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Encyclopedia > Seton Hall University

Seton Hall University

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Motto Hazard Zet Forward
Established 1856
Type Private, Catholic, Sea-grant
Endowment $221 Million[1]
President Msgr. Robert Sheeran
Staff 860
Undergraduates 5,245
Postgraduates 4,500
Location South Orange, New Jersey, United States
Campus 58 acres (230,000 m²)
Sports Seton Hall Pirates
17 varsity teams
Colors Blue and White            
Website www.shu.edu

Seton Hall University is a private Roman Catholic university located 14 miles from Manhattan in historic South Orange, New Jersey. Founded in 1856 by Archbishop James Roosevelt Bayley, Seton Hall is the oldest diocesan university in the United States.[2] It is also the oldest and largest Catholic university in the State of New Jersey. The University is known for its basketball team, its radio station, and its programs in business, law, education, nursing, and diplomacy. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... The United States of America National Sea Grant College Program encourages wise stewardship of marine resources through research, education, outreach and technology transfer. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Map of South Orange Village in Essex County South Orange is a village in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Image File history File links SetonHallPirates. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Seton Hall refers to certain schools affiliated with the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark: Seton Hall University, a four-year University with its main campus and schools located in South Orange, New Jersey Seton Hall University School of Law, a Law School with their campus located in Downtown Newark, New... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      As a Christian ecclesiastical... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Map of South Orange Village in Essex County South Orange is a village in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... First Bishop of Newark, New Jersey; eighth Archbishop of the Archdiocese of Baltimore. ... This article is about the sport. ... WSOU is a non-commercial, college radio station, located at 89. ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... This article is about negotiations. ...


The University has an undergraduate enrollment of about 5,200 students and a graduate enrollment of about 4,500. Its School of Law, which is ranked as one of the top law schools in the nation,[3] has an enrollment of about 1,200 students. The Seton Hall College of Medicine and Dentistry was acquired by the state in 1965, and is now the New Jersey Medical School, part of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Seton Hall University School of Law is part of Seton Hall University, the Catholic University of New Jersey, and is located in downtown Newark. ... Law School Rankings are a specific subset of College and university rankings deal specifically with law schools. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... New Jersey Medical School (abbreviated NJMS, also known as UMDNJ-NJMS) is one of eight schools that form the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. ... The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, an umbrella designation used to refer to one of eight New Jersey state institutions of higher education in medicine. ...

Contents

History

Like many of America's Catholic universities, Seton Hall arose out of the Plenary Council of American Bishops, held in Baltimore in 1844, with the goal of bringing Catholicism to higher education in order to help propagate the faith. The Third Plenary Council of Baltimore (1884) The Plenary Councils of Baltimore refer to three national meetings of Roman Catholic bishops in the 19th century in Baltimore, Maryland. ...

Founder Bishop James Roosevelt Bayley.

The university was founded on September 1, 1856 by Archdiocese of Newark Bishop James Roosevelt Bayley, a cousin of President Theodore Roosevelt. Bishop Bayley named the institution after his aunt, Mother Elizabeth Ann Seton, who was the first American-born Catholic saint. Image File history File links Bayley. ... Image File history File links Bayley. ... First Bishop of Newark, New Jersey; eighth Archbishop of the Archdiocese of Baltimore. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... First Bishop of Newark, New Jersey; eighth Archbishop of the Archdiocese of Baltimore. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... St. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ...


From the time of the council, Seton Hall had been charged with providing quality higher education in the Catholic tradition to the residents of the Archdiocese of Newark, but has since expanded to become a nationally renowned university, with students from all 50 states and many foreign countries


This school, originally located in Madison, New Jersey, opened on September 1, 1856. Reverend Bernard J. McQuaid served as the first college president (1856-1857, 1859-1868) and directed a staff of four diocesan clergy including Reverend Alfred Young, vice-president; Reverend Daniel Fisher (the second college president, 1857-1859) and five lay instructors. Initially, Seton Hall had only five students - Leo G. Thebaud, Louis and Alfred Boisaubin, Peter Meehan and John Moore. By the end of the first year, the student body had grown fivefold to 54.


During the 19th century, in spite of setbacks, lean times and the American Civil War, the College continued to expand. Seton Hall opened a military science department (forerunner to the ROTC program) during the summer of 1893, but this program was ultimately disbanded during the Spanish-American War. Perhaps one of the most pivotal events in the history of Seton Hall came in 1897 when Seton Hall’s preparatory (high school) and college (undergraduate) divisions were permanently separated.[4] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties... for the university see Seton Hall University Seton Hall Preparatory School , commonly termed Seton Hall Prep, is a Roman Catholic boys high school of the Archdiocese of Newark, located in the suburban community of West Orange in Essex County, New Jersey. ...


By 1937, Seton Hall established a University College. This marked the first matriculation of women at Seton Hall. Seton Hall became fully coeducational in 1968.

President's Hall is one of the university's oldest buildings.

In 1948, Seton Hall was given a license by the FCC for WSOU-FM. Today, the station is one of the leading college radio stations in the country. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The FCCs official seal. ... WSOU is a non-commercial, college radio station, located at 89. ...


The College was organized into a university in 1950 following an unprecedented growth in enrollment. The College of Arts and Sciences and the schools of business, nursing and education comprised the University; the School of Law opened its doors in 1951, with Miriam Rooney as the first woman dean of law in the United States.


The state of New Jersey had no facilities for medical and dental education until 1954 when the Seton Hall College of Medicine and Dentistry was established under the auspices of the Archdiocese of Newark. The College was incorporated on August 6, 1954, as a legal entity separate from Seton Hall University, but with an interlocking Board of Trustees. In September 1955 remodeling construction was begun in two buildings of the Jersey City Medical Center to house the clinical and teaching facilities of the College. The first class of 80 students was admitted to the four-year MD program in September 1956. From the first graduating class in 1960 through 1964, the College awarded the MD degree to a total of 348 individuals. There were 36 dental graduates in the first class of 1960. By 1963, the total reached 139. The College expanded its program in 1961 when the Graduate School of Biomedical Science was chartered by the State Board of Education. The first candidates for the M.S. and Ph.D. degree entered in 1962. is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jersey City Medical Center is a hospital in Jersey City, New Jersey. ...


As the medical college expanded, the Archdiocese was concerned about its ability to properly cover the costs of operating the college. On July 28, 1964, a committee appointed by New Jersey governor Richard J. Hughes recommended that the State purchase the assets of the SHCMD for $4 million and continue its operation under state control. The action was consummated on May 3, 1965, and the institution's name was officially changed to the New Jersey College of Medicine and Dentistry (NJCMD). The college continues today as the New Jersey Medical School, part of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... New Jersey Medical School (abbreviated NJMS, also known as UMDNJ-NJMS) is one of eight schools that form the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. ... The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, an umbrella designation used to refer to one of eight New Jersey state institutions of higher education in medicine. ...

Statue of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton.

The next two decades saw the construction and modernization of a large number of facilities and the construction of the library, science building, residence halls and the University center. Many new programs and majors were inaugurated, as were important social outreach efforts. New ties were established with the private and industrial sectors, and a growing partnership developed with federal and state governments in creating programs for the economically and educationally disadvantaged. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


The 1970s and 1980s continued to be a time of growth and renewal. New business and nursing classroom buildings and an art center were opened. In 1984, the Immaculate Conception Seminary returned to Seton Hall, its original home until 1926, when it moved to Darlington (a section of Mahwah). The Recreation Center was dedicated in 1987. With the construction of four new residence halls between 1986 to 1988, and the purchase of an off-campus apartment building in 1990, the University made significant changes to account for a larger number of student residents. Seton Hall is recognized as a residential campus, providing living space for approximately 2100 students. Map highlighting Mahwahs location within Bergen County. ...


The physical development of the campus continued in the 1990s. The $20 million Walsh Library opened in 1994, and its first-class study and research resources marked the beginning of a technological transformation of Seton Hall. Kozlowski Hall, the University's newest academic center dedicated in 1997, is a clear example of Seton Hall's continued commitment to undergraduate education and the expanding role of information technology in higher education. The building was named after Seton Hall graduate Dennis Kozlowski, who is notorious for allegedly stealing millions of dollars from Tyco. On July 18, 2005, Kozlowski's name was removed from the building at his request, and it was subsequently renamed Jubilee Hall.[5] All classrooms in this six-story, 126,000 square foot (12,000 m²) building are wired for network and Internet connections, and many of the lecture halls are equipped with distance-learning technology. Its recreation center was originally named after Robert Brennan, but he was found guilty of securities fraud in 1994. It has since been renamed for long-time athletic director Richie Regan. A new School of Law building and parking garage were also constructed in the 1990s. Seton Hall continues to be a leader in technology in education, as well as in distance learning, with its renowned Seton World Wide program. In 1998, all incoming full-time, first-year students were issued laptop computers as part of the University's innovative and nationally recognized mobile computing program. Leo Dennis Kozlowski (born November 16, 1946, Newark, New Jersey) is a former CEO of Tyco International, convicted of misappropriating more than $400 million of the companys funds. ... Tyco has been used as the name for a number of distinct companies: Tyco International is a Bermuda-based conglomerate. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Richard Joseph Regan (1930-2002) was an American basketball player and coach. ...


Ever Forward Campaign

Immaculate Conception Chapel was built during the American Civil War.

The Seton Hall alumni and community, on the 150th anniversary (1856-2006) of the university’s founding have initiated the ‘’Ever Forward Campaign’’ to raise a total of $150 million.[6] The campaign is one of the most prestigious building campaigns in the University’s long history. The raised funds are intended to go to a variety of areas throughout the university but most significantly to the building and reconstruction of campus facilities and historic sites. There is expected to be a significant improvement to academic and community areas. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Among the notable objectives of the campaign, there will be a new site and complex for the University’s Whitehead School of Diplomacy. The University Center is also being planned to be rebuilt in a neo-gothic style to match other university buildings. Most recently, the rebuilding of the University’s Science and Technology Center has already taken place as of 2005. It is expect to be completed in the summer of 2007. The John C. Whitehead School of Diplomacy and International Relations, or simply the Whitehead School of Diplomacy, is a post-secondary degree-granting institution concentrating in international affairs within Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. ... Neo-gothic architecture is an American branch of the Gothic revival style that was imported from England in the 1830s. ...


Presently, with help of over 21,000 donors, the University has raised a total of $125 million, which 83% of its intended goal. [7]


Boland Hall Fire

Main article: Boland Hall Fire

On January 19, 2000, three students died and 54 were injured in a dormitory fire.[8] The fire prompted calls for increased fire safety measures at colleges across the country. In 2003, two people who were freshman at the university during the time of the fire were charged with murder and arson for allegedly starting the fire. [9] Joseph T. LePore and Sean Ryan, both 26, pleaded guilty and were sentenced to five years in prison. [10]. The Boland Hall Fire was a fatal fire in Boland Hall, a freshman dormitory on the Seton Hall University campus in South Orange, New Jersey on January 19, 2000. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Traditions

  • University Seal – The University seal as it is today is symbolic of hundreds of years of history. The seal combines attributes from the Bayley Coat of Arms and the Seton family crest. The Seton crest dates back as early as 1216 and symbolizes Scottish nobility. Renowned crest-maker, William F. J. Ryan designed the current form of the Seton Hall crest which is notable for its three crescents and three torteau.[11] The motto on the seal Hazard Zet Forward (Hazard Zit Forward on some versions) is a combination of Norman French and archaic English meaning at whatever risk, yet go forward.[12] Part custom and part superstition, students avoid stepping on an engraving of the seal in the middle of the university green. It is said that students who step on the seal will not graduate.
  • Alma Mater – The lyrics were written by Charles A. Byrne (SH '37) To Alma Mater all be loyal, keep her name in purest light. Never waver from her precepts, guard her banner blue and white. O sing her praise to highest skies and be ye faithful in her eyes, for she will foster all your dreams, her name is Seton Hall. When on life's hard stones you stumble, pray to God to be your guide. Think of Seton Hall your mother, then forge on in steady stride. O sing her praise to highest skies, and be ye faithful in her eyes, for she will foster all your dreams, her name is Seton Hall.[13]
  • Campus Fires - Throughout its history, there has been a bizarre series of fires that plagued Seton Hall’s campus. The first of these fires occurred in 1867 which destroyed the college’s first building. Two decades later in 1886 (March 9), another fire destroyed the university’s main building.[14] The administration, however, rallied quickly each time to allow for studies to continue in the following academic years. In the 20th century, another campus fire burned down a classroom as well as several dormitory buildings in 1909. The most recent of these Seton Hall fires was in 2000, which claimed the lives of three students. The university’s strange history of campus fires has made fire safety an especially important part of campus life.

A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Seton is the surname of a prominent Scottish Lowlands family, and may refer to: Titles of Nobility: The Earls of Dunfermline The Earls of Winton The Viscounts Kingston Other: Anya Seton, American historical novelist, daughter of Ernest Thompson Seton Barry Seton, Australian racing driver Elizabeth Ann Seton, American Catholic saint... // Prince Louis of France, the future King Louis VIII, invades England in the First Barons War Henry III becomes King of England. ... Stirling Castle has stood for centuries atop a volcanic crag defending the lowest ford of the River Forth. ... For things named Crescent, see Crescent (disambiguation). ... This article is about the insignia/symbol. ... The Norman language is a Romance language, one of the Oïl languages. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Schools and colleges

A panoramic view of the west end of the South Orange campus from the University Center.
From left to right: Walsh Library, Mooney Hall, Presidents Hall, Jubilee Hall, the University Green and the University Center.

College of Arts and Sciences (1856)

Dean: Joseph Marbach, Ph.D. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

  • Africana and Diaspora Studies (B.A.)
  • Biochemistry (B.S.)
  • Biology (B.S.)
  • Chemistry and Biochemistry (B.S., M.S., Ph.D.)
  • Computer Science (B.S.)
  • Anthropology (B.A.)
  • Art History (B.A.)
  • Asian Studies (B.A., M.A.)
  • Biological Sciences (B.A., M.S., Ph.D.)
  • Broadcasting and Visual Media (B.A.)
  • Catholic Studies (B.A.)
  • Classical Studies (B.A.)
  • Communication Studies (B.A., M.A.)
  • Computer Science (B.S.)
  • Music/Music Education (B.A.)
  • Criminal Justice (B.A.)
  • Economics (B.A.)
  • English (B.A., M.A.)
  • Environmental Studies (B.A.)
  • Fine Arts (B.A.)
  • French (B.A.)
  • Graphic, Interactive and Advertising Design (B.A.)
  • History (B.A., M.A.)
  • Italian (B.A.)
  • Jewish-Christian Studies (M.A.)
  • Journalism and Public Relations (B.A.)
  • Liberal Studies (B.A.)
  • Mathematics (B.S.)
  • Modern Languages (B.A.)
  • Museum Professions (M.A.)
  • Music Performance (B.A.)
  • Philosophy (B.A.)
  • Physics (B.S.)
  • Political Science (B.A.)
  • Psychology (B.A., M.S.)
  • Public Administration (M.P.A.)
  • Public Health (M.P.A., M.H.A.)
  • Religious Studies (B.A.)
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences (B.A.)
  • Social Work (B.A.)
  • Sociology (B.A.)
  • Spanish (B.A.)
  • Theatre and Performance (B.A.)

Stillman School of Business (1950)

Dean: Karen E. Boroff, Ph.D. A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... BS or bs is an abbreviation with multiple meanings, including: Bachelor of Science degree British Standard Bahamas (ISO country code) The postcode for Bristol, England A somewhat more polite abbreviation of bullshit A card game The Swiss canton of Basel_Stadt Shorthand for the backspace and the backspace control character Shorthand... BS or bs is an abbreviation with multiple meanings, including: Bachelor of Science degree British Standard Bahamas (ISO country code) The postcode for Bristol, England A somewhat more polite abbreviation of bullshit A card game The Swiss canton of Basel_Stadt Shorthand for the backspace and the backspace control character Shorthand... BS or bs is an abbreviation with multiple meanings, including: Bachelor of Science degree British Standard Bahamas (ISO country code) The postcode for Bristol, England A somewhat more polite abbreviation of bullshit A card game The Swiss canton of Basel_Stadt Shorthand for the backspace and the backspace control character Shorthand... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... BS or bs is an abbreviation with multiple meanings, including: Bachelor of Science degree British Standard Bahamas (ISO country code) The postcode for Bristol, England A somewhat more polite abbreviation of bullshit A card game The Swiss canton of Basel_Stadt Shorthand for the backspace and the backspace control character Shorthand... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... BS or bs is an abbreviation with multiple meanings, including: Bachelor of Science degree British Standard Bahamas (ISO country code) The postcode for Bristol, England A somewhat more polite abbreviation of bullshit A card game The Swiss canton of Basel_Stadt Shorthand for the backspace and the backspace control character Shorthand... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... BS or bs is an abbreviation with multiple meanings, including: Bachelor of Science degree British Standard Bahamas (ISO country code) The postcode for Bristol, England A somewhat more polite abbreviation of bullshit A card game The Swiss canton of Basel_Stadt Shorthand for the backspace and the backspace control character Shorthand... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... BS or bs is an abbreviation with multiple meanings, including: Bachelor of Science degree British Standard Bahamas (ISO country code) The postcode for Bristol, England A somewhat more polite abbreviation of bullshit A card game The Swiss canton of Basel_Stadt Shorthand for the backspace and the backspace control character Shorthand... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... The Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) historically has been a professional Masters degree that provides training in public policy, project and program implementation. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ...

  • Accounting (B.S.)
  • Economics (B.S.)
  • Business Administration (B.A.)
  • Business Administration (B.S.)
    • Accounting
    • Economics
    • Finance
    • Management Information Systems
    • Marketing
    • Sport Management
  • Full-time M.B.A.
  • ”Practical” M.B.A.
  • Master of Science (M.S.)
    • Accounting
    • Professional Accounting
    • Taxation

College of Education/Human Services (1920)

Dean: Joseph De Pierro, Ed. D. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “MBA” redirects here. ... “MBA” redirects here. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ...

College of Nursing (1937)

Dean: Phyllis Shanley Hansell, Ed. D., R.N., F.A.A.N. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Education Specialist, Educational Specialist, Specialist in Education, or Ed. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Education Specialist, Educational Specialist, Specialist in Education, or Ed. ... The Doctor of Education degree (Ed. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Doctor of Education degree (Ed. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... The Education Specialist, Educational Specialist, Specialist in Education, or Ed. ... The Education Specialist, Educational Specialist, Specialist in Education, or Ed. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ...

  • Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.)
  • Health Systems Administration (M.S.N.)
  • Nursing (Ph.D.)
  • Nursing Education (M.A.)
  • Nurse Practitioner (M.S.N.)
    • Acute Care Nurse Practitioner
    • Adult Nurse Practitioner
    • Gerontological Nurse Practitioner
    • Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner

School of Graduate Medical Education (1987)

Dean: Brian B. Shulman, PhD CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow, BRS-CL Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ...

  • Athletic Training (M.S.)
  • Health Sciences (M.S., Ph.D.)
  • Occupational Therapy (M.S.)
  • Physical Therapy (Ph.D.)
  • Physician Assistant (M.S.P.A.)
  • Speech-Language Pathology (M.S.)

I.C. School of Theology (1860)

Rector/Dean: Monsignor Robert F. Coleman, J.C.D. A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... In the United States, Physician Assistants (PAs) are non-physician clinicians licensed to practice medicine with a physicians supervision. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... The Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology (ICSST) is part of Seton Hall University, the Catholic University of New Jersey, and is located in South Orange. ...

  • Catholic Theology (B.A)
  • Master of Arts in Theology (M.A.)
  • Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry (M.A.)
  • Master of Divinity (M.Div.)
  • Special Program for Neocatechumenal Way Seminarians

Whitehead School of Diplomacy (1997)

Dean: Amb. John K. Menzies, Ph.D. A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Master of Divinity is a common degree among theological seminaries and is considered the minimum academic requirement for ordination into pastoral ministry. ... BS or bs is an abbreviation with multiple meanings, including: Bachelor of Science degree British Standard Bahamas (ISO country code) The postcode for Bristol, England A somewhat more polite abbreviation of bullshit A card game The Swiss canton of Basel_Stadt Shorthand for the backspace and the backspace control character Shorthand... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A terminal degree is the generally accepted highest academic degree in a field of study. ... Ambassador John K. Menzies served as the 16th president of Graceland University in Lamoni, Iowa, from September 2002 to August 2006. ...

  • Diplomacy and International Relations (B.S.)
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy and International Relations (M.A.D.I.R.)
    • Juris Doctor in Law (J.D./ (M.A.D.I.R.))
    • Master of Business Administration (M.B.A./ (M.A.D.I.R.)
    • Master of Public Administration (M.P.A./(M.A.D.I.R.)
    • Master of Arts in Asian Studies (M.A./(M.A.D.I.R.)
    • Master of Arts in Corporate Communication (M.A./(M.A.D.I.R.)

School of Law (1951)

Dean: Patrick E. Hobbs, J.D. BS or bs is an abbreviation with multiple meanings, including: Bachelor of Science degree British Standard Bahamas (ISO country code) The postcode for Bristol, England A somewhat more polite abbreviation of bullshit A card game The Swiss canton of Basel_Stadt Shorthand for the backspace and the backspace control character Shorthand... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) historically has been a professional Masters degree that provides training in public policy, project and program implementation. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Doctor of Law, Doctor of Jurisprudence, or Juris Doctor (abbreviated J.D. or JD, from the Latin, Teacher of Law) is a professional degree in law offered by universities in a number of countries. ... The Medicinæ Doctor or Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or D.M.) is a doctorate level degree held by medical doctors. ... Doctor of Law, Doctor of Jurisprudence, or Juris Doctor (abbreviated J.D. or JD, from the Latin, Teacher of Law) is a professional degree in law offered by universities in a number of countries. ... The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, an umbrella designation used to refer to one of eight New Jersey state institutions of higher education in medicine. ... Doctor of Law, Doctor of Jurisprudence, or Juris Doctor (abbreviated J.D. or JD, from the Latin, Teacher of Law) is a professional degree in law offered by universities in a number of countries. ... “MBA” redirects here. ... Doctor of Law, Doctor of Jurisprudence, or Juris Doctor (abbreviated J.D. or JD, from the Latin, Teacher of Law) is a professional degree in law offered by universities in a number of countries. ... The John C. Whitehead School of Diplomacy and International Relations, or simply the Whitehead School of Diplomacy, is a post-secondary degree-granting institution concentrating in international affairs within Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... The Medicinæ Doctor or Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or D.M.) is a doctorate level degree held by medical doctors. ... The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, an umbrella designation used to refer to one of eight New Jersey state institutions of higher education in medicine. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree, commonly abbreviated LL.M. (also LLM or LL.M) from its Latin name, Legum Magister. ...

Campuses

Seton Hall School of Law in Newark, NJ

Main Campus -- 400 South Orange Ave., South Orange, NJ Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...

Newark Campus -- One Newark Center, Newark, NJ The John C. Whitehead School of Diplomacy and International Relations, or simply the Whitehead School of Diplomacy, is a post-secondary degree-granting institution concentrating in international affairs within Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. ... The Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology (ICSST) is part of Seton Hall University, the Catholic University of New Jersey, and is located in South Orange. ...

On-Line Campus Seton Hall University School of Law is part of Seton Hall University, the Catholic University of New Jersey, and is located in downtown Newark. ...

  • SetonWorldWide: The Online Campus [9]

School of Law

The Seton Hall University School of Law founded in 1951 is located at the Newark Campus. It is accredited by the American Bar Association (ABA) since 1951 and is also a member of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS). Seton Hall is one of three law schools in the state of New Jersey. Seton Hall University School of Law is part of Seton Hall University, the Catholic University of New Jersey, and is located in downtown Newark. ... American Bar Associations Washington, DC office The American Bar Association (ABA) is a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States. ... The Association of American Law Schools (AALS) is a non-profit organization of 166 law schools in the United States. ...


In 2007 and 2008, the U.S. News and World Report ranked the school 70th among the top 100 law schools in the nation. Its Health Law program, which also offers an L.L.M. degree, is ranked 4th in the nation.[15] The school was also ranked as having one of the highest rates of employment at graduation placing 19th with 92.1% (and 97% after nine months).[16] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Legal topics related to health and the health profession. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree that allows someone to specialize in a particular area of law. ...


Whitehead School

The Whitehead School was founded in 1997 in alliance with the United Nations Association of the United States of America. It has since become the fastest growing division of the University. A partial explanation for its internationally renown diplomacy program[17] is its notable faculty consisting of US ambassadors, world-famous lecturers, and student body made up individuals from across the nation and world. The John C. Whitehead School of Diplomacy and International Relations, or simply the Whitehead School of Diplomacy, is a post-secondary degree-granting institution concentrating in international affairs within Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. ... The United Nations Association of the United States of America or UNA-USA was founded in 1943 by Eleanor Roosevelt as the American Association for the United Nations (AAUN) which was merged with the in 1964. ...


Athletics

Image File history File links New Big East Conference logo File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


The school's sports teams are called the Pirates. They participate in the NCAA's Division I and in the Big East Conference. The college established its first basketball squad in 1903. Seton Hall cancelled football (which was played in Division III) in 1982. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


Seton Hall is best known for its men's basketball program, which won the NIT tournament in 1953, and lost in the finals of the 1989 NCAA tournament to Michigan 80-79 in overtime, but the game result was marred by a "phantom foul" call. Most recently, they were in the 2006 NCAA tournament (or Big Dance), but the 10th seed Pirates were eliminated in a crushing 86-66 first round loss to the 7th seed Wichita State Shockers of the Missouri Valley Conference. Following this season-ending loss, Seton Hall fired head coach Louis Orr, a move that had been rumored all year. After contacting several head coaches to replace Orr, Seton Hall hired head coach Bobby Gonzalez away from Manhattan College. [18] NIT or Nit or nit can refer to:- A common name for various types of lice eggs. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The University of Michigan features 24 varsity sports teams called the Wolverines, which compete in the NCAAs Division I and in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except mens ice hockey which competes in the NCAA D1 Central Collegiate Hockey Association. ... It has been suggested that March Madness be merged into this article or section. ... Wichita State University, an American university, was founded as Fairmount College in 1886 by the Rev. ... Former Missouri Valley Conference logo The Missouri Valley Conference (also called MVC or simply The Valley) is a college athletic conference whose members are located in the midwestern United States. ... Louis M. Orr (born May 7, 1958 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American mens basketball coach. ... Bobby Gonzalez is currently the head coach of the Seton Hall University mens basketball team. ... The main entrance to Manhattan College Manhattan College is a Roman Catholic liberal arts college in the Lasallian tradition in New York City. ...

Seton Hall currently participates in the following sports at the Division I level:

Seton Hall also offers the following club sports: This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... This article is about the sport. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... For other uses, see Dive. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ...

Seton Hall Pirates Logo

Seton Hall and Rutgers University have a spirited rivalry in sports that the two offer. Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ...


All Seton Hall sports have their home field on the South Orange campus, except for Men's Basketball, who will now play at the Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey.[19] Prudential Tower in 1963, with construction not quite finished. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - City 67. ...


Student Media

The school's principal newspaper is The Setonian. The paper has national news, school news, editorials, letters, a "life" section (entitled "Pirate's Life"), and an athletics section. The staff consists mostly of undergraduates and publishes weekly on Thursday.


Other newspapers have also sprung up over time on campus. The Stillman Exchange is the Stillman Business school's own newspaper. Its stories cover a wide scope, including ethical issues, business and athletics. The Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations is a bi-annually published journal that is composed of writings by international leaders in government, the private sector, academia, and nongovernmental organizations. A more recent addition to Seton Hall's growing number of publications is the Liberty Bell. Currently the only political newspaper on campus, the Liberty Bell is published by the Seton Hall University Students for Individual Liberty and features news and op-ed articles about issues dealing with individual liberty. The Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations is the official publication of the John C. Whitehead School of Diplomacy and International Relations. ...


The Rampage is an unofficial paper that is popular among students on campus. Known for humorously questioning the integrity of The Setonian, the Rampage has grown into an underground phenomenon. The members of the staff are kept relatively secret as to protect their identities. They also maintain a website.


WSOU is a non-commercial, college radio station, located at 89.5 MHz FM. The station broadcasts from the campus of Seton Hall University in South Orange, NJ. It is a student run station with General Manager Mark Maben at helm as a full time faculty member. WSOU currently broadcasts in HD-RADIO. In 2007, the Princeton Review rated WSOU as the 8th best college radio station in the nation. [20] WSOU is a non-commercial, college radio station, located at 89. ...


Greek life

There are currently twenty-five recognized fraternity and sorority chapters at Seton Hall. Approximately ten percent of the student body is a member of a Greek-letter organization.

In the Fall os 2005, a group of students purporting to be an unrecognized chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon recently made headlines when it was discovered that a pledge had been kidnapped and beaten for alerting university administration of the group's existence. [10] Alpha Phi Delta (ΑΦΔ), commonly referred to as APD, is a secret letter, social college fraternity that evolved from an exclusive Italian society (Il Circolo Italiano) at Syracuse University in 1914. ... ΑΚΨ (Alpha Kappa Psi) is a co-ed professional business fraternity. ... Lambda Theta Phi, Latin Fraternity, Inc. ... La Unidad Latina, Lambda Upsilon Lambda Fraternity, Incorporated was established on February 19, 1982 in order to address the shortcomings of academic institutions in meeting and addressing the needs of Latino students in higher education. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phi Kappa Theta (ΦΚΘ) is a national social fraternity with over 50 chapters and colonies at universities across the United States. ... Pi Kappa Phi is a national social fraternity that was founded in the spirit of nu phi, meaning non-fraternity. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Sigma Pi (ΣΠ) is an international college social fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Zeta Beta Tau (ZBT, brothers of which are nicknamed Zebes) is a historically Jewish, presently nonsectarian international fraternity. ... The Zeta Psi Fraternity of North America Inc. ... Alpha Gamma Delta (ΑΓΔ) Founded in 1904, Alpha Gamma Delta is an international fraternity for women dedicated to academic excellence, leadership development, high ideals and sisterhood. ... Alpha Phi (ΑΦ) is a fraternity for women founded at Syracuse University on October 10, 1872. ... Alpha Sigma Tau (AΣT) Sorority is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 4, 1899 at Michigan State Normal College (now Eastern Michigan University). ... Chi Upsilon Sigma National Latin Sorority Inc. ... Delta Phi Epsilon (ΔΦΕ) is the name given to several college fraternities and sororities. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority, Inc. ... Mu Sigma Upsilon Sorority, Inc. ... Omega Phi Beta Sorority(ΩΦΒ) is a Latino oriented Greek letter intercollegiate sorority founded on March 15, 1989 on the University at Albany in Albany, New York. ... Sigma Sigma Sigma (ΣΣΣ), also known as Tri Sigma or Sigma, is a national American women’s sorority with membership of more than 92,000 members (as of August 1, 2006). ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority Inc. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren Convent (WSC). ... Pledge is a verb, meaning to promise solemnly, and a noun, meaning the promise or its maker or its object. ...


People

Notable Alumni

For a comprehensive list of alumni, see the list of notable Seton Hall University alumni. The following is a list of Seton Hall University alumni. ...

alumnus Anthony Principi
alumnus Anthony Principi

Besides numerous members of the United States Congress and the New Jersey State Legislature, two former Governors of New Jersey, Donald DiFrancesco and John O. Bennett are alumni. Other notable alumni in government include from United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs Anthony Principi and United States Attorney Christopher J. Christie. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The Legislature of New Jersey is the U.S. state of New Jerseys legislative branch, seated at the states capital, Trenton. ... Jon Corzine 54th Governor of New Jersey; Incumbent Christine Christie Todd Whitman, the first female governor of New Jersey The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Donald Thomas DiFrancesco (b. ... John O. Bennett John O. Bennett III (born 1948) is a former New Jersey |Republican politician who served as State Senator, President of the State Senate, and acting Governor during the course of his career. ... The United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs is the head of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, the department concerned with veterans benefits and related matters. ... Anthony Joseph Principi (born April 16, 1944) was the 4th United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs. ... United States Attorneys (also known as federal prosecutors) represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court and United States court of appeals. ... United States Attorney Christopher J. Christie Christopher J. Christie was nominated by President George W. Bush to be the United States Attorney for the District of New Jersey on December 7, 2001. ...


Seton Hall graduates have also served as the head of major business and institutions such as Tyco, American International Group, and the Archdiocese of Newark. Many alumni have become prominent players in professional sports such as two-time Gold Medalist sprinter Andy Stanfield and numerous players of the National Basketball Association like Andre Barrett, Adrian Griffin, Eddie Griffin and Samuel Dalembert. Major League Baseball player alumni include Mo Vaughn, Craig Biggio, John Valentin and Matt Morris. Other highlights include a Congressional Medal of Honor recipient, a two-time Emmy-winning journalist, Chuck Connors and Max Weinberg. Tyco has been used as the name for a number of distinct companies: Tyco International is a Bermuda-based conglomerate. ... American International Group, Inc. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark includes 4 counties in northeastern New Jersey: Bergen, Hudson, Essex, and Union. ... Andrew William Andy Stanfield (December 29, 1927-June 15, 1985) was an American track and field athlete. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... Andre Barrett (born February 21, 1982) is a professional basketball player in the NBA who plays for the Milwaukee Bucks. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... [[:Template:Mlbretired]] Maurice Samuel Mo Vaughn (born December 15, 1967 in Norwalk, Connecticut), nicknamed Hit Dog, (a nickname given to him by his Omega Psi Phi fraternity brothers at Seton Hall University) was a Major League Baseball first baseman from 1991 to 2003. ... Craig Alan Biggio (born December 14, 1965 in Smithtown, New York) is a seven-time All-Star Major League baseball player who has played his entire career with the Houston Astros. ... John William Valentin (born February 16, 1967 in Mineola, New York) is a former shortstop and third baseman in Major League Baseball. ... Matthew Christian Morris (born August 9, 1974 in Middletown, New York) is a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball with the Pittsburgh Pirates. ... For the computer game, see Medal of Honor (computer game). ... Chuck Connors Kevin Joseph Aloysius Connors, better known by his professional name of Chuck Connors (April 10, 1921 – November 10, 1992), was an American actor and professional basketball and baseball player. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Notable Faculty

Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the supreme court in the United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Justice_Alito_official. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Justice_Alito_official. ... Ambassador Clay Constantinou served as the first dean of the John C. Whitehead School of Diplomacy and International Relations at Seton Hall University from May 1999 through May 2005. ... This is a list of ambassadors from the United States. ... The John C. Whitehead School of Diplomacy and International Relations, or simply the Whitehead School, is a post-secondary degree-granting institution concentrating in international affairs within Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. ... Will Durant William James Durant (November 5, 1885–November 7, 1981) was an American philosopher, historian, and writer. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal, which is bestowed by an... Patrick E. Hobbs was named the dean of Seton Hall Law School in 1999. ... Seton Hall University School of Law is part of Seton Hall University, the Catholic University of New Jersey, and is located in downtown Newark. ... Cover of Constitutional Chaos, by former judge and current Fox News judicial analyst Andrew P. Napolitano. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Fox News” redirects here. ... Peter Wallace Rodino Jr. ... U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Eliakim Parker Scammon (December 27, 1816 – December 7, 1894) was a career officer in the United States Army, serving as a brigadier general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Sister Rose Thering (August 9, 1920 in Plain, Wisconsin – May 6, 2006 in Racine, Wisconsin) was a Roman Catholic Dominican nun, activist against anti-Semitism, educator and a professor of Catholic-Jewish dialogue at Seton Hall University. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...

Trivia

  • In 2006, Seton Hall celebrated its sesquicentennial anniversary.
  • By its 150th anniversary, Seton Hall had about 91,106 graduates worldwide.
  • In the HBO series, The Sopranos, Tony Soprano attended Seton Hall for a semester and a half before dropping out. [22]
  • The village of South Orange is one of only a few in New Jersey to retain gas light street illumination and has a tavern named for them in town which is frequented by Seton Hall students.
  • In the 1994 movie Clerks, Dante Hicks girlfriend, Vernonica, briefly mentioned transferring from Seton Hall to a local school to be with Dante.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... The Sopranos is an American television drama series created by David Chase and originally broadcast on the HBO network. ... Information Aliases Ron Spears, Kevin Finnerty, Mr. ... Gas lighting is the process of burning piped natural gas or coal gas for illumination. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ US News & World Best Colleges 2008 Endowment Index. US News & World Report (2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-18.
  2. ^ Seton Hall University History. Social Science Research Network (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  3. ^ Graduate School Rankings. US News and World Report (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  4. ^ Delozier, Alan, et al. "History of Seton Hall", Walsh Library Archives. Retrieved on 2007-05-09. 
  5. ^ New Jersey: South Orange: Convict's Name Off Building. New York Times (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  6. ^ Ever Forward Campaign Description. Seton Hall University Website (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  7. ^ Ever Forward Campaign Funds Chart. Seton Hall University Website (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  8. ^ Three Die in Dorm Fire at Seton Hall. CNN News (2000). Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
  9. ^ Former students reach plea deal in killer dorm fire. CNN News (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  10. ^ Ibid.
  11. ^ Wister, Msgr. Robert. "Saints, Monsters, Bishops and Seton Hall", mimeo. Retrieved on 2007-05-09. 
  12. ^ Ibid.
  13. ^ "Alma Mater lyrics", 2007 Commencement Exercises Pamphlet. Retrieved on 2007-05-09. 
  14. ^ Delozier, Alan, et al. "History of Seton Hall", Walsh Library Archives. Retrieved on 2007-05-09. 
  15. ^ Graduate School Rankings. US News and World Report (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  16. ^ 2007 Raw Law School Data – Employment at Graduation. Internet Legal Research Group (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  17. ^ Seton Hall University / UNA-USA Alliance. United Nations Association of the United States of America (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  18. ^ Larranaga 'Very Happy' at GMU. The Washington Post (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  19. ^ [http://newjerseydevils.com/njd/theteam/teamnews/prucenter_setonhall.php Seton Hall University Men's Basketball Joins Roster At Newark's Prudential Center]. New Jersey Devils. Retrieved on 2007-18-06.
  20. ^ Best College Radio Rankings. The Princeton Review (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  21. ^ At Seton Hall, Professor Alito Wore a Cloak of Inscrutability. The Washington Post (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  22. ^ FBI Files: Tony Soprano. HBO Online (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-04.

U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Jersey Devils are a professional ice hockey team based in Newark, New Jersey. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Seton Hall University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1994 words)
Seton Hall University is a Roman Catholic university located 14 miles (23 km) from Manhattan, with an official address of South Orange, New Jersey, although the majority of the campus is within Newark's city proper.
Seton Hall University is the oldest diocesan university in the United States and is known for its basketball team (the Pirates), its radio station (WSOU-FM), its progressive use of technology in education, and its programs in business, law, education, nursing, and diplomacy.
Seton Hall is best known for its men's basketball program, which won the NIT tournament in 1953, and lost in the finals of the 1989 NCAA tournament to Michigan 80-79 in overtime, but the game result was marred by a "phantom foul" call.
Campus Profile: Seton Hall University (2316 words)
Seton Hall’s commitment to technology is backed by universitywide support and a rigorous strategic plan, and its efforts have gained the institution national attention, including recognition through the 1999 EDUCAUSE Award for Excellence in Campus Networking.
Seton Hall began a universitywide strategic planning process in the 1994-95 academic year, and as part of that process the institution developed a long-range plan for information technology.
Seton Hall was founded with a commitment to provide our students with a values-based education, building core competencies in their disciplines and providing students with the underlying skills they need to succeed in their personal and professional lives.
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