caerdydd, from caer, fort, and dydd, Aulus Didius) is the capital and largest city of Wales. ... Ft is an abbreviation that may refer to the following: The foot, a unit of length, see foot (unit of length) The Hungarian Forint A fort, especially when used as a placename, for example Ft. ...


The cause of the flood remains disputed. Before the 2004 tsunami disaster the BBC made a programme covering research by Professor Simon Haslett, from Bath Spa University College, and Australian geologist Ted Bryant, from the University of Wollongong. They found evidence including massive boulders that had been displaced up the beach by enormous force, and a layer up to 20cm thick comprised of sand, shells and stones within an otherwise constant deposit of mud. The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... Palladian Pulteney Bridge and the weir at Bath Bath is a city in south-west England, most famous for its baths fed by three hot springs. ... Wollongong is an industrial city located on the eastern coast of Australia in the state of New South Wales. ...


Written evidence from the time describes events that were uncannily similar to the tragedies that unfolded in South East Asia, including a wave of water that rushed in faster than men could run, and a crowd of people who stood and watched the wave coming towards them until it was too late to run.


The idea that the 1607 flood was due to a tsunami was first put forward by Haslett and Bryant in a scientific paper published in 2002 in the journal Archaeology in the Severn Estuary.


The BBC programme was not broadcast until 2nd April 2005 ("BBC News"), but was covered in The Times (article) on 4th January 2004, leading some to wrongly suggest that the notion of a tsunami in 1607 was simply speculation following the 2004 tsunami disaster. 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom. ... The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ...


Prior to this it had long been believed that the floods were caused by a combination of meteorological extremes and tidal peaks. There was indeed an unusually high tide at the time. (discussion). Cumulus clouds This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The tide is the regular rising and falling of the oceans surface caused by changes in gravitational forces external to the Earth. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
River Severn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1320 words)
As the Severn becomes tidal the associated deity changes to Noadu, who (Romanized as Nodeus), is represented mounted on a seahorse, riding on the crest of the Severn bore.
The Severn Princess is currently undergoing restoration after being found in Ireland full of fertiliser, after dragging her back with her sinking twice on the way it is hoped that at some time in the near future she will be fully operational again.
A curious phenomenon associated with the lower reaches of the Severn is the tidal phenomenon known as the bore.
Bristol Channel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1024 words)
The city of Newport on the estuary of the River Usk is an important administrative, industrial and docks centre, famous for its transporter bridge.
The Severn Tunnel, situated near the Second Severn Crossing road bridge, carries the railway line under the channel.
The proposed Severn Barrage would constitute a third crossing, and would have a significant environmental impact on the Severn estuary and Bristol Channel.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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