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Encyclopedia > Seven Wonders of the World
The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World (from left to right, top to bottom): Great Pyramid of Giza, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Temple of Artemis, Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Mausoleum of Maussollos, Colossus of Rhodes and the Lighthouse of Alexandria as depicted by 16th-century Dutch artist Marten Heemskerk

The 'Seven Wonders of the World' (or the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World) is a widely-known list of seven remarkable manmade constructions of classical antiquity. It was based on guide-books popular among Hellenic sight-seers and only includes works located around the Mediterranean rim. Later lists include those for the Medieval World and the Modern World. Wonders of the World can refer to the following: // Seven Wonders of the World, wonders from the ancient, medieval and modern worlds. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 431 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (529 × 736 pixel, file size: 726 KB, MIME type: image/png) A collage of The Seven Wonders of the (ancient) world, depicted by 16th-century Dutch artist Maarten van Heemskerck. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 431 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (529 × 736 pixel, file size: 726 KB, MIME type: image/png) A collage of The Seven Wonders of the (ancient) world, depicted by 16th-century Dutch artist Maarten van Heemskerck. ... The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza Necropolis bordering what is now Cairo, Egypt in Africa, and is the only remaining member of the Seven Wonders of the World. ... Gardens of Semiramis, 20th century interpretation Hanging Garden, Assyrian interpretation The Hanging Gardens of Babylon (also known as Hanging Gardens of Semiramis) and the walls of Babylon (near present-day Al Hillah in Iraq) are considered one of the original Seven Wonders of the World. ... The site of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus in Turkey. ... A fanciful reconstruction of Phidias statue of Zeus, in an engraving made by Philippe Galle in 1572, from a drawing by Maarten van Heemskerck. ... A fanciful interpretation of the Mausoleum of Maussollos, from a 1572 engraving by Martin Heemskerck (1498–1574), who based his reconstruction on descriptions The Tomb of Maussollos, Mausoleum of Maussollos, or Mausoleum of Halicarnassus (Ancient Greek: ), was a tomb built between 353 and 350 BC at Halicarnassus (present Bodrum, Turkey... The Colossus of Rhodes was a huge statue of the Greek god Helios, erected on the Greek island of Rhodes by Chares of Lindos, a student of Lysippos, between 292 and 280 BC. It was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. ... Graphic reconstruction of the lighthouse according to a comprehensive study of 2006. ... Marten Heemskerk self-portrait (detail) Marten Jacobszoon Heemskerk van Veen or Maarten van Heemskerck (1498, Heemskerk – October 1, 1574, Haarlem), was one of the leading Dutch portrait and religious painters of the sixteenth century, famous for his depictions of the Seven Wonders of the World. ... Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... Ancient Greece is a period in Greek history that lasted for around nine hundred years. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ...

Contents

The Original Seven Wonders

The historian Herodotus (484 BC–ca. 425 BC), and the scholar Callimachus of Cyrene (ca 305240 BC) at the Museum of Alexandria, made early lists of "seven wonders" but their writings have not survived, except as references. The earliest extant version of a list of seven wonders was compiled by Antipater of Sidon, who described the structures in a poem around 140 BC: This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 489 BC 488 BC 487 BC 486 BC 485 BC - 484 BC - 483 BC 482 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC - 420s BC - 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC Years: 430 BC 429 BC 428 BC 427 BC 426 BC - 425 BC - 424 BC 423 BC... Callimachus (Greek: ; ca. ... Cyrene can refer to: The USS Cyrene (AGP-13), a motor torpedo boat tender Cyrene, a figure from Greek mythology Cyrene, a Greek colony in Libya (north Africa) 133 Cyrene, an asteroid Cyrene, fictional character who is the mother of Xena in the series Xena: Warrior Princess See also: Cyrenaica... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 310 BC 309 BC 308 BC 307 BC 306 BC 305 BC 304 BC 303 BC 302... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC - 240s BC - 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC Years: 245 BC 244 BC 243 BC 242 BC 241 BC - 240 BC - 239 BC 238 BC... Antiquity and modernity stand cheek-by-jowl in Egypts chief Mediterranean seaport For other uses, see Alexandria (disambiguation). ... Antipater of Sidon (2nd century BC) is an ancient Greek writer and poet best known for his list of Seven Wonders of the World. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC - 140s BC - 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC Years: 145 BC 144 BC 143 BC 142 BC 141 BC - 140 BC - 139 BC 138 BC...

I have set eyes on the wall of lofty Babylon on which is a road for chariots, and the statue of Zeus by the Alpheus, and the hanging gardens, and the Colossus of the Sun, and the huge labour of the high pyramids, and the vast tomb of Mausolus; but when I saw the house of Artemis that mounted to the clouds, those other marvels lost their brilliancy, and I said, 'Lo, apart from Olympus, the Sun never looked on aught so grand.'

Antipater, Greek Anthology IX.58

A later list, under various titles like De septem orbis spactaculis and traditionally misattributed to the engineer Philo of Byzantium, may date as late as the fifth century AD, though the author writes as if the Colossus of Rhodes were still standing. Philo of Byzantium, a Greek writer on mechanics, (born about 280 BCE) flourished during the latter half of the 2nd century B.C. (according to some, a century earlier). ...


These are given in the table below:

Wonder Date of construction Builder Notable features Date of destruction Cause of destruction
Great Pyramid of Giza 2650-2500 BC Egyptians Built as the tomb of Fourth dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Khufu. Still standing N/A
Hanging Gardens of Babylon 600 BC Babylonians Diodorus described multi-levelled gardens reaching 22 metres (75 feet) high, complete with machinery for circulating water. Large trees grew on the roof. After 1st century BC Earthquake
Statue of Zeus at Olympia 435 BC Greeks Occupied the whole width of the aisle of the temple that was built to house it, and was 40 feet (12 meters) tall. 5th-6th centuries AD Unknown, presumed destroyed by fire or earthquake.
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus 550 BC Lydians, Persians, Greeks Dedicated to the Greek goddess Artemis, it took 120 years to build. Herostratus burned it down in an attempt to achieve lasting fame. 356 BC Arson
Mausoleum of Maussollos at Halicarnassus 351 BC Persians, Greeks Stood approximately 45 meters (135 feet) tall with each of the four sides adorned with sculptural reliefs. Origin of the word mausoleum. by AD 1494 Damaged by an earthquake and eventually disassembled by European Crusaders
Colossus of Rhodes 292-280 BC Greeks A giant statue of the Greek god Helios roughly 3/4ths as large as today's Statue of Liberty in New York. 224 BC Earthquake
Lighthouse of Alexandria 3rd century BC Hellenistic Egypt Between 115 and 135 meters (383 - 440 ft) tall it was among the tallest man-made structures on Earth for many centuries. AD 1303-1480 Earthquake

The Greek category was not "Wonders" but "theamata", which translates closer to "must-sees". The list that we know today was compiled in the Middle Ages—by which time many of the sites were no longer in existence. Since the list came mostly from ancient Greek writings, only sites that would have been known and visited by the ancient Greeks were included. Even as early as 1600 BC, tourist graffiti was scrawled on monuments in the Egyptian Valley of the Kings. The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza Necropolis bordering what is now Cairo, Egypt in Africa, and is the only remaining member of the Seven Wonders of the World. ... The Fourth dynasty of Egypt was the second of the four dynasties considered forming the Old Kingdom. ... Khufus Cartouche Khufu (in Greek known as Cheops) was a Pharaoh of Ancient Egypts Old Kingdom. ... Gardens of Semiramis, 20th century interpretation Hanging Garden, Assyrian interpretation The Hanging Gardens of Babylon (also known as Hanging Gardens of Semiramis) and the walls of Babylon (near present-day Al Hillah in Iraq) are considered one of the original Seven Wonders of the World. ... Babylonia was a state in the south part of Mesopotamia (in modern Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... Diodorus Siculus was a Greek historian, born at Agyrium in Sicily (now called Agira, in the province of Enna). ... An earthquake is the result of a sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... A fanciful reconstruction of Phidias statue of Zeus, in an engraving made by Philippe Galle in 1572, from a drawing by Maarten van Heemskerck. ... The site of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus in Turkey. ... Lydia (Greek ) is a historic region of western Anatolia, congruent with Turkeys modern provinces of Ä°zmir and Manisa. ... The Achaemenid Empire (Persian: IPA: ) (559 BC–330 BC) was the first of the Persian Empires to rule over significant portions of Greater Iran. ... Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture For the 1934 film, see, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... The Diana of Versailles, a Roman copy of a sculpture by Leochares (Louvre Museum) In Greek mythology, Artemis (Greek: (nominative) , (genitive) ) was the daughter of Zeus and Leto and the twin sister of Apollo. ... Herostratus was a young man who set fire to the Temple of Artemis in Ephesus (currently in the territory of Turkey) in his quest for fame on July 21, 356 BC. The Temple of Artemis in Ephesus was built of marble, and was considered the most beautiful of some thirty... The Skyline Parkway Motel in Afton, Virginia after an arson fire on July 9, 2004. ... A fanciful interpretation of the Mausoleum of Maussollos, from a 1572 engraving by Martin Heemskerck (1498–1574), who based his reconstruction on descriptions The Tomb of Maussollos, Mausoleum of Maussollos, or Mausoleum of Halicarnassus (Ancient Greek: ), was a tomb built between 353 and 350 BC at Halicarnassus (present Bodrum, Turkey... The Seleucid Empire was a Hellenistic successor state of Alexander the Greats dominion. ... The Colossus of Rhodes was a huge statue of the Greek god Helios, erected on the Greek island of Rhodes by Chares of Lindos, a student of Lysippos, between 292 and 280 BC. It was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. ... God, as a male deity, contrasts with female deities, or goddesses. While the term goddess specifically refers to a female deity, words like gods and deities can be applied to all gods collectively, regardless of gender. ... In Greek mythology the sun was personified as Helius (Greek Ἥλιος / ἥλιος). Homer often calls him Titan and Hyperion. ... Liberty Enlightening the World (French: La liberté éclairant le monde), known more commonly as the Statue of Liberty (Statue de la Liberté), is a large statue that was presented to the United States by France in 1886. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... An earthquake is the result of a sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... Graphic reconstruction of the lighthouse according to a comprehensive study of 2006. ... The Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt began following Alexander the Greats conquest in 332 BC and ended with the death of Cleopatra VII and the Roman conquest in 30 BC. It was founded when Ptolemy I Soter declared himself Pharaoh of Egypt, creating a powerful Hellenistic state from southern Syria... An earthquake is the result of a sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Graffiti (singular: graffito, although the plural is more common) is the name for images or lettering scratched, scrawled, or more usually spray-painted on property that does not belong to the artist, and which is often regarded by others as unsightly damage or unwanted vandalism. ... Location of the valley in the Theban Hills, West of the Nile, October 1988 (red arrow shows location) The Valley of the Kings (Arabic: وادي الملوك Wadi Biban el-Muluk; Gates of the King)[1] is a valley in Egypt where for a period of nearly 500 years from the 16th to...


Antipater's original list replaced the Lighthouse of Alexandria with the Ishtar Gate. It was not until the 6th century AD that the list above was used. Of these wonders, the only one that has survived to the present day is the Great Pyramid of Giza. The existence of the Hanging Gardens has not been definitively proven. Records show that the other five wonders were destroyed by natural disasters. The Temple of Artemis and the Statue of Zeus were destroyed by fire, while the Lighthouse of Alexandria, Colossus, and Mausoleum of Maussollos were destroyed by earthquakes. There are sculptures from the Mausoleum of Maussollos and the Temple of Artemis in the British Museum in London. The reconstructed Ishtar Gate in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin A detail from the reconstructed gate. ... The British Museum in London, England is one of the worlds greatest museums of human history and culture. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Seven Wonders lists about the Middle Ages

Seven Wonders lists about the Middle Ages are existing historical lists for which there is no unanimity of opinion about origin, content or name.[1] These historical lists go by names such as "Wonders of the Middle Ages" (implying no specific limitation to seven), "Seven Wonders of the Middle Ages", "Medieval Mind" and "Architectural Wonders of the Middle Ages". The lists are more properly seen as a continuing type or genre in the Seven Wonders tradition than a specific list. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Look up genre in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


It is unlikely the lists originated in the Middle Ages. Brewet's calls them "later list[s]"[2] suggesting the lists were created after the Middle Ages. This is supported because the word medieval was not even invented until the Enlightenment-era, and the concept of a "Middle Age" did not become popular until the 16th century. Further, the Romanticism movement glorified all things related to the Middle Ages, or more specifically anything pre-Enlightenment era, suggesting such lists would have found a popular audience in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Some items found on some of the lists are not technically from the Middle Ages (according to modern historical standards), but we know the lists were not created by modern medieval historians, so such standards did not apply. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The Age of Enlightenment (French: ; German: ) was an eighteenth century movement in European and American philosophy, or the longer period including the Age of Reason. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Wanderer above the sea of fog by Caspar David Friedrich Romanticism is an artistic, literary, and intellectual movement that originated in 18th century Western Europe during the Industrial Revolution. ...


Typically representative of the seven:[1][3][4][2]

Other sites that have been mentioned include: For other uses, see Stonehenge (disambiguation). ... The Colosseum by night: exterior view of the best-preserved section. ... The Catacombs of Kom el Shoqafa are one of the wonders of the world. ... “Great Wall” redirects here. ... The Porcelain Tower of Nanjing, (Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as Baoensi - the Temple of Gratitude, is on the south bank of the Yangtze in Nanjing, China. ... Hagia Sophia The patriarchal basilica Hagia Sophia (Greek: ; Holy Wisdom), now known as the Ayasofya Museum, was the culmination of early Christian architecture. ... The Leaning Tower of Pizza Deliveries (Italian: ) or simply The Tower of Pizza Boxesin Italyan La Torre ditoy rabits (La Torre di Pisa Boeux) is the campanile, or freestanding belly-button tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa. ...

Taj Mahal Location of the Taj Mahal within India The Taj Mahal (Devanagari: ताज महल, Nastaliq: تاج محل) is a mausoleum located in Agra, India. ... The Saladin Citadel of Cairo (Arabic: قلعة صلاح الدين) is one of the most popular tourist attractions of Cairo. ... Front of Ely Cathedral Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal church of the diocese of Ely, in Cambridgeshire, England, and the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Ely. ... The abbey today The Abbey of Cluny (or Cluni, or Clugny) was founded on 2 September 909 by William I, Count of Auvergne, who installed Abbot Berno and placed the abbey under the immediate authority of Pope Sergius III. The Abbey and its constellation of dependencies soon came to exemplify...

Modern Wonders

In the tradition of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, many other lists of wonders have been proposed, including both human feats of engineering and wonders of Nature. However, these lists are rather informal, and there is no consensus on any particular list.


Modern wonders

The American Society of Civil Engineers compiled another list of wonders of the modern world:[9] The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) is a professional body, founded in 1852, to represent members of the civil engineering profession worldwide. ...

Wonder Date Started Date Finished Locations
Channel Tunnel December 1, 1987 May 6, 1994 Strait of Dover, between England and France
CN Tower February 6, 1973 June 26, 1976 Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Empire State Building January 22, 1930 May 1, 1931 New York, New York, USA
Golden Gate Bridge January 5, 1933 May 27, 1937 Golden Gate Strait, north of San Francisco, California, USA
Itaipu Dam January 1970 May 5, 1984 Paraná River, between Brazil and Paraguay
Delta Works 1953 May 10, 1997 Netherlands, Europe
Panama Canal January 1, 1880 January 7, 1914 Isthmus of Panama, Central America

Map of the Channel Tunnel. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Satellite image of the Strait of Dover The Strait of Dover (French: Pas de Calais, i. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ... This article is about the CN Tower in Toronto. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area [1] Ranked... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York, NY on the intersection of 5th Ave and W 34th Street. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening into the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the strait in California. ... Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country State City-County San Francisco Founded 1776 Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... Itaipu Dam close-up Itaipu (Guarani: Itaipu, Portuguese: Itaipu, Spanish: Itaipú; pronounced ) is a hydroelectric dam on the Paraná River located on the border between Brazil and Paraguay. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... The sun rising over the Paraná River, from the north-east of Rosario, Argentina. ... The Delta Works are a number of constructions that were built between 1950 and 1997 in the southwest of the Netherlands to protect a large area of land from the sea. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Two Panamax running the Miraflores Locks The Panama Canal (Spanish: ) is a major ship canal that traverses the Isthmus of Panama in Central America, connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Isthmus of Panama. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ...

Tourist travel wonders

Noted travel writer Howard Hillman has compiled lists of the top man-made[10] and natural[11] tourist travel wonders of the world: Howard Hillman is an author specializing in travel, cooking, and wine, including a book on kitchen science that has seen three editions. ...


Man-made travel wonders of the world

  1. Great Pyramids of Giza
  2. Great Wall of China
  3. Taj Mahal
  4. Machu Picchu
  5. Bali
  6. Angkor Wat
  7. Forbidden City
  8. Bagan Temples & Pagodas
  9. Karnak Temple
  10. Teotihuacán

The Giza pyramid field, viewed from the southwest. ... “Great Wall” redirects here. ... Taj Mahal Location of the Taj Mahal within India The Taj Mahal (Devanagari: ताज महल, Nastaliq: تاج محل) is a mausoleum located in Agra, India. ... Machu Picchu (Quechua: Machu Pikchu Old Peak) is a pre-Columbian Inca city located at 2,430 m (7,970 ft) altitude[1] on a mountain ridge above the Urubamba Valley in Peru, about 70 km (44 mi) northwest of Cusco. ... Bali is an Indonesian island located at , the westernmost of the Lesser Sunda Islands, lying between Java to the west and Lombok to the east. ... Aerial view of Angkor Wat The main entrance to the temple proper, seen from the eastern end of the Naga causeway Angkor Wat (or Angkor Vat) is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built for King Suryavarman II in the early 12th century as his state temple and capital city. ... For other uses, see Forbidden City (disambiguation). ... Bagan (Burmese: ; MLCTS: ), formerly Pagan, formally titled Arimaddanapura (the City of the Enemy Crusher) and also known as Tambadipa (the Land of Copper) or Tassadessa (the Parched Land), was the ancient capital of several ancient kingdoms in Myanmar. ... Entrance to Precinct of Amon-Re of the Karnak Temple Complex This article is about the village and pharaonic temple complex in Egypt. ... Teotihuacán[1] was, at its height in the first half of the 1st millennium CE, the largest pre-Columbian city in the Americas. ...

Natural travel wonders of the world

  1. Serengeti Migration
  2. Galápagos Islands
  3. Grand Canyon
  4. Iguazu Falls
  5. Amazon Rainforest
  6. Ngorongoro Crater
  7. Great Barrier Reef
  8. Victoria Falls
  9. Bora Bora
  10. Cappadocia

The Serengeti is a region of grasslands and woodlands in Mara Region in Tanzania. ... Bold textThis article is about the islands. ... Christmas Day 2006, South Rim The Grand Canyon is a very colorful, steep-sided gorge, carved by the Colorado River in the U.S. state of Arizona. ... Devils throat from the Brazilian side. ... Map of the Amazon rainforest ecoregions as delineated by the WWF. Yellow line encloses the Amazon rainforest. ... Ngorongoro crater is the worlds largest unbroken volcanic caldera, sited towards the northwest of Arusha in Tanzania, and is connected to the Serengeti savannah to its immediate south. ... The Great Barrier Reef in Australia is the worlds largest coral reef system,[1][2] composed of roughly 3,000 individual reefs and 900 islands stretching for 2,600 kilometres (1,616 mi) over an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (132,974 sq mi). ... Victoria Falls entrance At lower water levels, more of the First Gorge can be seen. ... Mount Otemanu, Bora Bora Bora Bora Pearl Beach Resort, Bora Bora Frigate Flor al, stationned in Bora-Bora lagoon Bora Bora is an atoll in French Polynesia, about 260 km northwest of the capital, Papeete. ... In ancient geography, Cappadocia or Capadocia, Turkish Kapadokya (from Persian: Katpatuka meaning the land of beautiful horses, Greek: Καππαδοκία; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was the name of the extensive inland district of Asia Minor (modern Turkey). ...

Natural wonders

Similar to the other lists of wonders, there is no consensus on a list of seven natural wonders of the world, as there has been debate over how large the list should be. One of the many lists was compiled by CNN:[12] The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ...

Christmas Day 2006, South Rim The Grand Canyon is a very colorful, steep-sided gorge, carved by the Colorado River in the U.S. state of Arizona. ... The Great Barrier Reef in Australia is the worlds largest coral reef system,[1][2] composed of roughly 3,000 individual reefs and 900 islands stretching for 2,600 kilometres (1,616 mi) over an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (132,974 sq mi). ... Location of Rio de Janeiro Coordinates: , Country Brazil Region Southeast State Rio de Janeiro Government  - Mayor César Maia (Democrats) Area  - City 1,260 km²  (486. ... “Everest” redirects here. ... The Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights, shines above Bear Lake Aurora Borealis as seen over Canada at 11,000m (36,000 feet) Red and green Aurora in Fairbanks, Alaska “Aurora Borealis” redirects here. ... Parícutin (or Volcán de Parícutin, commonly also accented Paricutín or spelled unaccented as Paricutin) is a volcano in the Mexican state of Michoacán, close to a lava-covered village of the same name. ... Victoria Falls entrance At lower water levels, more of the First Gorge can be seen. ...

Underwater wonders

This list of underwater wonders is of unknown origin, but has been repeated sufficiently often to acquire a degree of notability:[13] [14]

The coastal area of Belize is an outstanding natural system consisting of the largest barrier reef in the northern hemisphere, offshore atolls, several hundred sand cays, mangrove forests, coastal lagoons and estuaries. ... The Great Barrier Reef in Australia is the worlds largest coral reef system,[1][2] composed of roughly 3,000 individual reefs and 900 islands stretching for 2,600 kilometres (1,616 mi) over an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (132,974 sq mi). ... A hydrothermal vent A hydrothermal vent is a fissure in a planets surface from which geothermally heated water issues. ... NASA Satellite photo of the Galápagos archipelago. ... Lake Baikal (Russian: , pronounced ; Buryat and Mongol: Dalai-Nor) lies in Southern Siberia in Russia between Irkutsk Oblast to the northwest and Buryatia to the southeast near the city of Irkutsk. ... Location of the Red Sea The Red Sea is an inlet of the Indian Ocean between Africa and Asia. ...

New Seven Wonders

Two "New Seven Wonders" lists have been promoted since 2000. Location of the New Seven Wonders winners. ...


In 2001 an initiative was started by Swiss corporation New Open World Corporation (NOWC) to choose the New Seven Wonders of the World from a selection of 200 existing monuments for profit.[15] Twenty-one finalists were announced January 1, 2006.[16] Egypt was not happy with the fact that the only original wonder would have to compete with the likes of the Statue of Liberty, the Sydney Opera House, the Taj Mahal, and other landmarks; and called the project absurd. To solve this, Giza was named an honorary Candidate. [17]The results were announced on July 7, 2007[18] and are: Location of the New Seven Wonders winners. ... Location of the New Seven Wonders winners. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

Wonder Date of construction Location
Great Wall of China 5th century BC – 16th century China
Petra unknown Jordan
Christ the Redeemer (statue) Opened 12 October 1931 Brazil
Machu Picchu c.1450 Peru
Chichen Itza c.600 Mexico
Colosseum Completed 80 AD Italy
Taj Mahal Completed c.1648 India
Great Pyramid (Honorary Candidate) Completed c.2560 BC Egypt

In November 2006 the American national newspaper USA Today in conjunction with the American television show Good Morning America revealed a list of "New Seven Wonders" as chosen by six judges.[19] The wonders were announced one per day over a week on Good Morning America. An eighth wonder was chosen on November 24 from viewer feedback.[20] “Great Wall” redirects here. ... Petra (from petra, rock in Greek; Arabic: البتراء, Al-Butrā) is an archaeological site in Jordan, lying in a basin among the mountains which form the eastern flank of Arabah (Wadi Araba), the large valley running from the Dead Sea to the Gulf of Aqaba. ... Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro Christ the Redeemer (Portuguese: Cristo Redentor), is a statue of Jesus Christ in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Machu Picchu (Quechua: Machu Pikchu Old Peak) is a pre-Columbian Inca city located at 2,430 m (7,970 ft) altitude[1] on a mountain ridge above the Urubamba Valley in Peru, about 70 km (44 mi) northwest of Cusco. ... Temple of the Warriors Chichen Itza is the largest of the Pre-Columbian archaeological sites in Yucat n, Mexico. ... The Colosseum by night: exterior view of the best-preserved section. ... Taj Mahal Location of the Taj Mahal within India The Taj Mahal (Devanagari: ताज महल, Nastaliq: تاج محل) is a mausoleum located in Agra, India. ... The Great Pyramid of Giza, (sometimes spelled Gizeh) is the oldest and last remaining of the Seven Wonders of the World and the most famous pyramid in the world. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Good Morning America is a weekday morning news show that is broadcast on the ABC television network. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Number Wonder Location
1 Potala Palace Tibet, China
2 Old City of Jerusalem Israel
3 Polar ice caps Polar regions
4 Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument Hawaii, United States
5 Internet N/A
6 Mayan ruins Yucatán Peninsula, México
7 Great Migration of Serengeti and Masai Mara Tanzania and Kenya
8 Grand Canyon (viewer-chosen eighth wonder) Arizona, United States

The Potala Palace located in Lhasa, Tibet Autonomous Region, China, was the chief residence of the Dalai Lama until the 14th Dalai Lama fled to Dharamsala, India after a failed uprising in 1959. ... Tibet (see Name section below for other spellings) is a plateau region in Central Asia and the indigenous home to the Tibetan people. ... The Old City is a 0. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Location of the polar regions Northern Hemisphere permafrost (permanently frozen ground) in purple. ... The Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (formerly the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument) is the largest Marine Protected Area in the world and was named by the American television show Good Morning America and newspaper USA Today as one of the New Seven Wonders of the World [1... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... The Maya civilization is a Mesoamerican civilization, noted for the only known fully developed written language of the pre-Columbian Americas, as well as its spectacular art, monumental architecture, and sophisticated mathematical and astronomical systems. ... As unique and spectacular as any Greek or Roman architecture, Maya architecture spans many thousands of years. ... The Yucatán peninsula as seen from space The Yucatán Peninsula separates the Caribbean Sea from the Gulf of Mexico. ... Mexico or, in Spanish, México, is: Mexico, a federal republic in North America Mexico City, that countrys capital city Mexican Federal District, the federal district containing that capital city Estado de México (State of Mexico), one of that republics 31 constituent states Mexico is also the... The Serengeti National Park ( ) is a large national park in Serengeti area, Tanzania, Africa. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Christmas Day 2006, South Rim The Grand Canyon is a very colorful, steep-sided gorge, carved by the Colorado River in the U.S. state of Arizona. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ...

National lists of Seven Wonders

The Seven Wonders of Canada is a 2007 search put on by CBC televisions The National and CBC radios Sounds Like Canada programs. ... The Seven Wonders of Portugal (Portuguese language: Sete Maravilhas de Portugal) is a list of cultural wonders located in Portugal. ... The Seven Wonders of Wales is a traditional list of notable landmarks in Wales, commemorated in an anonymous rhyme: Pistyll Rhaeadr and Wrexham steeple, Snowdons mountain without its people, Overton yew trees, St Winefride wells, Llangollen bridge and Gresford bells. ... This article is about Ukraines Wonders. ...

See also

Eighth Wonder of the World is a term sometimes used to describe things in comparison to the Seven Wonders of the World, the widely-known list of seven remarkable constructions of classical antiquity. ... The Seven Blunders of the World is a list that Mahatma Gandhi gave to his grandson Arun Gandhi during his final days. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (Gujarati: , Hindi: , IAST: mohandās karamcand gāndhī, IPA: ) (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948), was a major political and spiritual leader of India and the Indian independence movement. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Hereward Carrington (1880-1958), "The Seven Wonders of the World: ancient, medieval and modern", reprinted in the Carington Collection (2003) ISBN 0-7661-4378-3, page 14.
  2. ^ a b I H Evans (reviser), Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (Centenary edition Fourth impression (corrected); London: Cassell, 1975), page 1163
  3. ^ Edward Latham. A Dictionary of Names, Nicknames and Surnames, of Persons, Places and Things (1904), page 280.
  4. ^ Francis Trevelyan Miller, Woodrow Wilson, William Howard Taft, Theodore Roosevelt. America, the Land We Love (1915), page 201.
  5. ^ Palpa, as You Like it, page 67)
  6. ^ The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Crusades (2001, page 153))
  7. ^ The Rough Guide To England (1994, page 596))
  8. ^ The Catholic Encyclopedia, v.16 (1913), page 74
  9. ^ American Society of Civil Engineers Seven Wonders
  10. ^ Hillman, Howard. World's top 10 man-made travel wonders. Hillman Quality Publications. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  11. ^ Hillman, Howard. World's top 10 natural travel wonders. Hillman Quality Publications. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  12. ^ CNN Natural Wonders
  13. ^ Underwater Wonders of the World
  14. ^ 2nd list of Underwater Wonder
  15. ^ New Seven Wonders
  16. ^ Finalist Page
  17. ^ Egypt Angered at New Wonders Idea
  18. ^ Reuters via ABC News Australia "Opera House snubbed as new Wonders unveiled" 7 July 2007
  19. ^ New Seven Wonders panel
  20. ^ The world's 8th wonder: Readers pick the Grand Canyon

Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the twenty-seventh President of the United States, the tenth Chief Justice of the United States, a leader of the progressive conservative wing of the Republican Party in the early 20th century, a pioneer in international arbitration... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... The Catholic Encyclopedia is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by the Roman Catholic Church, designed to give authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. Starting in 1993, the encyclopedia (now in the public domain) was placed on the Internet through a world-wide... Howard Hillman is an author specializing in travel, cooking, and wine, including a book on kitchen science that has seen three editions. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Howard Hillman is an author specializing in travel, cooking, and wine, including a book on kitchen science that has seen three editions. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Cox, Reg, and Neil Morris, "The Seven Wonders of the Modern World". Chelsea House Publications: Library. October 2000. ISBN 0-7910-6048-9
  • Cox, Reg, Neil Morris, and James Field, "The Seven Wonders of the Medieval World". Chelsea House Publications: Library. October 2000. ISBN 0-7910-6047-0
  • D'Epiro, Peter, and Mary Desmond Pinkowish, "What Are the Seven Wonders of the World? and 100 Other Great Cultural Lists". Anchor. December 1, 1998. ISBN 0-385-49062-3
  • Morris, Neil, "The Seven Wonders of the Natural World". Chrysalis Books. December 30, 2002. ISBN 1-84138-495-X

is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...

External links

Seven Ancient Wonders

  • The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World — an in-depth look from a professor of civil engineering at the University of South Florida
  • Image of the Seven Wonder locations
  • Video about the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, a virtual satellite tour made with Google Earth [02:34]
  • Parkin, Tim, Researching Ancient Wonders: A Research Guide, from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. - a collection of books and Internet resources with in-depth information on seven ancient wonders.
  • Google Maps 7 Ancient Wonders of the World
  • "Eternal wonder of humanity's first great achievements", by Jonathan Glancey in The Guardian, March 10, 2007
  • Seven Wonders Suite for Orchestra — A symphonic suite inspired by the seven ancient monuments by UK composer Stuart Mitchell - The Prague Symphony Orchestra

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The University of South Florida (USF), known within its system as USF Tampa[1][2][3], is a public university system located in Tampa, Florida, USA, with an autonomous campus in St. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ...

Other wonders

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) is a professional body, founded in 1852, to represent members of the civil engineering profession worldwide. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Seven Wonders of the World - Pyramid of Giza (831 words)
This is one of the largest pyramids in the world and considered to be one of the great among the seven wonders of the world.
It probably is considered to be one among the seven wonders of world because of its sheer size.
This is not one among the seven wonders of world.
Seven Wonders of the World - MSN Encarta (829 words)
Seven Wonders of the World, works of art and architecture regarded by ancient Greek and Roman observers as the most extraordinary structures of antiquity.
The Seven Wonders are most often listed in the order in which they were built.
The oldest of the seven wonders, the pyramids are the only one remaining nearly intact today.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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