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Encyclopedia > Severan Dynasty

The Severan dynasty is a lineage of Roman Emperors, reigning several decades from the late 2nd century to the early 3rd century. It was the last lineage of the "Principate", preceding the Crisis of the 3rd century. Roman Emperor is the term historians use to refer to rulers of the Roman Empire, after the epoch conventionally named the Roman Republic. ... The office of Roman Emperor went through a complex evolution over the centuries of its existence. ... The Crisis of the Third Century marked the end of the Principate, the early phase of Imperial Roman government. ...

Contents


Emperors and Caesars

For dynastic relationships: see Severan dynasty family tree - see also Roman Emperor (Principate)

The Severan dynasty spanned the reigns of (who were Emperor and/or Caesar): This is a family tree of the Severan dynasty of the Roman Empire. ... The office of Roman Emperor went through a complex evolution over the centuries of its existence. ...


Septimius Severus (193211)

Lucius Septimius Severus, (April 11, 146-February 4, 211) was Roman emperor from April 9, 193 to 211. ... Events June 1 – Roman Emperor Didius Julianus is assassinated in his palace. ... This article is about the year 211. ...

Caracalla (198217)

Caracalla Caracalla (April 4, 186–April 8, 217) was emperor of the Roman Empire from AD 211–217. ... Events Publius Septimius Geta receives the title of Caesar. ... Events Macrinus becomes Roman Emperor on the death of Caracalla. ...

Publius Septimius Geta (209211)

Publius Septimius Geta Publius Septimius Geta (March 7, 189–December 211), was a Roman Emperor co-ruling with his father Septimius Severus and his older brother Caracalla from 209 to his death. ... Events Publius Septimius Geta receives the titles of Imperator and Augustus from his father, Roman emperor Septimius Severus. ... This article is about the year 211. ...

Intermezzo: Macrinus (Emperor, 217218) and Diadumenian (Caesar, 217218)

M.M. Opelius Macrinus was born in 164 at Caesarea. Although coming from a humble background (not dynastically related to the Severan dynasty), he rose through the imperial household until, under the emperor Caracalla, he was made prefect of the praetorian guard. On account of the cruelty and treachery of the emperor, Macrinus became involved in a conspiracy to kill him, and ordered the praetorian guard to do so. On April 8th 217, Caracalla was assassinated traveling to Carrhae. Three days later, Macrinus was declared Augustus. Macrinus on an aureus. ... Events Macrinus becomes Roman Emperor on the death of Caracalla. ... Events May 16 - Heliogabalus is acclaimed as Roman Emperor. ... Marcus Opellius Antoninus Diadumenianus or Diadumenian, Roman Caesar (junior emperor), died 218 A.D. was the son of Emperor Macrinus who served his father briefly as Caesar (junior emperor) from May, 217 to 218 A.D. and as Augustus in 218. ... Events Macrinus becomes Roman Emperor on the death of Caracalla. ... Events May 16 - Heliogabalus is acclaimed as Roman Emperor. ... Caracalla Caracalla (April 4, 186–April 8, 217) was emperor of the Roman Empire from AD 211–217. ... The Praetorian Guard of Caesar Augustus - 1st century. ... The Praetorian Guard of Caesar Augustus - 1st century. ... Caracalla Caracalla (April 4, 186–April 8, 217) was emperor of the Roman Empire from AD 211–217. ... The famous statue of Octavian at the Prima Porta (Vatican Museums) Caesar Augustus (Latin:IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·AVGVSTVS) ¹ (23 September 63 BC – 19 August AD 14), known to modern historians as Octavian for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, is considered the first and one of...


His most significant early decision was to make peace with the Persians, but many thought that the terms were degrading to the Romans. However, his downfall was his refusal to award the pay and privileges promised to the eastern troops by Caracalla. He also kept those forces wintered in Syria, where they became attracted to the young Elagabalus. After months of mild rebellion by the bulk of the army in Syria, Macrinus took his loyal troops to meet the army of Elagabalus near Antioch. Despite a good fight by the praetorian guard, his soldiers were defeated.
Macrinus managed to escape to Chalcedon but his authority was lost: he was betrayed and executed after a short reign of just 14 months. The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Caracalla Caracalla (April 4, 186–April 8, 217) was emperor of the Roman Empire from AD 211–217. ... A bust depicting Elagabalus. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Praetorian Guard of Caesar Augustus - 1st century. ...


M. Opelius Diadumenianus was the son of Macrinus, born in 208. He was given the title Caesar in 217, when his father became Emperor. After his fathers defeat outside Antioch, he tried to escape east to Parthia, but was captured and killed before he could achieve this. Macrinus on an aureus. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Parthia, or known in their native Iranian language as Ashkâniân [2] (also called the Arsacid Empire) was the dominating force on the Iranian plateau beginning in the late 3rd century BCE, and intermittently controlled Mesopotamia between ca 190 BCE and 224 CE. It was the second dynasty of...


Elagabalus (218222)

Born Varius Avitus Bassianus on May 16th 205, known later as M. Aurelius Antonius, he was appointed at an early age to be priest of the sun God, Elagabalus, represented by a phallus, by which name he is known to historians (his name is sometimes written "Heliogabalus"). He was proclaimed emperor by the troops of Emesa, his hometown, who were instigated to do so by Elagabalus's grandmother, Julia Maesa. She spread a rumor that Elagabalus was the secret son of Caracalla. This revolt spread to the entire Syrian army (which, at the time, was swollen with troops raised by the Emperor Caracalla, and not fully loyal to Macrinus), and eventually they were to win the short struggle that followed by defeating Macrinus at a battle just outside Antioch. Elagabalus was then accepted by the senate, and began the slow journey to Rome. A bust depicting Elagabalus. ... Events May 16 - Heliogabalus is acclaimed as Roman Emperor. ... Events Pope Urban I succeeds Pope Callixtus I Roman Emperor Alexander Severus succeeds Heliogabalus Kingdom of Wu is established in China Sun Quan defeats Liu Bei at the Battle of Yi Ling Deaths March 11 - Roman Emperor Heliogabalus murdered Tertullian, theologian Pope Callixtus I Claudius Aelianus, teacher and rhetorician Ma... Julia Maesa (about 170- about 226) was daughter of Julius Bassianus, priest of the sun god Heliogabalus, the patron god of Emesa in the Roman province of Syria. ... Caracalla Caracalla (April 4, 186–April 8, 217) was emperor of the Roman Empire from AD 211–217. ... Caracalla Caracalla (April 4, 186–April 8, 217) was emperor of the Roman Empire from AD 211–217. ... Macrinus on an aureus. ... Macrinus on an aureus. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2. ...


His reign in Rome has long been known for outrageousness, although the historical sources are few, and in many cases not to be fully trusted. He is said to have smothered guests at a banquet by flooding the room with rose petals: married his male lover - who was then referred as the 'Empress's husband', and married one of the vestal virgins. Some say he was transgender, and one ancient text states that he offered half the empire to the physician who could give him female genitalia. Transgender is generally used as an overarching term for a variety of individuals, behaviors, and groups involving tendencies along the gender continuum that are opposite to or in divergence with the assigned biological sex: woman or man. ...


The running of the Empire during this time was mainly left to his grandmother and mother (Julia Soamias). Seeing that her grandsons outrageous behavior could mean the loss of power, Julia Maesa persuaded Elagabalus to accept his cousin Alexander Severus as Caesar (and thus the nominal Emperor to be). However, Alexander was popular with the troops, who viewed their new Emperor with dislike: when Elagabalus, jealous of this popularity, removed the title of Caesar from his nephew the enraged praetorian guard swore to protect him. Elagabalus had to beg the troops to let him live, and this humiliation could not last for long. Alexander Severus Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexandrus (October 1, 208- March 18?, 235), commonly called Alexander Severus, Roman emperor from 222 to 235, was born at Arca Caesarea in Palestine. ... The Praetorian Guard of Caesar Augustus - 1st century. ...


Alexander Severus (222235)

On March 6th, 222, a rumor went around the city troops that Alexander had been killed. Elagabalus and his mother were taken from the palace, dragged through the streets,murdered and thrown in the river Tiber by the praetorian guard, who then proclaimed Alexander Severus as Augustus. He was pagan. Alexander Severus Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexandrus (October 1, 208- March 18?, 235), commonly called Alexander Severus, Roman emperor from 222 to 235, was born at Arca Caesarea in Palestine. ... Events Pope Urban I succeeds Pope Callixtus I Roman Emperor Alexander Severus succeeds Heliogabalus Kingdom of Wu is established in China Sun Quan defeats Liu Bei at the Battle of Yi Ling Deaths March 11 - Roman Emperor Heliogabalus murdered Tertullian, theologian Pope Callixtus I Claudius Aelianus, teacher and rhetorician Ma... Events Maximinus Thrax becomes Roman Emperor. ... Tiber River in Rome The River Tiber (Italian Tevere), the third-longest river in Italy (disputed — see talk page) at 406 km (252 miles) after the Po and the Adige, flows through Rome in its course from Mount Fumaiolo to the Tyrrhenian Sea, which it reaches in two branches that... The Praetorian Guard of Caesar Augustus - 1st century. ... Alexander Severus Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexandrus (October 1, 208- March 18?, 235), commonly called Alexander Severus, Roman emperor from 222 to 235, was born at Arca Caesarea in Palestine. ...


Women of the Severan Dynasty

The women of the Severan dynasty, beginning with Septimius Severus's wife Julia Domna, were notably active in advancing the careers of their male relatives. Julia Domna Julia Domna (about 170-217), like her sister Julia Maesa, was a daughter of Julius Bassianus, priest of the sun god Heliogabalus, the patron god of Emesa in the Roman province of Syria. ...


See also

Roman Emperors by Epoch (see also: List - Concise List - Roman Empire)  
 Principate  Crisis of the 
 3rd Century 
 Dominate  Late Empire
(most Tetrarchies) Theodosian Dynasty
(Tetrarchy, unification
and final split)

Emperors of the
Western Empire
Roman Emperor is the term historians use to refer to rulers of the Roman Empire, after the epoch conventionally named the Roman Republic. ... This is a list of Roman Emperors with the dates they ruled the Roman Empire. ... This is the short overview of Roman Emperors: for more detail and explanation, see: list of Roman Emperors and Roman Emperor. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The office of Roman Emperor went through a complex evolution over the centuries of its existence. ... The Crisis of the Third Century marked the end of the Principate, the early phase of Imperial Roman government. ... The Crisis of the Third Century marked the end of the Principate, the early phase of Imperial Roman government. ... The accession to the purple on November 20, 284, of Diocletian, the lower-class, Greek-speaking Dalmatian commander of Caruss and Numerians household cavalry (protectores domestici), marked a major departure from traditional Roman constitutional theory regarding the Emperor, who was nominally first among equals; Diocletian introduced Oriental despotism... The office of Roman Emperor underwent significant turbulence in the fourth and fifth centuries, after assuming the trappings of Eastern despotism during the Dominate. ... The Julio-Claudian dynasty was the series of the first five Roman Emperors. ... The forced suicide of emperor Nero, in 68 AD, was followed by a brief period of civil war (the first Roman civil war since Antonys death in 31 BC) known as the Year of the four emperors. ... The Flavian dynasty was a series of three Roman Emperors who ruled from 69, the Year of the Four Emperors, to 96, when the last member was assassinated. ... Error creating thumbnail: convert: unable to open image `/mnt/upload3/wikipedia/en/9/9f/Five_Good_Emperors. ... Barraks Emperor is the way Roman Emperors who ruled during 235–268 are collectively known. ... Several emperors of the Roman Empire were of Illyrian origin. ... The Gallic Empire (in Latin, imperium Galliarum) is the modern name for the independent realm that lived a brief existence during the Roman Empires Crisis of the Third Century, from 260 to 274. ... The Tetrarchs, a porphyry sculpture sacked from a Byzantine palace in 1204, Treasury of St. ... The Constantine Dynasty is an informal name for the loosely related ruling families of the Roman Empire from the rise of Diocletian in 284 to the death of Julian the Apostate in 363. ... The Valentinian Dynasty ruled the Roman Empire from 364 to 392. ... The House of Theodosius was a Roman family that rose to eminence in the waning days of the Roman Empire. ... The Western Roman Empire is the name given to the western half of the Roman Empire after its division by Diocletian in 286 AD. It would exist intermittently in several periods between the 3rd Century and the 5th Century, after Diocletians Tetrarchy and the reunifications associated with Constantine the...


Byzantine emperors This is a list of the Emperors of the late Roman Empire, called Byzantine. ...

→ (Italy:)
Barbarian kings

→ (Much later in Western Europe:)
The following is a list of barbarian kings of Italy: Maximinus Thrax (235-238) Odoacer (476-493) Ostrogothic Kings of Italy Theoderic (493-526) Athalaric (526-534) Theodahad (534-536) Witiges (536-540) Heldebadus (540-541) Totila (541-552) Teias (552) Teias was killed by the Byzantine general Narses, and...

Holy Roman Emperors

→ (Continuing in Eastern Europe:)
The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ...

Byzantine emperors

This is a list of the Emperors of the late Roman Empire, called Byzantine. ...

External links

  • The Severan Women

 
 

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