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Encyclopedia > Sergei Rachmaninoff
Rachmaninoff, in his later years, toured the United States extensively, and remained there from 1918 until his death.
Rachmaninoff, in his later years, toured the United States extensively, and remained there from 1918 until his death.

Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff[a] (Russian: Сергей Васильевич Рахманинов, Sergej Vasil’evič Rakhmaninov, 1 April 1873 [O.S. 20 March]28 March 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor, one of the last great champions of the Romantic style of European classical music. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1500x2586, 388 KB) Sergei Rachmaninoff, date of photo not recorded. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1500x2586, 388 KB) Sergei Rachmaninoff, date of photo not recorded. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Old Style redirects here. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... A conductor conducting at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... The expression romantic music and the homophone phrase Romantic music have two essentially different meanings. ...


Rachmaninoff is regarded as one of the most influential pianists of the 20th century. He had legendary technical faculties and rhythmic drive, and his large hands were able to cover the interval of a thirteenth on the keyboard (a hand span of approximately twelve inches). According to fellow composer Igor Stravinsky Rachmaninoff stood 6 feet 6 inches (198 cm) tall.[1] He also had the ability to play complex compositions upon first hearing. Many recordings were made by the Victor Talking Machine Company as well as the Edison Phonograph Company recording labels of Rachmaninoff performing his own music, as well as works from the standard repertoire. In music theory, the term interval describes the difference in pitch between two notes. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ...


His reputation as a composer generated a variety of opinions, before his music gained steady recognition across the world. The 1954 edition of Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians notoriously dismissed his music as "monotonous in texture ... consist[ing] mainly of artificial and gushing tunes" and predicted that his popular success was "not likely to last".[citation needed] To this, Harold C. Schonberg, in his Lives of the Great Composers, responded, "It is one of the most outrageously snobbish and even stupid statements ever to be found in a work that is supposed to be an objective reference."[citation needed] Indeed, not only have Rachmaninoff's works become part of the standard repertoire, but their popularity among both musicians and audiences has, if anything, increased since the middle of the twentieth century, with some of his symphonies and other orchestral works, songs and choral music recognized as masterpieces alongside the more familiar piano works. The Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians is a dictionary of music and musicians, generally considered to be one of the best general reference sources on the subject. ... Harold Charles Schonberg (November 29, 1915 - July 26, 2003) was a American music critic and journalist, most notably for the New York Times between 1960 and 1980. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Orchestra (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musical composition. ... This article is about choirs, musical ensembles containing singers. ...


His compositions include, among numerous others: four piano concerti; the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini; three symphonies; two piano sonatas; three operas; a choral symphony (The Bells, based on the poem by Edgar Allan Poe); the All-Night Vigil, for unaccompanied choir (often known as Rachmaninoff's Vespers); twenty-four Preludes (including the famous Prelude in C-sharp minor); the Six Moments Musicaux; seventeen Études-tableaux; many songs, of which the most famous are "V molchanyi nochi taynoi" ("In the silence of night"), Lilacs, and the wordless Vocalise; and the last of his works, the Symphonic Dances. Most of his pieces follow a melancholy, late-Romantic style akin to Tchaikovsky, although strong influences of Chopin and Liszt are apparent. Further inspiration included the music of Balakirev, Mussorgsky, Medtner (whom he considered the greatest contemporary composer and who, according to Schonberg's Lives, returned the compliment by imitating him) and Henselt. A piano concerto is a concerto for solo piano and orchestra. ... Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini (Russian: , Rapsodiya na temu Paganini) is a piece of classical music for orchestra and solo piano by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A piano sonata is a sonata written for unaccompanied piano. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Bells (Kolokola), Op. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Bells The Bells is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... The All-Night Vigil (Russian: ), Opus 37, is an a cappella choral composition by Sergei Rachmaninoff written and premiered in 1915. ... Vespers is the evening prayer service in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox liturgies of the canonical hours. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Six Moments Musicaux, Op. ... The Études-tableaux are two sets of études composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff, arranged under opus numbers 33 and 39. ... Lied (plural Lieder) is a German word, literally meaning song; among English speakers, however, it is used primarily as a term for European classical music songs, also known as art songs. ... Vocalise, Op. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Symphonic Dances , Op. ... The expression romantic music and the homophone phrase Romantic music have two essentially different meanings. ... “Tchaikovsky” redirects here. ... Chopin redirects here. ... Liszt redirects here. ... Portrait of Balakirev Mily Alexeyevich Balakirev (Russian: , Milij Alekseevič Balakirev) (January 2, 1837 – May 29, 1910) was a Russian composer. ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... Nicolai Karlovich Medtner Nikolai Karlovich Medtner (Николай Карлович Метнер) (January 5, 1880 – November 13, 1951) was a Russian composer and pianist. ... Statue of von Henselt in his hometown of Schwabach Adolf von Henselt (May 12, 1814 - October 10, 1889), German composer and pianist, was born at Schwabach, in Bavaria. ...

Contents

Life

Main article: Life of Sergei Rachmaninoff

Youth

Rachmaninoff at age 10
Rachmaninoff at age 10

Rachmaninoff was born in Semyonovo, which is near Novgorod in north-western Russia, into an aristocratic family with strong musical and military leanings. His parents were both amateur pianists. When he was four, his mother gave him casual piano lessons,[2] but it was his paternal grandfather, Arkady Alexandrovich, who brought Anna Ornatskaya, a teacher from Saint Petersburg, to teach Sergei in 1882. Ornatskaya remained for "two or three years", until Vasily had to auction off their home. Due to financial troubles, the family moved to Saint Petersburg, where Rachmaninoff studied at the Conservatory before moving to Moscow alone to study piano under Nikolai Zverev and Alexander Siloti (who was his cousin and a former student of Franz Liszt). He also studied harmony under Anton Arensky, and counterpoint under Sergei Taneyev. Rachmaninoff was found to be quite lazy, failing most of his classes, and it was the strict regime of the Zverev home that instilled discipline in the boy.[citation needed] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other cities named Novgorod, see Novgorod (disambiguation). ... Northwestern Federal District (Russian: Се́веро-За́падный федера́льный о́круг; tr. ... Aristocracy is a form of government in which rulership is in the hands of an upper class known as aristocrats. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Theatre Square and the conservatory in 1913. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Alexander Ilyich Siloti or Ziloti, (Russian: ; 9 October 1863 near Kharkov - 8 December 1945, New York ) was a Russian-Ukrainian pianist, conductor and composer. ... Liszt redirects here. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... Anton Stepanovich Arensky (Russian: ) (born July 12, 1861 in Novgorod, Russia – died February 25, 1906 in Perkijarvi, Finland), was a Russian composer of Romantic classical music, a pianist and a professor of music. ... For other uses, see Counterpoint (disambiguation). ... Sergey I. Taneev. ...


In his early years, he showed great skill in composition. While still a student, he wrote the one-act opera, Aleko, for which he was awarded a gold medal in composition, his first piano concerto, and a set of piano pieces, Morceaux de Fantaisie (Op. 3, 1892), which includes the popular and famous Prelude in C-sharp minor. The composer later became annoyed by the public’s fascination with this piece, composed when he was just nineteen years old. He would often tease an expectant audience in the days when it was traditional for the audience to request particular compositions, by asking, "Oh, must I?" or claiming inability to remember anything else.[3] In Moscow, he met the prominent composer Pyotr Tchaikovsky, who became an important mentor and commissioned the teenage Rachmaninoff to arrange a piano transcription of the suite from his ballet, Sleeping Beauty. Rachmaninoff confided in Zverev his desire to compose more, requesting a private room where he could compose in silence, but Zverev saw him only as a pianist and severed his links with the boy. He moved out and continued to compose. For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Aleko is an opera by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... Piano Concerto No. ... Morceaux de Fantaisie (French for Fantasy Pieces; Russian: , Pyesy Fantazii), opus 3, is a set of solo piano pieces composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff in 1892. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... “Tchaikovsky” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... The Sleeping Beauty (Russian: , Spyashchaya Krasavitsa) is a ballet in a prologue and three acts, Opus 66, by Pyotr Tchaikovsky. ...


Setbacks

Even after vacationing at Ivanovka the following summer, the failure of his Symphony No. 1 (Op. 13, 1896) bothered Rachmaninoff for years.

The sudden death of Tchaikovsky in 1893 made a strong impression on Rachmaninoff, affecting his emotional state and personality as well as his creativity. His Symphony No. 1 (Op. 13, 1896) premiered on 27 March 1897 in one of a long-running series of "Russian Symphony Concerts," but was torn apart by critics. In a particularly vitriolic review, nationalist composer César Cui likened the work to a depiction of the ten plagues of Egypt, suggesting it would be admired by the "inmates" of a music conservatory in hell.[4] However, the criticisms stem from inadequacy of the performance; the conducting of Alexander Glazunov is often remembered as a problem: he liked the piece, but was a weak conductor and starved of rehearsal time. Rachmaninoff's wife and other witnesses later suggested that Glazunov may have been drunk and, although this was never intimated by Rachmaninoff, it would not seem out of character.[5][6] The disastrous reception of his Symphony No 1, a negative review from writer Leo Tolstoy, and his distress over the Russian Orthodox Church's objection to his marrying his cousin, Natalia Satina, contributed to a period of severe depression. Ivanovka (Russian: ) is an estate near Tambov, Russia, which used to be the summer residence of the Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff in the period between 1890 and 1917 (until his emigration). ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs First Symphony in d minor, Op. ... Tchaikovskys tomb at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery Nine days after the premiere of the Sixth Symphony, the Pathétique, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky died on 6 November 1893. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs First Symphony in d minor, Op. ... César Antonovich Cui (Russian: , Tsezar Antonovič Kjui) (January 6, 1835 (Old Style)-March 13, 1918) was a Russian of French and Lithuanian descent. ... The Plagues of Egypt (Hebrew: ), the Biblical Plagues or the Ten Plagues (Hebrew: ) are the ten calamities foisted upon Egypt by God in the Bible (as recounted in the book of Exodus, chapters 7 - 12), in order to convince Pharaoh[1] to let the Israelite slaves go. ... A conductor conducting at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... Portrait by Ilya Repin, 1887. ... Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov (or Glazounov) (August 10, 1865 – March 21, 1936) was a Russian composer, as well as an influential music teacher. ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy(Lyof, Lyoff) (September 9 [O.S. August 28] 1828 – November 20 [O.S. November 7] 1910) (Russian: , IPA:  ), commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer – novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher – as well as pacifist Christian anarchist and educational reformer. ... The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... For other uses, see Depression. ...


Recovery

Rachmaninoff wrote little music over the following years, until he began a course of autosuggestive therapy with psychologist Nikolai Dahl, himself an amateur musician. Rachmaninoff quickly recovered confidence and overcame his writer's block. A result of these sessions was the composition of Piano Concerto No. 2 (Op. 18, 1900–01), dedicated to Dr. Dahl. The piece was very well received at its premiere, at which Rachmaninoff was soloist, and remains one of his most popular compositions. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Autosuggestion. ... A psychologist is an expert in psychology, the systematic investigation of the human body, including behavior, cognition, and affect. ... Nikolai Vladimirovich Dahl (born 1860) was a russian physician. ... For other uses, see Writers block (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Rachmaninoff's spirits were further bolstered when, after years of engagement, he was finally allowed to marry Natalia. They were married in a suburb of Moscow by an army priest on 29 April 1902, using the family's military background to subvert the church. Although he had an affair with the 22-year-old singer Nina Koshetz in 1916[1], his and Natalia's union lasted until the composer's death. After several successful appearances as a conductor, Rachmaninoff was offered a job as conductor at the Bolshoi Theater in 1904, although political reasons led to his resignation in March 1906, after which he stayed in Italy until July. He spent the following three winters in Dresden, Germany, intensively composing, and returning to the family estate of Ivanovka every summer. For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... This article is about religious workers. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Bolshoi Theatre of Moscow, Russia The Bolshoi Theatre (Russian: , Bolshoy Teatr, Large Theater) is a theatre and opera company in Moscow, Russia, which gives performances of ballet and opera. ... Dresden (etymologically from Old Sorbian Drežďany, meaning people of the riverside forest) is the capital city of the German Federal Free State of Saxony. ... Ivanovka (Russian: ) is an estate near Tambov, Russia, which used to be the summer residence of the Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff in the period between 1890 and 1917 (until his emigration). ...


Emigration

Rachmaninoff made his first tour of the United States as a pianist in 1909, an event for which he composed the Piano Concerto No. 3 (Op. 30, 1909) as a calling card. This successful tour made him a popular figure in America. The beginning of the opening theme of the The Piano Concerto No. ...


Following the Russian Revolution of 1917, which meant the end of the old Russia, and the loss of his estate, on 22 December 1917, Rachmaninoff with his wife and two daughters left Saint Petersburg for Helsinki on an open sledge, having only a few notebooks with sketches of his own compositions. Then he took a train to Stockholm, arriving there for Christmas. They never returned to their homeland. Rachmaninoff then settled in Denmark and spent a year giving concerts in Scandinavia. He left from Kristiania (Oslo) to New York on 1 November 1918, which marked the beginning of the American period of the composer's life. After Rachmaninoff's departure, his music was banned in the Soviet Union for several years. His compositional output then started to slow down to some degree, partly because he was required to spend much of his time performing in order to support himself, but the main cause was homesickness.[7] When he left Russia, it was as if he had left behind his inspiration. Nevertheless, his Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, one of his best known works, was written in the United States in 1934. While still in Russia, he had had about ten pieces in his piano repertoire (that is, of other composers; in Russia he mostly performed his own compositions). When he came to the US, he re-invented himself as a concert pianist; in fact he became one of the top pianists of his generation, the generation that is now referred to as the Golden Age of Piano Playing. The Russian Revolution of 1917 was a series of political and social upheavals in Russia, involving first the overthrow of the tsarist autocracy, and then the overthrow of the liberal and moderate-socialist Provisional Government, resulting in the establishment of Soviet power under the control of the Bolshevik party. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Location of Helsinki in Northern Europe Coordinates: , Country Province Region Uusimaa Sub-region Helsinki Charter 1550 Capital city 1812 Government  - Mayor Jussi Pajunen Area  - Total 187. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... In the period 1878–1924, Kristiania was the name used for Norways capital Oslo (having been called Christiania since 1624). ... This article is about the capital of Norway. ... This article is about the state. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini (Russian: , Rapsodiya na temu Paganini) is a piece of classical music for orchestra and solo piano by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ...


In 1919, William Andrews Clark, Jr., founder of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, asked Rachmaninoff to move west to Southern California to be the Philharmonic's first Music Director, but since that he had recently moved to New York and did not want to move again, he declined.[8][9] Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... William Andrews Clark, Jr. ... The Los Angeles Philharmonic (LAP) is an American orchestra based in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... This article is about the region of Southern California. ... The title of music director is used by many symphony orchestras to designate the primary conductor and artistic leader of the orchestra. ...


After emigration, Rachmaninoff had an extremely busy concert schedule. He played over a thousand solo piano concerts in America, in addition to his tours in Europe. He made over one hundred studio recordings of his own music as well as the music of his favorites, Chopin and Beethoven, among others. Due to his busy concert career, Rachmaninoff had a decreased output as composer. Between 1892 and 1917 (living mostly in Russia), Rachmaninoff wrote thirty-nine compositions with opus numbers. Between 1918 and his death in 1943, while living in the U.S. and Europe, he completed only six. His revival as composer became possible only after he built himself a new home, Villa Senar on Lake Lucerne, Switzerland, where he spent summers from 1932 to 1939. There, in the comfort of his own villa which reminded him of this family estate Ivanovka back in Russia, Rachmaninoff composed the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini. Fr̩d̩ric Fran̤ois Chopin as portrayed by Eug̬ne Delacroix in 1838. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 РMarch 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Opus, from the Latin word opus meaning work, is usually used in the sense of a work of art. In this sense the plural of opus, opera, is used to refer to the genre of music drama. ... Senar is a villa built in Switzerland by the Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... For other uses, see Lake Lucerne (disambiguation). ... Ivanovka (Russian: ) is an estate near Tambov, Russia, which used to be the summer residence of the Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff in the period between 1890 and 1917 (until his emigration). ... Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini (Russian: , Rapsodiya na temu Paganini) is a piece of classical music for orchestra and solo piano by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ...


Settling in the U.S., Rachmaninoff began making recordings for Thomas Edison in 1919, recording on an upright piano that the inventor admitted was below average; however, the discs provided the composer with some much-needed income. The next year he signed an exclusive contract with the Victor Talking Machine Company and continued to make recordings for Victor until February 1942. Edison redirects here. ... Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ...


Rachmaninoff played most of his public performances on Steinway & Sons pianos. He owned two New York Steinways D-274 in his Beverly Hills home on Elm Drive, he also owned a New York D in his New York home, however, in 1933, he chose a Hamburg D for his new home, villa Senar, in Switzerland.[citation needed] Steinway & Sons grand piano on stage Steinway & Sons is a piano maker, since 1853 in New York City. ... Senar is a villa built in Switzerland by the Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff. ...

Rachmaninoff statue at World's Fair Park in Knoxville, Tennessee

In 1931, together with other Russian exiles, he helped found a music school in Paris which would later bear his name, the Conservatoire Rachmaninoff. His Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, today one of his best-known works, was written in his home, Villa Senar, Switzerland in 1934. He went on to compose his Symphony No. 3 (Op. 44, 1935–36) and the Symphonic Dances (Op. 45, 1940), his last completed work. Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra premiered the Symphonic Dances in 1941 in the Academy of Music. Rachmaninoff fell ill during a concert tour in late 1942, and was subsequently diagnosed with advanced sarcoma. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Conservatoire russe de Paris Serge Rachmaninoff (English translation: Sergei Rachmaninoff Russian Conservatory of Paris) is a professional music school in Paris, which conducts its courses in both French and Russian. ... Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini (Russian: , Rapsodiya na temu Paganini) is a piece of classical music for orchestra and solo piano by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Third Symphony in A minor, Op. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Symphonic Dances , Op. ... Eugene Ormandy (November 18, 1899, Budapest, Hungary – March 12, 1985, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was an eminent American orchestral conductor. ... A sarcoma is a cancer of the connective or supportive tissue (bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, blood vessels) and soft tissue. ...


Rachmaninoff and his wife became American citizens on 1 February 1943. His last recital, given on 17 February 1943 at the Alumni Gymnasium of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, prophetically featured Chopin's Piano Sonata No. 2 in B flat Minor, which contains the famous Funeral March. A statue called "Rachmaninoff: The Last Concert", designed and sculpted by Victor Bokarev, now stands in World Fair Park in Knoxville as a permanent tribute to Rachmaninoff. is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... Knoxville redirects here. ... Chopin redirects here. ... Frédéric Chopin composed his Piano Sonata No. ... A funeral march or dead march is a march, usually in a minor key, in a slow simple duple metre, imitating the solemn pace of a funeral procession. ...


As Rachmaninoff became more and more aware of the fact that he would never again return to his beloved homeland, he was overwhelmed with melancholia. Most people who knew him later in life described him as the saddest man they had ever known. In a 1961 interview, conductor Eugene Ormandy declared: "Rachmaninoff was really two people. He hated his own music and was usually unhappy about it when he performed or conducted it in public so that the public saw only this side of him. But, among his close friends, he had a very good sense of humor and was in good spirits." [2] Melancholy redirects here. ... Eugene Ormandy (November 18, 1899, Budapest, Hungary – March 12, 1985, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was an eminent American orchestral conductor. ...

The grave of Sergei Rachmaninoff in Kensico Cemetery
The grave of Sergei Rachmaninoff in Kensico Cemetery

Kensico Cemetery, located in Valhalla, Westchester Co. ...

Death

Rachmaninoff died of melanoma on March 28, 1943, in Beverly Hills, California, just four days before his 70th birthday, and was interred on June 1 in Kensico Cemetery in Valhalla, New York.[10] Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes which are found predominantly in skin but also in the bowel and the eye (see uveal melanoma). ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Beverly Hills redirects here. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kensico Cemetery, located in Valhalla, Westchester Co. ... Valhalla is a hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of Mount Pleasant in Westchester County, New York, USA. The population was 5,379 at the 2000 census. ...


Works

Oeuvre

Rachmaninoff wrote five works for piano and orchestra: four concerti, and the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini. Of the concerti, the Second and Third are the most popular. The Third is widely considered one of the most difficult of all piano concertos, and thus is a favorite among virtuoso pianists, although Rachmaninoff felt that the Third "fell more easily under the fingers" than the famous Second. Rachmaninoff admired the way Vladimir Horowitz played the Third, observing that "He swallowed it whole!", and such was Horowitz's performance that Rachmaninoff himself seldom played the concerto after hearing Horowitz. This is a list of works by Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini (Russian: , Rapsodiya na temu Paganini) is a piece of classical music for orchestra and solo piano by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The beginning of the opening theme of the The Piano Concerto No. ... Vladimir Samoylovich Horowitz (Russian: ; Ukrainian: ) (1 October 1903 – 5 November 1989) was a Russian-American[1][2] pianist. ...

The cadenza of Piano Concerto No. 3 is famous for its large chords.

Works for piano solo include the Preludes, ten in Op. 23 and thirteen in Op. 32. Together with the Prelude in C-sharp minor (Op. 3 No. 2) from Morceaux de Fantaisie (Op. 3), they traverse all 24 major and minor keys. Especially difficult are the two sets of Études-Tableaux, Opp. 33 and 39, which are very demanding study pictures. Stylistically, Op. 33 hearkens back to the preludes, while Op. 39 shows the influences of Scriabin and Prokofiev. There are also the Six Moments Musicaux (Op. 16), the Variations on a Theme of Chopin (Op. 22), and the Variations on a Theme of Corelli (Op. 42). He wrote two piano sonatas, both of which are large scale and virtuosic in their technical demands. Rachmaninoff also composed works for two pianos, four hands, including two Suites (the first subtitled Fantasie-Tableaux), a version of the Symphonic Dances (Op. 45), and a Russian Rhapsody (posth.). The beginning of the opening theme of the The Piano Concerto No. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Morceaux de Fantaisie (French for Fantasy Pieces; Russian: , Pyesy Fantazii), opus 3, is a set of solo piano pieces composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff in 1892. ... The Études-tableaux are two sets of études composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff, arranged under opus numbers 33 and 39. ... Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin (Russian: Александр Николаевич Скрябин, Aleksandr Nikolajevič Skriabin; sometimes transliterated as Skryabin or Scriabine (6 January 1872 [O.S. 26 December 1871]—27 April 1915) was a Russian composer and pianist. ... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Russian: , Sergej Sergejevič Prokofijev; April 27 (April 151 O.S.), 1891–March 5, 1953) was a Russian and Soviet composer who mastered numerous musical genres and came to be admired as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. ... Six Moments Musicaux, Op. ... Variations on a Theme of Chopin (Russian: , ), opus 22, is a group of 22 variations on Frederic Chopins Prelude in C minor (Op. ... Variations on a Theme of Corelli (Russian: , ), opus 42, is a group of 20 variations on Arcangelo Corellis Sonata for violin, violone, and harpsichord (Op. ... A piano sonata is a sonata written for unaccompanied piano. ...


Rachmaninoff wrote three symphonies, of which, the first in D minor was a gargantuan failure at its premiere. For many years it was believed lost; however after his death, the orchestral parts were found in the Leningrad Conservatory and the score was reconstructed, leading to its second performance (and American premiere) on 19 March 1948 at an all-Rachmaninoff concert, marking the fifth anniversary of the composer's death. The second and third symphonies are both considered among his greatest works. Other orchestral works include The Rock (Op. 7), Caprice Bohémien (Op. 12), The Isle of the Dead (Op. 29), and the Symphonic Dances (Op. 45). Sergei Rachmaninoffs First Symphony in d minor, Op. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Symphony No. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Third Symphony in A minor, Op. ... The Rock, Op. ... Isle of the Dead is a symphonic poem by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Symphonic Dances , Op. ...

Rachmaninoff at the piano, 1910s
Rachmaninoff at the piano, 1910s

Rachmaninoff wrote two major a cappella choral works: the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom and the All-Night Vigil (also known as the Vespers). The Bells, a work for choir and orchestra, is based on the translated poetry of Edgar Allan Poe; its four-movement program signifies the circle of life: youth, marriage, maturity, and death. The Spring Cantata is lesser known and rarely performed; the same can be said about his Three Russian Songs and his early Concerto for Choir (a cappella). The All-Night Vigil and The Bells are widely admired: Rachmaninoff himself considered them his favorites among all his works.[11] This article is about the vocal technique. ... The All-Night Vigil (Russian: ), Opus 37, is an a cappella choral composition by Sergei Rachmaninoff written and premiered in 1915. ... The Bells (Kolokola), Op. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Sergei Rachmaninoff wrote his Vesna (Spring) Cantata for Baritone, Chorus, and Orchestra, Op. ...


His chamber music includes two piano trios, both which are named Trio Elégiaque, the second of which is a memorial tribute to Tchaikovsky, and a Cello Sonata. In his chamber music, the piano tends to be perceived by some to dominate the ensemble. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October 25, 1893 (O.S.)) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Cello Sonata in G minor, op. ...


He completed three operas: Aleko, The Miserly Knight, and Francesca da Rimini. He started another opera in 1907, based on a work by Maurice Maeterlinck, titled Monna Vanna, but did not finish it. It was completed by Igor Buketoff and had its first performance in 1984. Aleko is an opera by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... The Miserly Knight (Skupoy rïtsar’ in transliteration) is an opera in one act by Sergei Rachmaninoff to a Russian libretto by Alexander Pushkin, based his drama. ... Francesca da Rimini, (Russian: Франческа да Римини) Op. ... Maurice Polydore Marie Bernard Maeterlinck, Belgian author Count Maurice Polydore Marie Bernard Maeterlinck (August 29, 1862 - May 6, 1949) was a Belgian poet, playwright, and essayist. ...


He also composed songs for voice and piano, based on works by Aleksey Tolstoy, Aleksandr Pushkin, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Victor Hugo and Anton Chekhov, among others. Aleksei Nikolaevich Tolstoi (Russian: Алексей Николаевич Толстой) (January 10, 1883 (December 29, 1882 (O.S.)) - February 23, 1945), nicknamed the Comrade Count, was a Soviet Russian writer who was most famous for science fiction and historical novels. ... Aleksandr Pushkin by Vasily Tropinin Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Серге́евич Пу́шкин, Aleksandr Sergeevič PuÅ¡kin,  ) (June 6, 1799 [O.S. May 26] – February 10, 1837 [O.S. January 29]) was a Russian Romantic author who is considered to be the greatest Russian poet[1] [2][3] and the founder of modern Russian... Goethe redirects here. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (Russian: , IPA: ) was a Russian short story writer and playwright. ...


Composition style

Portrait of Sergei Rachmaninoff (1925) by Konstantin Somov
Portrait of Sergei Rachmaninoff (1925) by Konstantin Somov

Rachmaninoff's style is fundamentally Russian: his music shows the influence of the idol of his youth, Tchaikovsky. His harmonic language expanded above and beyond that of Tchaikovsky, however. Rachmaninoff's frequently used motifs include the Dies Irae, often just the fragments of the first phrase. This is especially prevalent in The Bells, The Isle of the Dead, the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, and in all of his symphonies. Konstantin Andreyevich Somov (1869-1939) was a Russian artist associated with the Mir iskusstva. ... “Tchaikovsky” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Dies Irae (disambiguation). ...


Especially important is Rachmaninoff's use of unusually wide-spread chords for bell-like sounds: this occurs in many pieces, most notably in the cantata The Bells, the Second Piano Concerto, the E flat major Etude-Tableaux (Op. 33 No. 7), and the B-minor prelude (Op. 32 No. 10). He was also fond of Russian Orthodox chants. He uses them most perceptibly in his Vespers, but many of his melodies found their origins in these chants. The opening melody of the First Symphony is derived from chants. (Note that the opening melody of the Third Piano Concerto is not derived from chants; when asked, Rachmaninoff said that "it had written itself").[12]


Rachmaninoff had great command of counterpoint and fugal writing. The above-mentioned occurrence of the Dies Irae in the Second Symphony is but a small example of this. Very characteristic of his writing is chromatic counterpoint. For other uses, see Counterpoint (disambiguation). ... In music, a fugue (IPA: ) is a type of contrapuntal composition or technique of composition for a fixed number of parts, normally referred to as voices, irrespective of whether the work is vocal or instrumental. ... The chromatic scale is a scale with twelve pitches, each a semitone or half step apart. ...


His later works, such as the Piano Concerto No. 4 (Op. 40, 1926) and the Variations on a Theme of Corelli (Op. 42, 1931), are composed in a more emotionally detached style, with a greater clarity of texture combined with an abrasive chromatic harmony and a new rhythmic incisiveness.[13] Nevertheless, some of his most beautiful (nostalgic and melancholy) melodies occur in the Third Symphony, Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, and Symphonic Dances, the last-named of which is considered his swan song, and which has references to the Alliluya of the Vespers and the first theme of his First Symphony (neither of which would have been recognized by most listeners at the premiere). The Piano Concerto No. ... Variations on a Theme of Corelli (Russian: , ), opus 42, is a group of 20 variations on Arcangelo Corellis Sonata for violin, violone, and harpsichord (Op. ... In music, chromatic indicates the inclusion of notes not in the prevailing scale and is also used for those notes themselves (Shir-Cliff et al 1965, p. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Third Symphony in A minor, Op. ... Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini (Russian: , Rapsodiya na temu Paganini) is a piece of classical music for orchestra and solo piano by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Symphonic Dances , Op. ... For other uses, see Swan Song. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs First Symphony in d minor, Op. ...


Pianism

Rachmaninoff possessed a formidable piano technique. His playing was marked by precision, rhythmic drive, a refined legato and an ability of maintaining complete clarity when playing works with complex textures. He applied these qualities to excellent effect in music by Chopin, especially the B flat minor Piano Sonata. The remainder of Rachmaninoff's repertoire, excepting his own works, were many standard 19th Century virtuoso works plus music by Beethoven, Borodin, Debussy, Grieg, Liszt, Mendelssohn, Mozart, Schubert, Schumann and Tchaikovsky.[14] Frédéric Chopin composed his Piano Sonata No. ...


Regardless of the music, Rachmaninoff always planned his performances carefully. He based his interpretations of the theory that each piece of music has a "culminating point." Regardless of whether that point was or at which dynamic within that piece, the performer had to know how to approach it with absolute calculation and precision; otherwise, the whole construction of the piece could crumble and the piece could become disjointed.[14]


Early recordings

Rachmaninoff, from a 1921 Victor advertisement
Rachmaninoff, from a 1921 Victor advertisement

Rachmaninoff made his first phonograph recordings for Edison Records on their "Diamond Disc" records, since they claimed the best audio fidelity in recording the piano at the time. Rachmaninoff did not consider himself a great pianist and believed his own performances to be variable in quality; he therefore requested to personally approve any recorded performances to be commercially issued. Despite this, the Edison Company issued multiple alternative takes of Rachmaninoff's recordings, a common occurrence in the gramophone record industry at the time, possibly for reasons of simple carelessness or because of the ease of mass production of records from multiple masters. Sergei Rachmaninov, Victor Talking Machine Company advertisment, March, 1921 This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Sergei Rachmaninov, Victor Talking Machine Company advertisment, March, 1921 This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ... Edison Records was the first record label, pioneering recorded sound and an important player in the early record industry. ... High Fidelity is also the title of a book by Nick Hornby and a film directed by Stephen Frears, based upon Hornbys book. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... A 12-inch record (left), a 7-inch record (right), and a CD (above) Two 7 singles (left), two colored 7 singles (middle), and two 7 singles with large spindle holes (right). ...


Rachmaninoff was so angered by this that he left Edison and subsequently started recording for the Victor Talking Machine Company (in 1920) and its successor, RCA Victor. The company was pleased to abide by Rachmaninoff's restrictions, and proudly advertised him as one of the great artists who recorded for the Victor Company. Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ... This article is about the former RCA Corporation. ...


Piano rolls

Rachmaninoff was also involved in various ways with music on piano rolls. Several manufacturers, and in particular the Aeolian Company, had perforated his compositions on music roll from about 1900 onwards.[15] His sister-in-law, Sofia Satina, remembered him at the family estate at Ivanovka, pedalling gleefully through a set of rolls of his Second Piano Concerto, apparently acquired from a German source,[16] most probably the Aeolian Company's Berlin subsidiary, the Choralion Company. Aeolian in London created a set of three rolls of this concerto in 1909, which remained in the catalogues of its various successors until the late 1970s.[17] Example of a piano roll being punched. ...


From 1919 he made a number of recorded piano rolls for the American Piano Company's Ampico re-enacting piano; according to the Ampico publicity department, he initially disbelieved that a roll of punched paper could provide an accurate record, so he was invited to listen to a proof copy of his first recording. After the performance, he was quoted as saying "Gentlemen — I, Sergei Rachmaninoff, have just heard myself play!" For demonstration purposes, he recorded the solo part of his Second Piano Concerto for Ampico, though only the second movement was used publicly and has survived. He continued to record until around 1929, though his last roll, the Chopin Scherzo in Bb minor, was not published until October 1933.[18] Example of a piano roll being punched. ... Ampico (short for American Piano Company) was one of the leading reproducing piano technologies of the early 20th century, the others being Duo-Art and Welte. ...


Gramophone

Many of Rachmaninoff's recordings are acknowledged as classics. Particularly renowned are his renditions of Schumann's Carnaval and Chopin's Funeral March Sonata, which many consider the finest performance of that work, along with many shorter pieces. He recorded all four of his piano concertos with the Philadelphia Orchestra, including two versions of the second concerto with Leopold Stokowski conducting, and a world premiere recording of the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, soon after the first performance (1934) with the Philadelphians under Stokowski. The first, third, and fourth concertos were recorded with Eugene Ormandy. For other persons named Robert Schumann, see Robert Schumann (disambiguation). ... Robert Schumanns Carnaval, op. ... Chopin redirects here. ... Frédéric Chopin composed his Piano Sonata No. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... Leopold Stokowski (born Antoni Stanisław Bolesławowicz April 18, 1882 in London, England, died September 13, 1977 in Nether Wallop, England) was the conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the NBC Symphony Orchestra, Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and the Symphony of the Air. ... Eugene Ormandy (November 18, 1899, Budapest, Hungary – March 12, 1985, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was an eminent American orchestral conductor. ...


Rachmaninoff wanted to record several other major piano works, including Beethoven's Waldstein Sonata, Liszt's Sonata in B minor and his own Symphonic Dances in a two-piano collaboration with Vladimir Horowitz, but RCA turned him down. He also wanted to record his second symphony. “Beethoven” redirects here. ... The Piano Sonata No. ... Liszt redirects here. ... One of the pages from the original manuscript of the sonata. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Symphonic Dances , Op. ... Vladimir Samoylovich Horowitz (Russian: ; Ukrainian: ) (1 October 1903 – 5 November 1989) was a Russian-American[1][2] pianist. ...


Rachmaninoff also made three greatly admired recordings conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra in his own Third Symphony, his symphonic poem Isle of the Dead, and his orchestration of Vocalise. The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Third Symphony in A minor, Op. ... Isle of the Dead is a symphonic poem by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... A vocalise is a vocal exercise (often one suitable for performance) without words, which is sung on one or more vowel sounds. ...


His final recordings were made for RCA Victor in February 1942; a Musicians Union recording ban prevented him from making further recordings before his death the following year.


Whenever Rachmaninoff played in a concert that was broadcast, he specifically requested that one of his recordings be played instead by the station or network. However, at least one private recording of him playing in public has survived and was included by RCA Victor in its boxed set of his complete recordings (1919-42), released in 1973 on LP and later reissued on CD.[19]


For many years Rachmaninoff's lengthy second symphony was played in concert or recorded in abridged versions. The first recording of the Second Symphony, abridged, was made by the Cleveland Orchestra with Nikolai Sokoloff conducting in 1928. Unabridged performances became more common in later years, spurred by recordings including one by Eugene Ormandy in the composer's centenary year of 1973. The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the major symphony orchestras in the United States. ...


Rachmaninoff's performances on piano can be heard on many recordings including: Rachmaninoff Plays Rachmaninoff (electrical recording) and the piano roll reconstructions: A Window In Time and A Window In Time 2.


Music samples

  • As performer

    Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2
    Rachmaninoff playing the first 4 minutes of Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2, recorded in 1919 by Edison Records
    The Maiden's Wish
    From his 1942 recording of The Maiden's Wish by Chopin, arranged for solo piano by Liszt
    Prelude in C-sharp minor
    The notorious Prelude in C-sharp minor (Op. 3, No. 2), that he composed when he was 19, established his fame in America.

    As composer

    Étude-Tableau in E-flat minor
    Karine Gilanyan performing Étude-Tableau in E-flat minor, Op. 39, No. 5 (4:31, 8.48 MB) . Courtesy of Musopen
    Piano Concerto No. 2, I. Moderato
    Performed by the Skidmore College Orchestra. Courtesy of Musopen
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

Image File history File links Second_Hungarian_Rhapsody. ... Liszt redirects here. ... Main Theme from Friska Hungarian Rhapsody Number 2 is the second in a set of 19 Hungarian Rhapsodies by composer Franz Liszt, and is by far the most famous of the set. ... Edison Records was the first record label, pioneering recorded sound and an important player in the early record industry. ... Image File history File links Rach_maidens_wish. ... Chopin redirects here. ... Liszt redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Modern references

Rachmaninoff's music is heavily quoted, especially themes from his second and third piano concerto, and the eighteenth variation in Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini. The Conservatoire Rachmaninoff and Rachmaninoff vodka are named after the composer. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The beginning of the opening theme of the The Piano Concerto No. ... Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini (Russian: , Rapsodiya na temu Paganini) is a piece of classical music for orchestra and solo piano by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... The Conservatoire russe de Paris Serge Rachmaninoff (English translation: Sergei Rachmaninoff Russian Conservatory of Paris) is a professional music school in Paris, which conducts its courses in both French and Russian. ... This article is about the vodka Rachmaninoff, if youre looking for the person, see Sergei Rachmaninoff. ...


Bruce Beresford was signed in March 2006 to direct a feature film based on Rachmaninoff's life, as seen through the eyes of his widow, to be called Rhapsody.[20] Bruce Beresford (born 16 August 1940) is an Academy Award-nominated Australian film director, writer, and producer. ...


See also

This is a list of works by Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... // This is a list of prominent individuals who have been romantically or maritally coupled with a cousin, niece, nephew, aunt or uncle. ...

Notes

  • a.^  "Sergei Rachmaninoff" was the spelling the composer himself used while living in the West throughout the latter half of his life. However, transliterations of his name include "Sergey" or "Serge", and "Rachmaninov", "Rachmaninow", "Rakhmaninov", or "Rakhmaninoff".

Occident redirects here. ...

References

  1. ^ About Rachmaninov: Stravinsky Quotation 2
  2. ^ Shelokhonov, Steve (2007). Biography for Sergei Rachmaninoff. IMDb. Retrieved on 2007-12-14.
  3. ^ Francis Crociata’s liner notes to RCA's 10-CD set of Rachmaninoff’s recordings
  4. ^ Kyui, Ts., "Tretiy russkiy simfonicheskiy kontsert," Novosti i birzhevaya gazeta (17 March 1897(o.s.)), 3.
  5. ^ Geraint Lewis. Programme notes for Proms performance of Glazunov's Violin Concerto. BBC.
  6. ^ David Brown, Liner Notes to a Deutsche Grammophon recording of the 3rd Rachmaninov Symphony conducted by Mikhail Pletnev
  7. ^ Sergei Rachmaninoff Biography. 8notes. Retrieved on 2008-03-02.
  8. ^ Rich, Alan. Los Angeles Philharmonic Story (page 1). Great Performances: The Los Angeles Philharmonic Inaugurates Walt Disney Concert Hall. Retrieved on 2008-01-18.
  9. ^ Swed, Mark. "The Salonen-Gehry Axis; The Los Angeles Philharmonic Has Arrived at a Rare Confluence of Musical Distinction and Visionary Architecture", Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles Times Magazine), August 31, 2003. 
  10. ^ Harrison, Max (2006). Rachmaninoff: Life, Works, Recordings. London: Continuum. ISBN 0-8264-9312-2. 
  11. ^ Sergei Bertensson, Jay Leyda, Sophia Satina, Sergei Rachmaninoff: A Lifetime in Music, Indiana University Press, 2001, p. 191
  12. ^ Yasser, Joseph (1969), "The Opening Theme of Rachmaninoff's Third Piano Concerto and its Liturgical Prototype", Musical Quarterly LV: 313-328 
  13. ^ Norris, New Grove, 716.
  14. ^ a b Norris, New Grove, 714.
  15. ^ Music for the Pianola and the Aeriol Piano, The Aeolian Company, New York, July 1901.
  16. ^ Harrison 2006, p.223
  17. ^ Catalogue of Music for the Pianola and Pianola-Piano, The Orchestrelle Company, London, June 1910, and many successive catalogues.
  18. ^ Obenchain 1987.
  19. ^ RCA Victor liner notes
  20. ^ George, Sandy. "Grasping the poetry of features", The Australian, 2006-08-31. Retrieved on 2007-07-09. 

  • Sergei Rachmaninoff, Rachmaninoff's Recollections Told to Oskar von Rieseman, translated by Dolly Rutherford; New York, MacMillan, 1934
  • Rakhmaninov, Sergei Vasil'yevich by Richard Taruskin, in 'The New Grove Dictionary of Opera', ed. Stanley Sadie (London, 1992) ISBN 0-333-73432-7
  • The Lives of the Great Composers by Harold C. Schonberg,(Abacus; 2Rev Ed edition) ISBN 978-0349109725
  • Harrison, Max. 2006. Rachmaninoff: Life, Works, Recordings. London: Continuum International Publishing Group. ISBN 0-826-49312-2.
  • Obenchain, Elaine. 1987. The Complete Catalog of Ampico Reproducing Piano Rolls (Vestal Press edition). Vestal, NY: Vestal Press. ISBN 0-911-57262-7.

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the former RCA Corporation. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Mikhail Vasilievich Pletnev (Russian: Михаил Васильевич Плетнёв, Mikhail Vaciljievič Pletnev) (born 14 April 1957) in Arkhangelsk, Russia is a pianist, conductor, and composer. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jay Leyda (1910-1988) was an avant-garde filmmaker and film historian, noted for his work on U.S, Soviet and Chinese Cinema. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Grove Dictionary of Opera is an encyclopedia (or encyclopedic dictionary) of opera, considered to be one of the best general reference sources on the subject. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Sergei Rachmaninoff

Vladimir Davidovich Ashkenazy (Russian: Влади́мир Дави́дович А́шкенази, Vladimir Davidovič Aškenasi) (b. ... MusicBrainz (MusicBrainz. ... WorldCat is the worlds largest bibliographic database, the merged catalogs of over 50,000 OCLC member libraries in over 90 countries. ...

Recordings and MIDI

  • Selection of midi files
  • Rachmaninov Piano Trio No.1 sound-bites
  • Arkady Chubrik Classic Music Collection: Rachmaninov, many free recordings in MP3 format (original page in Russian, but translated page in English)

Free scores

The Age of Enlightenment (French: ; Italian: ; German: ; Spanish: ; Swedish: ; Polish: ; Portuguese: ) was an eighteenth-century movement in Western philosophy. ... Victorianism is the name given to the attitudes, art, and culture of the later two-thirds of the 19th century. ... For other uses, see Realism (disambiguation). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sergei Rachmaninoff biography - 8notes.com (1386 words)
Rachmaninoff made his first recordings for Edison Records on their 'Diamond Disc' records, as at the time the Edison company had the best audio fidelity in recording the piano.
Rachmaninoff was angered, left Edison, and thereafter recorded for the Victor Talking Machine Company (and later its successor, RCA Victor), which was pleased to abide by Rachmaninoff's restrictions and proudly advertised him as one of the great artists who recorded for the Victor Company.
Sergei Rachmaninoff is interred in Kensico Cemetery in Valhalla, New York.
Sergei Rachmaninoff: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (3792 words)
The grave of Sergei Rachmaninoff in Kensico Cemetery
Rachmaninoff's frequently used motifs include the Dies Irae, often just the fragments of the first phrase: this is especially prevalent in The Bells, The Isle of the Dead, the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, and in all three Symphonies.
Rachmaninoff also made a number of piano rolls; initially disbelieving that a roll of punched paper could provide an accurate record, he was invited to listen to a master roll of his first recording in 1919 for the Ampico company.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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