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Encyclopedia > Sergei Eisenstein
Sergei Eisenstein

Birth name Sergei Mikhailovich Eizenshtein
Born January 23, 1898
Riga, Russian Empire
Died February 11, 1948
Moscow, Soviet Union
Years active 1923-1946
Spouse(s) Pera Atasheva (1934-1948)

Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн) (January 23, 1898February 11, 1948) was a revolutionary Soviet Russian film director and film theorist noted in particular for his silent films Strike, Battleship Potemkin and Oktober. His work vastly influenced early film makers owing to his innovative use of and writings about montage. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Sergei_Eisenstein_with_skull. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Riga (disambiguation). ... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... CCCP redirects here. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Film theory debates the essence of the cinema and provides conceptual frameworks for analyzing, among other things, the film image, narrative structure, the function of film artists, the relationship of film to reality, and the film spectators position in the cinematic experience. ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... The Battleship Potemkin (Russian: , ), sometimes rendered as The Battleship Potyomkin, is a 1925 silent film directed by Sergei Eisenstein and produced by Mosfilm. ... October (Ten Days That Shook The World), (Russian language title: “Октябрь” (“Десять дней, которые потрясли мир”), which... Film editing is the connecting of one or more shots to form a sequence, and the subsequent connecting of sequences to form an entire movie. ...

Contents

Biography

Early years

Eisenstein's father, Mikhail Eisenstein, was an architect from Latvia. His mother Julia Ivanovna Konetskaya, was the daughter of a wealthy contractor. His mother came from a Russian Orthodox Christian family, while his father was of German-Jewish and Swedish descent, having adopted Russian culture and the Orthodox faith. Although he claimed to have only an eighth of Jewish blood he was sometimes perceived as being German-Jewish, possibly because of his proliferance of the German language at a young age. [1]. The young Sergei was raised in the Orthodox faith.[1] Mikhail Eisenstein, (1867 - 1921), was a Latvian architect and civil engineer of German Jewish descent. ... The term Orthodox Christian refers to two Christian traditions: Oriental Orthodoxy, which separated from the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church in the 5th century; Eastern Orthodoxy, which the Roman Catholic church separated from in 1054 was the church that was started by the apostles. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... The Russian culture is rooted in the early East Slavic culture. ... Separate articles treat Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Orthodox Judaism. ... German Jews have lived in Germany for over 1700 years, through both periods of tolerance and spasms of anti-Semitic violence, culminating in the Holocaust and the destruction of the Jewish community in Germany and much of Europe. ...


Eisenstein was a pioneer in the use of montage, a specific use of film editing. He believed that editing could be used for more than just expounding a scene or moment, through a "linkage" of related scenes. Eisenstein felt the "collision" of shots could be used to manipulate the emotions of the audience and create film metaphors. He developed what he called "methods of montage": Soviet montage theory is an approach to understanding and creating cinema that relies heavily upon editing (montage is French for putting together). Although Soviet filmmakers in the 1920s disagreed about how exactly to view montage, Sergei Eisenstein marked a note of accord in A Dialectic Approach to Film Form when... Film editing is the connecting of one or more shots to form a sequence, and the subsequent connecting of sequences to form an entire movie. ...

  1. Metric
  2. Rhythmic
  3. Tonal
  4. Overtonal
  5. Intellectual montage

His articles and books — particularly Film Form and The Film Sense — explain these methods in detail. He and Lev Kuleshov were two of the earliest film theorists. His impact on film makers in the 1920s was enormous. Intellectual montage is an alternative to continuity editing proposed by Sergei Eisenstein where a new idea emerges from a sequence of shots and where the new idea is not originally found in any of the individual shots. ... Lev Vladimirovich Kuleshov (1899 - 1970) was a Russian filmmaker known for his work on film editing and the impact it has on the viewers. ... List of 1920s films Films released in the 1920s include: The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) Metropolis (1927) ok yeash your gay this site sucks! Other lists of movies List of years in film in the 1920s 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 Decades in Film...


In his initial films, Eisenstein did not use professional actors. His narratives eschewed individual characters and addressed broad social issues, especially class conflict. He used stock characters, and the roles were filled with untrained people from the appropriate classes. Class conflict is both the friction that accompanies social relationships between members or groups of different social classes and the underlying tensions or antagonisms which exist in society. ...


Eisenstein's vision of Communism brought him into conflict with officials in the ruling regime of Joseph Stalin. Like many Bolshevik artists, Eisenstein envisioned a new society which would subsidize artists totally, freeing them from the confines of bosses and budgets, leaving them absolutely free to create, but budgets and producers were as significant to the Soviet film industry as the rest of the world. The fledgling war- and revolution-wracked and isolated new nation did not have the resources to nationalize its film industry at first. When it did, limited resources - both monetary and equipment - required production controls as extensive as in the capitalist world. Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... Josef Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili (Georgian: , Ioseb Besarionis Dze Jughashvili; Russian: , Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (December 18 [O.S. December 6] 1878[1] – March 5, 1953), better known by his adopted name, Joseph Stalin (alternatively transliterated Josef Stalin), was General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Unions Central Committee from... For other uses, see Bolshevik (disambiguation). ...


Eisenstein's popularity and influence in his own land waxed and waned with the success of his films and the passage of time. The Battleship Potemkin (1925) was acclaimed critically worldwide. But it was mostly his international critical renown which enabled Eisenstein to direct The General Line (aka Old and New), and then October (aka Ten Days That Shook The World) as part of a grand tenth anniversary celebration of the October Revolution of 1917. The critics of the outside world praised them, but at home, Eisenstein's focus in these films on structural issues such as camera angles, crowd movements and montage, brought him and likeminded others, such as Pudovkin and Dovzhenko, under fire from the Soviet film community, forcing him to issue public articles of self-criticism and commitments to reform his cinematic visions to conform to socialist realism's increasingly specific doctrines. The Battleship Potemkin (Russian: , ), sometimes rendered as The Battleship Potyomkin, is a 1925 silent film directed by Sergei Eisenstein and produced by Mosfilm. ... The General Line aka Old and New (original title: Staroye i novoye) is a 1929 Soviet film directed by Sergei Eisenstein. ... October (Ten Days That Shook The World), (Russian language title: “Октябрь” (“Десять дней, которые потрясли мир”), which... For other uses, see October Revolution (disambiguation). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Vsevolod Pudovkin Vsevolod Illarionovich Pudovkin (Russian Всеволод Илларионович Пудовкин) (February 16, 1893 - June 20, 1953) was a Russian film director who developed influential theories of... Alexander Dovzhenko was the most famous of Ukrainian filmmakers, whose two best known films are Arsenal (1928) and Earth (1930). ... Roses for Stalin, Boris Vladimirski, 1949 For other meanings of the term realism, see realism (disambiguation). ...


Europe and Hollywood

In the autumn of 1928, with October still under fire in many Soviet quarters, Eisenstein left the Soviet Union for a tour of Europe, accompanied by his perennial film collaborator Grigori Aleksandrov and cinematographer Eduard Tisse. Officially, the trip was supposed to allow Eisenstein and company to learn about sound motion pictures and to present the famous Soviet artists, in person, to the capitalist West. For Eisenstein, however, it was also an opportunity to see landscapes and cultures outside those found within the Soviet Union. He spent the next two years touring and lecturing in Berlin, Zurich, London and Paris where, in late April, 1930, Jesse L. Lasky, on behalf of Paramount Pictures, offered the opportunity to make a film in the United States. He accepted a short-term contract for $100,000 and arrived in Hollywood in May 1930. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Lasky in 1915. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... ...


Unfortunately, this arrangement failed. Eisenstein's idiosyncratic and artistic approach to cinema was incompatible with the more formulaic and commercial approach of American studios. Eisenstein proposed a biography of munitions tycoon Sir Basil Zaharoff and a film version of Arms and the Man by George Bernard Shaw, and more fully developed plans for a film of Sutter's Gold by Jack London, but on all accounts failed to impress the studio's producers. Paramount finally settled on a movie version on Theodore Dreiser's An American Tragedy. This excited Eisenstein, who had read and liked the work, and had met Dreiser at one time in Moscow. Eisenstein completed a script by the start of October 1930, but Paramount disliked it completely and, additionally, found themselves intimidated by the American fascist agitator Major Pease, who had mounted a public campaign against Eisenstein. Seventeen days later, by "mutual agreement", Paramount and Eisenstein declared their contract null and void, and the Eisenstein party were treated to return tickets to Moscow, at Paramount's expense. Sir Basil Zaharoff, originally Basileios Zacharias, (b. ... Arms and the Man is a comedy by G. Bernard Shaw. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and socialist. ... For other persons named Jack London, see Jack London (disambiguation). ... Theodore Dreiser, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser (August 27, 1871 – December 28, 1945) was an American naturalist author known for dealing with the gritty reality of life. ... An American Tragedy is a famous American novel, by Theodore Dreiser. ... Major Frank Pease was president of the Hollywood Technical Directors Institute, an anti-communist and allegedly an anti-Semite activist organization during 1920s and 30s. ...


Eisenstein was thus faced with returning home an image of failure. The Soviet film industry was solving the sound-film issue without him and his films, techniques and theories were becoming increasingly attacked as 'ideological failures' and prime examples of formalism at its worst by the Stalinists, as the Soviet film industry came increasingly under their sway. Many of his theoretical articles from this period, such as "Eisenstein on Disney" have surfaced decades later as seminal scholarly texts used as curriculum in film schools around the world. The term formalism describes an emphasis on form over content or meaning in the arts, literature, or philosophy. ... Soviet Cinema should not be used as a synonym for Russian Cinema. Although Russian language films predominated, several of the constituent republics of the Soviet Union contributed films reflecting elements of their pre-Soviet culture, language and history, although sometimes censored by the Central Government. ... Eisenstein on Disney (1986) is a book by film critic Jay Leyda that collects and reprints the various liturature that Sergei Eisenstein produced about Disney. ...


¡Que Viva México!

Sergei Eisenstein in the 1920s

A last-minute reprieve came from Charlie Chaplin, who arranged for Eisenstein to meet with a sympathetic benefactor in the person of American socialist author Upton Sinclair. Sinclair's works had been accepted by and were widely read in the USSR, and were known to Eisenstein. Conversely, Sinclair was a fan of Eisenstein's film work and looked forward to the opportunity to assist the artist. Between the end of October 1930, and Thanksgiving of that year, Sinclair had secured an extension of Eisenstein's absences from the USSR, and permission for him to travel to Mexico to make a film to be produced by Sinclair and his wife, Mary Craig Kimbrough Sinclair, and three other investors organized as the Mexican Film Trust. Image File history File links Sergei_Eisenstein_portrait1. ... Image File history File links Sergei_Eisenstein_portrait1. ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... Upton Sinclair Jr. ...


On 24 November, Eisenstein signed a contract with the Trust "upon the basis of Eisenstein's desire to be free to direct the making of a picture according to his own ideas of what a Mexican picture should be, and in full faith in Eisenstein's artistic integrity".[citation needed] The contract also stipulated that the film would be "non-political", that immediately available funding came from Mrs. Sinclair in an amount of "not less than Twenty-Five Thousand Dollars", that the shooting schedule amounted to "a period of from three to four months", and most importantly that "Eisenstein furthermore agrees that all pictures made or directed by him in Mexico, all negative film and positive prints, and all story and ideas embodied in said Mexican picture, will be the property of Mrs. Sinclair..."[citation needed] A codicil to the contract, dated 1 December, allowed that the "Soviet Government may have the [finished] film free for showing inside the U.S.S.R."[citation needed] Reportedly, it was verbally clarified that the expectation was for a finished film of about an hour's duration.


If Eisenstein's experience in Hollywood had seemed a failure, his journey to Mexico was destined to be an utter fiasco. Mexico was a right-wing dictatorship with no diplomatic ties to the Soviet Union, and had insisted on censorship rights over all footage shot as a condition of admitting the Soviet filmmakers to Mexico. The process devised was to have every reel of negative sent back to Los Angeles for development, a print struck and returned to the Mexican authorities for review and comment, which they were not inclined to do in any hurry.


Eisenstein had no story or subject in mind for a film about Mexico, however, even when he left Los Angeles and embarked on a full-scale photographic expedition, filming anything and everything of personal interest without clear idea what he would be doing with it in fulfillment of his contract. He planned, however, to create something without use of a script, to utilize local "types" rather than professional actors for any human role, and to shoot the film silent.


Eisenstein should have, by contract, returned with the finished film by the end of April 1931. Instead, by the 15th of that month, he could only offer up a sketchily written, abstraction-based, somewhat poetic impression of what the finished film might be. It was six months later before he produced a brief synopsis of the six-part film which would come, in one form or another, to be the final plan Eisenstein would settle on for his project. The title for the project, ¡Que Viva México!, was decided on some time later still.


While in Mexico, Eisenstein had gotten wind that the Soviet film industry was pressing Stalin to have Eisenstein declared a deserter, due to his prolonged absence from the Soviet Union, and that Stalin was not resisting that pressure.


On 5 February 1932, Sinclair received a telegram from Soyuzkino, to forward to Eisenstein, ordering the latter immediately back to the U.S.S.R, leaving Aleksandrov and Tisse to finish the film without him. On the same day, Sinclair learned that Eisenstein blamed Mary Sinclair's younger brother, Hunter Kimbrough -- who had been sent along to act as a line producer -- for the film's problems. Eisenstein hoped to pressure the Sinclairs to insinuate themselves between him and Stalin, so Eisenstein could finish the film in his own way. The furious Sinclair shut down production and ordered Kimbrough to return to the U.S. with the remaining film footage and the three Soviets to see what they could do with the film already shot. is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Nikolai Cherkasov as Ivan the Terrible in Eisenstein's film of the same name.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x700, 53 KB)Nikolai Cherkasov as Ivan the Terrible in Sergei Eisensteins movie. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x700, 53 KB)Nikolai Cherkasov as Ivan the Terrible in Sergei Eisensteins movie. ... Cherkasov as Ivan the Terrible in Eisensteins film. ... Tsar Ivan the Terrible, by Viktor Vasnetsov Ivan IV Vasilyevich (Russian: ) (August 25, 1530, Moscow â€“ March 18, 1584, Moscow) was the Grand Prince of Moscow from 1533 to 1547 and Czar of Russia from 1547 until his death. ...

Departure from Mexico

To cap things off, when Eisenstein arrived at the American border, a customs search of his trunk revealed sketches and drawings of Christ caricatures amongst other material of a lewd pornographic nature. Kimbrough was barely able to prevent their arrest and confiscation of the entire cargo. Simultaneously, it was determined that Eisenstein's re-entry visa had expired, and Sinclair's contacts in Washington were unable to secure him an additional extension. Eisenstein, Alexandrov and Tisse were, after a month's stay at the U.S.-Mexico border outside Laredo, Texas, allowed a 30-day "pass" to get from Texas to New York, and thence depart for Moscow, while Kimbrough returned to Los Angeles with the remaining film. The international border between Mexico and the United States runs a total of 3,141 km (1,951 miles) from San Diego, California, and Tijuana, Baja California, in the west to Matamoros, Tamaulipas, and Brownsville, Texas, in the east. ... Nickname: Settled 1755 Government  - Type Mayor / City Manager  - Mayor Raul G. Salinas  - City Manager Carlos R. Villarreal Area  - City 218. ...


Eisenstein planned to edit the film in Moscow, and Sinclair was inclined to allow this. However, Eisenstein took the entire 30 days to tour the American South, and repeated his blaming of Kimbrough to the Soviet film people in New York. Additionally, once Eisenstein had left the USA, the Soviets agreed to allow him to cut the film in Moscow but expected the Mexican Film Trust to pay for the duplicate negatives and shipping of the material, then began insisting on the original negative being sent. Mary Sinclair, on behalf of herself and the other trust members, balked at that juncture. The Trust was virtually broke, and all faith by the investors toward Eisenstein was broken. For the most part, the Trust consisted of friends and relatives of Upton and Mary Sinclair's who had invested in good faith and expecting a results several months prior by which an already edited film may be examined. Eisenstein was officially "off the project"; someone else, in the USA, would be found to edit the film.


It took another year to find someone to deal with the vast amount of Eisenstein's Mexican footage. Other than two general descriptions of each part of the film, Eisenstein had provided Sinclair with no descriptive material to work from. Indeed, he had never developed the film's structure on paper anywhere beyond this most general of stages. The major studios were not interested in either trying to figure out a continuity for the mass of film or to market a silent picture. Another, American-made "photographic expedition" to Mexico had already been shown in New York. Finally, in mid-1932, the Sinclairs were able to secure the services of Sol Lesser, who had just opened his own distribution office in New York, Principal Distributing Corp.. Lesser agreed to supervise post-production work on the miles of negative — at the Sinclairs expense — and distribute any resulting product. Two short feature films and a short subjectThunder Over Mexico, Eisenstein in Mexico, and Death Day, respectively — were completed and released in the United States between the autumn of 1933 and early 1934. Sinclair's refusal to let Eisenstein work on the films made at least the first title an object of ire and scorn among American Communists and other Eisenstein supporters, and came out with some attendant publicity in the form of public controversy and protest. However, none of the films did very well, failing to return the original investment. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ... Early American actor William Garwood starred in numerous short films, many of which were only 20 minutes in length Short subject is a format description originally coined in the North American film industry in the early period of cinema. ...


Back in the USSR

Eisenstein never saw any of the Sinclair-Lesser films, nor a later effort by his first biographer, Marie Seton, called Time In The Sun. He would publicly maintain that he had lost all interest in the project. Eisenstein's foray into the west made the now-staunchly Stalinist film industry look upon him with a more suspicious eye, and this suspicion would never be completely erased in the mind of the Stalinist elite. He apparently spent some time in a Soviet mental hospital in Kislovodsk, in July 1933, ostensibly a result of depression born of his final acceptance that he would never be allowed to edit the Mexican footage. He was subsequently assigned a teaching position with the film school, GIK. He explored with the Soviet film industry three or four projects, but was denied permission to begin serious work on any of them. Finally, in 1935, he was allowed to undertake direction of another's project, Bezhin Meadow, but it appears the film was afflicted with many of the same problems as Que Viva Mexico -- Eisenstein unilaterally decided to film two versions of the scenario, one for adult viewers and one for children; failed to define a clear shooting schedule; and shot film prodigeously, resulting in cost overruns and missed deadlines. When he was sidetracked with a case of smallpox, the Soviet producers and critics began examining the product, and found it awash in formalism. Production was stopped, furious debate ensued over whether the film could be salvaged to the government's expectations, it was decided it could not, Eisenstein was publicly excoriated and all but a few stills and footage samples were destroyed. Bezhin Meadow is a 1937 Russian film, directed by Sergei Eisenstein, which is famous for having been destroyed before completion. ... The term formalism describes an emphasis on form over content or meaning in the arts, literature, or philosophy. ...


The thing which appeared to save Eisenstein's career at this point was that Stalin ended up taking the position that the Bezhin Meadow catastrophe, along with several other problems facing the industry at that point, had less to do with Eisenstein's approach to filmmaking as with the executives who were supposed to have been supervising him. Ultimately this came down on the shoulders of Boris Shumyatsky, "executive producer" of Soviet film since 1932, who in early 1938 was denounced, arrested, tried and convicted as a traitor, and shot. (The production executive at Film studio Mosfilm, where Meadow was being made, was also replaced, but without further executions.) Boris Zakharovich Shumyatsky, the de-facto Executive Producer for the Soviet film monopoly from 1930-1937, was born November 4, 1886 somewhere in the vicinity of Lake Baikal in Russian Siberia. ... Mosfilm logo was the Statue of the Worker and Kolkhoznitsa at VDNKh Mosfilm film studio (in Cyrillic, Мосфи́льм) is often described as the largest and oldest in Russia and in Europe. ...


Eisenstein was thence able to ingratiate himself with Stalin for 'one more chance', and he chose, from two offerings, the assignment of a biopic of Alexander Nevsky. This time, however, he was also assigned a co-scenarist, Pyotr Pavlenko, to bring in a completed script; professional actors to play the roles; and an assistant director, Dmitry Vasiliev, to expedite shooting. The result was a film critically received by both the Soviets and in the West, an obvious allegory and stern warning against the massing forces of Nazi Germany, well-played and well-made. This was started, completed, and placed in distribution all within the year 1938, and represented not only Eisenstein's first film in nearly a decade, but also his first sound film. For other uses, see Alexander Nevsky (disambiguation). ...


Unfortunately, within months of its release, the mercurial Stalin entered into his infamous pact with Hitler, and Nevsky was promptly pulled from distribution. Thwarted again on the morning of triumph, Eisenstein returned to teaching and had to wait until Hitler's double-cross sent German troops pouring across the Soviet border in a devastating first strike, to see "his" success receive its just, wide distribution and real international success.


With the war approaching Moscow, Eisenstein was one of the many filmmakers based there who was evacuated to Alma-Ata, where he first considered the idea of making a film about Czar Ivan IV, aka Ivan the Terrible, which could have been favored by Stalin.

Faina Ranevskaya as Princess Staritskaya in a screen test for Ivan the Terrible, Part I (1942).

His film, Ivan The Terrible, Part I, presenting Ivan IV of Russia as a national hero, won Stalin's approval (and a Stalin Prize), but the sequel, Ivan The Terrible, Part II was not approved of by the government. All footage from the still incomplete Ivan The Terrible: Part III was confiscated, and most of it was destroyed (though several filmed scenes still exist today). Image File history File links Faina Ranevskaya in try-out for Sergei Eisensteins Ivan the Terrible (1942). ... Image File history File links Faina Ranevskaya in try-out for Sergei Eisensteins Ivan the Terrible (1942). ... Ranevskaya in The Foundling (1940). ... Vladimir Andreyevich (1533 - October 9, 1569) was the last appanage Russian prince. ... Nikolai Cherkasov as Ivan the Terrible in Eisensteins film of the same name Faina Ranevskaya as Princess Staritskaya in Ivan The Terrible, Part I (1942) Ivan The Terrible was a film about Ivan IV of Russia in three parts made by Russian director Sergei Eisenstein. ... Tsar Ivan the Terrible, by Viktor Vasnetsov Ivan IV Vasilyevich (Russian: ) (August 25, 1530, Moscow â€“ March 18, 1584, Moscow) was the Grand Prince of Moscow from 1533 to 1547 and Czar of Russia from 1547 until his death. ... Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვი&#4314... The USSR State Prize (Russian:Госуда́рственная пре́мия СССР) was the Soviet Unions highest civilian honour. ... Nikolai Cherkasov as Ivan the Terrible in Eisensteins film of the same name Faina Ranevskaya as Princess Staritskaya in Ivan The Terrible, Part I (1942) Ivan The Terrible was a film about Ivan IV of Russia in three parts made by Russian director Sergei Eisenstein. ...


Death

Eisenstein suffered a hemorrhage and died at the age of 50. An unconfirmed legend in film history states that Russian scientists preserved his brain and it supposedly was much larger than a normal human brain, which the scientists took as a sign of genius. He is buried at Novodevichy Cemetery in Moscow. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the profession. ... The human brain In animals, the brain (enkephalos) (Greek for in the skull), is the control center of the central nervous system, responsible for behavior. ... Grave of Anton Chekhov Novodevichy Cemetery (Новодевичье кла́дбище, Novodevichye kladbishche) is the most famous cemetery in Moscow, Russia, situated next to the World Heritage Site, the 16th-century Novodevichy Convent, which is the citys third most popular tourist site. ...


Private life

Eisenstein was married to filmmaker and writer Pera Atasheva (1900-1965) from 1934 until his death in 1948. However, many documentaries have documented his life as a closeted homosexual or bisexual.[2] Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... In human sexuality, bisexuality describes a man or woman having a sexual orientation to persons of either or both sexes (a man or woman who sexually likes both sexes; people who are sexually and/or romantically attracted to both males and females). ...


Quotation

"The profession of film director can and should be such a high and precious one; that no man aspiring to it can disregard any knowledge that will make him a better film director or human being." —Sergei Eisenstein


Filmography

  • Dnevnik Gloumova — a short film (four minutes) Eisenstein assembled in 1923 for the Proletkult theater; inspired by a Nicolas Ostrovsky play and projected at the time of the "a wise man" spectacle.
  • Strike (Стачка, 1925)
  • The Battleship Potemkin (Броненосец „Потёмкин“, 1925)
  • October (Октябрь: Десять дней,которые потрясли мир, 1927) (aka "Ten Days That Shook The World" - 1928 U.S. title)
  • The General Line (Генеральная линия aka Старое и новое, 1929) (aka "Old And New" - 1930 U.S. title)
  • Romance sentimentale (France, 1930)
  • ¡Que Viva México! (unfinished) (1930-1932)
  • Thunder Over Mexico (1933)
  • Eisenstein In Mexico (1933)
  • Death Day (1933)
  • Bezhin Meadow (Бежин луг, unfinished, 1935 – 1937)
  • Alexander Nevsky (Александр Невский, 1938)
  • Time In The Sun (1940)
  • Ivan The Terrible, Part I (Иван Грозный, 1945)
  • Ivan The Terrible, Part II (1946 / 1958)
  • Ivan The Terrible, Part III (1946, unfinished)
  • Que Viva Mexico (1979)
  • In 1929, in Switzerland, Eisenstein supervised a film (educational documentary about abortion) directed by Edouard Tissé: Frauennot - Frauenglück

The Battleship Potemkin (Russian: , ), sometimes rendered as The Battleship Potyomkin, is a 1925 silent film directed by Sergei Eisenstein and produced by Mosfilm. ... October (Ten Days That Shook The World), (Russian language title: “Октябрь” (“Десять дней, которые потрясли мир”), which... The General Line aka Old and New (original title: Staroye i novoye) is a 1929 Soviet film directed by Sergei Eisenstein. ... Bezhin Meadow is a 1937 Russian film, directed by Sergei Eisenstein, which is famous for having been destroyed before completion. ... For other uses, see Alexander Nevsky (disambiguation). ... Nikolai Cherkasov as Ivan the Terrible in Eisensteins film of the same name Faina Ranevskaya as Princess Staritskaya in Ivan The Terrible, Part I (1942) Ivan The Terrible was a film about Ivan IV of Russia in three parts made by Russian director Sergei Eisenstein. ... Nikolai Cherkasov as Ivan the Terrible in Eisensteins film of the same name Faina Ranevskaya as Princess Staritskaya in Ivan The Terrible, Part I (1942) Ivan The Terrible was a film about Ivan IV of Russia in three parts made by Russian director Sergei Eisenstein. ...

Further reading

  1. ^ Bergen, Pg. 19
  2. ^ LaValley, Albert J.; Barry P. Scherr (2001). Eisenstein at 100: A Reconsideration. Rutgers University Press, 53. ISBN 0813529719. 
  • Marie Seton "Sergei M. Eisenstein: a biography," Dobson, 1978
  • Bulgakowa, Oksana "Sergei Eisenstein: A Biography" PotemkinPress, 2002
  • Harry M. Geduld and Ronald Gottesman (eds.), "Sergei Eisenstein and Upton Sinclair: The Making & Unmaking of Que Viva Mexico!", Indiana University Press, 1970
  • Bergan, Ronald, "Sergei Eisenstein: A Life in Conflict," Overlook Hardcover, 1999
  • Leyda, Jay and Zina Voynow, "Eisenstein At Work", Pantheon Books, 1982
  • Leyda, Jay, "Kino: A History Of The Russian And Soviet Film", George Allen and Unwin, Ltd., 1960
  • Leyda, Jay, "Eisenstein on Disney", Methuen Paperback, 1986
  • Ronald Bergan,Eisenstein: A Life in Conflict, Overlook Press, 1999
  • David Bordwell, The Cinema of Eisenstein, Harvard University Press, 1994
  • S. M. Eisenstein, Towards a Theory of Montage, British Film Institute, 1994
  • S. M. Eisenstein, Film Form: Essays in Film Theory, Hartcourt
  • S. M. Eisenstein, The Film Sense , Hartcourt
  • Ivor Montagu, "With Eisenstein in Hollywood," Seven Seas Books, Berlin, 1968

Indiana University, founded in 1820, is a nine-campus university system in the state of Indiana. ... Jay Leyda (1910-1988) was an avant-garde filmmaker and film historian, noted for his work on U.S, Soviet and Chinese Cinema. ... Pantheon Books was an American publishing company that was acquired by Random House in 1961. ... Jay Leyda (1910-1988) was an avant-garde filmmaker and film historian, noted for his work on U.S, Soviet and Chinese Cinema. ... Jay Leyda (1910-1988) was an avant-garde filmmaker and film historian, noted for his work on U.S, Soviet and Chinese Cinema. ... Eisenstein on Disney (1986) is a book by film critic Jay Leyda that collects and reprints the various liturature that Sergei Eisenstein produced about Disney. ... David Bordwell is a film scholar. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... Ivor Goldsmid Samuel Montagu (23 April 1904, London, England – 5 November 1984, London) was a British filmmaker, screenwriter, producer and film critic. ...

See also

Political Cinema in the narrow sense of the term is a cinema which portrays current or historical events or social conditions in a partisan way in order to inform or to agitate the spectator. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Literary Encyclopedia: Sergei Eisenstein (489 words)
Eisenstein’s father, Mikhail, was a German Jew who had converted to the Orthodox faith and, although himself raised in the Orthodox faith, Sergei Eisenstein remained proud of his Jewish origins.
Eisenstein’s artistic training meant that he was initially attracted to a career in the theatre as a set and costume designer, although it was not until 1920 that he got to put any of his designs into practice.
Eisenstein’s enthusiasm and aptitude for the theatre meant that he was quickly drafted into an agitprop detachment of the Red Army – through which he became a set designer at the Western Front Theatre in Minsk (although he staged no productions there, owing to the ongoing military conflict with Poland that raged on that front).
Sergei Eisenstein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3315 words)
Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн, Latvian: Sergejs Eizenšteins) (January 23, 1898 – February 11, 1948) was a revolutionary Soviet theatrical scenic designer-turned-film director and film theorist noted in particular for his silent films Strike, Battleship Potemkin and Oktober, which vastly influenced early documentary and narrative directors owing to his innovative use of montage.
Eisenstein was a pioneer in the use of editing.
Eisenstein suffered a hemorrhage and died at the age of 50.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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