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Encyclopedia > Sergei Prokofiev

Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Russian: Серге́й Серге́евич Проко́фьев, Serge'j Serge'jevič Proko'fijev; April 27 (April 151 O.S.), 1891March 5, 1953) was a Russian and Soviet composer who mastered numerous musical genres and came to be admired as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. (Alternative transliterations of his name include Sergey or Serge, and Prokofief, Prokofieff, or Prokofyev.) Image File history File links Sergei_Prokofiev. ... Image File history File links Sergei_Prokofiev. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (65th in leap years). ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Soviet redirects here. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ...

Contents

Biography

Prokofiev displayed unusual musical abilities by the age of five. His first piano composition to be written down (by his mother), an 'Indian Galop', was in F major but without the customary B-flat--the young Prokofiev did not like to touch the the black keys. By the age of seven, he had also learned to play chess. Much like music, chess would remain a passion his entire life, and he became acquainted with world chess champions Capablanca and Botvinnik. Chess is a recreational and competitive game for two players. ... José Raúl Capablanca y Graupera (November 19, 1888 - March 8, 1942) was a famous Cuban chess player in the early to mid twentieth century. ... Mikhail Moiseevich Botvinnik (Михаи́л Моисе́евич Ботви́нник) (August 17, 1911 - May 5, 1995) was a Jewish Russian International Grandmaster and long-time World Champion of chess. ...


A child prodigy, at the age of nine he was composing his first opera,[1] The Giant; an overture; and miscellaneous pieces. A child prodigy is someone who is a master of one or more skills or arts at an early age. ...


By 1902, when Prokofiev started taking private lessons in composition, he had already produced a number of innovative pieces. As soon as he had the necessary theoretical tools, he quickly started experimenting, laying the base for his own musical style.


After a while, Prokofiev felt that the isolation in Sontsovka was restricting his further musical development. Although his parents were not too keen on forcing their son into a musical career at such an early age, in 1904 he moved to St. Petersburg and applied to the St. Petersburg Conservatory. By this point he had composed two more operas, Desert Islands and The Feast during the Plague and was working on his fourth, Undine.[2] He passed the introductory tests and started his composition studies the same year, being several years younger than most of his classmates. He was viewed as eccentric and arrogant, and he often expressed dissatisfaction with much of the education, which he found boring. During this period he studied under, among others, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. Later, he would regret squandering his opportunity to learn more from Rimsky-Korsakov. He also became friends with Boris Asafiev and Nikolai Myaskovsky. Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and... Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: , Nikolaj Andreevič Rimskij-Korsakov), also Nikolay, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 6 (O.S. March 18), 1844 – June 8 (O.S. June 21) 1908) was a Russian composer, one of five Russian composers known as The Five, and was later a teacher of harmony and... Boris Asafiev (1884-1949) was a composer and writer. ... Nikolai Myaskovsky (ru: Николай Мясковский) (April 20, 1881 – August 8, 1950) was a Russian composer. ...


As a member of the St. Petersburg music scene, Prokofiev eventually earned a reputation as an enfant terrible, while also getting praise for his original compositions, which he would perform himself on the piano. In 1909, he graduated from his class in composition, getting less than impressive marks. He continued at the Conservatory, but now concentrated on playing the piano and conducting. His piano lessons went far from smoothly, but the composition classes made an impression on him. His teacher encouraged his musical experimentation, and his works from this period display more intensity than earlier ones. From the French meaning terrible child, an enfant terrible is one whose startlingly unconventional behavior, work, or thought embarrasses or disturbs others. ...


In 1910, Prokofiev's father died and Sergei's economic support ceased. Luckily, at that time, he had started making a name for himself as a composer, although he frequently caused scandals with his forward-looking works. His first two piano concertos were composed around this time. He made his first excursion out of Russia in 1913, travelling to Paris and London where he first encountered Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. A piano concerto is a concerto for solo piano and orchestra. ... Portrait of Sergei Diaghilev by Valentin Serov (1904) Sergei Pavlovich Diaghilev (Russian: / Sergei Pavlovich Dyagilev), also referred to as Serge, (March 31, 1872 – August 19, 1929) was a Russian art critic, patron, ballet impresario and founder of the Ballets Russes from which many famous dancers and choreographers would later arise. ... Léon Bakst: Firebird, Ballerina, 1910 The Ballets Russes was a ballet company established in 1909 by the Russian impresario Serge Diaghilev and resident first in Théâtre Mogador, Paris; and then in Monte Carlo. ...


In 1914, Prokofiev left the Conservatory with the highest marks of his class, a feat which won him a grand piano. Soon afterwards, he made a trip to London where he made contact with Diaghilev and Igor Stravinsky. Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer, considered by many in both the West and his native land to be the most influential composer of 20th-century music. ...


During World War I, Prokofiev returned again to the Academy, now studying the organ. He composed an opera based on Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel The Gambler, but the rehearsals were plagued by problems and the première scheduled for 1917 had to be cancelled because of the February Revolution. In summer the same year, Prokofiev composed his first symphony, the Classical. This was his own name for the symphony which was written in the style, that according to Prokofiev, Joseph Haydn would have used if he had been alive at the time. Hence, the symphony is more or less classical in style but incorporated more modern musical elements (see Neoclassicism). After a brief stay with his mother in Kislovodsk in the Caucasus, because of worries of the enemy capturing Petrograd (the new name for St. Petersburg), he returned in 1918, but he was now determined to leave Russia, at least temporarily. In the current Russian state of unrest, he saw no room for his experimental music and, in May, he headed for the USA. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (Russian: Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский, IPA: , sometimes transliterated Dostoyevsky,Dostoievsky, or Dostoevski  ) (November 11 [O.S. October 30] 1821 – February 9 [O.S. January 28] 1881) is considered one of two greatest prose writers of Russian literature, alongside close contemporary Leo Tolstoy. ... The Gambler is a novella by Fyodor Dostoyevsky about a youngish tutor in the employment of a formerly wealthy Russian civil servant. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Sergei Prokofiev wrote his Symphony No. ... Portrait by Thomas Hardy, 1792 Franz Joseph Haydn[1] (March 31, 1732 – May 31, 1809) was one of the most prominent composers of the Classical period, and is called by some the Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. A life-long resident of Austria, Haydn spent... Neoclassicism in music was a 20th century development, particularly popular in the period between the two World Wars, in which composers drew inspiration from music of the 18th century, though some of the inspiring canon was drawn as much from the Baroque period as the Classical period - for this reason... Kislovodsk (Кислово́дск) is a city of 129,788 inhabitants (2002 census) in Stavropol Krai, Russia. ... Saint Petersburg  listen (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991...


Life abroad

Arriving in San Francisco, he was immediately compared to other famous Russian exiles (such as Sergei Rachmaninoff), and he started out successfully with a solo concert in New York, leading to several further engagements. He also received a contract for the production of his new opera The Love for Three Oranges but, due to illness and the death of the director, the première was cancelled. This was another example of Prokofiev's bad luck in operatic matters. The failure also cost him his American solo career, since the opera took too much time and effort. He soon found himself in financial difficulties, and, in April 1920, he left for Paris, not wanting to return to Russia as a failure. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff (Russian: , Sergej Vasilevič Rakhmaninov, 1 April 1873 (N.S.) or 20 March 1873 (O.S.) – 28 March 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor, one of the last great champions of the Romantic style of European classical music. ... The Love for Three Oranges (Любовь к трем апельсинам in Russian, Lyubov k Tryom Apelsinam in transliteration) is an opera by Sergei Prokofiev to a libretto based on the play Lamore delle tre melarance by Carlo Gozzi. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ...


Paris was better prepared for Prokofiev's musical style. He reaffirmed his contacts with the Diaghilev's Ballets Russes and with Stravinsky, and returned to some of his older unfinished works such as the Third Piano Concerto. Later, in December 1920, The Love for Three Oranges finally premièred in Chicago. However, the reception was cold, forcing Prokofiev to again leave America without triumph. Léon Bakst: Firebird, Ballerina, 1910 The Ballets Russes was a ballet company established in 1909 by the Russian impresario Serge Diaghilev and resident first in Théâtre Mogador, Paris; and then in Monte Carlo. ... Sergei Prokofiev wrote his Piano Concerto No. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ...


Prokofiev then moved with his mother to the Bavarian Alps for over a year so he could concentrate fully on his composing. Most of his time was spent on an old opera project, The Fiery Angel. By this time his later music had started sifting back into Russia and he received invitations to return there, but he felt that his new European career was more important. In 1923, he married the Spanish singer Lina Llubera, before moving back to Paris. The geographic region and Free State of Bavaria (German:  ), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... The Fiery Angel (Ognennïy angel in transliteration) is an opera in five acts by Sergei Prokofiev to a Russian libretto by the composer, based on the novel by Valery Bryusov. ...


There, a number of his works (for example the Second Symphony) were performed, but critical reception was lukewarm, perhaps because he could no longer really lay claim to being a "novelty". He did not particularly like Stravinsky's later works and, even though he was quite friendly with members of "Les Six", musically he had very little in common with them. Sergei Prokofiev wrote his Symphony No. ... Le Groupe des Six, 1922, by Jacques-Emile Blanche. ...


Around 1927, things started looking up; he had some exciting commissions from Diaghilev and made a number of concert tours in Russia; in addition, he enjoyed a very successful staging of The Love for Three Oranges in Leningrad (as Saint Petersburg was then known). Two older operas (one of them The Gambler) were also played in Europe and in 1928 he produced the Third Symphony which was broadly based on his unperformed opera The Fiery Angel. The years 1931 and 1932 saw the completion of his fourth and fifth piano concertos. Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and... Sergei Prokofiev wrote his Symphony No. ... The Fiery Angel (Ognennïy angel in transliteration) is an opera in five acts by Sergei Prokofiev to a Russian libretto by the composer, based on the novel by Valery Bryusov. ...


In 1929, he had a car accident in which his hands were slightly injured, preventing him from touring in Moscow, but permitting him to enjoy some of the contemporary Russian music instead. After his hands healed, he made a new attempt at touring in the USA, and this time he was received very warmly, propped up by his recent success in Europe. This, in turn, propelled him to do a major tour through Europe.


In the early 1930s, Prokofiev was starting to long for Russia again and he moved more and more of his premières and commissions to his home country instead of Paris. One such was Lieutenant Kije, which was commissioned as the score to a Russian film. Another commission, from the Kirov Theatre in Leningrad, was the ballet Romeo and Juliet, today one of Prokofiev's best known works. However, there were numerous choreographic problems, postponing the premiere for several years. Lieutenant Kije (Подпоручик Киже) is a short story by the Soviet author Yuri Nikolaevich Tynyanov (1894-1943) published in 1927. ... View of the Mariinsky Theatre in the 1890ies The Mariinsky Theatre, known as the Kirov Opera and Ballet Theatre in 1934-92, is a historic theatre of opera and ballet in St Petersburg. ... Romeo and Juliet is a ballet by Sergei Prokofiev based on Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet. ...


Prokofiev was soloist with the London Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Piero Coppola, in the world premiere recording of his third piano concerto, recorded in London by His Master's Voice in June 1932. The recording has exceptionally clear sound and Prokofiev's piano virtuoso playing remains very impressive. Prokofiev also recorded some of his solo piano music for HMV in Paris in February 1935. These recordings were issued on CD by Pearl. In 1938, he conducted the Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra in a recording of the second suite from his ballet Romeo and Juliet; this performance was also later released on LP and CD. Another reported recording with Prokofiev and the Moscow Philharmonic was of the Prokofiev first violin concerto with David Oistrakh as the soloist; Everest Records later released this recording on an LP, along with a performance of Khachaturian's violin concerto with that composer conducting the Philharmonic with much inferior sound compared to the EMI recording with Khachaturian and Oistrakh. The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ... His Masters Voice, often abbreviated to HMV, is a famous trademark in the music business, and for many years was the name of a large record company. ... Strand of akoya pearls from China Pearl farm, Seram, Indonesia A pearl is a hard, rounded object produced by certain animals, primarily mollusks such as pearl oysters. ... The Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra is an orchestra based in Moscow, Russia. ... David Fyodorovich Oistrakh (Russian: , David Fiodorovič Ojstrah; September 30 [O.S. September 17] 1908 – October 24, 1974) was a Jewish Soviet violinist who made many recordings and was the dedicatee of numerous violin works. ... An Everest Records reissue of music by Ralph Vaughan Williams and Malcolm Arnold Everest Records was a stereophonic record company in Bayside, Long Island; started by Harry D. Belock and Bert Whyte in May 1958 as a division of the Belock Instrument Corporation. ... Aram Ilich Khachaturian (Armenian: Արամ Խաչատրյան, Russian: Аpaм Ильич Xaчaтypян) (June 6, 1903 – May 1, 1978) was a composer of classical music. ...


Return to Soviet Union

In 1934, Prokofiev moved back to the Soviet Union permanently, but his family came a year after him. At this time, the official Soviet policy towards music changed; a special bureau, the "Composers' Union", was established in order to keep track of the artists and their doings, and regulations were drawn up outlining what kind of music was acceptable. By limiting outside influences, these policies would gradually cause almost complete isolation of Soviet composers from the rest of the world. Willing to adapt to the new circumstances Prokofiev wrote a series of "mass songs" (opp. 66, 79, 89), using the lyrics of officially approved Soviet poets, and also the oratorio "Zdravnitsa" (Hail to Stalin) op.85, which secured his position as a Soviet composer and put an end to persecution. At the same time Prokofiev also composed music for children (Three Songs for Children, Peter and the Wolf, and so on) as well as the gigantic Cantata for the Twentieth Anniversary of the October Revolution, which was, however, never performed. The première of the opera Semyon Kotko was postponed because the producer Vsevolod Meyerhold was imprisoned and executed. Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვი&#4314... 1947 coloring book cover. ... Semyon Kotko (Семён Котко in Russian) is an opera in five acts by Sergei Prokofiev to a libretto by Sergei Prokofiev and Valentin Katayev based on Valentin Katayevs 1937 novel I Am The Son Of Working People. ... Vsevolod Emilevich Meyerhold (born Karl Kazimir Theodor Meyerhold) (1874 - 1940) was a Russian theatrical director, actor and theorist. ...


In 1938, Prokofiev collaborated with the great Russian filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein on the historical epic Alexander Nevsky, composing some of his best dramatic music. Although the film had very poor sound recording, Prokofiev adapted much of his music into a cantata, which has been extensively performed and recorded. Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн, Latvian: Sergejs Eizenšteins) (January 23, 1898 – February 11, 1948) was a revolutionary Soviet film director and film theorist noted in particular for his silent films Strike, Battleship Potemkin and Oktober. ... Alexander Nevsky (Александр Невский) is a 1938 historical drama film directed by Sergei Eisenstein and Dmitry Vasiliev and produced by Mosfilm. ...


In 1941, Prokofiev suffered the first of several heart attacks, resulting in a gradual decline in health. Because of the war, he was periodically evacuated to the south together with a large number of other artists. This had consequences for his family life in Moscow, and his relationship with the 25-year-old Mira Mendelson finally led to his separation from his wife Lina, although they remained married for the next seven years. It should be mentioned that marriage with foreigners had been made illegal and some believe that the breakup with his wife was forced.


The outbreak of war inspired Prokofiev to a new opera project, War and Peace, which he worked on for two years, along with more film music for Sergei Eisenstein (Ivan the Terrible) and the second string quartet. However, Soviet government had opinions about the opera which resulted in numerous revisions and no première. In 1944, Prokofiev moved to an estate outside of Moscow, to compose his Fifth Symphony (Op. 100) which would turn out to be his most successful. Shortly afterwards, Sergei suffered a concussion in a fall from which he never really recovered and which severely lowered his productivity in later years. War and Peace (Op. ... Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн, Latvian: Sergejs EizenÅ¡teins) (January 23, 1898 – February 11, 1948) was a revolutionary Soviet film director and film theorist noted in particular for his silent films Strike, Battleship Potemkin and Oktober. ... Nikolai Cherkasov as Ivan the Terrible in Eisensteins film of the same name Faina Ranevskaya in a screen test for the role of Princess Staritskaya. ... Sergei Prokofiev wrote his Symphony No. ...


Prokofiev had time to write his postwar Sixth Symphony and a ninth piano sonata (for Sviatoslav Richter) before the Party suddenly changed its opinion about his music. The end of the war allowed attention to be turned inwards again and the Party tightened its reins on domestic artists. Prokofiev's music was now seen as a grave example of formalism, and dangerous to the Soviet people. Sergei Prokofiev wrote his Symphony No. ... Sviatoslav Teofilovich Richter (Russian: , Svjatoslav Teofilovič Rikhter; March 20 [O.S. March 7] 1915 – August 1, 1997) was a Soviet pianist, widely recognized as one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century. ... // Introduction The distinctive feature of Russian Formalism is the emphasis on the functional role of literary devices and the original conception of the evolution of literary history. ...


On February 20, 1948, the same year Prokofiev married Mira, his wife Lina was arrested for 'espionage', as she tried to send money to her mother in Spain. She was sentenced to death and killed in March 1949. Prokofiev supposedly began writing a prelude inspired by her murder, but it was never finished. February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... A Prelude is something that serves as a preceding event or introduces what follows after it. ...


His latest opera projects were quickly cancelled by the Kirov Theatre and this, in combination with his declining health, caused Prokofiev to withdraw more and more. His doctors ordered him to limited his activities, which resulted in him spending only an hour or two each day on composition. His last performance was the première of the Seventh Symphony in 1952, a piece of somewhat bittersweet character, for which Prokofiev was asked to substitute a cheerful ending, possibly because the music was written for a children's television program. Sergei Prokofiev wrote his Symphony No. ...


Prokofiev died at the age of 61 on 5 March 1953 (on the same day and from the same cause as Soviet premier Joseph Stalin). Prokofiev had lived near Red Square and for three days the throngs gathered to mourn Stalin made it impossible to carry Prokofiev's body out for the funeral service at the headquarters of the Soviet Composer's Union. Paper flowers and a taped recording of the funeral march from his Romeo and Juliet had to be used, as all real flowers and musicians were reserved for Stalin's funeral. He is buried in the Novodevichy Cemetery in Moscow. March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (65th in leap years). ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... For other uses, see Red Square (disambiguation). ... Grave of Anton Chekhov Novodevichy Cemetery (Новодевичье кла́дбище, Novodevichye kladbishche) is the most famous cemetery in Moscow, Russia, situated next to the World Heritage Site, the 16th-century Novodevichy Convent, which is the citys third most popular tourist site. ...


Prokofiev's death is usually attributed to cerebral hemorrhage (bleeding into the brain) but it is known that he was not well for 8 years before he died and was plagued during that length of time by headaches, nausea and dizziness[2], so the precise nature of Prokofiev's terminal illness is uncertain. A cerebral hemorrhage is a bleed into the substance of the cerebrum. ... A headache (cephalalgia in medical terminology) is a condition of pain in the head; sometimes neck or upper back pain may also be interpreted as a headache. ... For the Beck song, see Nausea (song). ... // Pre-syncope is a sensation of feeling faint. ...


Mira Prokofieva outlived her ex-husband by many years, dying in London in early 1989. Royalties from her late husband's music provided her a modest income. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Works

Compositions

Further information: List of compositions by Sergei Prokofiev and Category:Compositions by Sergei Prokofiev

This is a list of musical compositions by the 20th century Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev. ...

Autobiography

Prokofiev's diaries were translated into English by aAlexander Phillips and published by Faber and Faber in 2006.[3]


Biographers

  • David Nice
  • Daniel Jaffe
  • Harlow Robinson
  • Israel Nestjev

Music Analyses

  • Stephen Press
  • Stephen C. I. Fiess

More modern references to Sergei Prokofiev

Love and Death is a 1975 comedy by Woody Allen. ... The Dream of the Blue Turtles is the first solo album released by Sting. ... For professional wrestler Steve Borden, see Sting (wrestler). ... Lieutenant Kije (Подпоручик Киже) is a short story by the Soviet author Yuri Nikolaevich Tynyanov (1894-1943) published in 1927. ... Isao Tomita (冨田 勲; Tomita Isao, born April 22, 1932), is a renowned electronic music composer. ... Sergei Prokofiev wrote his Symphony No. ... Sergei Prokofiev wrote his Symphony No. ... The Violin Concerto No. ... Romeo and Juliet is a ballet by Sergei Prokofiev based on Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet. ... Intro – 0:34 Davy Jones Locker – 0:56 Flight 19 – 1:48 Mausoleum Door – 3:29 Sea of Expanding Shapes – 4:24 The Triangle Part 1: Extrakd – 1:16 Bionic Fog – 2:01 Forbidden Zone – 2:15 Telegraph Land of the Crispies – 1:53 Pullin the Heavy – 2:55 Phantom... Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (August 31, 12 – January 24, 41), more commonly known by his nickname Caligula, was the third Roman Emperor and a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, ruling from 37 to 41. ... Romeo and Juliet is a ballet by Sergei Prokofiev based on Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... The Damned are a punk rock/gothic rock band formed in London, England in 1976. ... Prokofiev was a single released by The Damned in 1991. ... William Martin Joel (born May 9, 1949, in Bronx, New York, USA) an American singer, pianist, and songwriter . ... We Didnt Start the Fire is a song by Billy Joel that chronicles 120 well-known events, people, things, and places widely noted during his lifetime, from March 1949 to 1989, when the song was released on his album Storm Front. ... Romeo and Juliet in the famous balcony scene by Ford Madox Brown For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... In astronomy, the term black moon is neither well known nor frequently used. ... The Apprentice was a television franchise that originated in 2004 in the United States. ... Romeo and Juliet is a ballet by Sergei Prokofiev based on Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet. ...

Trivia

  • While Prokofiev himself believed 23 April to be his birth date, the posthumous discovery of his birth certificate showed that he was actually born four days later, on 27 April.[4]
  • Igor Stravinsky characterized him as the greatest Russian composer of his day, other than Stravinsky himself.[5]
  • The Political Compass organisation rates Prokofiev as one of the most left-wing individuals on their "Composers' Political Compass" [3]
  • Technical death metal band Necrophagist samples a piece of the Romeo and Juliet ballet (Montagues and Capulets) in their song "Only Ash Remains"
  • Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No. 2 in G Minor (Op. 63) was used as part of Jack Parsons' Babalon Working occult ritual in 1946.
  • Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3 in C major was performed in Prague in 1926 for the first time ever (Ilona Štěpánová-Kurzová, Václav Talich, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra). This concert was featured in the 1980 movie The Competition starring Richard Dreyfuss, Amy Irving, and Lee Remick. Amy Irving wins the competition over Richard Dreyfuss by deciding to play the Prokofiev concerto at the last minute instead of the Mozart piano concerto she had planned to play.

April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer, considered by many in both the West and his native land to be the most influential composer of 20th-century music. ... The chart proposed by the Political Compass Organization A political compass or political diamond is a multi-axis model used to label or organize political thought on several dimensions. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Death metal is an extreme metal subgenre. ... Necrophagist is a Technical Brutal Death Metal band from Germany, led by guitarist/vocalist Muhammed Suiçmez. ... The Babalon Working was a series of magickal ceremonies or rituals commenced on March 2, 1946 by Jack Parsons, essentially designed to manifest an individual incarnation of the archetypal divine feminine called Babalon , as well as to catalyze the reification of that force as it exists latently in every man... Nickname: Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area  - City 496 km²  (191. ... 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Ilona Å tÄ›pánová-Kurzová Ilona Å tÄ›pánová-Kurzová (1899-1975) was a Czech concert pianist and piano teacher, a professor at the Prague Academy of Arts. ... Václav Talich (May 28, 1883 - March 16, 1961) was a Czech conductor and violinist. ... Czech Philharmonic Orchestra at Rudolfinum Hall in Prague The Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (ÄŒeská filharmonie in Czech language) is based in Prague and is probably the most famous and most internationally respected Czech orchestra. ...

References

  • The Concise Edition of Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Musicians, 8th ed. Revised by Nicolas Slonimsky. New York, Schirmer Books, 1993. ISBN 002872416X
  • Prokofiev, Sergei by Richard Taruskin, in 'The New Grove Dictionary of Opera', ed. Stanley Sadie (London, 1992) ISBN 0-333-73432-7

The New Grove Dictionary of Opera is an encyclopedia (or encyclopedic dictionary) of opera, considered to be one of the best general reference sources on the subject. ...

Notes

  1. ^ "He was a child prodigy on the order of Mozart, composing for piano at age five and writing an opera at nine." [1]
  2. ^ Layton, Robert: "Prokofiev's Demonic Opera" Found in the introductory notes to the Philips Label recording of The Fiery Angel
  3. ^ amazon.uk.com
  4. ^ Slonimsky, p. 793
  5. ^ Martin Kettle. First among equals. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2006-10-21.

The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 71 days remaining. ...

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Sergei Prokofiev (652 words)
Sergei Prokofiev (April 23, 1891 - March 5, 1953) was a Russian composer.
Sergei was born in Sontsovka (now the village of Krasne in Donetsk oblast), Ukraine, as an only child.
Sergei displayed unusual musical abilities at an early age and in 1902, when he started taking private lessons in composition, he had already produced a number of pieces.
Sergei Prokofiev - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2630 words)
Prokofiev was born in Sontsovka, Russian Empire (now the village of Krasnoe, Krasnoarmiysky Raion, in Donetsk Oblast, Ukraine).
Prokofiev displayed unusual musical abilities by the age of five, and by the age of seven had also learned to play chess.
Prokofiev's music was now suddenly seen as a grave example of formalism, and generally dangerous to the Soviet people.
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