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Encyclopedia > Seven Wonders of the Ancient World
The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World (from left to right, top to bottom): Great Pyramid of Giza, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Temple of Artemis at Epheseus, Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Mausoleum of Maussollos, Colossus of Rhodes and the Lighthouse of Alexandria as depicted by 16th-century Dutch artist Marten Heemskerk
The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World (from left to right, top to bottom): Great Pyramid of Giza, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Temple of Artemis at Epheseus, Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Mausoleum of Maussollos, Colossus of Rhodes and the Lighthouse of Alexandria as depicted by 16th-century Dutch artist Marten Heemskerk

The Seven Wonders of the World (or the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World) is a well known list of seven remarkable manmade constructions of classical antiquity. It was based on guide-books popular among Hellenic (Greek) tourists and only includes works located around the Mediterranean rim. Later lists include those for the Medieval World and the Modern World. The number seven was chosen because the Greeks believed it to be magical.[1] Wonders of the World can refer to the following: // Seven Wonders of the World, wonders from the ancient, medieval and modern worlds. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 431 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (529 × 736 pixel, file size: 726 KB, MIME type: image/png) A collage of The Seven Wonders of the (ancient) world, depicted by 16th-century Dutch artist Maarten van Heemskerck. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 431 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (529 × 736 pixel, file size: 726 KB, MIME type: image/png) A collage of The Seven Wonders of the (ancient) world, depicted by 16th-century Dutch artist Maarten van Heemskerck. ... The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza Necropolis bordering what is now Cairo, Egypt in Africa, and is the only remaining member of the Seven Wonders of the World. ... Hanging Gardens redirects here. ... The site of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus in Turkey. ... A fanciful reconstruction of Phidias statue of Zeus, in an engraving made by Philippe Galle in 1572, from a drawing by Maarten van Heemskerck. ... The Mausoleum site in ruins, as it stands today The Tomb of Maussollos, Mausoleum of Maussollos or Mausoleum at Halicarnassus (in Greek, ) was a tomb built between 353 and 350 BC at Halicarnassus (present Bodrum, Turkey) for Mausolus, a satrap in the Persian Empire, and Artemisia II of Caria, his... “The Colossus of Rhodes” redirects here. ... Graphic reconstruction of the lighthouse according to a comprehensive study of 2006. ... Marten Heemskerk self-portrait (detail) Marten Jacobszoon Heemskerk van Veen or Maarten van Heemskerck (1498, Heemskerk – October 1, 1574, Haarlem), was one of the leading Dutch portrait and religious painters of the sixteenth century, famous for his depictions of the Seven Wonders of the World. ... Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... For other uses, see Wonders of the World (disambiguation). ...

Contents

The Seven Ancient Wonders

The historian Herodotus (484 BC–ca. 425 BC), and the architect Callimachus of Cyrene (ca 305240 BC) at the Museum of Alexandria, made early lists of "seven wonders" but their writings have not survived, except as references. The earliest extant version of a list of seven wonders was compiled by Antipater of Sidon, who described the structures in a poem around 140 BC: Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: HÄ“ródotos Halikarnāsseús) was a Greek historian who lived in the 5th century BC (c. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 489 BC 488 BC 487 BC 486 BC 485 BC - 484 BC - 483 BC 482 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC - 420s BC - 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC Years: 430 BC 429 BC 428 BC 427 BC 426 BC - 425 BC - 424 BC 423 BC... Callimachus (Greek: , 310 BC/305 BC-240 BC) was a native of Cyrene, Libya. ... Cyrene can refer to: The USS Cyrene (AGP-13), a motor torpedo boat tender Cyrene, a figure from Greek mythology Cyrene, a Greek colony in Libya (north Africa) 133 Cyrene, an asteroid Cyrene, fictional character who is the mother of Xena in the series Xena: Warrior Princess See also: Cyrenaica... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 310 BC 309 BC 308 BC 307 BC 306 BC 305 BC 304 BC 303 BC 302... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC - 240s BC - 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC Years: 245 BC 244 BC 243 BC 242 BC 241 BC - 240 BC - 239 BC 238 BC... Antiquity and modernity stand cheek-by-jowl in Egypts chief Mediterranean seaport For other uses, see Alexandria (disambiguation). ... Antipater of Sidon (2nd century BC) is an ancient Greek writer and poet best known for his list of Seven Wonders of the World. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC - 140s BC - 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC Years: 145 BC 144 BC 143 BC 142 BC 141 BC - 140 BC - 139 BC 138 BC...

I have set eyes on the wall of lofty Babylon on which is a road for chariots, and the statue of Zeus by the Alpheus, and the hanging gardens, and the Colossus of the Sun, and the huge labour of the high pyramids, and the vast tomb of Mausolus; but when I saw the house of Artemis that mounted to the clouds, those other marvels lost their brilliancy, and I said, 'Lo, apart from Olympus, the Sun never looked on aught so grand.'

Antipater, Greek Anthology IX.58

A later list, under various titles such as De septem orbis spactaculis and traditionally misattributed to the engineer Philo of Byzantium, may date as late as the fifth century AD, though the author writes as if the Colossus of Rhodes were still standing. Philo of Byzantium, a Greek writer on mechanics, (born about 280 BCE) flourished during the latter half of the 2nd century B.C. (according to some, a century earlier). ...


These are given in the table below:[1]

Wonder Date of construction Builder Notable features Date of destruction Cause of destruction
Great Pyramid of Giza 2584-2561 BC Egyptians Built as the tomb of fourth dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Khufu. Still standing N/A
Hanging Gardens of Babylon 605-562 BC Babylonians Diodorus Siculus described multi-levelled gardens reaching 22 metres (75 feet) high, complete with machinery for circulating water. Large trees grew on the roof. Built by Nebuchadnezzar II for his wife Amytis of Media. After 1st century BC Earthquake
Statue of Zeus at Olympia 466-456 BC(Temple) 435 BC(Statue) Greeks Occupied the whole width of the aisle of the temple that was built to house it, and was 12 meters (40 feet) tall. 5th-6th centuries AD Unknown, presumed destroyed by fire or earthquake.
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus c. 550 BC Lydians, Persians, Greeks Dedicated to the Greek goddess Artemis, it took 120 years to build. Herostratus burned it down in an attempt to achieve lasting fame. Rebuilt by Alexander the Great only to be destroyed again by the Goths. 356 BC(by Herostratus)
AD 409 (by the Goths)
Arson, Plundering
Mausoleum of Maussollos at Halicarnassus 351 BC Persians, Greeks Stood approximately 45 meters (135 feet) tall with each of the four sides adorned with sculptural reliefs. Origin of the word mausoleum.a tomb built for Mausolus, a satrap in the Persian Empire by AD 1494 Damaged by an earthquake and eventually disassembled by European Crusaders.
Colossus of Rhodes 292-280 BC Greeks A giant statue of the Greek god Helios, c. 35m (110 ft) tall. Toppled by an earthquake in 226 BC, with the bronze scrap removed in 654. Earthquake
Lighthouse of Alexandria c. 280 BC Hellenistic Egypt Between 115 and 135 meters (383 - 440 ft) tall it was among the tallest man-made structures on Earth for many centuries. AD 1303-1480 Earthquake
The Great Pyramid of Giza, the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still standing.
The Great Pyramid of Giza, the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still standing.

The Greek category was not "Wonders" but theamata, which translates closer to "must-sees". The list that we know today was compiled in the Middle Ages—by which time many of the sites were no longer in existence. Since the list came mostly from ancient Greek writings, only sites that would have been known and visited by the ancient Greeks were included. Even as early as 1600 BC, tourist graffiti was scrawled on monuments in the Egyptian Valley of the Kings. The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza Necropolis bordering what is now Cairo, Egypt in Africa, and is the only remaining member of the Seven Wonders of the World. ... (27th century BC - 26th century BC - 25th century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2900 - 2334 BC – Mesopotamian wars of the Early Dynastic period. ... The Fourth dynasty of Egypt was the second of the four dynasties considered forming the Old Kingdom. ... Khufus Cartouche Khufu (in Greek known as Cheops) was a Pharaoh of Ancient Egypts Old Kingdom. ... Hanging Gardens redirects here. ... Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 650s BC 640s BC 630s BC 620s BC 610s BC - 600s BC - 590s BC 580s BC 570s BC 560s BC 550s BC The 600s BC are the years 609 to 600 BC. Events and trends 609 BC - King Josiah... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 610s BC 600s BC 590s BC 580s BC 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC 540s BC 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC Events and Trends 562 BC - Amel-Marduk succeeds Nebuchadnezzar as king of Babylon 560 BC - Neriglissar succeeds... Babylonia was a state in southern Mesopotamia, in modern Iraq, combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... Diodorus Siculus (c. ... Nebuchadnezzar (or Nebudchadrezzar) II (ca. ... Amytis of Media was the daughter or granddaughter of the Median king Cyaxares and the wife of Nebuchadrezzar II. Married to Nebuchadrezzar to formalize the alliance between the Babylonian and Median dynasties, it is reported that Amytis homesickness led to the construction of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, as Nebuchadrezzar... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... A fanciful reconstruction of Phidias statue of Zeus, in an engraving made by Philippe Galle in 1572, from a drawing by Maarten van Heemskerck. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC Years: 471 BC 470 BC 469 BC 468 BC 467 BC - 466 BC - 465 BC 464 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC Years: 461 BC 460 BC 459 BC 458 BC 457 BC - 456 BC - 455 BC 454 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC - 430s BC - 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC Years: 440 BC 439 BC 438 BC 437 BC 436 BC - 435 BC - 434 BC 433 BC... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... The site of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus in Turkey. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 600s BC - 590s BC - 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC Events and Trends Carthage conquers Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica 559 BC - King Cambyses I of Anshan dies... Lydia (Greek ) is a historic region of western Anatolia, congruent with Turkeys modern provinces of Ä°zmir and Manisa. ... Founder of empires: Cyrus, The Great is still revered in modern Iran as he was in all the successor Persian Empires. ... For the 1934 film, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... Herostratus was a young man who set fire to the Temple of Artemis in Ephesus (currently in the territory of Turkey) in his quest for fame on July 21, 356 BC. The Temple of Artemis in Ephesus was built of marble, and was considered the most beautiful of some thirty... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... This article is about the Germanic tribes. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC - 350s BC - 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 361 BC 360 BC 359 BC 358 BC 357 BC 356 BC 355 BC 354 BC 353... For the cleaning product 409®, see butoxyethanol. ... The Skyline Parkway Motel in Afton, Virginia after an arson fire on July 9, 2004. ... Looting (which derives via the Urdu lut from Hindi/Sanskrit lung, to rob), sacking, plundering, or pillaging is the indiscriminate taking of goods by force as part of a military or political victory, or during a catastrophe or riot, such as during war,[1] natural disaster,[2] or rioting. ... The Mausoleum site in ruins, as it stands today The Tomb of Maussollos, Mausoleum of Maussollos or Mausoleum at Halicarnassus (in Greek, ) was a tomb built between 353 and 350 BC at Halicarnassus (present Bodrum, Turkey) for Mausolus, a satrap in the Persian Empire, and Artemisia II of Caria, his... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC - 350s BC - 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 356 BC 355 BC 354 BC 353 BC 352 BC 351 BC 350 BC 349 BC 348... The Seleucid Empire was a Hellenistic successor state of Alexander the Greats dominion. ... Mausolus (Greek: Μαύσωλος; also Maussollus) was a satrap of the Persian empire and virtual ruler of Caria (377-353/352 BC). ... Look up satrap in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Persia redirects here. ... 1494 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... “The Colossus of Rhodes” redirects here. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 297 BC 296 BC 295 BC 294 BC 293 BC 292 BC 291 BC 290 BC 289... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC - 280s BC - 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 285 BC 284 BC 283 BC 282 BC 281 BC 280 BC 279 BC 278 BC 277... God, as a male deity, contrasts with female deities, or goddesses while the term goddess specifically refers to a female deity, words like gods and deities can be applied to all gods collectively, regardless of gender. ... For other uses, see Helios (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC - 220s BC - 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC Years: 231 BC 230 BC 229 BC 228 BC 227 BC - 226 BC - 225 BC 224 BC... Events King Reccaswinth issues Visigothic law code. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... Graphic reconstruction of the lighthouse according to a comprehensive study of 2006. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC - 280s BC - 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 285 BC 284 BC 283 BC 282 BC 281 BC 280 BC 279 BC 278 BC 277... The Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt began following Alexander the Greats conquest in 332 BC and ended with the death of Cleopatra VII and the Roman conquest in 30 BC. It was founded when Ptolemy I Soter declared himself Pharaoh of Egypt, creating a powerful Hellenistic state from southern Syria... // Events 24 February: Battle of Roslin 20 April: Pope Boniface VIII founds the University of Rome La Sapienza Edward I of England reconquers Scotland (see also: William Wallace, Wars of Scottish Independence) The Khilji Dynasty conquers time travel Births Saint Birgitta, Swedish saint (died 1373) Gegeen Khan, Mongol emperor of... Events March 6 - Treaty of Toledo - Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain recognize African conquests of Afonso of Portugal and he cedes the Canary Islands to Spain Great standing on the Ugra river - Muscovy becomes independent from the Golden Horde. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... Image File history File links Pyramide_Kheops. ... Image File history File links Pyramide_Kheops. ... The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza Necropolis bordering what is now Cairo, Egypt in Africa, and is the only remaining member of the Seven Wonders of the World. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... For other uses, see Graffiti (disambiguation). ... Location of the valley in the Theban Hills, West of the Nile, October 1988 (red arrow shows location) The Valley of the Kings (Arabic: وادي الملوك Wadi Biban el-Muluk; Gates of the King)[1] is a valley in Egypt where for a period of nearly 500 years from the 16th to...


Antipater's original list replaced the Lighthouse of Alexandria with the Ishtar Gate. It was not until the 6th century that the above list was developed. Of these wonders, the only one that has survived to the present day is the Great Pyramid of Giza. The existence of the Hanging Gardens has not been proven while records confirm that the other five wonders used to exist. The Temple of Artemis and the Statue of Zeus were destroyed by fire, while the Lighthouse of Alexandria, Colossus, and Mausoleum of Maussollos were destroyed by earthquakes. There are sculptures from the Mausoleum of Maussollos and the Temple of Artemis in the British Museum in London. The reconstructed Ishtar Gate in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin A detail from the reconstructed gate. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... London museum | name = British Museum | image = British Museum from NE 2. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


See also

For other uses, see Wonders of the World (disambiguation). ... Eighth Wonder of the World is a term sometimes used to describe things in comparison to the Seven Wonders of the World, the widely-known list of seven remarkable constructions of classical antiquity. ...

Further reading

  • D'Epiro, Peter, and Mary Desmond Pinkowish, "What Are the Seven Wonders of the World? and 100 Other Great Cultural Lists". Anchor. December 1, 1998. ISBN 0-385-49062-3

is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...

External links

  • The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World — an in-depth look from a professor of civil engineering at the American University in Dubai
  • Image of the Seven Wonder locations
  • Livius.org: Seven Wonders of the Ancient World
  • Video about the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, a virtual satellite tour made with Google Earth [02:34]
  • Parkin, Tim, Researching Ancient Wonders: A Research Guide, from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. - a collection of books and Internet resources with in-depth information on seven ancient wonders.
  • Google Maps 7 Ancient Wonders of the World
  • "Eternal wonder of humanity's first great achievements", by Jonathan Glancey in The Guardian, March 10, 2007
  • Seven Wonders Suite for Orchestra — A symphonic suite inspired by the seven ancient monuments by UK composer Stuart Mitchell - The Prague Symphony Orchestra

The Petronas Twin Towers, designed by Thornton-Tomasetti and Ranhill Bersekutu Sdn Bhd engineers, and Cesar Pelli, were the worlds tallest buildings from 1998 to 2004. ... The American University in Dubai (AUD) (in Arabic:الجامعة الأمريكية في دبي ) is a for-profit private educational institute located in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Anon. (1993)The Oxford Illustrated Encyclopedia First Edition Oxford:Oxford University


  Results from FactBites:
 
Seven Wonders of the World - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (419 words)
The Seven Wonders of the World (or the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World) is a widely-known list of seven remarkable constructions of classical antiquity.
The Great Pyramid was built by the ancient Egyptians, the Hanging Gardens by the Babylonians, and the Maussollos Mausoleum by the Persians; the others were built by the ancient Greeks.
Seven Wonders of Chicago - A list compiled by the Chicago Tribune and voted on by residents of the Chicagoland area.
MSN Encarta - Seven Wonders of the World (813 words)
Seven Wonders of the World, works of art and architecture regarded by ancient Greek and Roman observers as the most extraordinary structures of antiquity.
The oldest of the seven wonders, the pyramids are the only one remaining nearly intact today.
Ancient historians report that Babylon at that time was dazzling in the splendor of its palace and temple buildings, fortification walls, and paved processional ways.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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