FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Serbs" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Serbs
Serbs
Срби
Saint Sava · Tsar Stefan Dushan · Karađorđe Petrović · Nikola Tesla · Nadežda Petrović
Total population

12.5[1]-[2]15 million Image File history File links Download high resolution version (825x139, 30 KB)From left to right: religious leader Saint Sava, politial leader Stefan Dušan, revolutionary Karadjordje, scientist Nikola Tesla, artist Nadežda Petrović and writer Ivo Andrić. These persons are chosen as globally known Serbs, and represent Serbian achievements... Saint Sava (Serbian: , Romanized: Sveti Sava) (1175 - January 14, 1235), originally the prince Rastko Nemanjić (Serbian: Растко Немањић) (son of the Serbian ruler and founder of the Serbian medieval state Stefan Nemanja and brother of Stefan Prvovenčani, first Serbian king), is the first Serb archbishop (1219-1233), the most important saint... Dušan Silni Stefan Uroš IV Dušan Silni (the Mighty) (Serbian: Стефан Урош IV Душан Силни, in English also Stephen Dushan) (c. ... Karađorđe Petrović (Serbian Cyrillic: Карађорђе Петровић; Anglicised: Karageorge Petrovitch), (November 3, 1768? – July 13, 1817) was the leader of the First Serbian Uprising against the Ottoman Empire, and the founder of the Serbian House of Karadjordjević. He was born as Đorđe (George) Petrović. Because of his dark complexion and... Nikola Tesla (1856-1943)[1] was a world-renowned Serbian inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer and electrical engineer. ... Nadežda Petrović (Надежда Петровић) is considered the most important Serbian female painter from late 19th and early 20th century. ...

Regions with significant populations
Flag of Serbia Serbia nearly 8.5 million (est.) [3]
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina 1,784,530 (2005)
Flag of Germany Germany[4] 707,328 (2006 est.) [5]
Flag of Montenegro Montenegro 201,892 (2003 census) [6]
Flag of Croatia Croatia 351,631 (2006 census) [7]
Flag of Austria Austria 377,300 (2005) [8]
Flag of the United States United States 1,169,479 (2007) [9]
Flag of Australia Australia 197,365 (2006) [10]
Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom 100,000 (2006 est.) [11]
Flag of France France [4] 180.000 (2007) [12]
Flag of the Netherlands Netherlands 110,000-122,500[citation needed]
Flag of Italy Italy 98,174 [13]
Flag of Canada Canada 755,000 (2007) [14]
Flag of Sweden Sweden 150,000 (2006) [15]
Flag of Switzerland Switzerland 145,303 (2004) [16]
Flag of Slovenia Slovenia 38,964 (2002) [17]
Flag of the Republic of Macedonia Republic of Macedonia 35,939 (2002) [18]
Flag of Romania Romania 22,518 (2002) [19]
Flag of Norway Norway 12,500 (2006) [20]
Flag of Hungary Hungary 7,350 [21]
Flag of Spain Spain 4,392 (2006) [22]
Flag of Russia Russia 4,156 (2002) [23]
Flag of the Czech Republic Czech Republic 1,801 (2001) [24]
Flag of New Zealand New Zealand 753 [25]
Flag of Slovakia Slovakia 434 (2001) [26]
Languages
Serbian
Religions
Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian
Related ethnic groups

Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs
See "Cognate peoples" below Image File history File links Flag_of_Serbia. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Montenegro. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Switzerland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Macedonia. ... For an explanation of terms related to Macedonia, see Macedonia (terminology). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovakia. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ... Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ...

(* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27]

Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. They are also a significant minority in two other republics of the SFRY- the Republic of Macedonia and Slovenia. Serbs are an officially recognized minority in both Romania and Hungary (mostly in Banat). There is a sizeable Serbian diaspora in Western Europe (predominantly concentrated in Germany, Switzerland and Austria), as well in North America: the United States and Canada. Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Countries inhabited by South Slavs (in teal) The South Slavs are a southern branch of the Slavic peoples that live in the Balkans, the southern Pannonian Plain and the eastern Alps. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... Bosnia and Herzegovina (also variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ... For an explanation of terms related to Macedonia, see Macedonia (terminology). ... Location of Banat in Europe Map of the Banat region with largest cities shown The Banat (Romanian: Banat, Serbian: Банат or Banat, Hungarian: Bánát or Bánság, German: Banat, Slovak: Banát, Bulgarian: Банат) is a geographical and historical region of Central Europe currently divided between three countries: the... There are currently 1. ... The borders of Western Europe were largely defined by the Cold War. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ...

Contents

Ethnogenesis

By genetics [5], Serbs have the following Y-Dna chromosome distribution: the highest is Haplogroup I1b (Y-DNA) with 29% occurrence, then Haplogroup E3b (Y-DNA) or E3b1 haplogroup 20%, R1a haplogroup with around 16% of tested individuals, and R1b haplogroup at 11%. Somewhat smaller samples have haplogroups J2 8%, K 7% and I1a 7% Haplogroup I1a (Y-DNA). In human genetics, Haplogroup I1b (S31) is a Y-chromosome haplogroup. ... In human genetics, Haplogroup E3b (M35) (previously called Hg21) is a Y-chromosome haplogroup with a distribution spreading from Africa around the Mediterranean into Europe and the Middle East. ... In human genetics, Haplogroup R1a1 (M17) is a Y-chromosome haplogroup, that is spread across Eurasia. ... In human genetics, Haplogroup R1b (M343) (previously called Hg1 and Eu18) is the most frequent Y-chromosome haplogroup in Europe. ... In human genetics, Haplogroup I1a (M253, M307, P30, P40) is a Y-chromosome haplogroup occurring at greatest frequency in Scandinavia. ...


There are several theories on the origin of the Serbs. One possible theory suggests that Serbs are mix of pre-Slavic Illyrian tribes and Slavs. Another theory suggests that Serbs are descendants of a tribe known as the Lugii. These Lugii lived in central Europe, around the same area that the present-day Lusatian Sorbs of Germany live in. Serbs are South Slavic people, living mainly in Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... This article is about an ancient civilization in southeastern Europe; see also Illyria (software), Illyria (character in the TV series Angel). ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Sorbs are a Slavic minority indigenous to the region known as Lusatia in the current German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). ...


According to the Iranian theory, the original Serboi were a Sarmatian (Iranian) tribe, who lived in the northern Caucasus and Eastern Europe. The earliest historical records of these Sarmatian Serboi date from the 1st century, in the works of the historian Tacitus (ca. 50 AD) and the geographer Pliny (Plinius) (69-75 AD). In the second century, the famous Greek scientist Ptolemy in his Geography associates the Serbian name with the Sarmatian tribes of the North Caucasus and Lower Volga, just as his predecessors. But these theories of an Iranian origin has been more or less bojcotted, as the genetics of Serbs show no Iranian origin. Serbi (Serboi) located near the mouth of the Volga, based on Greek literary sources, in a map printed in London, ca 1770 Serboi is the name of the ancient Sarmatian tribe that could be the possible predecessors of the present-day Slavic Serbs and Sorbs. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... There are two famous persons named Pliny: Pliny the Elder, a Roman nobleman, scientist and historian who died in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD The great-nephew of the former, Pliny the Younger, a statesman, orator, and writer who lived between 62 AD and 113 AD. This... The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... A medieval artists rendition of Claudius Ptolemaeus Claudius Ptolemaeus (Greek: ; ca. ... For other meanings of the word Volga see Volga (disambiguation) Волга Length 3,690 km Elevation of the source 225 m Average discharge  ? m³/s Area watershed 1. ...


However, It is known, with sources, that the Serb settlement before Balkans was in Poland, known as White Serbia (Polablje, Velikopoljska, and Pomorje). White Serbia is the area of modern-day eastern Germany and western Poland inhabited by White Serbs in the early medieval ages. ... ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Byzantine sources report that part of the Serbs migrated southward in the late sixth century and eventually overwhelmed the lands that now make up southern Serbia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Bosnia, Herzegovina and Dalmatia. In this region, Serbs mixed with other Slavic tribes (which settled there in the sixth century) and with descendants of the indigenous peoples of the Balkans: Illyrians, Thracians, Dacians and Celts. The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... This article is about the country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... This article is about the geographic area of Herzegovina. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... Illyria (disambiguation) Illyrians has come to refer to a broad, ill-defined Indo-European[1] group of peoples who inhabited the western Balkans (Illyria, roughly from northern Epirus to southern Pannonia) and even perhaps parts of Southern Italy in classical times into the Common era, and spoke Illyrian languages. ... Thracian peltast, fifth to fourth century BC. Thracian Roman era heros (Sabazius) stele. ... Dacian kingdom during the reign of Burebista, 82 BC The Dacians (Lat. ... Celts, normally pronounced // (see article on pronunciation), refers primarily to the members of any of a number of peoples in Europe using the Celtic languages, a branch of Indo-European languages, or descended from those who did. ...

Slavic populations and tribes (yellow) in the Balkans during the 6th century AD

Almost one millennia afterwards, overwhelmed by the Ottoman wars in Europe which ravaged their territories, Serbs once again started crossing the rivers Sava and Danube and resettling the previously abandoned regions in Central Europe which are today's Vojvodina, Slavonia, Transylvania and Hungary proper. Apart from the Habsburg Empire, thousands were attracted to Imperial Russia, where they were given territories to settle: Nova Serbia and Slavo-Serbia were named after these refugees. Two Great Serbian Migrations resulted in a relocation of the Serbian core from the Ottoman-dominated South towards the developed (Christian) North, where it has remained ever since. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 441 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (588 × 800 pixel, file size: 178 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 441 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (588 × 800 pixel, file size: 178 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... (5th century — 6th century — 7th century — other centuries) Events The first academy of the east the Academy of Gundeshapur founded in Persia by the Persian Shah Khosrau I. Irish colonists and invaders, the Scots, began migrating to Caledonia (later known as Scotland) Glendalough monastery, Wicklow Ireland founded... The wars of the Ottoman Empire in Europe marked the better part of the history of southeastern Europe, notably, giving infamy to the Balkans. ... Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... This article is about the Danube River. ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Coat of arms Slavonia (Croatian: Slavonija) is a geographical and historical region in eastern Croatia. ... Map of Romania with Transylvania in yellow Transylvania (Romanian: or ; Hungarian: ; German: ; Bulgarian: ; Serbian: / or / ) is a historical region in central and western Romania. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... New Serbia map New Serbia (Serbian: Нова Србија or Nova Srbija) was a territory of Imperial Russia in 1752-1764. ... Slavo-Serbia (Славо-Сербия) was a territory of Imperial Russia in 1753-1764 by the right bank of Donets River between Bakhmut (Бахмут) and Lugan (Лугань) rivers. ... Two Great Serbian Migrations have occured under Turkish rule: First Serbian Migration in 1690 under Patriarch Arsenije II Carnojevic Second Serbian Migration in 1737 under Patriarch Arsenije IV Jovanovic These migrations have added up to the numbers of Serbs living in Austria and changed numbers into their advantage in Vojvodina...


Population

Part of a series of articles on
Serbs

Serbian culture
Literature · Music · Art · Cinema
Epic poetry · Clans · Costume
Religion · Kinship · Cuisine · Sport Image File history File links Ocila. ... Serbian culture refers to the culture of Serbia as well as the culture of Serbs in other parts of the former Yugoslavia and elsewhere in the world. ... Serbian literature is literature written in Serbian language and/or in Serbia. ... Serbia and Montenegro is a Balkan country, recently ravaged by war that has caused widespread migration and cultural oppression. ... Art of Serbia. ... Songs of Serbian epic poetry rarely, if ever, rhyme, but they are easy to remember as each line has exactly ten syllables and caesura after fourth syllable. ... Map of the Serb clans (In Serbian Cyrillic). ... Traditional Serbian costume, like any other traditional dress of a nation or culture, has been lost to the advent of urbanization, industrialization, and the growing market of international clothing trends. ... The Serbian language is one of the richest languages regarding kinship terminology. ... Serbian cuisine is influenced by Mediterranean (especially Greek, Bulgarian), Turkish and Hungarian cuisines, which makes it a heterogeneous one. ...

By region or country
(including the diaspora)

Serbia (Kosovo · Vojvodina)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Montenegro
Croatia · Macedonia
Hungary · Romania · Albania
Germany · Austria · France · Switzerland
Canada · United States · Mexico
Australia · New Zealand
Argentina · Brazil · Chile
By town or city
Budapest · Chicago · Dubrovnik
Istanbul · London · Los Angeles
Mostar · Osijek · Paris · Sarajevo
Szentendre · Toronto
Trieste · Vienna · Zagreb
There are currently 1. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Serbs are the second largest ethnic group in Kosovo, a province of Serbia currently under UN administration. ... Serbs in Vojvodina according to the 2002 census The Serbs are the largest ethnic group in the Vojvodina province of Serbia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Serbs have a long history on the territory of todays Budapest (Serbian: Будимпешта or BudimpeÅ¡ta). ... The city of Chicago is considered to be the second largest Serb-populated city. ... The Serbs of Dubrovnik made up 3. ... The Serbs of Mostar (Срба у Мостару, Srba u Mostaru), Bosnia & Herzegovina, numbered about 24,000 at the outbreak of the Bosnian War in 1992, during which almost all left or were ethnically cleansed [1]. With the citys post-war division into Croat and Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) halves, very few Serbs have... The Serbs of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, numbered 157,526 according to the 1991 census, making up 30% of the citys population. ...

Subgroups
and closely related peoples

Bokelji · Bosniaks · Bunjevci · Croats
Ethnic Muslims · Goranci · Krashovani
Macedonians · Montenegrins · Shopi
Šokci · Torlaks · Užičans · Yugoslavs Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... A Bokelj in traditional Bokelj clothes The Bokelj people (pl. ... Languages Bosnian Religions Predominantly Islam Related ethnic groups Slavs (South Slavs) The Bosniaks or Bosniacs[1] (Bosnian: BoÅ¡njaci, IPA: ) are a South Slavic people, living mainly in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia) and the Sandžak region of Serbia and Montenegro, with a smaller autochthonous population also present in Croatia... The Catholic Church in the Bunjevac village of Stari Žednik Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Languages Serbo-Croat(Serbian, Bosnian, Croatian) Macedonian Religions Predominantly Islam Related ethnic groups South Slavs Muslims by nationality (Muslimani, Муслимани) was a term used in Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to describe mainly native Slavic Muslims. ... Gorani (also Горанци/Goranci, Gorançe or Goranska) are a Slavic ethnic group living in Gora region, just south of Prizren in the territory of Kosovo (Serbia), north-western Macedonia in the Å ar-planina region near Tetovo, as well as in north-eastern Albania (most notably in the village of Shishtavec... The Krashovani (Croatian and Serbian: KraÅ¡ovani, Крашовани, KaraÅ¡ovani or KraÅ¡ovanje, KaraÅ¡evci and KoroÅ¡evci; Romanian: CaraÅŸoveni, CârÅŸoveni, CotcoreÅ£i or CocoÅŸi; also known as Krashovans) are a South Slavic people indigenous to CaraÅŸova and other nearby locations in CaraÅŸ-Severin County within... Montenegrins (Serbian/Montenegrin: Црногорци/Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... The Shopi (шопи, scientific transliteration Å¡opi; singular шоп, Å¡op, with various regional names also existing) are are an ethnic subgroup of the Bulgarian people that inhabits the region of the Shopluk (Шоплук, Å opluk) in central western Bulgaria, around the towns of Botevgrad, Svoge, Elin Pelin, Kostinbrod, Slivnitsa, Dragoman, Samokov, Ihtiman, Dupnitsa, Kyustendil, Tran... Catholic Church in the Å okac village of Sonta, Serbia Å okci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Å okci, singular Å okac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of... Area where Torlakian dialect is spoken Torlaks (Torlaci, Торлаци) is a name for inhabitants of south-eastern Serbia who speak the Torlakian dialect of the Serbian language. ... Užičans (Serbian: ) generally refers to the locals of the western Serbian city of Užice, its local discrict and the surrounding area. ... Yugoslavs (Bosnian: Jugosloveni; Macedonian, Serbian Cyrillic: Југословени; Latinic: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) is an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ...

Serbian political entities
Serbia (Vojvodina · Kosovo)
BiH (RS · Brčko · FBiH) · Montenegro This is the list of political entities (states and provinces) that were inhabited or ruled by Serbs during the history. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Not to be confused with Serbia. ... Official language Serbian, Bosnian (Serbo-Croation) and Croatian Official script Cyrillic alphabet, Latin alphabet Capital Brčko Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  208 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total  â€“ Density  80,000  ? Ethnic groups (current est. ... The location of the FBiH entity as part of the state of Bosnia and Herzegovina in Europe. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006...

Serb Orthodox Church
Patriarchs · Monasteries · Saints Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ... This is a list of Patriarchs of Serbia, the person known officially as Patriarch of all Serbia, Archbishop of Pec, Metropolitan of Belgrade and Karlovci. ... The majority of Serb Orthodox monasteries are in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and to a lesser extent in Croatia. ... Over the history of the Serbian Orthodox Church, the church has had many people who were venerated to sainthood. ...

Serbian languages and dialects
Serbian · Serbo-Croat
Romano-Serbian · Shtokavian
Torlakian · Šatrovački · Užičan
(Old) Church Slavonic · Slavoserbian
Differences between standard
Serbian, Croatian and Bosnian Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Romano-Serbian language is a language in the Western group of South Slavic languages. ... Shtokavian or Štokavian is the primary dialect of the Central South Slavic languages system: Serbo-Croatian, Serbian, Croatian, Montenegrin and Bosnian languages. ... Torlak[1] (Торлачки говор or Torlački govor) is the name used for the Slavic dialects spoken in southern and eastern Serbia, northeast Republic of Macedonia (Kratovo-Kumanovo), northwest Bulgaria (Vidin-Bregovo), and further afield in the Caraş-Severin County in Romania. ... Šatrovački is a feature of permuting syllables of words used in Serbo-Croat (Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian) and Macedonian. ... Užican speech (Serbian: ужички говор or užički govor), also known as Zlatiborian speech (златиборски говор or zlatiborski govor) is a dialect of the Serbian language. ... Old Church Slavonic (Old Bulgarian or Old Slavic) is the first literary Slavic language, developed from the Slavic dialect of Thessaloniki (Solun) by the 9th century Byzantine missionaries, Saints Cyril and Methodius. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Slavoserbian language (славяносербскій [slavjanoserbskij], словенскій [slovenskij]; in Serbian славеносрпски/slavenosrpski) is a form of the Serbian language which was predominantly used at the end of the 18th century and the beginning of the 19th century by educated Serbian citizens in Vojvodina, and the Serbian diaspora in other parts of the Habsburg Monarchy. ... The standard Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian languages differ in various aspects as outlined below. ... The standard Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian languages differ in various aspects as outlined below. ...

History · Timeline · Monarchs
Origin of the Serbs This article presents the history of the Serbs. ... Categories: | ... Coat of arms of Serbia This is a list of Serbian monarchs. ... Serbs are South Slavic people, living mainly in Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ...

Persecution of Serbs
Serbophobia · Jasenovac
Persecution in World War II Serbs rule ... “Jasenovac” redirects here. ... Serbs were heavily persecuted during the Second World War. ...

v  d  e

The majority of Serbs live in Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Large indigenous population also lived in Croatia, where they were a constitutive nation before 1990. Much smaller Serb autochthonous minorities exist in the Republic of Macedonia (Kumanovo, Skopje), Slovenia (Bela Krajina), Romania (Banat), Hungary (Szentendre, Pécs, Szeged) and Italy (Trieste). Many Serbs also live in the diaspora, notably in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, France, Russia, Brazil, Canada, the US and Australia. Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... Photo of Szentendres FÅ‘ tér (Main Square) Szentendre (Medieval Latin: Sankt Andrae; Serbian: Сентандреја or Sentandreja; German: Sankt Andrä; Slovak: Senondrej; Croatian: Sentandrija) is a riverside town in Pest county, Hungary, near the capital city of Budapest. ... Pécs   (Latin: Quinque Ecclesiae, Croatian: Pečuh, German: Fünfkirchen, Serbian: Pečuj or Печуј, Slovak: Päťkostolie, Turkish: Peçuy, Italian: Cinquechiese) is the fourth largest city of Hungary, located in the south-west of the country. ... Szeged and the Tisza river. ... Trieste (Italian: Trieste; Slovenian, Croatian and Serbian: Trst; German: Triest) is a city and port in northeastern Italy right on the border with Slovenia. ... There are currently 1. ...


The largest urban populations of Serbs in the former Yugoslavia are to be found in Belgrade ( 1,700,000), Novi Sad (c. 300,000), Niš (c. 250,000), Banja Luka (in Bosnia-Herzegovina) (c. 220,000), Kragujevac (c. 175,000), East Sarajevo and Prijedor (in Bosnia-Herzegovina) (c. 130,000). All the capitals of the former Yugoslavia contain a strong historical Serbian minority - 10,000 strong and over (taking up anywhere between 2%- 3% of the population - Zagreb, Skopje - through Ljubljana and Sarajevo, and finally, Podgorica - over 26%). The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Novi Sad (disambiguation). ... NiÅ¡ or Nish (Serbian: Ниш / NiÅ¡,  , Latin: Naissus, Greek: Ναισσός Naissos) is a city in Serbia situated at 43. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (also variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... Location of Kragujevac within Serbia Coordinates: Country Serbia District Å umadija Municipalities 5 Founded 1476 Government  - Mayor Veroljub Stevanović (SDPO)  - Ruling parties SDPO Area  - City 835 km²  (322. ... East Sarajevo or Istočno Sarajevo is the part of the city of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina that belongs to Republika Srpska. ... Prijedor (Cyrillic: Приједор) is a city and municipality in northwestern Bosnia and Herzegovina, located in the Republika Srpska entity. ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (also variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Location of Zagreb within Croatia Coordinates: , Country RC diocese 1094 Free royal city 1242 Unified 1850 Government  - Mayor Milan Bandić Area [1]  - City 641. ... The church of St. ...   (IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Slovenia. ... Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Bosnia and Herzegovina Entity Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ... Coordinates Mayor Dr. Miomir MugoÅ¡a (DPS - SDP) Municipality area 1,441 km² Population (2003 census)  - city  - municipality  - density 136,473 169,132 117,4 pop per km² Time zone  - Standard  - Summer (DST) CET (UTC+1) CEST (UTC+2) Founded Before 12th Century as Birziminium Area code +382 81 Car...


In Europe, 6.8 million Serbs constitute about 66% of the population of Serbia, thus including Kosovo. Another 1,6 million used to live in Bosnia and Herzegovina [6] and 450,000 in Croatia [7] prior to the war, with another 200 thousand in Montenegro following its independence. In the 1991 census Serbs consisted 36% of the overall population of former Yugoslavia; there were around 8.5 million Serbs [8] in the entire country. Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006...


Abroad, Vienna is said to be home to the largest Serb population followed by Chicago (and its surrounding area) with Toronto and Southern Ontario coming in third. Los Angeles is known to have a sizable Serbian community, but so does Istanbul and Paris. The number of Serbs in the diaspora is unknown but is estimated to be between 1 and 2 million on one side, and up to 4 million according to Ministry for Diaspora Republic of Serbia. The maximum number of Serbs thus ranges anywhere from around 9.5 to 12 million, depending on the estimation used for the diaspora. Smaller numbers of Serbs live in New Zealand, and Serb(ian) communities in South America (Argentina, Bolivia Braziland Chile) are reported to grow and exist to this day. “Wien” redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Chicagoland is an informal name for the Chicago metropolitan area, used primarily by copywriters, advertising agencies, native residents, and traffic reporters. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the country. ...


Culture

Main article: Serbian culture

Serbian culture refers to the culture of Serbia as well as the culture of Serbs in other parts of the former Yugoslavia and elsewhere in the world. The nearby Byzantine Empire had a strong influence in the Middle Ages while the Serbian Orthodox Church has had an enduring influence. However one must note that first Serbian kings were crowned by the Vatican, not Constantinople, and that prior to the Ottoman invasion Serbs have had a strong Catholic element within them, especially in the coastal areas (Montenegro, Croatia). Austrians and Hungarians have highly influenced Serbs of Vojvodina, Croatian Serbs and Bosnian Serbs to smaller extent, while Republic of Venice influenced Serbs living on the coast (Bay of Kotor for example). Serbian culture fell into decline during three centuries of rule under the Ottoman Empire. Following autonomy in 1817 and latter formal independence, there was a resurgence of Serbian culture in today's Central Serbia in the nineteenth century. Prior to that Habsburg Vojvodina was the cultural bastion of the Serbian national identity. Socialist Realism was predominant in official art during the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia but recent decades have seen a growing influence from the West as well as traditional culture. Serbian culture refers to the culture of Serbia as well as the culture of Serbs in other parts of the former Yugoslavia and elsewhere in the world. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... “Byzantine” redirects here. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... The Serbs of Croatia are the largest national minority in that country. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... Boka Kotorska (Bay of Kotor, Bocca di Cattaro) in Montenegro is a winding bay on the Adriatic sea. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ...


Famous Serbs

See also: List of Serbs

Serbs have played a significant role in the development of the arts and sciences. Prominent individuals include the scientists Nikola Tesla, Mihajlo Pupin, Jovan Cvijić, and Milutin Milanković; the renowned mathematician Mihailo Petrović and controversial co-author of Theory of Relativity Mileva Marić (Albert Einstein's first wife); the famous composers Stevan Mokranjac and Stevan Hristić; the celebrated authors Borislav Pekić, Ivo Andrić and Miloš Crnjanski; the prolific inventor Ogneslav Kostović Stepanović; the polymath Đura Jakšić; the famous sports stars Vlade Divac, Peđa Stojaković,Novak Djoković,Jelena Janković,Ana Ivanović and Nemanja Vidić; actor Karl Malden (Mladen Sekulovich) and the actress Milla Jovovich, half Serbian). Famous directors like Dušan Makavejev, Peter Bogdanovich and Emir Kusturica. The Serb ruler during the Middle Ages (see List of Serbian rulers), Stephen Nemanja, and his son, Saint Sava, founded the monastery of Hilandar for the Serbian Orthodox Church, one of the greatest and oldest Orthodox Christian monuments in the world. This is a list of prominent ethnic Serbs and people from Serbia. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Nikola Tesla (1856-1943)[1] was a world-renowned Serbian inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer and electrical engineer. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ... Nikola Tesla (1856-1943)[1] was a world-renowned Serbian inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer and electrical engineer. ... Mihajlo Idvorski Pupin, Ph. ... Portrait of Jovan Cvijić by UroÅ¡ Predić Jovan Cvijić (Cyrillic Јован Цвијић) (1865 - 1927), greatest Serbian geographer, president of Serbian Royal Academy of Sciences and rector of Belgrade University. ... Milutin Milanković (1879-1958) Milutin Milanković (a. ... Mihajlo Petrovic-Alas (1868-1943) was the most important Serbian mathematicians of the first half of the twentieth century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Stevan Stojanović Mokranjac (Стеван Стојановић Мокрањац) is one of the most famous Serbian composers. ... Stevan Hristić (1885-1958) Stevan Hristić (1885-1958) was the most popular Serbian composer of the first half of the 20th century, remembered best for his technically cultivated compositions in the Neoromanticist, veristic, and Romanticist-Impressionist styles. ... Borislav Pekić Borislav Pekić (Борислав Пекић) (Podgorica, Montenegro, February 4, 1930 - London, July 2, 1992) was a Serbian writer. ... Ivo Andrić (Cyrillic: Иво Андрић; October 9, 1892 – March 13, 1975) was a Serb from Bosnia, novelist, short story writer, and the 1961 winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature from Yugoslavia. ... Milos Crnjanski; author, poet, activist, and diplomat; sporting his famous grin MiloÅ¡ Crnjanski (in Serbian Cyrillic: Милош Црњански) (1893-1977) was a leading poet of the expressionist wing of Serbian modernism, author, and a diplomat. ... Ogneslav Kostovich Stepanovich (russian: КОСТОВИЧ Огнеслав (Игнатий) Степанович) (1851-1916) was an eccentric Serbian inventor and designer living in Russia. ... Đura JakÅ¡ić, Authoportrait, oil Đura JakÅ¡ić / Ђура Јакшић (1832, on 27th July-1878, on 16th November) was a Serbian poet, painter, narrator, play writer, bohemian, and patriot. ... Vlade Divac (Serbian: Владе Дивац) (born February 3, 1968, in Prijepolje, Serbia) is a retired Serbian professional basketball player who spent most of his career in the United States NBA. At 71 he played at center and was known for his deft passing skills. ... Stojakovic playing for the Kings Predrag Peđa Stojaković (born June 9, 1977) is a basketball star for the NBAs Sacramento Kings. ... Nemanja Vidić (Serbian: Немања Видић) (born October 21, 1981 in Titovo Užice, Serbia, SFR Yugoslavia) is a Serbian footballer. ... Karl Malden (born on March 22, 1912) is an Emmy Award-winning, Oscar-winning and Golden Globe-nominated American actor, known for his expansive manner. ... Milla Jovovich (Serbian: Милица Јововић/Milica Jovović, Ukrainian: Мілла Йовович/MÑ–lla Jovovič) (born Milica NataÅ¡a Jovović on December 17, 1975) is an American supermodel, actress, musician, singer, and fashion designer. ... DuÅ¡an Makavejev (born 1932) is a Serbian film director, born in Belgrade, famous for his groundbreaking films of former Yugoslav cinema in late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Peter Bogdanovich Serbian Cyrillic Петар Богдановић(born July 30, 1939) is a Serbian-American film director, writer and actor. ... Emir Kusturica (Serbian Cyrillic: Емир Кустурица; IPA: ) (born November 24, 1954 in Sarajevo) is a Serbian filmmaker and actor. ... This is the list of Serbian monarchs. ... Stefan Nemanja (Old Church Slavonic: Стѣфань, Serbian: Стефан Немања, pronounced ) (1109-13 February 1199) was a Medieval Serb nobleman, descended from the Vukanović who was Grand Prince (Serbian: Велики Жупан) of the medieval Serb state of Rascia (Рашка) in 1166-1199. ... Saint Sava (Serbian: , Romanized: Sveti Sava) (1175 - January 14, 1235), originally the prince Rastko Nemanjić (Serbian: Растко Немањић) (son of the Serbian ruler and founder of the Serbian medieval state Stefan Nemanja and brother of Stefan Prvovenčani, first Serbian king), is the first Serb archbishop (1219-1233), the most important saint... Hilandar (Greek Chilandar) is an Eastern Orthodox monastery on Mount Athos in Greece, traditionally occupied and maintained by the Serbian Orthodox Church. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ...


The mother of the last (Eastern) Roman Emperor, Constantine XI Paleologos Dragases, was a Serbian princess, Helena Dragash (Jelena Dragaš), and she liked to be known by her Serbian surname of Dragaš. Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... Constantine XI: The last Byzantine emperor is considered a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Helene Dragas(Jelena DragaÅ¡)daughter of Konstantin Dragas, Co-ruler of East-Macedonia and NN. Source: Leo van de Pas. ...


According to the National Enquirer, author Ian Fleming patterned James Bond after Duško Popov, a real life Serbian double agent nicknamed "Tricycle". The National Enquirer is a national American supermarket tabloid. ... Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908 – August 12, 1964) was a British author, journalist and Second World War Navy Commander. ... Flemings image of James Bond; commissioned to aid the Daily Express comic strip artists. ... Tricycle was the codename of both DuÅ¡an DuÅ¡ko Popov (Serbian Cyrillic: Душан Попов) (1912 Titel, Serbia - 1981 Opio, Alpes-Maritimes, France) and the spy network with which he was involved. ...


Gavrilo Princip, a Bosnian Serb, assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand on 28 June 1914, precipitating the crisis between Austo-Hungary and Serbia that led to World War I. Gavrilo Princip (Serbian Cyrillic: Гаврило Принцип, IPA: ) (July 25, 1894) – April 28, 1918) was an ethnic Serb, but later proclaimed to be a Yugoslav Nationalist[1], with links to a group known as the Black Hand (Црна Рука or Crna Ruka) and Mlada Bosna, who assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, himself a Russian, composed the Slavonic March (Marche Slave) in 1876, known at first as the “Serbo-Russian March”, based on the Serbian folk melody “Come, my Dearest, why So Sad this Morning?”. “Tchaikovsky” redirects here. ... Slavonic March is a musical composition written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. ...


Language

Serbian Cyrillic and Serbian Latin, from Comparative orthography of European languages. Source: Vuk Stefanović Karadžić "Srpske narodne pjesme" (Serbian folk poems), Vienna, 1841
Serbian Cyrillic and Serbian Latin, from Comparative orthography of European languages. Source: Vuk Stefanović Karadžić "Srpske narodne pjesme" (Serbian folk poems), Vienna, 1841

Most Serbs speak the Serbian language, a member of the South Slavic group of languages. While the Serbian identity is to some extent linguistic, apart from the Cyrillic alphabet which they use along with Latin alphabet, the language is very similar to the standard Croatian and Bosnian (see Differences in standard Serbian, Croatian and Bosnian) and some linguists still consider it part of the common Serbo-Croatian language. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1086x1489, 228 KB)Serbian Cyrillic and Serbian Latin cca. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1086x1489, 228 KB)Serbian Cyrillic and Serbian Latin cca. ... Vuk Stefanović Karadžić (Serbian Cyrillic: Вук Стефановић Караџић) (November 7, 1787 - February 7, 1864) was a Serbian linguist and major reformer of the Serbian language. ... “Wien” redirects here. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ...  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The standard Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian languages differ in various aspects as outlined below. ... Serbo-Croatian or Croato-Serbian (sometimes just Croatian or Serbian) (srpskohrvatski, cрпскохрватски, hrvatskosrpski, hrvatski ili srpski or srpski ili hrvatski), earlier also Serbo-Croat, is a South Slavic language. ...


There are several variants of Serbian language. The older forms of Serbian are Old Serbian and Russo-Serbian, a version of the Church Slavonic language. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Some members of the Serbian diaspora do not speak the language (mostly in the US, Canada and UK) but are still considered Serbs by ethnic origin or descent. There are currently 1. ...


Non-Serbs who studied the Serbian language include such prominent individuals as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and J. R. R. Tolkien; see list of Serbian language speakers, learners, etc. “Goethe” redirects here. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... This is a list of prominent ethnic Serbs and people from Serbia. ...


Surnames

Most Serbian surnames have the surname suffix -ić (IPA: /itj/, Cyrillic: -ић). This is often transcribed as -ic. In history, Serbian names have often been transcribed with a phonetic ending, -ich or -itch. This form is often associated with Serbs from before the early 20th century: hence Milutin Milanković is usually referred to, for historical reasons, as Milutin Milankovitch. Most Serbian surnames have the surname suffix -ić (IPA: /itj/, Cyrillic: -ић). This is often transcribed as -ic. ... Family name affixes are a clue for family name etymology and determining ethnic origin of a person. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Transcription is the conversion into written, typewritten or printed form, of a spoken language source, such as the proceedings of a court hearing. ... Milutin Milanković (1879-1958) Milutin Milanković (a. ...


The -ić suffix is a Slavic diminutive, originally functioning to create patronymics. Thus the surname Petrić signifies little Petar, as does, for example, a common prefix Mac ("son of") in Scottish and O' in Irish names. It is estimated that some two thirds of all Serbian surnames end in -ić but that some 80% of Serbs carry such a surname with many common names being spread out among tens and even hundreds of non-related extended families.  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... A diminutive is a formation of a word used to convey a slight degree of the root meaning, smallness of the object or quality named, encapsulation, intimacy, or endearment. ... Look up patronymic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A family name, or surname or last name, is the part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ...


Other common surname suffixes are -ov or -in which is the Slavic possessive case suffix, thus Nikola's son becomes Nikolin, Petar's son Petrov, and Jovan's son Jovanov. Those are more typical for Serbs from Vojvodina. The two suffixes are often combined. Possessive case is a case that exists in some languages used for possession. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ...


The most common surnames are Nikolić, Petrović, and Jovanović.


Religion

Djurdjevi Stupovi monastery, Raska region, 12th century
Djurdjevi Stupovi monastery, Raska region, 12th century

Orthodox Christianity has played a significant role in formation of Serbian identity. Conversion of south Slavs from paganism to Christianity took place before the Great Schism, the split between the Orthodox East and the Roman Catholic West. After the Schism, those who lived under the Orthodox sphere of influence became Orthodox and those who lived under the Catholic sphere of influence became Catholic. Later, with the arrival of the Ottoman Empire, many Slavs converted to Islam. Some ethnologists consider that the distinct Serb, Croatian and Bosniak identities are drawn from religion rather than ethnicity. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1598x1202, 583 KB)Taken by NeroN_BG in Nov. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1598x1202, 583 KB)Taken by NeroN_BG in Nov. ... Djurdjevi Stupovi, Nemanjic dynasty Djurdjevi Stupovi is a 12th century church located in the vicinity of todays city of Novi Pazar, Sandzak region of Serbia and Montenegro. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... The term Orthodox Christianity may refer to: The Oriental Orthodox Churches: the Eastern Christian churches adhering to the teachings of only the first three Ecumenical Councils (plus the Second Council of Ephesus). ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... For the later Papal Schism in Avignon, see Western Schism. ... “Byzantine” redirects here. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... A sphere of influence (SOI) is an area or region over which an organization or state exerts some kind of indirect cultural, economic, military or political domination. ... “Ottoman” redirects here. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Ethnologyis a genre of cultural anthropology and| anthropological study, involving the systematic comparison of the beliefs and practices of different societies. ... Languages Bosnian Religions Predominantly Islam Related ethnic groups Slavs (South Slavs) The Bosniaks or Bosniacs[1] (Bosnian: BoÅ¡njaci, IPA: ) are a South Slavic people, living mainly in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia) and the Sandžak region of Serbia and Montenegro, with a smaller autochthonous population also present in Croatia...


Symbols

Serbian people's flag

The Serbian flag is a red-blue-white tricolour. It is often combined with one or both of the other Serb symbols. Image File history File links National_flag_of_Serbia. ... Image File history File links National_flag_of_Serbia. ... The Serbian flag is a tricolour with Pan-Slavic colors. ... French tricolour flag A tricolour is a flag or banner having three colours, usually in approximately equal size (horizontally or vertically) and lacking additional symbols. ...

  • The Serbian cross. If displayed on a field, traditionally it is on red field, but could be used with no field at all.

Both the eagle and the cross, besides being the basis for various Serbian coats of arms through history, are bases for the symbols of various Serbian organizations, political parties, institutions and companies. == The origins of the symbol == I. The oriental origine of the Two-headed eagle A/ The apparition of the symbol with the Hittites It seems that two-headed symbols are known for long time. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Nemanjić (Serbian Немањић; also Nemanjid) was a medieval Serb ruling dynasty. ... The Serbian Cross (српски крст/srpski krst) is a Greek cross which has C-shapes on each of its four corners. ... Large Coat of Arms of Serbia Small Coat of Arms of Serbia The Coat of Arms of Serbia, adopted on August 17, 2004, is a replica of the coat of arms of the former Obrenović dynasty (first adopted in 1882) and features the white bicephalic eagle of the Nemanjić dynasty...


Serbian folk attire varies, mostly because of the very diverse geography and climate of the territory inhabited by the Serbs. Some parts of it are, however, common:

  • A traditional shoe that is called the opanak. It is recognizable by its distinctive tips that spiral backward. Each region of Serbia has a different kind of tips.
  • A traditional hat that is called the šajkača. It is easily recognizable by its top part that looks like the letter V or like the bottom of a boat (viewed from above), after which it got its name. It gained wide popularity in the early 20th century as it was the hat of the Serbian army in the First World War. It is still worn everyday by some villagers today, and it was a common item of headgear among Bosnian Serb military commanders during the Bosnian War in the 1990s. However, "šajkača" is common mostly for the Serbian population living in the region of Central Serbia (Šumadija), while Serbs living in Vojvodina, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Croatia had different types of traditional hats, which are not similar to "šajkača". Different types of traditional hats could be also found in eastern and southern parts of Central Serbia.

Opanak (plural opanci) is a traditional Serbian peasant shoe. ... A WWI poster; two soldiers on the right wear Šajkačas The Šajkača (шајкача), the Serbian national hat, originated in the 18th century. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Serbia. ... Combatants Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Predominantly Bosniak) Army of Republika Srpska, Yugoslav Peoples Army, various paramilitary units from Serbia and Montenegro (Serbian) Croatian Defence Council, Croatian Army (Croatian) Commanders Alija Izetbegović (President of Bosnia and Herzegovina) Sefer Halilović (Army chief of staff 1992-1993) Rasim... The term Serbia proper is often used in English to refer to the part of Serbia that lies outside the northern and southern autonomous provinces of Kosovo and Vojvodina. ... Å umadija District in Central Serbia proposed Å umadija Region Kalenić village in Å umadija Å umadija is a geographical region in Central Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006...

Customs

Serbian bagpiper in traditional attire wearing opanci and šajkača.
Serbian bagpiper in traditional attire wearing opanci and šajkača.

The Serbs are a highly family-oriented society. A peek into a Serbian dictionary and the richness of their terminology related to kinship speaks volumes. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (740x1700, 200 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Bagpipes Serbs ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (740x1700, 200 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Bagpipes Serbs ... A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ... The Serbian language is one of the richest languages regarding kinship terminology. ...


Of all Slavs and Orthodox Christians, only Serbs have the custom of slava. The custom could also be found among some Russians and Albanians of Serbian origin although it has often been lost in the last century. Slava is celebration of a saint; unlike most customs that are common for the whole people, each family separately celebrates its own saint (of course, there is a lot of overlap) who is considered its protector. A slava is inherited from father to son and each household may only have one celebration which means that the occasion brings all of the family together. Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... alex (Cyrillic: Слава) is the Orthodox Christian custom of celebrating a family patron saint. ...


Though a lot of old customs are now no longer practised, many of the customs that surround Serbian wedding still are.


The traditional Serbian dance is a circle dance called kolo. It is a collective dance, where a group of people (usually several dozen, at the very least three) hold each other by the hands or around the waist dancing, forming a circle (hence the name), semicircle or spiral. The same dance, with the same name, is also traditional among the Croats. Similar circle dances also exist in other cultures of the region. Circle dance, is the most common name for a style of traditional dance usually done in a circle without partners to musical accompaniment. ... Kolo (Serbian Cyrillic: Коло , Croatian Latin: Кolo) is a collective folk dance, where a group of people (usually several dozen, at the very least three) hold each other by the hands or around the waist dancing, ideally in a circle, hence the name. ... Circle illustration This article is about the shape and mathematical concept of circle. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Serbs have their own customs regarding Christmas. The Serbian Orthodox Church uses the Julian calendar, so Christmas currently falls on January 7 of the Gregorian calendar. Early in the morning of Christmas Eve, the head of the family would go to a forest in order to cut badnjak, a young oak, the oaktree would then be brought into the church to be blessed by the priest. Then the oaktree would be stripped of its branches with combined with wheat and other grain products would be burned in the fireplace. The burning of the badnjak is a ritual which is most certainly of pagan origin and it is considered a sacrifice to God (or the old pagan gods) so that the coming year may bring plenty of food, happiness, love, luck and riches. Nowadays, with most Serbs living in towns, most simply go to their church service to be given a small parcel of oak, wheat and other branches tied together to be taken home and set afire. The house floor and church is covered with hay, reminding worshippers of the stable in which Jesus was born. For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used calendar in the world. ... Badnjak sales at Kalenić marketplace, Belgrade Badnjak is oak log which is cut and burned in the hearth as a part of Serbian Christmas customs (as the Serbian Orthodox Church uses the Julian calendar, the Christmas currently falls on January 7 of the Gregorian calendar). ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), and some related genera, notably Cyclobalanopsis and Lithocarpus. ... For other uses, see Hay (disambiguation). ... Leland Stanfords horse stable, still in use Horse kept in stable A stable is a building in which livestock, usually horses, are kept. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


Christmas Day itself is celebrated with a feast, necessarily featuring roasted piglet as the main meal. Another Christmas meal is a deliciously sweet cake made of wheat, called koljivo whose consumption is more for ritual than nourishment. One crosses oneself first, then takes a spoonful of the cake and savours it. But the most important Christmas meal is česnica, a special kind of bread. The bread contains a coin; during the lunch, the family breaks up the bread and the one who finds the coin is said to be assured of an especially happy year. Koljivo (also called žito, which means wheat in Serbian; in Romanian: colivă) is a traditional meal made by cooking whole (or sometimes ground) wheat seeds, with some sugar and ground nuts added. ... Cesnica is bread made on Christmas morning, in Serbian tradition. ... Lunch is an abbreviation of luncheon, meaning a midday meal. ...


Christmas is not associated with presents like in the West, although it is the day of St Nicolas, the protector saint of children, to whom presents are given. However, most Serbian families give presents on New Year's Day. Santa Claus (Deda Mraz (literally meaning grandpa frost)) and the Christmas tree (but rather associated with New Year's Day) are also used in Serbia as result of globalisation. Serbs also celebrate the Orthodox New Year (currently on January 14 of the Gregorian Calendar). The term Western world, the West or the Occident (Latin occidens -sunset, -west, as distinct from the Orient) [1] can have multiple meanings dependent on its context (e. ... Saint Nicholas, also known as Nikolaus in Germany and Sinterklaas (a contracted form of Sint Nicolaas) in the Netherlands and Flanders, is the common name for the historical Saint Nicholas of Myra, who lived in 4th century Byzantine Anatolia, (now in modern Turkey) and had a reputation for secret gift... This article is about January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... Globalization is a term used to describe the changes in societies and the world economy that are the result of dramatically increased trade and cultural exchange. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used calendar in the world. ...


Religious Serbs also celebrate other religious holidays and even non-religious people often celebrate Easter (on the Orthodox date). This article is about the Christian festival. ...


For Serbian meals, see Serbian cuisine. Serbian cuisine is influenced by Mediterranean (especially Greek, Bulgarian), Turkish and Hungarian cuisines, which makes it a heterogeneous one. ...


Stereotypes

One often-quoted feature of Serbian character is inat, approximately meaning "spite"—the refusal to take an action which is being forced upon (regardless of reason thereof), and even wilful acting to the contrary, even to one's own harm. While it often has negative connotations, many Serbian successes, especially in sports and in difficult times of warfare, are also attributed to the stubborn insistence to drive out one's own goals. [28][29] In fair division problems, spite is a phenomenon that occurs when a players value of an allocation decreases when one or more other players valuation increases. ...


The other related feature, often lamented upon by Serbs themselves, is the disunity and discord; as Slobodan Naumović puts it, "Disunity and disaccord have acquired in the Serbian popular imaginary a notorious, quasi-demiurgic status. They are often perceived as being the chief malefactors in Serbian history, causing political or military defeats, and threatening to tear Serbian society completely apart." That disunity is often quoted as the source of Serbian historic tragedies, from the Battle of Kosovo in 1389 to Yugoslav wars in 1990s.[30] Even the contemporary notion of "two Serbias"—one supposedly anational, liberal and Eurocentric, and the other conservative, nationalist and Euroskeptic—seems to be the extension of the said discord.[31] Popular proverbs "two Serbs, three parties" and "God save that Serbs may unite!", and even the unofficial Serbian motto "only unity saves Serbs" (Samo sloga Srbina spasava) illustrate the national frustration with the inability to unite over important issues. Combatants Ottoman Empire Serbia Commanders Murad I †, Bayezid I, Yakub † Lazar Hrebeljanović †, Vuk Branković, Vlatko Vuković Strength ~ 10,000[4][5][6] ~ 12,000-30,000[4][5][6][7] Casualties Low Extremely high The Battle of Kosovo (or Battle of Amselfeld; Serbian Cyrillic: Косовски бој or Бој на Косову; Turkish: Kosova Meydan Muharebesi; see... This does not cite any references or sources. ...


As with many other peoples, there are popular stereotypes on the local level: in popular jokes and stories, inhabitants of Vojvodina (Lale) are perceived as phlegmatic, undisturbed and slow; Montenegrins are lazy and pushy; southern Serbians are misers; Bosnians are raw and stupid; people from Central Serbia are often portrayed as capricious and malicious, etc. Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Phlegmatic is a temperament in the theory of the four humours. ... For Molières play, see The Miser. ...


Name

The etymology of the word "Serb" (root: Srb) is not known. Numerous theories exist, but none can be said to be certain or even probable: Serbs are South Slavic people, living mainly in Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Not to be confused with Entomology, the scientific study of insects. ...

  • First appearance of serbian name is in Rig Veda - ancient religious sanskrit text (3000-1500 b.c.) in book VIII., 32., 2.:

"Strong God, he slew Anarsani, Srbinda, Pipru, and the fiend, Ahisuva, and loosed the floods." From all the European peoples the Serbs are the only race from the construction of the wording of their name, according to the Austrian sanskritologist Walter Wust who are composed in the Vedic hymns as the characteristic SRBINDA, in which almost letter to letter is identical to the modern form SRBENDA used by Balkan Serbs.


In the Vedic manuscripts, Wust interprets, SRBINDA as its own original to say patented name with a predetermined meaning. Which is in complete harmony to thinking of today’s SRBENDA expression in Serbs, because Srbenda is always the best, the most respected, most brave, the greatest for respecting tradition: in short a man who is used and shown as an example to others. Srbin(da) in the Serbian language means Serb. Srbinda in Rig Veda represents mythological being (god,demon) or more likely the Prince of Serbs.

  • Some believe that the name is of Sarmatian/Iranian origin. From which particular word it derives is unclear. However, one theory suggests it derives from the word "Sarv" which means "cypress" tree.
  • Some [9] believe that the name comes from srkati, meaning "to suck in", referring to people so closely united as if they share mother's milk.
  • Also, others argue that all Slavs originally called themselves Serbs, and that Serbs (and Sorbs) are simply the last Slavs who retained the name.
  • There is also theory that name Serbs derived from the Caucasian word "ser", which means "man".
  • Another theory is that the name "Serbs", is connected with an elite of Russian soldiers called "Sarbi".

However, one thing is certain: the name is very old. It is clearly a self-identification and not a given name as its root cannot be found in Western European languages. Sarmatian horseman Sarmatians, Sarmatae or Sauromatae (the second form is mostly used by the earlier Greek writers, the other by the later Greeks and the Romans) were a people whom Herodotus (4. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... The Sorbs are a Slavic minority indigenous to the region known as Lusatia in the current German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). ... The term Caucasian languages is loosely used to refer to a large and extremely varied array of languages spoken by more than 7 million people in the Caucasus region of Eastern Europe, between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. ...


It is interesting that the etymology of the name of the Croats (root: Hrv) is also unknown. Some suggest that the names actually originate from the same root: indeed, the roots are distinctly similar (Srb/Hrv). However, it is not known whether this is merely coincidental or indicative of a common origin. Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ...


Regardless of the origin, the age and rarity of the name allows for certain historical conclusions based partly on it (for example, see Gordoservon). In the year 680 in Bythinia, city of Gordoservon is mentioned whose name is derived from the Serbs resettled in Asia Minor by Byzantine Emperor Constance II from the areas around river Vardar. ...


History

Main article: History of Serbs
Serbian settlement in 814
Serbian settlement in 814
See also: Theories on the origin of Serbs, History of Serbs in Vojvodina, History of Serbs in Kosovo, History of Croatian Serbs, History of Bosnian Serbs, History of Serbia

The tribal designation Serboi first appears in the 1st century in the works of the Tacitus (c. AD 50) and Pliny (AD 69-75), and also in the 2nd century in the Geography of Ptolemy (book 5, 9.21) to designate a tribe dwelling in Sarmatia, probably on the Lower Volga River. This article presents history of Serbs. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1477x1164, 301 KB) Summary Europe 814 From The Public Schools Historical Atlas edited by C. Colbeck, published by Longmans, Green, and Co. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1477x1164, 301 KB) Summary Europe 814 From The Public Schools Historical Atlas edited by C. Colbeck, published by Longmans, Green, and Co. ... Serbs are South Slavic people, living mainly in Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Serbs in Vojvodina according to the 2002 census The Serbs are the largest ethnic group in the Vojvodina province of Serbia. ... Serbs are the second largest ethnic group in Kosovo, a province of Serbia currently under UN administration. ... The Serbs of Croatia are the largest national minority in that country. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... One of the first Serbian states, RaÅ¡ka, was founded in the first half of the 7th century on Byzantine territory by the Unknown Archont, the founder of the House of Vlastimirović; it evolved into the Serbian Empire under the House of Nemanjić. In the modern era Serbia has been... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... A medieval artists rendition of Claudius Ptolemaeus Claudius Ptolemaeus (Greek: ; ca. ... Sarmatian horseman Sarmatians, Sarmatae or Sauromatae (the second form is mostly used by the earlier Greek writers, the other by the later Greeks and the Romans) were a people whom Herodotus (4. ... For other meanings of the word Volga see Volga (disambiguation) Волга Length 3,690 km Elevation of the source 225 m Average discharge  ? m³/s Area watershed 1. ...


The Slavs (including Serbs) came to the Balkans from a broad region in central and Eastern Europe, which extended from the rivers Elbe in the west to the Dnieper in the east, and from a point which touched the Carpathian mountains in the south and the river Niemen in the north. Different tribes settled in different parts of the Balkan peninsula, subsequently developing their distinct identities after displacing the Romanized Vlach population which already was in the area. The Balkan Vlachs were descendants of Romanized Thracians and Dacians and over time these Vlachs mixed with Slavic tribes; thus present-day Slavic nations of the Balkans, including Bosnian Serbs, have both Slavic and Vlach ancestors. This article is about a river in Central Europe. ... This article is about the river. ... Satellite image of the Carpathians. ... External links Wikimedia Commons has multimedia related to: Neman Categories: Belarus-related stubs | Rivers of Belarus | Rivers of Lithuania | Russian rivers ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Thracian peltast, fifth to fourth century BC. Thracian Roman era heros (Sabazius) stele. ... Dacian kingdom during the reign of Burebista, 82 BC The Dacians (Lat. ...

Serb-ruled lands during the 9th century, mostly according to the Serbian interpretation of the De Administrando Imperio
Serb-ruled lands during the 9th century, mostly according to the Serbian interpretation of the De Administrando Imperio

The Serb settlement in the Balkans appears to have taken place between 610 and 640. Some of the old Ostrogoths had settled with the Serbs, & decided to join their clans. The first certain data on the state of the Serboi, Serbia, dates to the 9th century. The Serbs were Christianized in several waves between the 7th and 9th century, with the last wave taking place between 867 and 874. Image File history File links Serb_lands04. ... Image File history File links Serb_lands04. ... De Administrando Imperio is the commonly used Latin title of a scholarly work written in Greek by the 10th-century Byzantine emperor Constantine VII. Constantine was a scholar-emperor, who sought to revive learning and education in the Byzantine Empire. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once (a political shift as much as a spontaneous mass shift in individual consciences), also includes the practice of converting pagan cult practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar...


During and after that period, Serbs struggled to gain independence from the Byzantine Empire. The first Serb states were Rascia or Raška and Zeta. Their rulers had varying degrees of autonomy, until virtual independence was achieved under Saint Sava, who became the first head of the Serbian Orthodox Church, and his brother Stefan Prvovenčani of Serbia, who became the first Serb king. Serbia did not exist as a state of that name, but was rather the region inhabited by the Serbs; its kings and tsars were called the "King of the Serbs" or "Tsar of the Serbs", not "King of Serbia" or "Tsar of Serbia". The medieval Serbian state is nonetheless often (if anachronistically) referred to as "Serbia". “Byzantine” redirects here. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... Zeta was one of the first Montenegrin states in the Middle Ages. ... Saint Sava (Serbian: , Romanized: Sveti Sava) (1175 - January 14, 1235), originally the prince Rastko Nemanjić (Serbian: Растко Немањић) (son of the Serbian ruler and founder of the Serbian medieval state Stefan Nemanja and brother of Stefan Prvovenčani, first Serbian king), is the first Serb archbishop (1219-1233), the most important saint... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ... Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ...


Serbia reached its golden age under the House of Nemanjić, with the Serbian state reaching its apogee of power in the reign of Tsar Stefan Uroš Dušan. Serbia's power subsequently dwindled arising from interminable conflict among the nobility, rendering the country unable to resist the steady incursion of the Ottoman Empire into south-eastern Europe. The Battle of Kosovo in 1389 is commonly regarded in Serbian national mythology as the key event in the country's defeat by the Turks, although in fact, Ottoman rule was not fully imposed until some time later. After Serbia fell, Tvrtko Kotromanić, the king of Bosnia used the title "King of Bosnia, the Serbs, the West-ends and the Primorje" from 1389 to 1390. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The House of Nemanjić, fresco from Visoki Dečani monastery The House of Nemanjić (Serbian: Немањићи; Anglicised: Nemanyid) was a medieval Serbian ruling dynasty. ... Tsar Stefan Uroš IV Dušan Silni (the mighty) (Цар Стефан Душан Силни) (around 1308-December 20, 1355) was a Serb king (September 8, 1331-1346) and tsar (1346-December 5, 1355). ... “Ottoman” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Combatants Ottoman Empire Serbia Commanders Murad I †, Bayezid I, Yakub † Lazar Hrebeljanović †, Vuk Branković, Vlatko Vuković Strength ~ 10,000[4][5][6] ~ 12,000-30,000[4][5][6][7] Casualties Low Extremely high The Battle of Kosovo (or Battle of Amselfeld; Serbian Cyrillic: Косовски бој or Бој на Косову; Turkish: Kosova Meydan Muharebesi; see...


As Christians, the Serbs were regarded as a "protected people" under Ottoman law. Some of them converted to Islam in order to be client or governor in Ottoman Empire. Beginning from period of Mehmed II most of the grand viziers are chosen from Serbs[citation needed]. This article is about dhimmi in the context of Islamic law. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... “Ottoman” redirects here. ... Mehmed II (Ottoman Turkish: محمد ثانى , Turkish: ), (also known as el-Fatih (الفاتح), the Conqueror, in Ottoman Turkish, or, in modern Turkish, Fatih Sultan Mehmet) (March 30, 1432 – May 3, 1481) was Sultan of the Ottoman Empire for a short time from 1444 to 1446, and later from 1451 to 1481. ...


At the beginning of the 19th century, the First Serbian Uprising succeeded in liberating at least some Serbs for a limited time. The Second Serbian Uprising was much more successful, resulting in Ottoman recognition of Serbia as autonomous principality within the Empire. Serbia acquired international recognition as an independent kingdom at the Congress of Berlin in 1878. However, many Serbs remained under foreign rule – that of the Ottomans in the south, and of the Habsburgs in the north and west. The southern Serbs were liberated in the First Balkan War of 1912, while the question of the Habsburg Serbs' independence was the spark that lit World War I two years later. During the war, the Serbian army fought fiercely, eventually retreating through Albania to regroup in Greece, and launched a counter-offensive through Macedonia. Though they were eventually victorious, the war devastated Serbia and killed a huge proportion of its population – by some estimates, over half of the male Serbian population died in the conflict, influencing the region's demographics to this day. // Flag of the First Serbian Uprising The First Serbian Uprising was a Serbian national revolution which lasted one decade (1804-1813), during which Serbia perceived itself as an independent state for the first time after 300 years of Ottoman and short-lasting Austrian occupations. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A principality is a monarchical feudatory or sovereign state, ruled or reigned over by a Monarch with the title of prince or princess (a synonym is princedom) or (in the widest sense) a Monarch with another title within the generic use of the term prince. ... For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... The Congress of Berlin (June 13 - July 13, 1878) was a meeting of the European Great Powers and the Ottoman Empires leading statesmen in Berlin in 1878. ... Combatants Ottoman Empire Balkan League: Bulgaria Greece Montenegro Serbia Commanders Nazim Pasha, Zekki Pasha, Esat Pasha, Abdullah Pasha, Ali Rizah Pasha Vladimir Vazov, Vasil Kutinchev, Nikola Ivanov, Radko Dimitriev Crown Prince Constantine, Panagiotis Danglis, Pavlos Kountouriotis King Nicholas I, Prince Danilo Petrović, Mitar Martinović, Janko Vukotić Radomir Putnik, Petar Bojovi... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Demographics refers to selected population characteristics as used in government, marketing or opinion research, or the demographic profiles used in such research. ...


After the war, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later called Yugoslavia) was created. Almost all Serbs finally lived in one state. The new state had its capital in Belgrade and was ruled by a Serbian king; it was, however, unstable and prone to ethnic tensions. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ...


During the Second World War, the Axis Powers occupied Yugoslavia, dismembering the country. Serbia was occupied by the Germans, while in Bosnia and Croatia, Serbs were put under the rule of the Italians and the fascist Ustaša regime in the Independent State of Croatia. Under Ustaša rule in particular, Serbs and other non-Croats were subjected to systematic genocide, known as the Serbian genocide, when hundreds of thousands were killed. The Hungarian and Albanian fascists, who occupied northern and southern parts of the country, also performed persecutions and genocide against the Serb population from these regions. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The UstaÅ¡e (often spelled Ustashe in English; singular UstaÅ¡a or Ustasha) was a Croatian far-right organisation put in charge of the Independent State of Croatia by the Axis Powers in 1941. ... Capital Zagreb Language(s) Croatian Religion Roman Catholicism Political structure Puppet-state King  - 1941-1943 Tomislav II Poglavnik  - 1941-1945 Ante Pavelić Legislature None Historical era World War II  - Established April 10, 1941  - Disestablished May 8, 1945 Population  - 1941 est. ... Genocide is the deliberate and systematic destruction of an ethnic or national group. ... Jasenovac is a municipality in Central Croatia, in the southern part of the Sisak-Moslavina county at the confluence of the river Una into Sava. ...


After the war, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was formed. As with pre-war Yugoslavia, the country's capital was at Belgrade. Serbia was the largest republic. There were also two established autonomous provinces within Serbia - Kosovo (with an Albanian majority) and Vojvodina (with a Serb majority and a large number of different minorities). Besides Serbia, the large Serb populations were concentrated in Bosnia and Herzegovina (where they were largest ethnic group until 1971) and Croatia as well Montenegro with a sizeable Serb population. Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throuout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006...


Communist Yugoslavia collapsed in the early 1990s, with four of its six republics becoming independent states. This led to several bloody civil wars, as the large Serbian communities in Croatia and Bosnia attempted to remain within Yugoslavia, then consisting of only Serbia and Montenegro. Serbs in Croatia formed their state of Republika Srpska Krajina, but they were later military defeated by the Croatian army (expelling hundreds of thousand of Serbian civilians) a shuttering reminder of events in World War 2. Serbs in Bosnia and Herzegovina formed their state of Republika Srpska, currently one of the two political entities that form the country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. This does not cite any references or sources. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... The Republic of Serbian Krajina (Republika Srpska Krajina, RSK) was an internationally unrecognized Serbian republic in Croatia. ... Not to be confused with Serbia. ...


Another war broke out in Kosovo (see Kosovo War) after years of tensions between Serbs and Albanians. Up to 250,000 Serbs expelled from Croatia during the "Operation Storm" in 1995, and 300,000 left until 1993, and another 200,000 were expelled from Kosovo after the Kosovo War, and settled mostly in Central Serbia and Vojvodina as refugees. For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... Combatants Croatia (HV) Bosnia and Herzegovina (ABiH) Republic of Serbian Krajina (VSK) Republika Srpska (VRS) Commanders Zvonimir ÄŒervenko (HV) Atif Dudakovic (ABiH) Mile MrkÅ¡ić (VSK) Strength 150,000 soldiers, 350 tanks, 400 artillery pieces, 50 rocket launchers, 50 aircraft and helicopters 40,000 soldiers, 150 tanks, 350 artillery pieces... The term Serbia proper is often used in English to refer to the part of Serbia that lies outside the northern and southern autonomous provinces of Kosovo and Vojvodina. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ...


Subgroups

The subgroups of Serbs are commonly based on regional affiliation. Some of the major subgroups of Serbs include: Šumadinci, Ere, Vojvođani, Bačvani, Banaćani, Bokelji, Sremci, Semberci, Krajišnici, Hercegovci, Torlaks, Shopi,etc. Å umadija District in Central Serbia proposed Å umadija Region Kalenić village in Å umadija Å umadija is a geographical region in Central Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... Winter in Zlatibor Zlatibor (Cyrillic: ЗлатибoÑ€) is a mountain region situated in Serbia and Montenegro, in the western part of Serbia, a part of the Dinaric Alps. ... Serbs in Vojvodina according to the 2002 census The Serbs are the largest ethnic group in the Vojvodina province of Serbia. ... Bačka (Serbian: Бачка or Bačka, Hungarian: Bácska, Croatian: Bačka, Slovak: Báčka, German: Batschka) is an area of the Pannonian plain lying between the rivers Danube and Tisa. ... Location of Banat in Europe Map of the Banat region with largest cities shown The Banat (Romanian: Banat, Serbian: Банат or Banat, Hungarian: Bánát or Bánság, German: Banat, Slovak: Banát, Bulgarian: Банат) is a geographical and historical region of Central Europe currently divided between three countries: the... A Bokelj in traditional Bokelj clothes The Bokelj people (pl. ... Map of the Syrmia region Syrmia (Serbian: Srem (Cyrillic: Срем), Croatian: Srijem) is a fertile region of the Pannonian plain in Europe, between the Danube and Sava rivers. ... Semberija (Cyrillic: Семберија) is a geographical region in north-eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Bosanska Krajina Region Bosanska Krajina (lit Bosnian Frontier) is a geographical region of Bosnia and Herzegovina enclosed by three rivers - Sava, Una and Vrbas. ... This article is about the geographic area of Herzegovina. ... Area where Torlakian dialect is spoken Torlaks (Torlaci, Торлаци) is a name for inhabitants of south-eastern Serbia who speak the Torlakian dialect of the Serbian language. ... The Shopi (шопи, scientific transliteration Å¡opi; singular шоп, Å¡op, with various regional names also existing) are are an ethnic subgroup of the Bulgarian people that inhabits the region of the Shopluk (Шоплук, Å opluk) in central western Bulgaria, around the towns of Botevgrad, Svoge, Elin Pelin, Kostinbrod, Slivnitsa, Dragoman, Samokov, Ihtiman, Dupnitsa, Kyustendil, Tran...


Montenegrins were/are considered a subgroup of Serbs for a long time by themselves, as well as by Serbs outside Montenegro. In the late 20th century, an independence movement in Montenegro gained ground, resulting in a split among Montenegrins on the issue. Now some consider themselves to belong to a separate Montenegrin nation, however world wide the presence of Serb Montenegrins is prevailing. Montenegrins (Serbian/Montenegrin: Црногорци/Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ...


(Note: These terms can be also used to refer to any native inhabitants of the regions in question, regardless of ethnicity, i.e. to Magyar Vojvodinians or Croat Herzegovinians.) Hungarians in Vojvodina according to the 2002 census Hungarians or Magyars are a second largest ethnic group in the Vojvodina province, Serbia and Montenegro. ...


Some Serbs, mostly living in Montenegro and Herzegovina are organized in clans. See: list of Serbian tribes. Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... This article is about the geographic area of Herzegovina. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Following the disintegration of the medieval Serbian state of the Nemanjici and the Ottoman subjugation of Serb-inhabitted lands an old system of clan organization sprung in many Dinaric areas such as Montenegro, Herzegovina, the Highlands, Krajina, Bosnia and Serbia. ...


Cognate peoples

These peoples are the closest relatives of Serbs:

  • by name: Sorbs or Serbs of Luzice

Yugoslavs (Bosnian: Jugosloveni; Macedonian, Serbian Cyrillic: Југословени; Latinic: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) is an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (also variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... Languages Bosnian Religions Predominantly Islam Related ethnic groups Slavs (South Slavs) The Bosniaks or Bosniacs[1] (Bosnian: BoÅ¡njaci, IPA: ) are a South Slavic people, living mainly in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia) and the Sandžak region of Serbia and Montenegro, with a smaller autochthonous population also present in Croatia... Bosnia and Herzegovina (also variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... The Catholic Church in the Bunjevac village of Stari Žednik Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Catholic Church in the Å okac village of Sonta, Serbia Å okci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Å okci, singular Å okac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... A Bokelj in traditional Bokelj clothes The Bokelj people (pl. ... Historic mpap of the Bay, 16th century Boka Kotorska (Bay of Kotor, Bocche di Cattaro) in western Montenegro is a winding bay on the Adriatic sea. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... The Krashovani (Croatian and Serbian: KraÅ¡ovani, Крашовани, KaraÅ¡ovani or KraÅ¡ovanje, KaraÅ¡evci and KoroÅ¡evci; Romanian: CaraÅŸoveni, CârÅŸoveni, CotcoreÅ£i or CocoÅŸi; also known as Krashovans) are a South Slavic people indigenous to CaraÅŸova and other nearby locations in CaraÅŸ-Severin County within... Gorani (also Горанци/Goranci, Gorançe or Goranska) are a Slavic ethnic group living in Gora region, just south of Prizren in the territory of Kosovo (Serbia), north-western Macedonia in the Å ar-planina region near Tetovo, as well as in north-eastern Albania (most notably in the village of Shishtavec... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Janjevci are the inhabitants of the Kosovo town of Janjevo and surrounding villages, located near Pristina as well as villages centered on Letnica near Vitina (Papare, Vrmez, Vrnavo Kolo). ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Montenegrins (Serbian/Montenegrin: Црногорци/Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... For an explanation of terms related to Macedonia, see Macedonia (terminology). ... The Sorbs are a Slavic minority indigenous to the region known as Lusatia in the current German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). ...

Maps

See also

This is a list of prominent ethnic Serbs and people from Serbia. ... This is the list of political entities (states and provinces) that were inhabited or ruled by Serbs during the history. ... Raci (Раци, Rác, Ratzen, Ratzians, Rasciani) was a name used to designate Serbs and Bunjevci. ... Map of the Serb clans (In Serbian Cyrillic). ... Serbian Americans are citizens of the United States who are of Serbian ancestry. ... Serbs have a long history on the territory of todays Albania. ... Serbs are one of the three constitutive nations of Bosnia-Herzegovina, predominantly concentrated in the Republika Srpska, although many also live in the other entity, the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... The Serbs of Croatia are the largest national minority in that country. ... Main Square in Szentendre The Serbs are an ethnic minority in Hungary. ... Serbs are the second largest ethnic group in Kosovo. ... Serbs are one of the constitutional peoples of the Republic of Macedonia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Serbs in Romania The Serbs are an ethnic minority in Romania. ... Serbs in Vojvodina according to the 2002 census The Serbs are the largest ethnic group in the Vojvodina province of Serbia. ... Categories: | ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Serbomans (singular Serboman) is Bulgarian-Macedonian term for people who live in the Republic of Macedonia and have or are nationally declaring as Serbs. ... Yugoslavs (Bosnian: Jugosloveni; Macedonian, Serbian Cyrillic: Југословени; Latinic: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) is an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ... Đurđevi Stupovi Orthodox monastery, near Novi Pazar Bajrakli Mosque in Belgrade Synagogue in Belgrade Catholic Cathedral in Bačka Topola Uniate Church in Đurđevo Protestant Theological College in Novi Sad Serbia is a multireligious country. ... This article is about a salute used by some Serbs. ...

External links

Serbs Portal
  • Serbianna News server about Serbia and the Balkans

Image File history File links Portal. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.joshuaproject.net/peoples.php
  2. ^ http://www.mzd.sr.gov.yu/_eng/intentions.asp
  3. ^ Official results of 2002 Serbia census
  4. ^ a b This population statistic includes the people who formerly considered themselves Yugoslavs, thus many non-Serbs from former Yugoslavia.
  5. ^ http://www.destatis.de/download/e/bevoe/AuslaenderGeburtsland.xls
  6. ^ CIA Factbook 2006 for Montenegro
  7. ^ Demographics of Croatia
  8. ^ Statistik Austria (page 75): Volkszählung 2001 Hauptergebnisse I - Österreich (PDF)
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ 2001 Australia: 2006 Australian Bureau of Statistics: Ancestry by Birthplace of Parent(s) - Australia : 2006 Census (PDF)
  11. ^ The Serbian Council of Great Britain
  12. ^ Ministère des Affaires étrangères: Présentation de la Communauté étatique de Serbie-et-Monténégro
  13. ^ http://demo.istat.it/str2004/index.html
  14. ^ List of Canadians by ethnicity
  15. ^ Aftonbladet: [2]
  16. ^ Office fédéral de la statistique: Recensement fédéral de la population 2000 (PDF)
  17. ^ Statistični urad Republike Slovenije: 7. Prebivalstvo po narodni pripadnosti, Slovenija, popisi 1953, 1961, 1971, 1981, 1991 in 2002
  18. ^ Државен завод за статистика: Попис на населението, домаќинствата и становите во Република Македонија, 2002: Дефинитивни податоци (PDF)
  19. ^ Agenţia Naţionala pentru Intreprinderi Mici si Mijlocii: Recensamânt România 2002
  20. ^ Norwegian Central Statistical Office: The immigrant population
  21. ^ Hungarian Central Statistical Office: Population by languages spoken with family members or friends, affinity with nationalities' cultural values and sex
  22. ^ Instituto Nacional de Estadística [3]
  23. ^ Федеральная служба государственной статистики: 4.1. Национальный состав населения
  24. ^ [4]
  25. ^ New Zealand's official statistics agency: Ethnic Group - Up to Three Responses (XLS)
  26. ^ http://www.ethnologue.com/show_country.asp?name=TRE
  27. ^ http://www.euroamericans.net/Serbian.htm
  28. ^ Inat: Serbia's secret weapon. BBC News e-cyclopedia (1999-04-23).
  29. ^ Bruce W. Nelan (1993-01-25). Serbia's Spite. TIME magazine.
  30. ^ Slobodan Naumović. "The social origins and political uses of popular narratives on Serbian disunity". Filozofija i društvo 2005 Issue 26, Pages: 65-104.
  31. ^ Branko Radun (2007-03-10). Dve zadušnice za "dve Srbije”. Nova srpska politička misao.


Yugoslavs (Bosnian: Jugosloveni; Macedonian, Serbian Cyrillic: Југословени; Latinic: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) is an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ... Croatia is inhabited mostly by Croats, while minority groups include Serbs, Bosniaks, Hungarians, Italians, Germans, Czechs, Roma people and others. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... In 1589, the four French Secretaries of State became specialized, with one of the secretaries responsible for foreign affairs. ... Map of the dominant self-identified ethnic origins of ancestors per census division. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Microsoft Excel is a spreadsheet program written and distributed by Microsoft for computers using the Microsoft Windows operating system and Apple Macintosh computers. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ...

Ethnic groups of Serbia
Demographic history of Serbia
Bosniaks · Ethnic Muslims · Jews · Montenegrins · Roma · Romanians · Serbs · Vlachs

  Results from FactBites:
 
Human Rights Watch: Abuses Against Serbs And Roma In The New Kosovo (August 1999) (10480 words)
Serbs displaced inside Kosovo are mostly concentrated in Serb majority villages and towns such as Kosovo Polje, Dobratin (Lipljan/Liplan municipality), Gracanica (Pristina municipality), Velika Hoca (Orahovac/Rahovec municipality), and Gorazdevac (Pec/Peje municipality).
Serb residents of Dobratin village told Human Rights Watch that Dragan Madenovic, a forty-year-old night watchman, was killed in the village of Donja Gusterica (Lipljan municipality) on June 23.
On June 23, the body of Milenko Lekovic, a Serb professor for the economics faculty, was found in the faculty's basement, along with the bodies of Miodrag Mladenovic, a Serb guard in the building, and Jovica Stamenkovic, a Serb waiter from a cafe in the building.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m