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Encyclopedia > Serbs in Kosovo
Part of a series of articles on
Serbs

Serbian culture
Literature · Music · Art · Cinema
Epic poetry · Clans · Costume
Religion · Kinship · Cuisine · Sport Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Image File history File links Ocila. ... Serbian culture refers to the culture of Serbia as well as the culture of Serbs in other parts of the former Yugoslavia and elsewhere in the world. ... Serbian literature is literature written in Serbian language and/or in Serbia. ... Serbia and Montenegro is a Balkan country, recently ravaged by war that has caused widespread migration and cultural oppression. ... Art of Serbia. ... Songs of Serbian epic poetry rarely, if ever, rhyme, but they are easy to remember as each line has exactly ten syllables and caesura after fourth syllable. ... Map of the Serb clans (In Serbian Cyrillic). ... Traditional Serbian costume, like any other traditional dress of a nation or culture, has been lost to the advent of urbanization, industrialization, and the growing market of international clothing trends. ... The Serbian language is one of the richest languages regarding kinship terminology. ... Serbian cuisine is influenced by Mediterranean (especially Greek, Bulgarian), Turkish and Hungarian cuisines, which makes it a heterogeneous one. ...

By region or country
(including the diaspora)

Serbia (Kosovo · Vojvodina)
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Subgroups
and closely related peoples
Bokelji · Bosniaks · Bunjevci · Croats
Ethnic Muslims · Goranci · Krashovani
Macedonians · Montenegrins · Shopi
Šokci · Torlaks · Yugoslavs There are currently 1. ... Serbs in Vojvodina according to the 2002 census The Serbs are the largest ethnic group in the Vojvodina province of Serbia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Serbs have a long history on the territory of todays Budapest (Serbian: Будимпешта or BudimpeÅ¡ta). ... The city of Chicago is considered to be the second largest Serb-populated city. ... The Serbs of Dubrovnik made up 3. ... The Serbs of Mostar (Срба у Мостару, Srba u Mostaru), Bosnia & Herzegovina, numbered about 24,000 at the outbreak of the Bosnian War in 1992, during which almost all left or were ethnically cleansed [1]. With the citys post-war division into Croat and Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) halves, very few Serbs have... The Serbs of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, numbered 157,526 according to the 1991 census, making up 30% of the citys population. ... Serbs of TimiÅŸoara (Serbian: TemiÅ¡var) comprise 1,500 of the population in the capital and form a ethnic minority in Romania, according to the 2002 census there were 22,518 Serbs in Romania. ... Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... A Bokelj in traditional Bokelj clothes The Bokelj people (pl. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Catholic Church in the Bunjevac village of Stari Žednik Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Muslims by nationality was a term used in Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to describe people who spoke Serbo-Croatian language and professed Islam that werent identified as one of the other nations. ... Gorani (also Горанци/Goranci, Gorançe or Goranska) are a Slavic ethnic group living in Gora region, just south of Prizren in the territory of Kosovo (Serbia), north-western Macedonia in the Å ar-planina region near Tetovo, as well as in north-eastern Albania (most notably in the village of Shishtavec... The Krashovani (Croatian and Serbian: KraÅ¡ovani, Крашовани, KaraÅ¡ovani or KraÅ¡ovanje, KaraÅ¡evci and KoroÅ¡evci; Romanian: CaraÅŸoveni, CârÅŸoveni, CotcoreÅ£i or CocoÅŸi; also known as Krashovans) are a South Slavic people indigenous to CaraÅŸova and other nearby locations in CaraÅŸ-Severin County within... Montenegrins (Serbian/Montenegrin: Црногорци/Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... The Shopi (шопи, scientific transliteration Å¡opi; singular шоп, Å¡op, with various regional names also existing) are are an ethnic subgroup of the Bulgarian people that inhabits the region of the Shopluk (Шоплук, Å opluk) in central western Bulgaria, around the towns of Botevgrad, Svoge, Elin Pelin, Kostinbrod, Slivnitsa, Dragoman, Samokov, Ihtiman, Dupnitsa, Kyustendil, Tran... Catholic Church in the Å okac village of Sonta, Serbia Å okci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Å okci, singular Å okac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of... Area where Torlakian dialect is spoken Torlaks (Torlaci, Торлаци) is a name for inhabitants of south-eastern Serbia who speak the Torlakian dialect of the Serbian language. ... Yugoslav (Bosnian: Jugosloveni; Macedonian, Serbian Cyrillic: Југословени; Latinic: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) is an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ...

Serbian political entities
Serbia (Vojvodina · Kosovo)
BiH (RS · Brčko · FBiH) · Montenegro This is the list of political entities (states and provinces) that were inhabited or ruled by Serbs during the history. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian language 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian, English 3 Government Parliamentary republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 8th century   -  First unified state c. ... Republic of Serbia   â€“Vojvodina   â€“Kosovo (UN admin. ... For uses of the name Kosova, see Kosova (disambiguation). ... Motto none Anthem Intermeco Bosnia and Herzegovina() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Sarajevo Official languages Bosnian Croatian Serbian Government Parliamentary democracy  -  Presidency members NebojÅ¡a Radmanović1 Haris Silajdžić2 Željko KomÅ¡ić3  -  Chairman of the Council of Ministers Nikola Å pirić  -  High Representative 4 Independence... Anthem: Bože Pravde2 (English: God of Justice) Patron Saint: Saint Stephen3 The location of Republika Srpska as part of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Official language Serbian, Bosnian (Serbo-Croation) and Croatian Official script Cyrillic alphabet, Latin alphabet Capital Brčko Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  208 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total  â€“ Density  80,000  ? Ethnic groups (current est. ... The location of the FBiH entity as part of the state of Bosnia and Herzegovina in Europe. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, the bright dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006   -  Recognized...

Serb Orthodox Church
Patriarchs · Monasteries · Saints Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church The MONTENEGRO Orthodox Church (crnogorski: Crnogorska Православна Црква / Crnogorska Pravoslavna Crkva; СПЦ / SPC) or the Church of Montenegro is one of the autocephalous Orthodox Christian churches, ranking sixth after Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, Jerusalem, and Russia. ... This is a list of Patriarchs of Serbia, the person known officially as Patriarch of all Serbia, Archbishop of Pec, Metropolitan of Belgrade and Karlovci. ... The majority of Serb Orthodox monasteries are in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and to a lesser extent in Croatia. ... Over the history of the Serbian Orthodox Church, the church has had many people who were venerated to sainthood. ...

Serbian languages and dialects
Serbian · Serbo-Croat
Romano-Serbian · Užice speech
Shtokavian · Torlakian · Šatrovački
(Old) Church Slavonic · Slavoserbian
Differences between standard
Serbian, Croatian and Bosnian Serbian (српски језик; srpski jezik) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Romano-Serbian language is a language in the Western group of South Slavic languages. ... Užican speech (Serbian: ужички говор or užički govor), also known as Zlatiborian speech (златиборски говор or zlatiborski govor) is a dialect of the Serbian language. ... Shtokavian (Štokavian, štokavski/штокавски) is the primary dialect of the Central South Slavic languages system, Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian language. ... Torlakian is the name used for the Slavic dialects spoken in Southern and Eastern Serbia, Northwest Republic of Macedonia (Kratovo-Kumanovo) and Northwest Bulgaria (Vidin-Bregovo). ... Šatrovački is a feature of permuting syllables of words used in Serbo-Croat (Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian) and Macedonian. ... Old Church Slavonic (Old Bulgarian, Old Macedonian, or Old Slavic) is the first literary Slavic language, developed from the Slavic dialect of Thessaloniki (Solun) by the 9th century Byzantine missionaries, Saints Cyril and Methodius. ... Page from the Spiridon Psalter in Church Slavonic. ... The Slavoserbian language (славяносербскій [slavjanoserbskij], словенскій [slovenskij]; in Serbian славеносрпски/slavenosrpski) is a form of the Serbian language which was predominantly used at the end of the 18th century and the beginning of the 19th century by educated Serbian citizens in Vojvodina, and the Serbian diaspora in other parts of the Habsburg Monarchy. ... The standard Bosnian, Croatian, Montenegrin and Serbian languages differ in various aspects as outlined below. ... The standard Bosnian, Croatian, Montenegrin and Serbian languages differ in various aspects as outlined below. ...

History · Timeline · Monarchs
Origin of the Serbs This article presents the history of the Serbs. ... Categories: | ... Coat of Arms of Serbia This is a list of Serbian monarchs. ... Serbs are South Slavic people, living mainly in Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ...

Persecution of Serbs
Serbophobia · Jasenovac
Persecution in World War II Serbs rule ... Jasenovac concentration camp (in Croatian: Logor Jasenovac in Serbian: Логор Јасеновац) was the largest concentration and extermination camp in Croatia during World War II. It was established by the Ustaša (Ustasha) regime of the Independent State of Croatia in August 1941. ... Serbs were heavily persecuted during the Second World War. ...

v  d  e

Serbs are the second largest ethnic group in Kosovo, a province of Serbia currently under UN administration. There are between 120,000 and 150,000 Serbs in Kosovo, forming 7%-8% of its total population. Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... For uses of the name Kosova, see Kosova (disambiguation). ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian language 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian, English 3 Government Parliamentary republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 8th century   -  First unified state c. ... The United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo or UNMIK is an interim civilian administration in Kosovo, under the authority of the United Nations. ...

Contents

Population

The last 1991 population census registered 194,190 Serbs (9.9% of the population), 20,365 Montenegrins (1.04% of the total population) and 66,189 Muslims (3.4% of the total populace). Modern estimates of Serbs (excluding part of Muslims that became identified as Bosniaks) vary from the lowest (120,000) to the highest (150,000). Montenegrins (Serbian/Montenegrin: Црногорци/Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Muslims by nationality was a term used in Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to describe people who spoke Serbo-Croatian language and professed Islam that werent identified as one of the other nations. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Geography

According to the 1991 census, Serbs formed a majority in five municipalities of Kosovo:

For other places in Kosovo inhabited by Serbs, see: Kosovo Serb enclaves. Leposavić/Лепосавић (Serbian) or Leposaviq/Albaniku (Albanian) is a town and municipality in Kosovo (under UN administration, formally part of Serbia). ... Zvečan/Звечан (Serbian) or Zveçan/Zveçani (Albanian) is a town and municipality in Kosovo (under UN administration, formally part of Serbia). ... Zubin Potok (Зубин Поток) is a town and municipality in Kosovo. ... Štrpce (Штрпце) is a town and municipality in Kosovo. ... Novo Brdo/Ново Брдо (Serbian) or Novobërda/Novobërdë (Albanian) is a town and municipality in Kosovo (under UN administration, formally part of Serbia). ... Kosovo Serb Enclaves are the few remaining areas of the Serbian province of Kosovo where Serbs, Roma and other non-Albanians live. ...


History

Medieval

Slavs came to the territories of roughly modern-day Kosovo in the 6th-7th centuries, with the largest waves coming in the 630s. The Slavs were christianized in several waves, between the 7th and 9th century, with the last wave taking place between 867 and 874. The northwestern part of Kosovo - Hvosno, became a part of the Byzantine-vassalaged Serb Principality of Rascia, with Dostinik as the Principality's Capital. Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was that century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... Events September - Basil I becomes sole ruler of the Byzantine Empire. ... Events March 13 - The bones of Saint Nicephorus are interred in the Church of the Apostles, Constantinople. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... RaÅ¡ka (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ...


In the late 800s entire Kosovo was seized by the forces of the Czardom of the Bulgarians. Although Serbia restored control over Metohija throughout the 10th century, the rest of Kosovo was returned to the Byzantine Empire after the Bulgarian Empire crumbled in the late 900s. In a renewed Slavic rebellion of Tsar Samuil, entire Kosovo was controlled by the renewed Bulgarian Czardom from the late 10th century, until the Byzantine restoration of 1018. In 1040-1041 a massive Slavic rebellion against the Eastern Roman Empire arose that temporarily controlled Kosovo. After its break, the Byzantines restored control. The First Bulgarian Empire was founded in 681 AD in the lands near the Danube delta and disintegrated in 1018 AD by annexion to the Byzantine Empire. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian language 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian, English 3 Government Parliamentary republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 8th century   -  First unified state c. ... Metohija (Serbian: Метохија) also spelled Metohia, is a large western basin in Kosovo. ... Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... Tsar Samuil of Bulgaria (c. ... The First Bulgarian Empire was founded in 681 AD in the lands near the Danube delta and disintegrated in 1018 AD by annexion to the Byzantine Empire. ...

Serbs in Kosovo in 1991
Ethnic composition of Kosovo in 2005 according to the OSCE
Ethnic composition of Kosovo in 2005 according to the OSCE

In 1072 the local Slavs under George Voiteh pushed a final attempt to restore Imperial Bulgarian power and invited the last heir of the House of Comitopuli - Duklja's prince Konstantin Bodin of the House of Vojislavljević, son of the Serbian King Mihailo Voislav. The Serbs decided to conquer the entire Byzantine theme of Bulgaria, so King Mihailo dispatched his son with 300 finest Serb fighters led by Duke Petrilo. Constantine Bodin was crowned in Prizren as Petar III, Czar of the Bulgarians by Goerge Voiteh and Slavic Boyars. The Empire swept across Byzantine territories in months, until the significant losses on the south had forced Czar Petar to withdraw. In 1073 the Byzantine forces chased Constantine Bodin, defeated his army at Pauni and had him imprisoned. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x680, 88 KB)Kosovo ethnic map File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x680, 88 KB)Kosovo ethnic map File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Kosovo_ethnic_2005. ... Image File history File links Kosovo_ethnic_2005. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) is an international organization for security. ... The Comitopuli dynasty (Bulgarian: Династията на комитопулите) was the last royal dynasty in the First Bulgarian Empire, ruling from ca. ... Duklja according to De administrando imperio. ... Constantin Bodin (Konstantin Bodin), king of Duklja 1081–1101, and Peter III (Petăr III) as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria for a short time in 1072. ... The House of Vojislav was a medieval dynasty that inherited the claims over Duklja of the old ruling House of Saint Vladimir and the Serbian House of Vlastimir dynasty. ... This is the list of Serbian monarchs. ... Mihailo of the House of Voislav was the ruler of Duklja as Grand Prince (1050-1077) and King (1077-1082). ... View of Prizren. ... // Rulers of Bulgaria Note on titles According to a controversial 17th century Volga Bulgar source, early Bulgar leaders bore the title of baltavar, which might mean ruler of Avars, although this is likely a folk etymology. ... Pauni is a city and a municipal council in Bhandara district in the Indian state of Maharashtra. ...


The full Serbian takeover was carried out under a branch of the House of Voislav Grand Princes of Rascia. In 1093, Prince Vukan advanced all the way to Lipljan, burned it down and raided the neighbouring areas. The Byzantine Emperor himself came to Zvečan for negotiations. Zvečan served as the Byzantine line-of-defence against constant invasions from the neighbouring Serbs. A peace was concluded, but Vukan broke it and defeated the army of John Comnenus, the Emperor's nephew. His armies stormed Kosovo. Byzantine Emperor Alexius had to come to Ulpiana in 1094 and negotiated again. Peace was concluded and Vukan gave hostages to the Emperor, including his two nephews Uroš and Stefan Vukan. Prince Vukan renewed the warring in 1106, once again defeating John Comnenus' army, but Vukan's following death put a halt to a total conquest of Kosovo. The House of Vojislav was a medieval dynasty that inherited the claims over Duklja of the old ruling House of Saint Vladimir and the Serbian House of Vlastimir dynasty. ... The title Grand Prince (Latin, Magnus Princeps; German, Großfürst, Finnish Suuriruhtinas, Swedish Storfurste, Lithuanian Didysis kunigaikÅ¡tis, Russian Великий князь Velikii kniaz) ranks in honour below Emperor and Tsar but higher than a sovereign Prince (Fürst) or Royal Prince. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... // Events Donald III of Scotland comes to the throne of Scotland. ... Lipljan (Albanian: Lipjan, Serbian: Lipljan or Липљан) is a city in central Kosovo, a Serbian province under UN administration. ... Zvečan/Звечан (Serbian) or Zveçan/Zveçani (Albanian) is a town and municipality in Kosovo (under UN administration, formally part of Serbia). ... Zvečan/Звечан (Serbian) or Zveçan/Zveçani (Albanian) is a town and municipality in Kosovo (under UN administration, formally part of Serbia). ... Byzantine emperor Alexius I Comnenus Alexius I (1048–August 15, 1118), Byzantine emperor (1081–1118), was the third son of John Comnenus, the nephew of Isaac I Comnenus (emperor 1057–1059). ... // May - El Cid completes his conquest of Valencia, Spain, and begins his rule of Valencia. ... Events September 28 - Henry I of England defeats his older brother Robert Curthose, duke of Normandy, at the Battle of Tinchebrai, and imprisons him in Cardiff Castle; Edgar Atheling and William Clito are also taken prisoner. ...


In 1166, a Serbian nobleman from Zeta, Stefan Nemanja, the founder of the House of Nemanja asserted to the Rascian Grand Princely throne and conquered most of Kosovo, in an uprising against the Byzantine Emperor Manuel I Comnenus. He defeated the previous Grand Prince of Rascia Tihomir's army at Pantino, near Pauni. Tihomir, who was Stefan's brother, was drowned in the Sitnica river. Stefan was eventually defeated and had to return some of his conquests, and vouched to the Emperor that he would not raise his hand against him. In 1183, Stefan Nemanja embarked on a new offensive with the Hungarians after the death of Manuel I Comnenus in 1180, which marked the end of Byzantine domination of Kosovo. // Events Marko III succeeds Yoannis V as patriarch of Alexandria. ... Zeta was one of the first Montenegrin states in the Middle Ages. ... Image:Simeon. ... Nemanjić dynasty insignia Nemanjić (Serbian Немањић; in English formerly Nemanjid) was a medieval Serbian ruling dynasty. ... Manuel I Comnenus (Greek: Μανουήλ Α ο Κομνηνός; November 28, 1118 – September 24, 1180), was a Byzantine Emperor of the 12th century who reigned over a crucial turning point in the history of Byzantium and the Mediterranean. ... The Sitnica (Albanian: Sitnicë; Serbian Cyrillic: Ситница), is a 90 km long river in Kosovo and Metohija province of Serbia (Serbia and Montenegro). ... Events Three-year old Emperor Go-Toba ascends to the throne of Japan after the forced abdication of his brother Antoku during the Genpei War William of Tyre excommunicated by the newly appointed Heraclius of Jerusalem, firmly ending their struggle for power Andronicus I Comnenus becomes the Byzantine emperor Births... Manuel I Comnenus (Greek: Μανουήλ Α ο Κομνηνός; November 28, 1118 – September 24, 1180), was a Byzantine Emperor of the 12th century who reigned over a crucial turning point in the history of Byzantium and the Mediterranean. ... Events April 13 - Frederick Barbarossa issues the Gelnhausen Charter November 18 - France Emperor Antoku succeds Emperor Takakura as emperor of Japan Afonso I of Portugal is taken prisoner by Ferdinand II of Leon Artois is annexed by France Prince Mochihito amasses a large army and instigates the Genpei War between...

Medieval Serbian states and Kosovo
Medieval Serbian states and Kosovo

Nemanja's son, Stefan II, recorded Nemanja's conquests, as Nemanja restored Kosovo from the Greeks, the border of the Serbian realm reaching the river of Lab. Grand Prince Stephen II finished the inclusion of the Kosovo territories in 1208, by which time he had conquered Prizren and Lipljan, and moved the border of his realm to the Šar mountain. Download high resolution version (655x686, 55 KB)Map from Kosovo: History of a Balkan Hot Spot, U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, Office of DCI Interagency Balkan Task Force, June 1998. ... Download high resolution version (655x686, 55 KB)Map from Kosovo: History of a Balkan Hot Spot, U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, Office of DCI Interagency Balkan Task Force, June 1998. ... Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ...


In 1217, the Serbian Kingdom achieved recognition. In 1219, an autocephalous Serbian Orthodox Church was created, with Hvosno, Prizren and Lipljan being the Orthodox Christian Episcopates on Kosovo. By the end of the 13th century, the centre of the Serbian Church was moved to Peć from Žiča. April 9 - Peter of Courtenay crowned emperor of the Latin Empire of Constantinople at Rome, by Pope Honorius III May 20 - First Barons War, royalist victory at Lincoln. ... First Serbian state was founded in 800s by House of Vlastimirović under the name of RaÅ¡ka; it has evolved into Serbian Kingdom and Empire under House of Nemanjić. In modern era it was an autonomous principality (1817–1878), independent principality and kingdom (1878–1918), part of the Kingdom of... // Events Saint Francis of Assisi introduces Catholicism into Egypt, during the Fifth Crusade The Flag of Denmark fell from the sky during the Battle of Lyndanisse Ongoing events Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Births Christopher I of Denmark (died 1259) Frederick II of Austria (died 1246) Guillaume de Gisors, supposedly the... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church The MONTENEGRO Orthodox Church (crnogorski: Crnogorska Православна Црква / Crnogorska Pravoslavna Crkva; СПЦ / SPC) or the Church of Montenegro is one of the autocephalous Orthodox Christian churches, ranking sixth after Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, Jerusalem, and Russia. ... It has been suggested that episcopal be merged into this article or section. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church The MONTENEGRO Orthodox Church (crnogorski: Crnogorska Православна Црква / Crnogorska Pravoslavna Crkva; СПЦ / SPC) or the Church of Montenegro is one of the autocephalous Orthodox Christian churches, ranking sixth after Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, Jerusalem, and Russia. ... Peć (Albanian: Pejë / Peja; Serbian: Пећ / Peć) is a city located in the western part of Kosovo (under UN-administration, formally part of Serbia). ... Žiča (Serbian: Жича) is a Serb Orthodox monastery near Kraljevo, Serbia. ...


In the 13th century, Kosovo becomes the heart of the Serbian political and religious life with the Šar mountain becoming the political center of the Serbian rulers. The main chatteu was that in Pauni. On an island was Svrčin and on the coast Štimlji, and in the mountains was the Castle of Nerodimlje. The Complexes were used for counciling, crowning of rulers, negotiating and as the rulers' living quarters. After 1291, the Tartars broke all the way to Peć. Serbian King Stefan Milutin managed to defeat them and then chase them further. He raised the Temple of the Mother of Christ of Ljeviška in Prizren around 1307, which became the seat of the Prizren Episcopric and the magnificent Gračanica in 1335, the seat of the Lipljan Episcopric. In 1331, Juvenile King Dušan attacked his father, Serbian King Stefan of Dechani, at his castle in Nerodimlje. King Stefan closed in his neighbouring fortress of Petrič, but Dušan captures him and closed him with his second wife Maria Palailogos and their children in Zvečan, where the dethroned King died on 11 November 1331. Shtime, Kosovo 2006 Shtime (Albanian) or Å timlje/Штимље (Serbian) is a town located in central Kosovo and the seat of the Shtime municipality. ... This is the list of Serbian monarchs. ... Stephen Uros II Milutin of Serbia was king of Serbia from 1282 to 1321. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek Θεοτόκος) is a title of Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... Municipality of Bosnia and Herzegovina General Information Entity {{{entity}}} Land area 219 km² Population 55,000 Population density Area code +387 35 Mayor Nusret Helić (SDP) Website http://www. ... Petrich (Петрич) is a town in Blagoevgrad Province in southwestern Bulgaria, located at the foot of the Belasitsa. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Events September 8 - Stefan Dusan declares himself king of Serbia Start of the reign of Emperor Kogon of Japan, first of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Births Coluccio Salutati, Florentine political leader (died 1406) Deaths January 14 - Odoric, Italian explorer October 27 - Abulfeda, Arab historian and geographer (born 1273) Categories: 1331...


In 1327 and 1328, Serbian King Stefan of Dechani started forming the vast Dečani domain, although, Serbian King Dušan would finish it in 1335. Stefan of Dechani issued that Dechani Charter in 1330. Listing every single citizen in every household under the Church Land's demesne.


King Stefan Dušan founded the vast Monastery of Saint Archaengel near Prizren in 1342-1352. The Kingdom was transformed into an Empire in 1345 and officially in 1346. Stefan Dušan received John VI Cantacuzenus in 1342 in his Castle in Pauni to discuss a joint War against the Byzantine Emperor. In 1346, the Serbian Archepiscopric at Peć was upgraded into a Patriarchate, but it was not recognized before 1370. A monarch (see sovereignty) is a type of ruler or head of state. ... DuÅ¡an Silni Tsar Stefan UroÅ¡ IV DuÅ¡an Silni (the mighty) (Serbian: Цар Стефан Душан Силни) (circa 1308 – December 20, 1355) was a Serb king (September 8, 1331 – 1346) and tsar (1346 – December 5, 1355). ... Events May - Pope Clement VI elected John III Comnenus becomes emperor of Trebizond Louis becomes king of Sicily and duke of Athens Constantine IV becomes king of Armenia Patriarch of Antioch transferred to Damascus under Ignatius II Kitzbühel becomes part of Tyrol Louis I becomes king of Hungary Births... Events June 4 - Glarus joins the Swiss Confederation. ... Serbia was formerly a principality (1817-1882), kingdom (1882-1918) and part of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia (1918-1945, until 1929 the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes). ... John VI Cantacuzenus (c. ... Events May - Pope Clement VI elected John III Comnenus becomes emperor of Trebizond Louis becomes king of Sicily and duke of Athens Constantine IV becomes king of Armenia Patriarch of Antioch transferred to Damascus under Ignatius II Kitzbühel becomes part of Tyrol Louis I becomes king of Hungary Births... Pauni is a city and a municipal council in Bhandara district in the Indian state of Maharashtra. ... // Events Serbian Empire was proclaimed in Skopje by Dusan Silni, occupying much of the South-Eastern Europe Foundation of the University of Valladolid Foundation of Pembroke College, University of Cambridge August 26 Battle of Crecy after which Edward the Black Prince honored the bravery of John I, Count of Luxemburg... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ... A patriarchate is the office or jurisdiction of a patriarch. ... Events Beginning of the rule of Poland by Capet-Anjou family. ...


After the Empire fell into disarray prior to Dušan's death in 1355, feudal anarchy caught up with the country during the reign of Tsar Stefan Uroš V. Kosovo became a domain of the House of Mrnjavčević, but Prince Voislav Voinović expanded his demesne further onto Kosovo. The armies of King Vukašin Mrnjavčević from Priština and his allies defeated Voislav's forces in 1369, putting a halt to his advances. After the Battle of Marica on 26 September 1371 in which the Mrnjavčević brothers lost their lives, Đurađ I Balšić of Zeta took Prizren and Peć in 1372. A part of Kosovo became the demesne of the House of Lazarević. Events January 7 - Portuguese king Afonso IV sends three men to kill Ines de Castro, beloved of his son prince Pedro - Pedro revolts and incites a civil war. ... Stefan UroÅ¡ V nejaki (The Weak) (Стефан Урош V нејаки) (1336-1371) was Serb king (1346-1355) as co-ruler of his father DuÅ¡an and tzar (1355-1371). ... Vukashin (Влъкашинъ; Serbian Вукашин Мрњавчевић, VukaÅ¡in Mrnjavčević; Bulgarian Вълкашин, Valkashin) (around 1320—1371) was a Serbian medieval ruler in modern-day central and northwestern Macedonia, who ruled from 1365 to 1371. ... Vukashin (Влъкашинъ; Serbian Вукашин Мрњавчевић, VukaÅ¡in Mrnjavčević; Bulgarian Вълкашин, Valkashin) (around 1320—1371) was a Serbian medieval ruler in modern-day central and northwestern Macedonia, who ruled from 1365 to 1371. ... UNMIK Head Quarters - PriÅ¡tina. ... Events King Charles V of France renounces the treaty of Brétigny and war is declared between France and England. ... The Battle of Maritsa was a battle that took place at the Maritsa River on September 26, 1371 between the forces of the Ottoman sultan Murad Is lieutenant LalaÅŸahin and a coalition of Serbian, Bulgarian and Macedonian forces numbering 70,000 men under the command of the Serbian... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Kogon of Japan, fourth of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Start of the reign of Emperor Go-Enyu of Japan, fifth and last of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Charterhouse Carthusian Monastery founded in Aldersgate, London. ... The House of BalÅ¡ić was a Serbian medieval dynasty that ruled Zeta. ... Zeta was one of the first Montenegrin states in the Middle Ages. ... In this year, the city of Aachen, Germany begins adding a Roman numeral Anno Domini date to a few of its coins. ... Prince Lazar, Photo courtesy of freesrpska. ...


The Ottomans invaded the Serbian Realm and met the Christian coalition under Prince Lazar on 28 June 1389, near Priština, at Gazi Mestan. The Serbian Army was assisted by various allies. The epic Battle of Kosovo followed, in which Prince Lazar himself lost his life. Prince Lazar amassed 70,000 men on the battlefield and the Ottomans had 140,000. Through the cunning of Miloš Obilić, Sultan Murad was murdered and the new Sultan Beyazid had, despite winning the battle, to retreat to consolidate his power. The Ottoman Sultan was buried with one of his sons at Gazi Mestan. Both Prince Lazar and Miloš Obilić were canonised by the Serbian Orthodox Church for their efforts in the battle. The local House of Branković came to prominence as the local lords of Kosovo, under Vuk Branković, with the temporary fall of the Serbian Despotate in 1439. Another great battle occurred between the Hungarian troops supported by the Albanian ruler Gjergj Kastrioti Skanderbeg on one side, and Ottoman troops supported by the Brankovićs in 1448. Skanderbeg's troops which were going to help John Hunyadi were stopped by the Branković's troops, who was more or less a Turkish Vassal. Hungarian King John Hunyadi lost the battle after a 2-day fight, but essentially stopped the Ottoman advance northwards. Kosovo then became vassalaged to the Ottoman Empire, until its direct incorporation as the Viyalet of Kosovo after the final fall of Serbia in 1459. Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI... Prince Lazar, Photo courtesy of freesrpska. ... June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... Events February 24 - Margaret I defeats Albert in battle, thus becoming ruler of Denmark, Norway and Sweden June 28 - Battle of Kosovo between Serbs and Ottomans. ... UNMIK Head Quarters - PriÅ¡tina. ... This page is about the Battle of Kosovo of 1389; for other battles, see Battle of Kosovo (disambiguation). ... MiloÅ¡ Obilić According to Serbian and South Slavic oral tradition, and historical and legendary sources, MiloÅ¡ Obilić (Serbian Cyrillic: Милош Обилић) - also known by the names: MiloÅ¡ Kobilić; Kobila, Kobilović; Koviljić; Obilović or Dragilović - was the name of the Serbian hero who, at the Battle of Kosovo, between Serbia and the Ottoman... Sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic title, with several historical meanings. ... Sultan Murad I (มู้หลัดที่หนึ่ง) Murad I (nick-named Hüdavendigâr, the God-liked one) (1319 (or 1326) – 1389) was the ruler of the Ottoman Empire from 1359 to 1389. ... Bayezid I (Ottoman: بايزيد اول, Modern Turkish: Beyazıt, nicknamed Yıldırım (Ottoman: ییلدیرم), the Thunderbolt; Arabic: بايزيد الأول; ca 1354–1403) was the sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1389 to 1402. ... Prince Lazar, Photo courtesy of freesrpska. ... MiloÅ¡ Obilić According to Serbian and South Slavic oral tradition, and historical and legendary sources, MiloÅ¡ Obilić (Serbian Cyrillic: Милош Обилић) - also known by the names: MiloÅ¡ Kobilić; Kobila, Kobilović; Koviljić; Obilović or Dragilović - was the name of the Serbian hero who, at the Battle of Kosovo, between Serbia and the Ottoman... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church The MONTENEGRO Orthodox Church (crnogorski: Crnogorska Православна Црква / Crnogorska Pravoslavna Crkva; СПЦ / SPC) or the Church of Montenegro is one of the autocephalous Orthodox Christian churches, ranking sixth after Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, Jerusalem, and Russia. ... Vuk Branković (in Serbian Cyrillic Вук Бранковић) (dead 6. ... Vuk Branković (in Serbian Cyrillic Вук Бранковић) (dead 6. ... The Serbian Despotate (Serbian: Српска деспотовина or Srpska despotovina) was among the last Serbian states to be conquered by the Ottoman Empire. ... Events Battle of Grotnik, which ended the hussite movement in Poland Eric of Pomerania, King of Sweden, Denmark and Norway is declared deposed in Sweden. ... Skanderbeg and the people, sculpture by Janaq Paço and Genc Hajdari in the National Museum, Krujë, Albania. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Events January 5/ 6 - Christopher of Bavaria, King of Denmark, Norway and Sweden dies with no designated heir leaving all three kingdoms with vacant thrones. ... Look up vassal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... John Hunyadi, as imagined by a 17th century artist John Hunyadi (Medieval Latin: Ioannes Corvinus, German: Johann Hunyadi; Hungarian: Hunyadi János, Romanian: Iancu or Ioan de Hunedoara) (c. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI... Vilayet of Kosovo, 1875-1878 Vilayet of Kosovo, 1881-1912 The Province of Kosovo (Turkish: Kosova) was a vilayet of the Ottoman Empire in the Balkan Peninsula only roughly corresponding to the current region of Kosovo. ...


In 1455, new castles rose to prominence in Priština and Vučitrn, centres of the Ottoman vassalaged House of Branković. ... no changes . ... UNMIK Head Quarters - PriÅ¡tina. ... Vučitrn (Вучитрн; Albanian: Vushtrri), is the name of a town, which is the seat of a municipality, situated in north-eastern part of the province of Serbia called Kosovo. ... Vuk Branković (in Serbian Cyrillic Вук Бранковић) (dead 6. ...


Ottoman rule

Serb monastery in Kosovo
Serb monastery in Kosovo
Serb monastery in Kosovo
Serb monastery in Kosovo
Serb monastery in Kosovo
Serb monastery in Kosovo

The Ottomans brought Islamisation with them, particularly in towns, and later also created the Viyalet of Kosovo as one of the Ottoman territorial entities. This brought a great shift, as the Orthodox Serb population began to lose its majority when masses of Turks and Albanians (Muslims) moved to Kosovo. During the Islamisation many Churches and Holy Orthodox Christian places were razed to the ground or turned in to Mosques. The big Monastery of Saint Archangel near Prizren was torn down at the end of the 16th century and the material used to build the Mosque of Sinan-pasha, an Islamized Serb, in Prizren. Although the Serbian Orthodox Church was officially abolished in 1532, an Islamized Serb from Bosnia, Vizier Mehmed-pasha Sokolović influenced the restoration of the Patriarchate of Peć in 1557. Special privalages were provided, which helped the survival of Serbs and other Christians on Kosovo. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 321 KB) de: Beschreibung: Erzengelkloster Bistricatal Kosovo vor der Zerstörung im März 2004. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 321 KB) de: Beschreibung: Erzengelkloster Bistricatal Kosovo vor der Zerstörung im März 2004. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 846 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)   Beschreibung: Erzengelkloster Bistricatal Kosovo: Serbischer Altar. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 846 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)   Beschreibung: Erzengelkloster Bistricatal Kosovo: Serbischer Altar. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI... Islamicization is a neologism coined to describe the process of a societys conversion to the religion of Islam, or the increase in observance by an already Muslim society. ... Vilayet of Kosovo, 1875-1878 Vilayet of Kosovo, 1881-1912 The Province of Kosovo (Turkish: Kosova) was a vilayet of the Ottoman Empire in the Balkan Peninsula only roughly corresponding to the current region of Kosovo. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church The MONTENEGRO Orthodox Church (crnogorski: Crnogorska Православна Црква / Crnogorska Pravoslavna Crkva; СПЦ / SPC) or the Church of Montenegro is one of the autocephalous Orthodox Christian churches, ranking sixth after Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, Jerusalem, and Russia. ... Mehmed-paÅ¡a Sokolović (Turkish: Sokollu Mehmet PaÅŸa) (born 1506, Sokolovići1 – died 1579, Istanbul) was an important 16th century Ottoman statesman of Bosnian origins. ... The Patriarchate of Peć is a Serbian Orthodox monastery located near Peć, Kosovo, a Serbian province under UN administration. ...


Kosovo was taken by the Austrian forces during the Great War of 1683 - 1699. In 1690, the Serbian Patriarch of Peć Arsenije III, who previously escaped a certain death, led 37,000 families from Kosovo, to evade Ottoman wrath since Kosovo had just been retaken by the Ottomans. The people that followed him were mostly Serbs, but there where numerous Orthodox Albanians and others too. 20,000 Serbs abandoned Prizren alone. Due to the oppression from the Ottomans, other migrations of Orthodox people from the Kosovo area continued throughout the 18th century. It is also noted that some Serbs adopted Islam and some even gradually fused with the predominantly Albanians and adopted their culture and even language. By the end of the 19th century, Albanians replaced the Serbs as the dominating nation of Kosovo. Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... This is a list of Patriarchs of Serbia, the person known officially as Patriarch of all Serbia, Archbishop of Pec, Metropolitan of Belgrade and Karlovci. ... Arsenije III Arsenije III ÄŒarnojević (Serbian Cyrillic: Арсеније III Чарнојевић, 1633, Bajice, Cetinje, Montenegro - 1706, Vienna, Habsburg Monarchy) was the Archbishop of Peć and Patriarch of Serbs from 1674 to 1691 and Metropolitan of Sentandreja from 1691 to his death in 1706. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... View of Prizren. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ...


In 1766 the Ottomans abolished the Patriarchate of Peć and the position of Christians on Kosovo was greatly reduced. All previous privileges were lost and the Christian population had to suffer the full weight of the Empire's extensive and losing wars, even to take the blame for the losses. The Patriarchate of Peć is a Serbian Orthodox monastery located near Peć, Kosovo, a Serbian province under UN administration. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ...


Modern

The arising Principality of Serbia planned a restoration of its rule on Kosovo as the Ottoman might crumbled on the Balkan peninsular. The period witnessed a rise of Serbian nationalism, as the Serb elite refused to admit the Albanian national spirit and referred to the Albanians as Arvanites, "Albanians of Serbian origin" or "Albanian-speaking Serbs". Serbia's plans for a post-Ottoman period included the return of Kosovo. First Serbian state was founded in 800s by House of Vlastimirović under the name of Raška; it has evolved into Serbian Kingdom and Empire under House of Nemanjić. In modern era it was an autonomous principality (1817–1878), independent principality and kingdom (1878–1918), part of the Kingdom of...


It is estimated that 200,000 to 400,000 Serbs were cleansed out of the Vilayet of Kosovo between 1876 and 1912, especially during the Greek-Ottman War in 1897. Vilayet of Kosovo, 1875-1878 Vilayet of Kosovo, 1881-1912 The Vilayet of Kossovo was how the present region of Kosovo was known to English speakers before becoming a part of the independent Serbia just a few years before the beginning of World War I. The word Vilayet in Turkish... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Greco-Turkish War of 1897, also called the Thirty Days War, was a war between Greece and the Ottoman Empire, under its ruler Sultan Hamid. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Albanians formed the nationalistic League of Prizren in Prizren in the 19th century. The Aim of the League of Prizren was to unite the four Albanian-inhabited Vilayets by merging the majority of Albanian inhabitants within the Ottoman Empire into one Albanian State. However at that time Serbs have consisted about 40% of the whole Vilayt of Kosovo's overall population and were opposing the Albanian nationalism along with Turks and other Slavs in Kosovo, which disabled the Albanian movements to establish Albanian rule over Kosovo. The League of Prizren (Albanian: Lidhja e Prizrenit) was created on June 10, 1878 in a mosque in Prizren, Kosovo by 300 Albanian nationalist leaders, mostly from Kosovo, Western former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and Muslim leaders from Bosnia-Hercegovina and the Sandzak, in order to achieve an autonomous Albanian... View of Prizren. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1912 during the Balkan Wars, most of Kosovo was taken by the Kingdom of Serbia, while the region of Metohija was taken by the Kingdom of Montenegro. The Serbian authorities planned a recolonization of Kosovo. Numerous colonist Serb families moved-in to Kosovo, equalizing the demographic balance between Albanians and Serbs. 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants Ottoman Empire Balkan League Bulgaria Greece Serbia Montenegro Commanders Ottoman Empire: Nizam Paşa, Zeki Paşa, Esat Paşa, Abdullah Paşa, Ali Rıza Paşa Bulgaria: Vladimir Vazov, Vasil Kutinchev, Nikola Ivanov, Radko Dimitriev Greece:Crown Prince Constantine, Panagiotis Danglis, Pavlos Kountouriotis Serbia:Radomir Putnik, Petar... First Serbian state was founded in 800s by House of Vlastimirović under the name of Raška; it has evolved into Serbian Kingdom and Empire under House of Nemanjić. In modern era it was an autonomous principality (1817–1878), independent principality and kingdom (1878–1918), part of the Kingdom of... Metohija (Serbian: Метохија) also spelled Metohia, is a large western basin in Kosovo. ... The history of Montenegro begins in the early Middle Ages, after the arrival of the Slavs into that part of the former Roman province of Dalmatia that forms present-day Montenegro. ...


In the winter of 1915-1916 during World War I Kosovo saw a large exodus of Serbian army; tens of thousands of soldiers have died of starvation, extreme weather and Albanian reprisals as they were approaching the Allies in Corfu and Thessaloniki. In 1918 the Serbian Army pushed the Central Powers out of Kosovo. Kosovo was unified as Montenegro subsequently joined the Kingdom of Serbia. The Monarchy was then transformed into the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Look up ally in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pontikonisi island in the background with the Vlaheraina Monastery in the foreground. ... Thessaloniki, (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη), is Greeces second-largest city and the capital of the Greek region of Macedonia and the periphery of Central Macedonia. ... European military alliances in 1914. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ...


The 1918-1929 period of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes witnessed a raise of the Serbian population in the region and a decline in the non-Serbian. In the Kingdom Kosovo was split onto four counties - three being a part of the entity of Serbia: Zvečan, Kosovo and southern Metohija; and one of Montenegro: northern Metohija. However, the new administration system since 26 April 1922 split Kosovo among three Areas of the Kingdom: Kosovo, Rascia and Zeta. 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (117th in leap years). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... For uses of the name Kosova, see Kosova (disambiguation). ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ...


In 1929 the Kingdom was transformed into the Kingdom of Yugoslavia with the Yugoslav nationality unifying all Kosovan Slavs. The territories of Kosovo were split among the Banate of Zeta, the Banate of Morava and the Banate of Vardar. The Kingdom lasted until the World War II Axis invastion of 1941. Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... Yugoslav (Bosnian: Jugosloveni; Macedonian, Serbian Cyrillic: Југословени; Latinic: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) is an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Map showing Yugoslav banovinas in 1929 (The Zeta Banovina is coloured pink, in the central part of the map) The Zeta Banovina or Zeta Banate (Serbian Bosnian, and Croatian: Зетска бановина Zetska banovina) was a province (banovina) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia between 1929 and 1941. ... Map showing Yugoslav banovinas in 1929 (The Zeta Banovina is coloured yellow, on the right part of the map) The Morava Banovina or Morava Banate (Serbian: Моравска бановина Moravska banovina) was a province (banovina) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia between 1929 and 1941. ... Map of the Vardar Banovina Map showing Yugoslav banovinas in 1929 (The Vardar Banovina is coloured green, on the lower right part of the map) The Vardar Banovina or Vardar Banate or in Serbian: Вардарска бановина/Vardarska banovina) was a province (banovina) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia between 1929 and 1941. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Following the Axis invasion, the greatest part of Kosovo became a part of Italian-controlled Fascist Albania, and smaller bits by the Tsardom of Bulgaria and Nazi German-occupied Kingdom of Serbia. Since the Albanian Fascist political leadership had decided in the Conference of Bujan that Kosovo would remain a part of Albania they started an ethnic cleansing campaign of the non-Albanian population in the Kosovo. The infamous SS Division Skanderbeg committed crimes. Tens of thousands of Serbs lost their lives and around 75,000 Serbs fled Kosovo during the war. Hundreds of thousands more would leave in the following decades, following the shift of power in Kosovo. It has been suggested that Ethnic Albania be merged into this article or section. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian language 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian, English 3 Government Parliamentary republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 8th century   -  First unified state c. ... Bold text The 21st SS Division Skanderberg was a Waffen SS division set up by Heinrich Himmler in March 1944, officially under the title of the 21st Waffen-Gebirgs Division der SS Skanderbeg (albanische Nr. ...


Prior to the surrender of Fascist Italy in 1943, the German forces took over direct control of the region. After numerous uprisings of Serbian Chetniks and Yugoslav Partisans, the latter being lead by Fadil Hoxha, Kosovo was liberated after 1944 with the help of the Albanian partisans of the Comintern, and became a province of Serbia within the Democratic Federal Yugoslavia. United in 1861, Italy has significantly contributed to the cultural and social development of the entire Mediterranean area, deeply influencing European culture as well. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... For the WWII guerilla force, see Yugoslav Army in the Fatherland. ... Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovenian, Macedonian Government Socialist republic President  - 1945 - 1953 Ivan Ribar  - 1991 Stjepan Mesić Prime Minister  - 1945 - 1963 Josip Broz Tito  - 1989 - 1991 Ante Marković Historical era Cold War  - Proclamation November 29, 1943  - UN membership October 24, 1945  - Constitution February 21, 1974  - Secessions... Partisan may refer to: A member of a lightly-equipped irregular military force formed to oppose control of an area by a foreign power or by an army of occupation. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Comintern (Russian: Коммунистический Интернационал, Kommunisticheskiy Internatsional – Communist International, also known as the Third International) was an international Communist organization founded in March 1919, in the midst of the war communism period (1918-1921), by Vladimir Lenin and the Russian Communist Party (Bolshevik), which intended to fight by all available means, including... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian language 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian, English 3 Government Parliamentary republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 8th century   -  First unified state c. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in Latin, Југославија in Cyrillic, English: Land of the South Slavs) describes four political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ...


The Province of Kosovo was formed in 1945 as an autonomous region to protect its regional Albanian majority within the People's Republic of Serbia as a member of the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia under the leadership of the former Partisan leader, Josip Broz Tito, but with no factual autonomy. After the Yugoslavia's name changed to the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and Serbia's to the Socialist Republic of Serbia in 1953, the Autonomous Region of Kosovo and gained inner autonomy in the 1960s. In the 1974 constitution, the Socialist Autonomous Province of Kosovo's government received higher powers, including the highest governmental titles - President and Premier and a seat in the Federal Presidency which made it a de facto Socialist Republic within the Federation, but remaining as a Socialist Autonomous Region within the Socialist Republic of Serbia. Serbian (called Serbo-Croatian at the time) and Albanian were defined official on the Provincial level marking the two largest linguistic Kosovan groups: Serbs and Albanians. In the 1970s, an Albanian nationalist movement pursued full recognition of the Province of Kosovo as another Republic within the Federation, while the most extreme elements aimed for full-scale independence. Tito's arbitrary regime dealt with the situation swiftly, but only gave it a temporary solution. The ethnic balance of Kosovo witnessed unproportional increase as the number of Albanians tripled gradually, rising from almost 65% to over 80% and the number of Serbs barely increased and dropped in the full share of the total population from some 25% down to 10%. First Serbian state was founded in 800s by House of Vlastimirović under the name of RaÅ¡ka; it has evolved into Serbian Kingdom and Empire under House of Nemanjić. In modern era it was an autonomous principality (1817–1878), independent principality and kingdom (1878–1918), part of the Kingdom of... Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovenian, Macedonian Government Socialist republic President  - 1945 - 1953 Ivan Ribar  - 1991 Stjepan Mesić Prime Minister  - 1945 - 1963 Josip Broz Tito  - 1989 - 1991 Ante Marković Historical era Cold War  - Proclamation November 29, 1943  - UN membership October 24, 1945  - Constitution February 21, 1974  - Secessions... Josip Broz Tito (Cyrillic: Јосип Броз Тито, May 7, 1892 (May 25th according to official birth certificate) – May 4, 1980) was the leader of the Second Yugoslavia, which lasted from 1943 until 1991. ... Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovenian, Macedonian Government Socialist republic President  - 1945 - 1953 Ivan Ribar  - 1991 Stjepan Mesić Prime Minister  - 1945 - 1963 Josip Broz Tito  - 1989 - 1991 Ante Marković Historical era Cold War  - Proclamation November 29, 1943  - UN membership October 24, 1945  - Constitution February 21, 1974  - Secessions... First Serbian state was founded in 800s by House of Vlastimirović under the name of RaÅ¡ka; it has evolved into Serbian Kingdom and Empire under House of Nemanjić. In modern era it was an autonomous principality (1817–1878), independent principality and kingdom (1878–1918), part of the Kingdom of... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Serbian (српски језик; srpski jezik) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ...


In 1981, Kosovar Albanian students organized protests seeking that Kosovo become a Republic within Yugoslavia. Those protests were harshly contained by the centralist Yugoslav and Serbian governments. In 1986, the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts (SANU) was working on a document, which later would be known as the SANU Memorandum. An unfinished edition was filtered to the press. In the essay, SANU portrayed the Serbian people as a victim and called for the revival of Serb nationalism, using both true and greatly exaggerated facts for propaganda. During this time, Slobodan Milošević's rise to power started in the League of the Socialists of Serbia. Milošević used the discontent reflected in the SANU memorandum for his political goals. 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts (Serbian: Српска академија наука и уметности) was founded in 1886 as the Serbian Royal Academy of Sciences and Arts. ... The Memorandum of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts was a draft document produced by a committee of the Serbian Academy from 1985 to 1986. ... Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević (Požarevac, Nedićs Serbia, 20 August 1941 – The Hague, 11 March 2006) was President of Serbia and of Yugoslavia. ...


One of the events that contributed to Milošević's rise of power was the Gazimestan Speech, delivered in front of 100,000 Serb citizens at the central celebration marking the 600th anniversary of the Battle of Kosovo, held at Gazimestan on 28 June, 1989. In the speech, Milošević criticised the "dramatic national divisions" and called Yugoslavia "a multinational community which can survive only under the conditions of full equality for all nations that live in it". This page is about the Battle of Kosovo of 1389; for other battles, see Battle of Kosovo (disambiguation). ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ...


Soon afterwards, as approved by the Assembly in 1990, the autonomy of Kosovo was revoked back to the old status. Milošević, however, did not remove Kosovo's seat from the Federal Presidency, installing in it his own supporters to seize more power in the Federal government. After Slovenia's secession from Yugoslavia in 1991, Milošević used the seat to attain dominance over the Federal government, outvoting his opponents.


With the events in Bosnia and Croatia coming to an end, the Serb government started relocating Serbian refugees from Croatia and Bosnia to Kosovo. Motto none Anthem Intermeco Bosnia and Herzegovina() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Sarajevo Official languages Bosnian Croatian Serbian Government Parliamentary democracy  -  Presidency members NebojÅ¡a Radmanović1 Haris Silajdžić2 Željko KomÅ¡ić3  -  Chairman of the Council of Ministers Nikola Å pirić  -  High Representative 4 Independence...

Christ Carrying the Cross. Fresco from Visoki Dečani.

After the Dayton Agreement in 1995, Kosovo Albanians organized into the Kosovo Liberation Army and started a clashes with the Yugoslav army and Serbian police. This triggered a 78-day NATO campaign in 1999. During the conflict, 1,000-2,000 Serbs and Roma in Kosovo were killed and over 100,000 Serbs expelled.[citation needed] The number of Serbian soldier, policemen, and civilian deaths is considered to be around 3,000, but it's also disputed to be much more, as 2,800 people of Serb origin are still missing, believed dead.[citation needed] According to OSCE numbers and Kosovar Albanian sources on population size and distribution, an estimated 59.5% of the Serb population had fled Kosovo during the bombings (i.e. from 23 March to 9 June 1999).[citation needed] Image File history File links A 14th-century fresco in Decani Monastery, Serbia. ... Image File history File links A 14th-century fresco in Decani Monastery, Serbia. ... General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, i. ... Ushtria Çlirimtare e Kosovës. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Languages Romani, languages of native region Religions Christianity, Islam Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) The Roma (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom) or Romanies are an ethnic group living in many communities all over the world. ...


With the arrival of NATO, a large number of Serbs fled the region, estimated at 100,000 by the UNHCR. Around 120,000 remain in Kosovo and oppose any rule by Albanians. Many Serbs fear to return to their homes since they perceive that they are not safe for them, even with UNMIK protection. These fears were notably confirmed by the unrest in 2004, when 900 Serbian houses were burned and other property destroyed while the Serbian populace was closed into enclaves and had to concentrate to the north of Kosovo (where it remains to this day), causing a wave of 3,500 Serbian refugees. Among the numerous UNESCO World Heritage sites destroyed by the Albanian paramilitary forces was King Stefan Milutin's grave, Our Lady of Ljeviš Orthodox Cathedral from the 12th century in Prizren. In total, 156 Serbian Orthodox churches and monasteries were destroyed during the unrest in Kosovo. Many of the churches and monasteries dated back to the 12th, 13th and 14th centuries. The United Nations Mission in Kosovo or UNMIK is an interim civilian administration of the Serbian province (as part of Serbia and Montenegro) called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), under the authority of the United Nations. ... Violent unrest in Kosovo (a United Nations-administrated province of Serbia officially called Kosovo and Metohija) broke out on March 17, 2004. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Stephen Uros II Milutin of Serbia was king of Serbia from 1282 to 1321. ... Our Lady of LjeviÅ¡ (Serbian Cyrillic: Богородица Љевишка; Albanian Zoja jon e Levishit) is a 12th century Serbian Orthodox Church cathedral in the town of Prizren, Kosovo. ... View of Prizren. ...


The Status talks started in February 2006, it is set to end in the course of the year. The security of the minorities, will be provided by Kosovo Albanian governments, but it is disputed by Serbs if the Kosovo Albanian Institutions can grant these guarantees.[citation needed]


Culture

List of Serbian Orthodox monasteries in Kosovo:

  • Banjska monastery
  • Devič monastery
  • Gračanica monastery
  • Patriarchate of Peć
  • Visoki Dečani monastery

Banjska Monastery (pronounced Bine-ska to rhyme with Mine-ska) is a Serb Orthodox Monastery near Zvečan in the north of Kosovo and Metohia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... Devič (Девич) is a female Serbian Orthodox Monastery in Drenica district , near Srbica, in the Serbian province of Kosovo-Metohia. ... Gračanica (Serbian: Грачаница) is a Serbian Orthodox monastery located near the village of Gračanica in municipality of Lipljan in Kosovo. ... The Patriarchate of Peć is a Serbian Orthodox monastery located near Peć, Kosovo, a Serbian province under UN administration. ... Christ Carrying the Cross. ...

Prominent individuals

  • Vuk Branković, a medieval ruler of Kosovo.
  • Nikola Lazetić, footballer

Vuk Branković (in Serbian Cyrillic Вук Бранковић) (dead 6. ... For uses of the name Kosova, see Kosova (disambiguation). ... Nikola Lazetić (Born February 9, 1978 in Kosovska Mitrovica, SFRY, today Kosovo, Serbia) is a Serbian professional football player. ...

See also

Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... For uses of the name Kosova, see Kosova (disambiguation). ... Kosovo Serb Enclaves are the few remaining areas of the Serbian province of Kosovo where Serbs, Roma and other non-Albanians live. ... Serbs in Vojvodina according to the 2002 census The Serbs are the largest ethnic group in the Vojvodina province of Serbia. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Famous Serbs who emerged from historic Croatian territory, from left to right: Baltazar BogiÅ¡ić, Svetozar Boroević, Milutin Milanković, Nikola Tesla, Patriarch Pavle, Rade Å erbedžija. ... This article presents history of Serbs. ...

External links

  • Kosovo Roma Oral History Project Contains detailed information on the post-1999 status of Serbs, Roma and other Kosovo minorities


Ethnic groups of Serbia
Demographic history of Serbia
Bosniaks · Ethnic Muslims · Jews · Montenegrins · Romanians · Serbs · Serbians · Vlachs

 
 

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