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Encyclopedia > Seven Sisters (colleges)
Seven Sisters
Data
Established 1927
Members 7
Continent North America
Country United States
University type Private liberal arts college

The Seven Sisters is the name given in 1927 to seven liberal arts women's colleges in the Northern United States. They are Barnard College, Bryn Mawr College, Mount Holyoke College, Radcliffe College, Smith College, Wellesley College, and Vassar College. They were all founded between 1837 and 1889. Four are in Massachusetts, two are in New York, and one is in Pennsylvania. Radcliffe (which merged with Harvard College) and Vassar (which became coeducational in 1969) are no longer women's colleges. World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Womens colleges in the United States were primarly founded during the early 19th century. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... Bryn Mawr is also the name of an official neighborhood of the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Mount Holyoke College is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ... Radcliffe College in winter 2003 Radcliffe College was a womens college closely associated with Harvard University; since 1977 the two schools have been effectively merged and since 1999 legally so. ... Smith College, located in Northampton, Massachusetts, is the largest womens college in the United States []. Smith admits only female undergraduates, but admits both men and women as graduate students. ... Wellesley College is a womens liberal arts college that opened in 1875, founded by Henry Fowle Durant and his wife Pauline Fowle Durant. ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, highly selective liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... NY redirects here. ... Official language(s) English, Pennsylvania Dutch Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, having been founded in 1636. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women at the same school facilities. ...


Six of the Seven Sister colleges are identified as "Hidden Ivies" by Howard and Matthew Greene in their book Hidden Ivies: Thirty Colleges of Excellence.

Contents

Seven sister colleges

Institution Location School type Famous alumnae Full-time enrollment Founding
Mount Holyoke College South Hadley, Massachusetts Private women's college Emily Dickinson
Suzan-Lori Parks
Wendy Wasserstein
Frances Perkins
Glenda Hatchett
Elizabeth Holloway Marston
Dari Alexander
2,100 1837
Vassar College Poughkeepsie, New York Private coeducational Elizabeth Bishop
Jackie Kennedy
Meryl Streep
Ruth Benedict
Grace Hopper
Lisa Kudrow
Stacy London
2,400 1861
Wellesley College Wellesley, Massachusetts Private women's college Hillary Rodham Clinton
Madame Chiang Kai-shek
Diane Sawyer
Madeleine Albright
Nora Ephron
Cokie Roberts
2,300 1870
Smith College Northampton, Massachusetts Private women's college Betty Friedan
Sylvia Plath
Gloria Steinem
Julia Child
Barbara Bush
Nancy Reagan
Molly Ivins
Yolanda King
2,750 1871
Radcliffe College Cambridge, Massachusetts Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study (no longer accepts students) Gertrude Stein
Helen Keller
Margaret Atwood
Ursula K. Le Guin
Benazir Bhutto
Stockard Channing
Anne McCaffrey
n/a 1879
Bryn Mawr College Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania Private women's college H.D.
Marianne Moore
Edith Hamilton
Katharine Hepburn
Drew Gilpin Faust
1,229 1885
Barnard College New York, New York Private women's college Jhumpa Lahiri
Zora Neale Hurston
Margaret Mead
Anna Quindlen
Jeane Kirkpatrick
Suzanne Vega
Laurie Anderson
Twyla Tharp
Lauren Graham
Erica Jong
Martha Stewart
2,356 1889

Mount Holyoke College is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ...   Settled: 1659 â€“ Incorporated: 1775 Zip Code(s): 01075 â€“ Area Code(s): 413 Official website: http://www. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Womens colleges in the United States were primarly founded during the early 19th century. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Suzan-Lori Parks (1964 - ) is an African-American playwright and novelist. ... Wendy Wasserstein (October 18, 1950 – January 30, 2006) was an award-winning American playwright and an Andrew Dickson White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University. ... Frances Coralie Fannie Perkins (April 10, 1882 – May 14, 1965) was the U.S. Secretary of Labor from 1933 to 1945, and the first female cabinet member. ... Glenda Hatchett is the judge on the nationally syndicated television series Judge Hatchett. ... Elizabeth Sadie Holloway Marston (1893 - 1993) was the co-creator of the comic book character, Wonder Woman with her husband, William Moulton Marston. ... Dari Alexander Dari Alexander (born in 1963) is the co-anchor of WNYWs weeknight 6pm newscast, and previously a reporter and part-time anchor for the Fox News Channel. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, highly selective liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York. ... Poughkeepsie City of Poughkeepsie Town of Poughkeepsie Poughkeepsie, Arkansas This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 – October 6, 1979), was an American poet and writer. ... First official White House portrait. ... Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Grace Hopper Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and United States Navy officer. ... Lisa Marie Diane Kudrow (born July 30, 1963) is an Emmy Award- and SAG-winning American actress best known for her role as Phoebe Buffay in the sitcom Friends. ... Stacy London is an American fashion consultant and media personality, known best for her role as a co-host on the makeover reality program What Not to Wear which broadcasts on TLC in the United States and Canada. ... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... Wellesley College is a womens liberal arts college that opened in 1875, founded by Henry Fowle Durant and his wife Pauline Fowle Durant. ...   Settled: 1660 â€“ Incorporated: 1881 Zip Code(s): 02481, 02482 â€“ Area Code(s): 339 / 781 Official website: http://www. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Womens colleges in the United States were primarly founded during the early 19th century. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the Biggest loser/retard these united states have seen from New York. ... Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai-shek with General Stilwell in Burma (1942). ... Diane Sawyer is a television journalist for the U.S. network ABC News and co-anchor of ABCs Good Morning America, along with with Robin Roberts. ... Madeleine Korbel Albright (born Marie Jana Korbelová on May 15, 1937) served as the 64th United States Secretary of State. ... Nora Ephron Nora Ephron (born May 19, 1941 in New York City, New York) is an American film director, producer, screenwriter and novelist. ... Mary Martha Corinne Morrison Claiborne Boggs Roberts, better known as Cokie Roberts (b. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Smith College, located in Northampton, Massachusetts, is the largest womens college in the United States []. Smith admits only female undergraduates, but admits both men and women as graduate students. ... Nickname: Noho, Hamp Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Hampshire County Settled 1654 Incorporated 1656 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Mary Clare Higgins Area  - City  35. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Womens colleges in the United States were primarly founded during the early 19th century. ... Betty Friedan, 1960 Betty Friedan (February 4, 1921 – February 4, 2006) was an American feminist, activist and writer. ... Sylvia Plath (October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963) was an American poet, novelist, short story writer, and essayist. ... Gloria Steinem at news conference, Womens Action Alliance, January 12, 1972 Gloria Steinem (b. ... Julia Child (August 15, 1912–August 13, 2004) was a famous American cook, author, and television personality who introduced French cuisine and cooking techniques to the American mainstream through her many cookbooks and television programs. ... Barbara Pierce Bush (born June 8, 1925) is the wife of the 41st President of the United States, George H. W. Bush, and was First Lady of the United States from 1989 to 1993. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins July 6, 1921) was the First Lady of the United States of America from 1981 to 1989. ... Molly Ivins (born August 30, 1944, as Mary Tyler Ivins) is a newspaper columnist, political commentator, and best-selling author from Austin, Texas. ... Yolanda Denise King (born November 17, 1955) is the first-born daughter of Coretta Scott King and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Radcliffe College in winter 2003 Radcliffe College was a womens college closely associated with Harvard University; since 1977 the two schools have been effectively merged and since 1999 legally so. ...   Settled: 1630 â€“ Incorporated: 1636 Zip Code(s): 02138, 02139, 02140, 02141, 02142 â€“ Area Code(s): 617 / 857 Official website: http://www. ... The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard is an educational institution in Cambridge, Massachusetts, one of the semiautonomous components of Harvard University. ... Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 29, 1946) was an American writer and catalyst in the development of modern art and literature, who spent most of her life in France. ... Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was a deafblind American author, activist and lecturer. ... Margaret Eleanor Atwood, OC (born November 18, 1939) is a Canadian writer. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Stockard Channing press kit photo Stockard Channing (born Susan Antonia Williams Stockard on February 13, 1944) is an American actress. ... Anne Inez McCaffrey (born April 1, 1926) is an American science fiction author best known for her Dragonriders of Pern series. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Bryn Mawr is also the name of an official neighborhood of the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Bryn Mawr is in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania and Delaware County, Pennsylvania, just west of Philadelphia, along U.S. Highway Route 30 (Lancaster Avenue). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Womens colleges in the United States were primarly founded during the early 19th century. ... H.D. in the mid 1910s Hilda Doolittle (September 10, 1886, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania – September 27, 1961, Zürich), prominently known only by her initials H.D., was an American poet, novelist and memoirist. ... Marianne Moore photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Marianne Moore (December 11, 1887 - February 5, 1972) was a Modernist American poet and writer. ... Edith Hamilton (August 12, 1867 - May 31, 1963) was a classicist and educator before she became a writer on mythology. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was a four-time Academy Award-winning American star of film, television and stage, widely recognized for her sharp wit, New England gentility and fierce independence. ... Drew Gilpin Faust (born 1947) is an American historian. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Womens colleges in the United States were primarly founded during the early 19th century. ... Jhumpa Lahiri Vourvoulias (born Nilanjana Sudeshna in 1967) (Bengali: ঝুম্পা লাহিড়ী Jhumpa LahiÅ—i) is a contemporary Indian American (Bengali) author based in New York City. ... Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an American folklorist and author during the time of the Harlem Renaissance, best known for the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. ... Margaret Mead Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901, Philadelphia – November 15, 1978, New York City) American cultural anthropologist. ... Anna Quindlen (Born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist and opinion columnist whose New York Times column, Public and Private, won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in 1992. ... Jeane Kirkpatrick Jeane Jordan Kirkpatrick (November 19, 1926 â€“ December 7, 2006) was an American ambassador and an ardent anticommunist. ... Suzanne Vega Suzanne Nadine Vega (born July 11, 1959) is an American songwriter and singer known for her poetic lyrics and eclectic folk-inspired music. ... Laurie Anderson (born Laura Phillips Anderson, on June 5, 1947, in Glen Ellyn, Illinois) is an American experimental performance artist and musician. ... Twyla Tharp (born July 1, 1941) is an American dancer and choreographer. ... Lauren Helen Graham (born March 16, 1967) is an American actress. ... Erica (Mann) Jong (born March 26, 1942, in New York City, New York) is an American author and educator. ... Martha Stewart (born Martha Helen Kostyra on August 3, 1941) is an American business magnate, author, editor, former stock broker, model, homemaking advocate and a convicted felon. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

History

Background

Irene Harwarth, Mindi Maline, and Elizabeth DeBra note that "Independent nonprofit women’s colleges, which included the 'Seven Sisters' and other similar institutions, were founded to provide educational opportunities to women equal to those available to men and were geared toward women who wanted to study the liberal arts" [1]. The colleges also offered broader opportunities in academia to women, hiring many female faculty members and administrators. Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... An academic administration is a branch of university or college employees responsible for the maintenance and supervision of the institution and separate from the research and teaching faculty. ...


Mount Holyoke Female Seminary (founded in 1837) received its collegiate charter in 1888 and became Mount Holyoke Seminary and College. It became Mount Holyoke College in 1893. Both Vassar College and Wellesley College were patterned after Mount Holyoke. [2]. Wellesley College was originally founded in 1870 as the Wellesley Female Seminary, and was renamed Wellesley College in 1873. It opened its doors to students in 1875. Radcliffe College was originally created in 1879 as The Harvard Annex for women's instruction by Harvard faculty. It was chartered as Radcliffe College by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1894. Barnard College became affiliated with Columbia University in 1900, but it continues to be independently governed. Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, highly selective liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York. ... Wellesley College is a womens liberal arts college that opened in 1875, founded by Henry Fowle Durant and his wife Pauline Fowle Durant. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Columbia University is a private research university in the United States. ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ...


Mount Holyoke College and Smith College are also members of Pioneer Valley's Five Colleges consortium. Bryn Mawr College is a part of the Tri-College Consortium in suburban Philadelphia, with its sister schools, Haverford College and Swarthmore College. The Pioneer Valley and Connecticut River, looking southward toward the towns of Sunderland, Amherst and Whately. ... The Five Colleges are affiliated colleges in the Connecticut River valley of western Massachusetts, belonging to a consortium called Five Colleges, Incorporated. ... Bryn Mawr is also the name of an official neighborhood of the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The Tri-College Consortium consists of three Pennsylvania Main Line private liberal arts colleges: Haverford College, Swarthmore College and Bryn Mawr College. ... Haverford College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Haverford, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia. ... Swarthmore College is a private, independent, liberal arts college in the United States with an enrollment of about 1,450 students. ...


Formation and name

Harwarth, Maline, and DeBra also state that "the 'Seven Sisters' was the name given to Barnard, Smith, Mount Holyoke, Vassar, Bryn Mawr, Wellesley, and Radcliffe, because of their parallel to the Ivy League men’s colleges" in 1927.[1][3] The name refers to the Pleiades, seven sisters from Greek mythology. For the record label, see Ivy League Records. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar). ... THE TITLE IS WRONG MUST BE = Pleiades (Greek Mythology) Greek myths is not the only or more important for be considered as whole. ...


Late 20th century events

Vassar and Radcliffe are no longer women's colleges. Vassar College declined an offer to merge with Yale University and was the first member of the Seven Sisters to adopt coeducation, in 1969. Beginning in 1963, students at Radcliffe College received Harvard diplomas signed by the presidents of Radcliffe and Harvard and joint commencement exercises began in 1970. The same year, several Harvard and Radcliffe dormitories began swapping students experimentally and in 1972 full co-residence was instituted. The departments of athletics of both schools merged shortly thereafter. In 1977, Harvard and Radcliffe signed an agreement which put undergraduate women entirely in Harvard College. In 1999 Radcliffe College was dissolved and Harvard University assumed full responsibility over the affairs of female undergraduates. Radcliffe is now the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. “Yale” redirects here. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women at the same school facilities. ... Refers to a set of physical activities comprising sports and games. ... The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard is an educational institution in Cambridge, Massachusetts, one of the semiautonomous components of Harvard University. ...


Mount Holyoke, Smith College, Bryn Mawr College, and Wellesley College are still women's colleges. Barnard College is still affiliated with Columbia University but remains an independent women's college. (In 1983, Columbia College began admitting women after a decade of failed negotiations with Barnard for a merger along the lines of Harvard and Radcliffe.) As an affiliate of Columbia University, Barnard confers Columbia University diplomas upon its students. 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Seven Sister colleges in popular culture

There are a number of references to Seven Sister Colleges in American popular culture. As noted by Mount Holyoke College, "The Seven Sisters were immortalized in popular culture in a 2003 episode of The Simpsons. Having won local and state spelling bees, Lisa Simpson advances to the national finals. However, the moderator, concerned about the contest’s low television ratings, offers Lisa free tuition ('and a hot plate') at the Seven Sisters college of her choice if she will allow a more popular contestant (who happens to be a boy) to win. Lisa refuses, but has a dream in which students from each of the Seven Sisters appear to her." [4] The article, "Wellesley College Is Among the Stars of the Film, Mona Lisa Smile indicates the role of Wellesley in the Julia Roberts film.[5] Finally, the 1978 film, National Lampoon's Animal House satirizes a common practice up until the mid-1970s, when women attending Seven Sister colleges were connected with or to students at Ivy League schools. The film, which takes place in 1962, shows fraternity brothers from Delta house of the fictional Faber College (based on Dartmouth College) taking a road trip to the fictional Emily Dickinson College (either Mount Holyoke College or Smith College). [6]. Popular culture, sometimes called pop culture, (literally: the culture of the people) consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... Mount Holyoke College is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ... Im Spelling as Fast as I Can is the twelfth episode of The Simpsons fourteenth season. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Lisa Marie Simpson is a fictional character on the animated television series The Simpsons, and is voiced by Yeardley Smith. ... Wellesley College is a womens liberal arts college that opened in 1875, founded by Henry Fowle Durant and his wife Pauline Fowle Durant. ... Mona Lisa Smile is a 2003 film that was produced by Revolution Studios and Columbia Pictures, directed by Mike Newell, written by Lawrence Konner and Mark Rosenthal, and starring Julia Roberts, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Kirsten Dunst, and Julia Stiles. ... Julia Roberts (born Julia Fiona Roberts on October 28, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former fashion model. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Template:A year The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... For the record label, see Ivy League Records. ... While real schools and universities are often prominently featured in works of fiction, this is a list of schools and universities which are entirely fictional, even though some of them are modeled after real world institutions. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... Mount Holyoke College is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ... Smith College, located in Northampton, Massachusetts, is the largest womens college in the United States []. Smith admits only female undergraduates, but admits both men and women as graduate students. ...


See also

The Seven Sisters of the South refers to a group of highly regarded American womens colleges in the Southern United States. ... This is a timeline of womens colleges in the United States. ...

References

  • Horowitz, Helen Lefkowitz. Alma Mater: Design and Experience in the Women's Colleges from Their Nineteenth-Century Beginnings to the 1930s, Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1993 (2nd edition).
  • Perkins, Linda M. (Spring 1998). "The Racial Integration of the Seven Sister Colleges". Journal of Blacks in Higher Education: 104–08. 

Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz is the Sydenham Clark Parsons Professor of History at Smith College. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b Irene Harwarth; Mindi Maline and Elizabeth DeBra. Women's Colleges in the United States: History, Issues, and Challenges. U.S. Department of Education National Institute on Postsecondary Education, Libraries, and Lifelong Learning.
  2. ^ Jennifer L. Crispen. http://www.dean.sbc.edu/crispen.html. sbc.edu.
  3. ^ Robert A. McCaughey (Spring 2003). Women and the Academy. Higher Learning in America, History BC4345x. Barnard College.
  4. ^ Seven Sisters. Mount Holyoke College.
  5. ^ Wellesley College Is Among the Stars of the Film, Mona Lisa Smile. Wellesley College.
  6. ^ Landis, John. Interview with Soledad O'Brien. Live from the Headlines. CNN. 2003-08-29. (Transcript).

Mount Holyoke College is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ... Wellesley College is a womens liberal arts college that opened in 1875, founded by Henry Fowle Durant and his wife Pauline Fowle Durant. ... John Landis (born August 3, 1950 in Chicago) is an American movie actor, director, writer, and producer. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
What are the Seven Sisters? (714 words)
The Seven Sisters are liberal arts colleges on the Eastern Seaboard of the United States.
The Seven Sisters were all founded in the 19th century with the goal of opening up educational opportunities to women, since most colleges were all male at the time.
The colleges considered part of the Seven Sisters are: Mount Holyoke College, Vassar College, Wellesley College, Smith College, Radcliffe College, Bryn Mawr College, and Barnard College.
Seven Sisters (colleges) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (835 words)
The Seven Sisters is the name given in 1927 to seven liberal arts women's colleges in the Northern United States.
It was chartered as Radcliffe College by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1894.
Vassar College declined an offer to merge with Yale University and was the first member of the Seven Sisters to adopt coeducation, in 1969.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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