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Encyclopedia > Serbia
Република Србија
Republika Srbija
Republic of Serbia
Flag of Serbia Coat of arms of Serbia
Flag Coat of arms
AnthemБоже правде / Bože pravde
"God of Justice"

Location of  Serbia  (orange)

on the European continent  (white)  —  [ Legend] Image File history File links Flag_of_Serbia. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Serbia. ... The flag of Serbia is a tricolour with Pan-Slavic colours, with three equal horizontal fields, red on the top, blue in the middle and white on the bottom, and the Coat of Arms of Serbia centered vertically and located left of center by one-seventh of the flags... Large Coat of Arms of Serbia Small Coat of Arms of Serbia The Coat of Arms of Serbia, adopted on August 17, 2004, is a replica of the coat of arms of the former Obrenović dynasty (first adopted in 1882) and features the white bicephalic eagle of the Nemanjić dynasty... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Bože pravde (God of Justice) is the official anthem of Serbia and Republika Srpska. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 112 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Serbia Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Countries Maps of Serbia ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Capital
(and largest city)
Belgrade
361) 44°48′N, 20°28′E
Official languages Serbian
Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian,
Rusyn 1 Albanian 2
Demonym Serbian
Government Parliamentary Democracy
 -  President Boris Tadić
 -  Prime Minister Vojislav Koštunica
Establishment [disambiguation needed]
 -  First state 7th century 
 -  Serbian Kingdom3 1217 
 -  Serbian Empire 1345 
 -  Independence lost 4 1459 
 -  First Serbian Uprising5(Modern Statehood) February 15, 1804 
 -  De facto independence 25 March 1867 
 -  De jure independence 13 July 1878 
 -  Unification 25 November 1918 
Area
 -  Total 88 361 km² (113th)
34 116 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) 0.13
Population
 -  2008 census 8,023,5576 
 -  Density 115/km² (94th)
297/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2008 estimate
 -  Total $81.982 billion (IMF) 
 -  Per capita $10 985 
Gini (2007) .24 (low
Currency Serbian dinar7 (RSD)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 -  Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Internet TLD .rs (.yu)8
Calling code +381
1 All spoken in Vojvodina.
2 Spoken in Kosovo.
3 Raška, preceded by Kingdom of Duklja (1077)
4To the Ottoman Empire and Kingdom of Hungary
5The Proclamation (of independence, 1809)
6 Boycotted by Kosovo with additional 2 million people
7 The Euro is used in Kosovo alongside the Dinar.
8 .rs became active in September 2007. Suffix .yu
will exist until September 2009.

Serbia (Serbian: Србија / Srbija), officially the Republic of Serbia (Serbian: Република Србија / Republika Srbija, listen ), is a landlocked country in Central and Southeastern Europe, covering the southern part of the Pannonian Plain and the central part of the Balkan Peninsula. Serbia is bordered by Hungary to the north; Romania and Bulgaria to the east; the Republic of Macedonia and Albania[1] to the south; and Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro to the west. The capital is Belgrade. Not to be confused with capitol. ... Ethnic map of Serbia // Demographics of Serbia Population of Serbia (including Kosovo) Serbs 66% Albanians 17% Hungarians 3. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... A regional language is a language spoken in a part of a country, be it may be a small area, a federal state or province, or a wider area. ... Rusyn is an East Slavic language (along with Russian, Belarusian and Ukrainian to which it shares a common linguistic ancestry) that is spoken by the Rusyns. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... A parliamentary system, or parliamentarism, is distinguished by the executive branch of government being dependent on the direct or indirect support of the parliament, often expressed through a vote of confidence. ... Presidential Standard of Serbia The President of Serbia is the head of state of the Republic of Serbia. ... Boris Tadić (Serbian: ; born 15 January 1958) is the President of Serbia. ... List of Prime Ministers of Serbia Current Prime Minister of Serbia is Vojislav Koštunica. ... Dr. Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica (Serbian Cyrillic: Војислав Коштуница,  ) (pronounced , born March 24, 1944, Belgrade, Yugoslavia, now Serbia) is the current Prime Minister of Serbia and President of the Democratic Party of Serbia. ... The Establishment is a slang term (chiefly in British and Commonwealth English) for a traditional conservative ruling class and its institutions. ... RaÅ¡ka (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... Тhe Serbian medieval history begins in the 5th century AD with the coming of the slavs on the Balkans, and ends with the occupation of Serbia by the Ottoman Empire in 1459 with the fall of the Serbian capital Smederevo. ... The Serbian Empire (Serbian: Српско Царство, Srpsko Carstvo) was a medieval empire in the Balkans that emerged from the medieval Serbian kingdom in the 14th century. ... // Flag of the First Serbian Uprising The First Serbian Uprising was a Serbian national revolution which lasted one decade (1804-1813), during which Serbia perceived itself as an independent state for the first time after 300 years of Ottoman and short-lasting Austrian occupations. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Principality of Serbia and Vojvodina of Serbia and TamiÅ¡ Banat in 1849 Serbian Principality was a state in the Balkans that came into existence as a result of First Serbian Uprising and Second Serbian Uprising between 1804 and 1816. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Congress of Berlin (June 13 - July 13, 1878) was a meeting of the European Great Powers and the Ottoman Empires leading statesmen in Berlin in 1878. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 10,000 km² and 100,000 km². ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... Graphical representation of the Gini coefficient The Gini coefficient is a measure of inequality of income distribution or inequality of wealth distribution. ... ISO 4217 Code RSD User(s) Serbia (including parts of Kosovo) Inflation 6. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .rs is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Serbia. ... .yu is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) assigned originally to the SFR Yugoslavia. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... This is an alphabetical list by town of phone dialing codes in Serbia. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... The Medieval Serbian Kingdom 1167 - 1196: Stefan Nemanja (Grand Zupan) 1331 - 1355: Stefan Uros IV Dusan (King to 1346, then Tsar) 1196 - 1227: Stefan First-Crowned (Grand Zupan to 1217, then crowned King) 1355 - 1371: Stefan Uros V (Tsar Uros) 1227 - 1234: Stefan Radoslav 1371 - 1389: Lazar (Prince) 1234 - 1243... Duklja according to De administrando imperio. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... .rs is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Serbia. ... .yu is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) assigned originally to the SFR Yugoslavia. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Image File history File links Republika_Srbija. ... A landlocked country is one that has no coastline. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Balkan redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Pannonian Plain is a large plain in Central Europe that remained when the Pliocene Pannonian Sea (see below) dried out. ... Balkan redirects here. ... For an explanation of terms related to Macedonia, see Macedonia (terminology). ... This article is about the country in Europe. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ...


For centuries, shaped at cultural boundaries between East and West, a powerful medieval Kingdom - later renamed Serbian Empire - occupied much of the Balkans. The modern state of Serbia emerged in 1817 following the Serbian revolution. Later, it expanded its territory further south to include Kosovo and the regions of Raška and Vardar Macedonia. Formerly an autonomous Habsburg crownland, Vojvodina proclaimed its secession from Austria-Hungary on November 25, 1918 to unite with Serbia, preceded by the Syrmia region. The current borders of the country were established following the end of World War II, when Serbia became a federal unit within the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. Serbia became an independent state again in 2006, after Montenegro left the union which was formed after the dissolution of Yugoslavia in 1990s. The term Eastern world refers very broadly to the various cultures, social structures and philosophical systems of the East, namely Asia (including China, India, Japan, and surrounding regions). ... Occident redirects here. ... Тhe Serbian medieval history begins in the 5th century AD with the coming of the slavs on the Balkans, and ends with the occupation of Serbia by the Ottoman Empire in 1459 with the fall of the Serbian capital Smederevo. ... The Serbian Empire (Serbian: Српско Царство, Srpsko Carstvo) was a medieval empire in the Balkans that emerged from the medieval Serbian kingdom in the 14th century. ... Balkan redirects here. ... Principality of Serbia and Vojvodina of Serbia and TamiÅ¡ Banat in 1849 Serbian Principality was a state in the Balkans that came into existence as a result of First Serbian Uprising and Second Serbian Uprising between 1804 and 1816. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... RaÅ¡ka is a geographical region in south-central Serbia. ... Vardar Macedonia (Macedonian: Вардарска Македонија, Vardarska Makedonija; Bulgarian: Вардарска Македония, Vardarska Makedoniya), also known as Southern Serbia]/Old Serbia (Serbian:Јужна Србија / Стара Србија, Južna Srbija / Stara Srbija) is the north-western area of the Macedonia region. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Banat, Bačka and Baranja map The Banat, Bačka and Baranja was a de facto existing province of the Kingdom of Serbia and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes between October 1918 and March 1919. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq... Map of the Syrmia region Syrmia (Serbian: Srem (Cyrillic: Срем), Croatian: Srijem) is a fertile region of the Pannonian plain in Europe, between the Danube and Sava rivers. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Motto Brotherhood and Unity Anthem Hey, Slavs Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throughout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ... This article is about the country in Europe. ... Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbian Government Republic President Svetozar Marović Historical era Post-Cold War  - UN membership¹ November 1, 2000  - Established February 4, 2003  - Disestablished June 5, 2006 Area  - 2006 102,350 km2 39,518 sq mi Population  - 2006 est. ... An animated series of maps showing the breakup of the second Yugoslavia; The different colors represent the areas of control. ...


In 1999 Kosovo was placed under interim UN administration pursuant to UN Resolution 1244. In February 2008 the parliament of Kosovo unilaterally declared independence from Serbia. Serbia's government, as well as the UN Security Council, have not recognised Kosovo's independence. The response from the international community has been mixed. In April 2008 Serbia was offered to enter the intensified dialogue programme with NATO despite the diplomatic rift with the Alliance over Kosovo.[2] For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with UN General Assembly Resolution 1244. ... “Security Council” redirects here. ... Intensified Dialogue with NATO is viewed as a stage before being invited to enter the alliance Membership Action Plan (MAP), while the latter should eventually lead to NATO membership. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ...

See also: Controversy over Kosovo independence

Contents

Geography

Main article: Geography of Serbia

Serbia is located in Europe, on the Balkan peninsula and in the Pannonian Plain. It is placed at the crossroads between Central, Southern and Eastern Europe. The Danube river (2850 km) flows through the northern third of the country; it is 588 km long and forms the border with Croatia and part of Romania, alongside the Wallachian Plain in the east. The Sava river forms the southern border of the Vojvodina province, flows into the Danube in central Belgrade, and bypasses the hills of the Fruška Gora in the west. Sixty kilometers to the northeast of Belgrade, the Tisa river flows into the Danube and ends its 1350 km long journey from Ukraine, and the partially navigable Timiş River (60 km/350 km) flows into the Danube near Pančevo. The Begej river (254 km) flows into Tisa near Titel. All five rivers are navigable, connecting the country with Northern and Western Europe (through the Rhine-Main-Danube Canal – North Sea route), to Eastern Europe (via the Tisa–, Timiş–, Begej – and Danube – Black sea routes) and to Southern Europe (via the Sava river). Map of Serbia according to United Nations and to United States before Operation Allied Force Serbia according to United States’ CIA 2008 World Factbook 2006 CIA World Factbook map. ... The Pannonian Plain is a large plain in Central Europe that remained when the Pliocene Pannonian Sea (see below) dried out. ... Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... The southern half of Europe is shown in shades of red. ... Statistical regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked red):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current borders: Russia (dark orange), other countries formerly part of the USSR... This article is about the Danube River. ... The Romanian Plain, in the southern part of ArgeÅŸ County The Romanian Plain (also: Wallachian Plain; Romanian: Câmpia Română) is located in Romania, bordered by the Danube in the east, south and west and by the Getic Plateau in the north. ... For other uses of this word, see Sava (disambiguation). ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... FruÅ¡ka Gora (Фрушка гора) is a mountain in Srem/Srijem. ... The Tisza or Tisa is one of the major rivers of Central Europe. ... The TimiÅŸ river (Hungarian: Temes, Serbian: TamiÅ¡) is a river rising in the Semenic Mountains, southern Carpathian Mountains, CaraÅŸ-Severin county, Romania. ... Church of Assumption in Pančevo Pančevo Banatsko Novo Selo Kačarevo Jabuka Glogonj Dolovo Starčevo Omoljica Ivanovo Banatski Brestovac Municipality of Pančevo ● Pančevo (Панчево) is a city and municipality located in Serbia at 44. ... The Begej (Serbian: Begej or Бегеј, Romanian: Bega) is a river in Romania and Serbia. ... Catholic Church in Titel Abandoned church in Titel map of the Titel municipality and Å ajkaÅ¡ka region Titel (Serbian: Titel or Тител, Hungarian: Titel, German: Tittel and sometimes Theisshügel, Latin: Titulium), is a town and municipality in the South Bačka District of the Vojvodina, Serbia. ... the Rhine-Main Danube Canal (in the foreground) near Nuremberg The Rhine-Main-Danube Canal (also called Main-Danube Canal, RMD Canal or Europa Canal) connects the Main and Danube from Bamberg by Nuremberg to Regensburg. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... The TimiÅŸ river (Hungarian: Temes, Serbian: TamiÅ¡) is a river rising in the Semenic Mountains, southern Carpathian Mountains, CaraÅŸ-Severin county, Romania. ... The Begej (Serbian: Begej or Бегеј, Romanian: Bega) is a river in Romania and Serbia. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ...


The eastern border of the country is determined by the Carpathian Mountain range,[3] which runs through the whole of Central Europe. The Southern Carpathians meet the Balkan Mountains, following the course of Velika Morava, a 500 km long (partially navigable) river. Midžor peak is the highest point in eastern Serbia at 2156 m. In the southeast, the Balkan Mountains meet the Rhodope Mountains, connecting the country with Greece. This is about the terrestrial mountain range. ... Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Southern Carpathians (also called Transylvanian Alps; in Romanian: Carpaţii Meridionali) are located between the Prahova river in the east and the Timiş river and Cerna river in the west. ... Stara Planina, Rhodope, Rila and Pirin Mountains View from Ray Resthouse towards the Central Balkan Mountains. ... The Velika Morava is a river in Serbia that flows into the Danube near Smederevo. ... Midžor (Serbian: ) or Midzhur (Bulgarian: ) is a peak in the Balkan Mountains, situated on the border between Bulgaria and Serbia. ... Stara Planina, Rhodope, Rila and Pirin Mountains View from Ray Resthouse towards the Central Balkan Mountains. ... Landscape of the Rhodopes near the village of Hvoyna View from the Belintash Rock towards the village of Vrata The Rhodopes (Bulgarian: , Rodopi, usually used with a definite article: Родопите, Rodopite, sometimes also called Родопа, Rodopa or Родопа планина, Rodopa planina; Greek: , Rodopi, red aspect) are a mountain range in Southeastern Europe, with over...

Serbia's borders (recognized by UN)
Serbia's borders (recognized by UN[4])

The Šar Mountain of Kosovo form the border with Albania, with one of the highest peaks in the region, Djeravica (2656 m). Dinaric Alps of Serbia follow the flow of the Drina river (at 350 km navigable for smaller vessels only) overlooking the Dinaric peaks on the other side of the shore in Bosnia and Herzegovina. This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... The Å ar mountain (Macedonian, Serbian and Bulgarian: Шар Планина, Å ar Planina ; Albanian: Malet e Sharrit, Mali i Sharrit, Sharr) is a mountain located on the southern border of Serbia (in Kosovo) and the northwest part of the Republic of Macedonia. ... This article should belong in one or more categories. ... Mt Orjen at the Bay of Kotor is the heaviest karstified range of the dinarids View of the central part of the Dinaric Alps (north=down) Valbona pass, northern Albania. ... The Drina is a river on the border of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia and Montenegro. ...


Over one quarter of Serbia's overall landmass (27%) is covered by forest.[5]


Climate

The Serbian climate varies between a continental climate in the north, with cold winters, and hot, humid summers with well distributed rainfall patterns, and a more Adriatic climate in the south with hot, dry summers and autumns and relatively cold winters with heavy inland snowfall. Differences in elevation, proximity to the Adriatic sea and large river basins, as well as the exposure to the winds account for climate differences.[6] A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ...

Mountain ranges and major rivers of Serbia
Mountain ranges and major rivers of Serbia

Vojvodina possesses typical continental climate, with air masses from Northern and Western Europe which shape its climatic profile. South and Southwest Serbia is subject to Mediterranean influences, however the Dinaric Alps and other mountain ranges contribute cooling down the biggest part of warm air masses. Winters are quite harsh in Sandžak because of the mountains which encircle that plateau.[7] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (429x620, 75 KB) Main mountain ranges of Serbia Based on Image:Serbia relief. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (429x620, 75 KB) Main mountain ranges of Serbia Based on Image:Serbia relief. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Northern Europe Northern Europe is the northern part of the European continent. ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ... Mt Orjen at the Bay of Kotor is the heaviest karstified range of the dinarids View of the central part of the Dinaric Alps (north=down) Valbona pass, northern Albania. ... Map of Sandžak RaÅ¡ka (Serbian: Рашка, RaÅ¡ka, Bosnian: Sandžak, Albanian: Sanxhak or Sanxhaku, Turkish: Sancak) is a geographical region in central Balkans. ...


Average annual air temperature for the period 1961–90 for the area with the altitude of up to 300 m amounts to 10.9 °C. The areas with the altitudes of 300 to 500 m have average annual temperature of around 10.0 °C, and over 1000 m of altitude around 6.0 °C.[8] The degree Celsius (°C) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ...


National parks

Ski centre of Kopaonik

Serbia has 5 national parks: Tourist Center Kopaonik Is The Most Popular Ski Resort in Serbia Visit website: www. ... This article is about national parks. ...

  • Fruška Gora (250 km²)
  • Kopaonik (120 km²)
  • Tara (220 km²)
  • Đerdap (640 km²)
  • Šar Mountains (390 km²)

Fruška Gora (Фрушка гора) is a mountain in Srem/Srijem. ... Tourist Center Kopaonik Is The Most Popular Ski Resort in Serbia Visit website: www. ... Tara national park is located in the mountainous region of western Serbia. ... Castle Golubac Tabula Traiana in Djerdap National Park The Đerdap National Park (Национални парк Ђердап) stretches along the right bank of the Danube River from the castle of Golubac (Golubački Grad) to the dam near Sip, Serbia and Montenegro. ...

History

Main article: History of Serbia

One of the first Serbian states, Raška, was founded in the first half of the 7th century on Byzantine territory by the Unknown Archont, the founder of the House of Vlastimirović; it evolved into the Serbian Empire under the House of Nemanjić. In the modern era Serbia has been...

Early history

Serbia's strategic location between two continents has subjected it to invasions by many peoples. Belgrade is believed to have been leveled to the ground by 30 different armies in recorded history. Contemporary Serbia comprises the classical regions of Moesia, Pannonia, parts of Dalmatia, Dacia and Macedonia [disambiguation needed]. Under nominal Serbian rule since the 7th century (having been allowed to settle in Byzantium by its emperor Heraclius after their victory over the Avars),[9] through early history various parts of the territory of modern Serbia have been colonized, claimed or ruled by: the Greeks and Romans (conquered the indigenous Celts and Illyrians); the Western- and the Eastern Roman Empires (challenged by the incursions of the Huns, the Ostrogoths, the Gepidae, the Sarmatians, the Avars, the Serbs, the Frankish Kingdom, the Great Moravia, the Bulgarians). No less than 17 Roman Emperors were born in Serbia.[10] For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Parthenon This article is on the term Classical Greece itself. ... Moesia (Greek: , Moisia; Bulgarian: Мизия, Miziya; Serbian: Мезија, Mezija) is an ancient province situated in the areas of modern Serbia and Bulgaria. ... For other uses, see Pannonia (disambiguation). ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... For other uses, see Dacia (disambiguation). ... // Macedonia may refer to: Macedonia (terminology), explanation of the term and the naming dispute Macedonia (region), a region of the Balkan peninsula which includes: Republic of Macedonia, a current state, also referred to as the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) Socialist Republic of Macedonia (1946-1991), a federal unit... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Byzantine redirects here. ... For the Patriarch of Jerusalem, see Patriarch Heraclius of Jerusalem. ... Late Avar period Map showing the location of Avar Khaganate, c. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Celts, normally pronounced //, is a modern term used to describe any of the European peoples who spoke, or speak, a Celtic language. ... Illyria (disambiguation) Illyrians has come to refer to a broad, ill-defined Indo-European[1] group of peoples who inhabited the western Balkans (Illyria, roughly from northern Epirus to southern Pannonia) and even perhaps parts of Southern Italy in classical times into the Common era, and spoke Illyrian languages. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus The Western Roman Empire in 395. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... The Hunnic Empire stretched from the steppes of Central Asia into modern Germany, and from the Black Sea to the Baltic Sea Hunnic Empire, the empire of the Huns. ... This article deals with the continental Ostrogoths. ... Gepidia The Gepids (Latin: , Old English: (Beowulf, Widsith) - possibly from *Gibiðos, givers [2] or gepanta, see below) were an East Germanic Gothic tribe most famous in history for defeating the Huns after the death of Attila. ... Sarmatia Europea in Scythia map 1697 AD Sarmatia Europæa separated from Sarmatia Asiatica by the Tanais (the River Don), based on Greek literary sources, in a map printed in London, ca 1770 Great steppe in early spring. ... The Avar Khanate was a long-lived Muslim state which controlled Central Dagestan from the early 13th century to the 19th century. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Statue of Charlemagne (also called Karl der Große, Charles the Great) in Frankfurt, Germany. ... Great Moravia was an empire existing in Central Europe between 833 and the early 10th century. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ...


Medieval Serb kingdoms and the Serbian Empire

The House of Nemanjić, fresco from Visoki Dečani monastery
Serbian knight armor, around 1440, Military Museum (Belgrade)

Serbs formed their first unified state under the Vlastimirovic dynasty by 812, at times disrupted by the wars with the aforementioned states. By the beginning of the 14th century Serbs lived in four distinctly independent kingdoms- Dioclea, Rascia, Bosnia and Syrmia.[11][12][13] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 354 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (450 × 761 pixel, file size: 342 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Medieval fresco from Visoki Dečani monastery This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 354 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (450 × 761 pixel, file size: 342 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Medieval fresco from Visoki Dečani monastery This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries... The House of Nemanjić, fresco from Visoki Dečani monastery The House of Nemanjić (Serbian: Немањићи; Anglicised: Nemanyid) was a medieval Serbian ruling dynasty. ... Christ Carrying the Cross. ... Military Museum in Belgrade The Military Museum in Belgrade was founded in 1878. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... The House of Vlastimirović was named after knez (duke) Vlastimir who was the great-great-grandson of the Unknown Archont who led the Serbs to the Balkans from White Serbia (modern day Poland, Slovakia and Ukraine) during the reign of Byzantine emperor Heraclius somewhere between 610 - 641. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Duklja according to De administrando imperio. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... This article is about a geographic region of Bosnia. ... Map of the Syrmia region Syrmia (Serbian: Srem (Cyrillic: Срем), Croatian: Srijem) is a fertile region of the Pannonian plain in Europe, between the Danube and Sava rivers. ...

The Coronation of the Emperor Stefan Dušan in Skoplje, 1346

At first heavily dependent on the Byzantine Empire as its tributary, in time the most powerful of the Serb states - Raška (Rascia) achieved full independence, overtaking the Kingdom of Duklja, which had previously dominated the Serbian lands between 11-12th centuries. The centre of the Serb world (Raska, Duklja, Travunia, Zahumlje, Pagania and Bosnia) moved northwards, further from the Adriatic coast. Although fully converted already by 865 AD,[14][15] this relocation to the north and east also meant the shift towards the Eastern Orthodox rather than Catholic faith (initially predominant in the south following the East-West Schism). Tsar Stefan UroÅ¡ IV DuÅ¡an Silni (the mighty) (Serbian: Цар Стефан Душан Силни) (circa 1308 – December 20, 1355) was a Serb king (September 8, 1331 – 1346) and tsar (1346 – December 5, 1355). ... Modern Skopje Skopje (Albanian: Shkup, Macedonian: Скопје) is the capital city of the Republic of Macedonia. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... Duklja according to De administrando imperio. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... The Second Ecumenical Council whose contributions to the Nicene Creed lay at the heart of the famous theological disputes underlying the East-West Schism. ...


The Serbian apogee in economy, law, military, and religion took place during the rule of the House of Nemanjić between 1166 and 1371; the Serbian Kingdom was proclaimed in 1217, joined later by the Kingdom of Syrmia, Banovina of Mačva and Bosnia; finally, the Serbian Empire of Stefan Dušan was formed in 1346. Under Dušan's rule, Serbia reached its territorial peak, becoming one of the larger states in Europe. The renowned Dušan's Code, a universal system of laws, was enforced. The House of Nemanjić, fresco from Visoki Dečani monastery The House of Nemanjić (Serbian: Немањићи; Anglicised: Nemanyid) was a medieval Serbian ruling dynasty. ... The Medieval Serbian Kingdom 1167 - 1196: Stefan Nemanja (Grand Zupan) 1331 - 1355: Stefan Uros IV Dusan (King to 1346, then Tsar) 1196 - 1227: Stefan First-Crowned (Grand Zupan to 1217, then crowned King) 1355 - 1371: Stefan Uros V (Tsar Uros) 1227 - 1234: Stefan Radoslav 1371 - 1389: Lazar (Prince) 1234 - 1243... Stefan Dragutin, king of Serbia (1276-1282), king of Srem (1282-1316), fresco, detail, 1296 Kingdom of Srem Stefan Dragutin (died March 12, 1316) was King of Serbia from 1276 to 1282 and king of Srem from 1282 to 1316. ... This article is about a geographic region of Bosnia. ... The Serbian Empire (Serbian: Српско Царство, Srpsko Carstvo) was a medieval empire in the Balkans that emerged from the medieval Serbian kingdom in the 14th century. ... Tsar Stefan UroÅ¡ IV DuÅ¡an Silni (the mighty) (Serbian: Цар Стефан Душан Силни) (circa 1308 – December 20, 1355) was a Serb king (September 8, 1331 – 1346) and tsar (1346 – December 5, 1355). ... Types of administrative and/or political territories include: A legally administered territory, which is a non-sovereign geographic area that has come under the authority of another government. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... DuÅ¡ans Code is a legal code, one of two the most significant cultural-historical monuments of medieval Serbia, accompanying St. ...

Golubac fortress overlooking the Danube river
Golubac fortress overlooking the Danube river

As a result of internal struggle between rival noble families, and heavy losses inflicted by the Ottomans in the epic Battle of Kosovo, the Serbian Empire had dissolved into many statelets by the beginning of the 15th century. Throughout the 15th and 16th centuries, constant struggles between various Serbian kingdoms on one side, and the Ottoman Empire on the other side, took place. The Serbian Despotate fell in 1459 following the siege of the "temporary" capital Smederevo, followed by Bosnia a few years later, and Herzegovina in 1482. Montenegro was overtaken by 1499. Belgrade was the last major Balkan city to endure Ottoman onslaughts, as it joined the Catholic Kingdom of Hungary. Serbs, Hungarians and European crusaders heavily defeated the Turkish in Siege of Belgrade of 1456. Several Serbian despots ruled in parts of Vojvodina as vassals of the Hungarian kings with the title of Hungarian barons. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x750, 287 KB) Golubac (Golubacki Grad), Serbien (Srbija) 2004, Foto: Denis Barthel File links The following pages link to this file: Djerdap National Park ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x750, 287 KB) Golubac (Golubacki Grad), Serbien (Srbija) 2004, Foto: Denis Barthel File links The following pages link to this file: Djerdap National Park ... Golubac fortress (Serbian: Голубачки град or Golubački grad) is a medieval fortified town most likely built during the 14th century. ... This article is about the Danube River. ... The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto El Muzaffer Daima The Ever Victorious (as written in tugra) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital İstanbul ( Constantinople/Asitane/Konstantiniyye ) Sovereigns Sultans of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40 million Area 12+ million km² Establishment 1299 Dissolution October 29, 1923... This page is about the Battle of Kosovo of 1389; for other battles, see Battle of Kosovo (disambiguation). ... The Serbian Empire (Serbian: Српско Царство, Srpsko Carstvo) was a medieval empire in the Balkans that emerged from the medieval Serbian kingdom in the 14th century. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... The Serbian Despotate (Serbian: Српска деспотовина or Srpska despotovina) was among the last Serbian states to be conquered by the Ottoman Empire. ... Location of Smederevo within Serbia Coordinates: , Country District Settlements 27 Government  - Mayor SaÅ¡a Radosavljević (DSS) Area [2]  - Municipality 484 km² (186. ... This article is about a geographic region of Bosnia. ... This article is about the geographic area of Herzegovina. ... This article is about the country in Europe. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Hungarian may refer to: Hungary or the Kingdom of Hungary. ... This article is about historical Crusades . ... Combatants Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Hungary Commanders Mehmet II John Hunyadi Strength About 100,000 About 75,000 Casualties About 50,000 About 10,000 After the fall of Constantinople in 1453, Ottoman sultan Mehmed II was rallying his resources in order to subjugate the Kingdom of Hungary. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ...


After repelling Ottoman attacks for over 70 years, Belgrade finally fell in 1521, alongside the greater part of the Kingdom of Hungary. Conversion to Islam was increased, especially in the southwest (Raška, Kosovo and Bosnia). For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... RaÅ¡ka is a geographical region in south-central Serbia. ... The Province of Bosnia was a key Ottoman province, the westernmost one, based on the territory of the present day state of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ...


Ottoman/Austrian rule

See also: Great Serb Migrations, Ottoman Serbia, and Habsburg Serbia
Medieval fortress of Bač, Vojvodina
Medieval fortress of Bač, Vojvodina

Early modern period saw the loss of Serbia's independence to the Kingdom of Hungary and the Ottoman Empire, interrupted shortly by the revolutionary state of the Emperor Jovan Nenad in the 16th century. Modern times witnessed the rise of the Habsburg Monarchy (known as the Austrian Empire, later Austria-Hungary), which fought many wars against the Ottoman Turks for supremacy over Serbia. Three Austrian invasions and numerous rebellions (such as the Banat Uprising) constantly challenged the Ottoman rule. Vojvodina endured a century long Ottoman occupation before ceded to Habsburg Empire in the 17th-18th centuries by the decision of the Treaty of Karlowitz (Sremski Karlovci). As the Great Serb Migrations have depopulated most of Kosovo and Serbia proper, the Serbs seeking refuge in more prosperous (and Christian) North and West were granted imperial rights by the Austrian crown (such as Statuta Wallachorum in 1630). The Ottoman persecutions against Christians culminated with the abolition and plunder of the Patriarchate of Peć in 1766.[16] As the Ottoman rule in the South grew ever more brutal, the Holy Roman Emperor Leopold I formally granted the Serbs the right to their autonomous crownland, speeding up their migrations into Austria. Arsenije III ÄŒarnojević The term Great Serb Migrations refer to the two large migrations of Serbs from the Ottoman Empire to the Habsburg Monarchy: First Serbian Migration in 1690 under Patriarch Arsenije III ÄŒarnojević Second Serbian Migration in 1737 under Patriarch Arsenije IV Jovanović Serbs from these migrations settled in... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 170 KB) Author:Sors bona File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bač Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 170 KB) Author:Sors bona File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bač Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Location in Serbia General Information Mayor Tomislav Bogunović (DS) Land area 367 km² (municipality) Population (2002 census) 6,087 (16,268 municipality) Population density (2002) 44. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... The early modern period is a term initially used by historians to refer mainly to the post Late Middle Ages period in Western Europe (Early modern Europe), its first colonies marked by the rise of strong centralized governments and the beginnings of recognizable nation states that are the direct antecedents... The Serbian Despotate (Serbian: Српска деспотовина or Srpska despotovina) was among the last Serbian states to be conquered by the Ottoman Empire. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... statue of Emperor Jovan Nenad in Subotica Serbian Empire of Jovan Nenad Emperor Jovan Nenad was a self-proclaimed Serbian Emperor. He was born in town Lipova near river Moris, in northern Banat (today in Romania). ... The term Modern Times is used by historians to loosely describe the period of time immediately following what is known as the Early Modern Times. ... The Habsburg Monarchy, often called Austrian Monarchy or simply Austria, are the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1526 and 1867/1918. ... Anthem Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) The Austrian Empire Capital Vienna Language(s) German Hungarian Romanian Czech Slovakian Slovenian Croatian Serbian Italian Polish Ruthenian Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Ausgleich 1867 The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was a modern era successor empire founded... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... Banat Uprising was a rebellion of Serbs living in Ottoman Empire that has started in Bosnia and spread across Serb- populated areas of the country. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... The Treaty of Karlowitz was signed in 1699 in Sremski Karlovci (a city in modern-day Serbia and Montenegro) (German: Karlowitz, Turkish:Karlofça), concluding the Austro-Ottoman War of 1683–1697 in which the Ottoman side was defeated. ... Arsenije III ÄŒarnojević The term Great Serb Migrations refer to the two large migrations of Serbs from the Ottoman Empire to the Habsburg Monarchy: First Serbian Migration in 1690 under Patriarch Arsenije III ÄŒarnojević Second Serbian Migration in 1737 under Patriarch Arsenije IV Jovanović Serbs from these migrations settled in... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... The term Serbia proper is often used in English to refer to the part of Serbia that lies outside the northern and southern autonomous provinces of Kosovo and Vojvodina. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Frontiersman from PomoriÅ¡je, first half of the 18th century. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ... The Patriarchate of Peć is a Serbian Orthodox monastery located near Peć, Kosovo, a Serbian province under UN administration. ... Sanjak of Smederevo (Pashaluk of Belgrade) in 1791 The Sanjak of Smederevo (Serbian: Smederevski sandžak or Смедеревски санџак, Turkish: Semendire Sancağı), also known as the Pashaluk of Belgrade, was an Ottoman administrative unit (sanjak), that existed between 15th and the outset of the 19th century. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor Silver coin of Leopold I, 3 Kreuzers, dated 1670. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Arsenije III ÄŒarnojević The term Great Serb Migrations refer to the two large migrations of Serbs from the Ottoman Empire to the Habsburg Monarchy: First Serbian Migration in 1690 under Patriarch Arsenije III ÄŒarnojević Second Serbian Migration in 1737 under Patriarch Arsenije IV Jovanović Serbs from these migrations settled in...


Serbian Revolution and independence (Principality of Serbia)

Karađorđe Petrović, leader of the First Serbian uprising in 1804
Karađorđe Petrović, leader of the First Serbian uprising in 1804

The quest for independence of Serbia began during the Serbian national revolution (1804-1817), and it lasted for several decades. During the First Serbian Uprising led by Karađorđe Petrović, Serbia was independent for almost a decade before the Ottoman army could reoccupy the country. Shortly after this, the Second Serbian Uprising began; led by Miloš Obrenović, it ended in 1815 with a compromise between the Serbian revolutionary army and the Ottoman authorities. Famous German historian Leopold von Ranke published his book "the Serbian revolution" (1829).[17] They were the easternmost bourgeois revolutions in the 19th-century world.[18] Likewise, Principality of Serbia abolished feudalism- second in Europe after France.[19] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x1430, 64 KB) Djordje (Karadjordje) Petrovic 1768-1817 (founder of dynasty) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Serbia History of Serbia KaraÄ‘orÄ‘e Petrović Vladimir Borovikovsky... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x1430, 64 KB) Djordje (Karadjordje) Petrovic 1768-1817 (founder of dynasty) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Serbia History of Serbia KaraÄ‘orÄ‘e Petrović Vladimir Borovikovsky... KaraÄ‘orÄ‘e Petrović (Serbian Cyrillic: Карађорђе Петровић; Anglicised: Karageorge Petrovitch), (November 3, 1768? – July 13, 1817) was the leader of the First Serbian Uprising against the Ottoman Empire, and the founder of the Serbian House of KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević. He was born as ĐorÄ‘e (George) Petrović, and is of Montegerin... // Flag of the First Serbian Uprising The First Serbian Uprising was a Serbian national revolution which lasted one decade (1804-1813), during which Serbia perceived itself as an independent state for the first time after 300 years of Ottoman and short-lasting Austrian occupations. ... Image File history File links Zastava_1ustanak. ... Image File history File links Zastava_1ustanak. ... // Flag of the First Serbian Uprising The First Serbian Uprising was a Serbian national revolution which lasted one decade (1804-1813), during which Serbia perceived itself as an independent state for the first time after 300 years of Ottoman and short-lasting Austrian occupations. ... // Flag of the First Serbian Uprising The First Serbian Uprising was a Serbian national revolution which lasted one decade (1804-1813), during which Serbia perceived itself as an independent state for the first time after 300 years of Ottoman and short-lasting Austrian occupations. ... Karadjordje or Karageorge (Serbian: Карађорђе (KaraÄ‘orÄ‘e)), (November 3, 1768? – July 13, 1817) was the leader of the First Serbian Uprising against the Ottoman Empire, and the founder of the Serbian House of Karadjordjević. He was born George Petrović (Ђорђе Петровић ĐorÄ‘e Petrović). Because of his dark complexion and short temper... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... MiloÅ¡ Obrenović Milosh Obrenovich (MiloÅ¡ Obrenović or in Cyrillic Милош Обреновић 1780 - 1860) was prince of Serbia between 1817 and 1839, and again from 1858 to 1860. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Leopold Von Ranke in 1877. ... Principality of Serbia and Vojvodina of Serbia and TamiÅ¡ Banat in 1849 Serbian Principality was a state in the Balkans that came into existence as a result of First Serbian Uprising and Second Serbian Uprising between 1804 and 1816. ... Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste Feudalism, a term first used in the early modern period (17th century), in its most classic sense refers to a Medieval European political system comprised of a set of reciprocal legal and military obligations among the... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...

Miloš Obrenović I, leader of the Second Serbian uprising in 1815
Miloš Obrenović I, leader of the Second Serbian uprising in 1815

The Convention of Ackerman (1828), the Treaty of Adrianople (1829) and finally, the Hatt-i Sharif of 1830, recognised the suzerainty of Serbia with Miloš Obrenović I as its hereditary Prince.[20][21]The struggle for liberty, modern society and a nation-state in Serbia was crowned by the first constitution in the Balkans on 15 February 1835 (replaced by a more conservative Constitution in 1838). In two following decades (temporarily ruled by the Karadjordjevic dynasty) the Principality actively supported the neighbouring Habsburg Serbs, especially during the 1848 revolutions. Interior minister Ilija Garašanin published The Draft (of the South Slavic unification), which became the stand point of Serbian foreign policy from mid- 19th century onwards. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (495x702, 93 KB) MiloÅ¡ Obrenović 1780-1860 was prince of Serbia Painting from year 1848, displayed in National Museum in Belgrade http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (495x702, 93 KB) MiloÅ¡ Obrenović 1780-1860 was prince of Serbia Painting from year 1848, displayed in National Museum in Belgrade http://www. ... MiloÅ¡ Obrenović Milosh Obrenovich (MiloÅ¡ Obrenović, (Serbian Cyrillic: Милош Обреновић) also known as MiloÅ¡ Teodorović) ( 18 March 1780 - 26 September 1860) was Prince of Serbia between 1815 and 1839, and again from 1858 to 1860. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Hatt-i Sharif of Gulhane was an 1839 proclamation by Ottoman Sultan Abd-ul-Mejid I that launched the Tanzimat period of reforms and reorganization. ... Suzerainty (pronounced or ) is a situation in which a region or people is a tributary to a more powerful entity which allows the tributary some limited domestic autonomy to control its foreign affairs. ... Principality of Serbia and Vojvodina of Serbia and TamiÅ¡ Banat in 1849 Serbian Principality was a state in the Balkans that came into existence as a result of First Serbian Uprising and Second Serbian Uprising between 1804 and 1816. ... MiloÅ¡ Obrenović Milosh Obrenovich (MiloÅ¡ Obrenović, (Serbian Cyrillic: Милош Обреновић) also known as MiloÅ¡ Teodorović) ( 18 March 1780 - 26 September 1860) was Prince of Serbia between 1815 and 1839, and again from 1858 to 1860. ... MiloÅ¡ Obrenović Milosh Obrenovich (MiloÅ¡ Obrenović, (Serbian Cyrillic: Милош Обреновић) also known as MiloÅ¡ Teodorović) ( 18 March 1780 - 26 September 1860) was Prince of Serbia between 1815 and 1839, and again from 1858 to 1860. ... The term nation-state, while often used interchangeably with the terms unitary state and independent state, refers properly to the parallel occurence of a state and a nation. ... MiloÅ¡ Obrenović Milosh Obrenovich (MiloÅ¡ Obrenović also known as MiloÅ¡ Teodorović in Cyrillic Милош Обреновић 18th March 1780 - 26th September 1860) was prince of Serbia between 1817 and 1839, and again from 1858 to 1860. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Karađorđević Serbian ruling dynasty is descended from Karađorđe. ... Principality of Serbia and Vojvodina of Serbia and TamiÅ¡ Banat in 1849 Serbian Principality was a state in the Balkans that came into existence as a result of First Serbian Uprising and Second Serbian Uprising between 1804 and 1816. ... From March 1848 through July 1849, the Habsburgs Austrian Empire was threatened by revolutionary movements. ... Ilija GaraÅ¡anin (born 1812, died 1874) was a politician in Serbia having considerable influence in national affairs. ...


Following the clashes between the Ottoman army and civilians in Belgrade in 1862 and pressured by the Great Powers, by 1867 the last Turkish soldiers left the Principality. By enacting a new constitution without consulting the Porte, Serbian diplomats confirmed the de facto independence of the country. In 1876, Montenegro and Serbia declared war against the Ottoman Empire, proclaiming their unification with Bosnia. Formal independence of the country was internationally recognized at the Congress of Berlin in 1878, which formally ended the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-78; this treaty, however, prohibited Serbia from uniting with Principality of Montenegro, and placed Bosnia and Raška region under Austro-Hungarian occupation to prevent the unification from happening.[22] For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... In the context of international relations and diplomacy, power (sometimes clarified as international power, national power, or state power) is the ability of one state to influence or control other states. ... Principality of Serbia and Vojvodina of Serbia and TamiÅ¡ Banat in 1849 Serbian Principality was a state in the Balkans that came into existence as a result of First Serbian Uprising and Second Serbian Uprising between 1804 and 1816. ... This article is about the country in Europe. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... This article is about a geographic region of Bosnia. ... The Congress of Berlin (June 13 - July 13, 1878) was a meeting of the European Great Powers and the Ottoman Empires leading statesmen in Berlin in 1878. ... The Russo-Turkish War of 1877–1878 had its origins in the Russian goal of gaining access to the Mediterranean Sea and dominating Constantinople (Istanbul) and the adjacent Turkish Straits. ... The history of Montenegro begins in the early Middle Ages, after the arrival of the Slavs into that part of the former Roman province of Dalmatia that forms present-day Montenegro. ... This article is about a geographic region of Bosnia. ... Sanjak of Novi Pazar in 1878 The Sanjak of Novi Pazar (Serbian: Новопазарски санџак Novopazarski sandžak; Turkish: Yeni Pazar sancağı) was an Ottoman sanjak (second-level administrative unit) that existed until the Balkan Wars of 1912-1913 in the territory of present day Serbia and Montenegro. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ...


Kingdom of Serbia/Crownland of Vojvodina

Two autonomous Serbias -Austrian and Ottoman Serbia, 1849
Two autonomous Serbias -Austrian and Ottoman Serbia, 1849

From 1815 to 1903, Serbia was ruled by the House of Obrenović (except from 1842 to 1858, when it was led by Prince Aleksandar Karađorđević). In 1882, Serbia, ruled by King Milan, was proclaimed a Kingdom. In 1903, the House of Karađorđević (the descendants of the revolutionary leader Đorđe Petrović) assumed power. Serbia was the only country in the region that was allowed by the Great Powers to be ruled by their own domestic dynasties. During the Balkan Wars (1912-1913), the Kingdom of Serbia tripled its territory by acquiring part of Macedonia [disambiguation needed], Kosovo, and parts of Serbia proper. Image File history File links Serbia02. ... Image File history File links Serbia02. ... Principality of Serbia and Vojvodina of Serbia and TamiÅ¡ Banat in 1849 Serbian Principality was a state in the Balkans that came into existence as a result of First Serbian Uprising and Second Serbian Uprising between 1804 and 1816. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Franz Joseph I (in Hungarian I. Ferenc József, in English Francis Joseph I) (August 18, 1830 – November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria, Apostolic King of Hungary, King of Bohemia from 1848 until 1916 and a German prince (Deutscher Fürst). ... Grosswojwod is the German version, official under the Habsburg monarchy in the case of the present Serbian autonomous region Vojvodina, of an original Slavonic (more precisely, Serbo-Croatian) title of the comparative semantic model (see Great King), augmenting the far more common Slavonic family of princely titles (including Wojwod) discussed... The House of Obrenović (or Obrenovići/Обреновићи) ruled Serbia from 1815 to 1842, and again from 1858 to 1903. ... Prince Aleksandar KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević, oil technique, painter Uros Knezevic Aleksandar KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević (Serbian Cyrillic Александар Карађорђевић) (1806–1885) was the prince of Serbia between 1842 and 1858. ... This is the list of Serbian monarchs. ... Milan I, born Milan Obrenovich IV, (August 22, 1854 - February 11, 1901), was the king of Serbia from 1882 to 1889. ... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq... The House of KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević (Serbian: Карађорђевићи; English: House of Karageorgevich) was a Serbian ruling dynasty descended from KaraÄ‘orÄ‘e (George Petrović). The family had a long blood feud with the Obrenović dynasty. ... KaraÄ‘orÄ‘e or Карађорђе (November 3, 1768 – July 13, 1817) was the leader of the First Serbian uprising against the Turks, and the founder of the House of KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević. He was born Ђорђе Петровић (ĐorÄ‘e Petrović). Because of his dark complexion and short temper he was nicknamed Black Djordje... In the context of international relations and diplomacy, power (sometimes clarified as international power, national power, or state power) is the ability of one state to influence or control other states. ... Combatants  Ottoman Empire Balkan League: Bulgaria Greece Serbia Montenegro Commanders Ottoman Empire: Nizam PaÅŸa, Zeki PaÅŸa, Esat PaÅŸa, Abdullah PaÅŸa, Ali Rıza PaÅŸa Bulgaria: Vladimir Vazov, Vasil Kutinchev, Nikola Ivanov, Radko Dimitriev Greece:Crown Prince Constantine, Panagiotis Danglis, Pavlos Kountouriotis Serbia:Radomir Putnik, Petar... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq... // Macedonia may refer to: Macedonia (terminology), explanation of the term and the naming dispute Macedonia (region), a region of the Balkan peninsula which includes: Republic of Macedonia, a current state, also referred to as the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) Socialist Republic of Macedonia (1946-1991), a federal unit... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ...


As for Vojvodina, during the 1848 revolution in Austria, Serbs of Vojvodina established an autonomous region known as the Serbian Vojvodina. As of 1849, the region was transformed into a new Austrian crownland known as the Vojvodina of Serbia and Tamiš Banat. Although abolished in 1860, Habsburg emperors claimed the title Großwoiwode der Woiwodschaft Serbien until its unification with the Kingdom of Serbia in 1918. From March 1848 through July 1849, the Habsburgs Austrian Empire was threatened by revolutionary movements. ... Serbs in Vojvodina according to the 2002 census The Serbs are the largest ethnic group in the Vojvodina province of Serbia. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official languages Serbian, Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn1 Capital Novi Sad Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  21,500 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)  â€“ Density  2,031,992  94. ... Vojvodina of Serbia and TamiÅ¡ Banat and Principality of Serbia in 1849 The Vojvodina of Serbia and TamiÅ¡ Banat (Hungarian: Szerb Vajdaság és Temesi Bánság, German: Woiwodschaft Serbien und Temescher Banat, Serbian: Vojvodstvo Srbija i TamiÅ¡ki Banat) was an Austrian crownland, which existed between 1849 and... Grosswojwod is the German version, official under the Habsburg monarchy in the case of the present Serbian autonomous region Vojvodina, of an original Slavonic (more precisely, Serbo-Croatian) title of the comparative semantic model (see Great King), augmenting the far more common Slavonic family of princely titles (including Wojwod) discussed... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq...


World War I and the birth of Yugoslavia

Military alliances [disambiguation needed] in Europe at the end of WWI
Military alliances [disambiguation needed] in Europe at the end of WWI

On 28 June 1914 the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria at Sarajevo in Bosnia-Herzegovina by Gavrilo Princip (a South Slav unionist, Austrian citizen and member of Young Bosnia) led to Austria-Hungary declaring war on Kingdom of Serbia. In defense of its ally Serbia the Russian Empire started to mobilize its troops , which resulted in the German Empire declaring war on Russia (in support of Austria-Hungary). The retaliation by Austria-Hungary against Serbia activated a series of military alliances that set off a chain reaction of war declarations across the continent in what would become World War I within a month period. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (495x702, 100 KB)Portrait of King Peter I of Serbia, painted by UroÅ¡ Predić The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (495x702, 100 KB)Portrait of King Peter I of Serbia, painted by UroÅ¡ Predić The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term... King Peter I of Yugoslavia (Serbian Cyrillic: Петар I Карађорђевић, Petar I KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević) (29 June 1844 – 16 August 1921) was King of Serbia from 1903 to 1918 after which he became the first King of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. ... Combatants Central Powers, Bulgaria Serbia, Triple Entente The Serbian Campaign was fought from August 1914 until then end of the war in 1918 with a nearly two year break in the middle as Serbia was conquered. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1198x863, 726 KB) Description: Europe 1914 Source: www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1198x863, 726 KB) Description: Europe 1914 Source: www. ... Entente, meaning a diplomatic understanding, may refer to a number of agreements: The Entente Cordiale, 1904 between France and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A plaque commemorating the exact location of the Sarajevo Assassination On June 28, 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg were shot to death in Sarajevo, capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina, by Gavrilo Princip, a member of Young... For the Scottish rock band, see Franz Ferdinand (band). ... Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Entity Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ... The assassination in Sarajevo sparked the first World War. ... Gavrilo Princip (Serbian Cyrillic: Гаврило Принцип, IPA: ) (July 25, 1894) – April 28, 1918) was an ethnic Serb, but later proclaimed to be a Yugoslav Nationalist[1], with links to a group known as the Mlada Bosna, who assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914. ... Young Bosnia (Serbo-Croat: Млада Босна / Mlada Bosna) was a revolutionary youth organization in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the early 20th century. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... For German colonial territories, see German Colonial Empire. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... A military alliance is an agreement between two, or more, countries; related to wartime planning, commitments, or contingencies; such agreements can be both defensive and offensive. ... Causality or causation denotes the relationship between one event (called cause) and another event (called effect) which is the consequence (result) of the first. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...

Monument to the Unknown Hero - in memory of the Serb soldiers fallen in the WWI
Monument to the Unknown Hero - in memory of the Serb soldiers fallen in the WWI

The Serbian Army won several major victories against Austria-Hungary at the beginning of World War I, such as the Battle of Cer and Battle of Kolubara - marking the first Allied victories against the Central Powers in WWI.[23] Despite initial success eventually it was overpowered by the joint forces of the German Empire, Austria-Hungary and Bulgaria in 1915. Most of its army and some people went to exile to Greece and Corfu where it healed, regrouped and returned to Macedonian front (World War I) to lead a final breakthrough through enemy lines on 15 September 1918, freeing Serbia again and defeating Austro-Hungarian Empire and Bulgaria.[24] Serbia (with its major campaign) was a member of the Entente [disambiguation needed] which won World War I in November 1918. The country was militarilly classified as minor Entente power.[25] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1999 × 1499 pixels, file size: 458 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1999 × 1499 pixels, file size: 458 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free... Monument to the Unknown Hero, World War I The Monument to the Unknown Hero is located atop Mt. ... WWI may be an acronym for: World War I World Wrestling Industry This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Battle of Cer was one of the first battles of the First World War. ... Belligerents Austria-Hungary Serbia Commanders General Oskar Potiorek, Nicolas von Krìszèw Marshal Radomir Putnik General Živojin MiÅ¡ić Strength 83,000 75,000 Casualties and losses 58,000 65,000 The Battle of Kolubara was a major battle in Balkans during World War I. It was fought between... Look up ally in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Kaiser Wilhelm II, Mehmed V, Franz Joseph: The three emperors of the Central Powers in World War I. European military alliances in 1914. ... WWI may be an acronym for: World War I World Wrestling Industry This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For German colonial territories, see German Colonial Empire. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... This article is about the Greek island Kerkyra known in English as Corfu or Corcyra. ... Combatants Central Powers:  Austria-Hungary  German Empire Bulgaria Allied Powers: Serbia  France (1915-1918) United Kingdom (1915-1918) Greece (1916-1918) Italy (1916-1918) Commanders August von Mackensen Oskar Potiorek Nikola Zhekov Petar Bojović Živojin MiÅ¡ić Maurice Sarrail Adolphe Guillaumat Franchet dEsperey George Milne Panagiotis Danglis Conquest of... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Combatants  Austria-Hungary Bulgaria  German Empire Serbia Montenegro Commanders Oskar Potiorek Nikola Zhekov Kliment Boyadzhiev Georgi Todorov Ivan Valkov August von Mackensen Radomir Putnik Živojin MiÅ¡ić Stepa Stepanović Petar Bojović Nicholas I The Serbian Campaign was fought from August 1914, when Austria-Hungary invaded Serbia at the outset of... Entente, meaning a diplomatic understanding, may refer to a number of agreements: The Entente Cordiale, 1904 between France and the United Kingdom. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Casualties
Serbian soldiers were 8% of the total killed Entente forces in WWI.
Serbian soldiers were 8% of the total killed Entente forces in WWI.

Prior to the war, the Kingdom of Serbia had 4.5 million inhabitants.[26] According to the New York Times, in 1915 alone 150,000 people are estimated to have died during the worst typhus epidemics in world's history; aided by the American Red Cross and 44 foreign governments, the disease was suppressed by the end of the year.[27] According to FirstWorldWar.com, the number of civilian deaths is estimated at 650,000, primarily due to the typhus outbreak and famine, but also direct clashes with the occupiers.[28] Kingdom of Serbia ranked first among the Entente powers by the percentage of military deaths; 8% of the total Entente military deaths or 58% of the Serbian Army (420,000 strong) has perished during the conflict.[29] The total number of casualties ranges anywhere between 700,000 and 900,000- over 20% of Serbia's prewar size, and over ⅓ of its male population. L.A.Times and N.Y.Times placed the figure at over one million in their respective articles.[30][31] Image File history File links WorldWarI-MilitaryDeaths-EntentePowers-Piechart. ... Image File history File links WorldWarI-MilitaryDeaths-EntentePowers-Piechart. ... Arms of Armed Forces of Serbia The Military of Serbia (Serbian: Војска Србије - Vojska Srbije) is the successor to the Military of Serbia and Montenegro, which ceased to exist after Montenegro voted to end the union of Serbia and Montenegro. ... Map of the World showing the participants in World War I. Those fighting on the Allies side (at one point or another) are depicted in green, the Central Powers in orange, and neutral countries in gray. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... For the unrelated disease caused by Salmonella typhi, see Typhoid fever. ... A WWII-era poster encouraged American women to volunteer for the Red Cross as part of the war effort. ... For the unrelated disease caused by Salmonella typhi, see Typhoid fever. ... <nowiki>Insert non-formatted text hereBold text</nowiki>A famine is a social and economic crisis that is commonly accompanied by widespread malnutrition, starvation, epidemic and increased mortality. ... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq...


The extent of the Serbian demographic disaster can be illustrated by the statement of the Bulgarian Prime Minister Vasil Radoslavov: "Serbia ceased to exist" (New York Times, summer 1917).[32] In July 1918 the US Secretary of State Robert Lansing urged the Americans of all religions to pray for Serbia in their respective churches. [33] [34] Vasil Radoslavov (Bulgarian: ) (1854-1929) was a leading Bulgarian liberal politician who twice served as Prime Minister. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... This article is about the former Secretary of State. ... Combatants  Austria-Hungary Bulgaria  German Empire Serbia Montenegro Commanders Oskar Potiorek Nikola Zhekov Kliment Boyadzhiev Georgi Todorov Ivan Valkov August von Mackensen Radomir Putnik Živojin MiÅ¡ić Stepa Stepanović Petar Bojović Nicholas I The Serbian Campaign was fought from August 1914, when Austria-Hungary invaded Serbia at the outset of...

This article is part of the series on the
History of Serbia Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Serbia_small. ... One of the first Serbian states, Raška, was founded in the first half of the 7th century on Byzantine territory by the Unknown Archont, the founder of the House of Vlastimirović; it evolved into the Serbian Empire under the House of Nemanjić. In the modern era Serbia has been...

Medieval Serbia
Rascia
Zeta, Zachlumia,Travunia,Paganija
Serbian Empire
Moravian Serbia
Battle of Kosovo
Serbian Despotate
Ottoman/Habsburg Serbia
First Habsburg Serbia
Second Habsburg Serbia
Revolutionary Serbia
Modern Serbia
Principality of Serbia
Kingdom of Serbia
Serbian Campaign (World War I)
Kingdom of Yugoslavia
Serbia (1941-1944)
Republic of Užice
Socialist Republic of Serbia
(as part of SFR Yugoslavia)
FR Yugoslavia
Serbia and Montenegro
Republic of Serbia
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Тhe Serbian medieval history begins in the 5th century AD with the coming of the slavs on the Balkans, and ends with the occupation of Serbia by the Ottoman Empire in 1459 with the fall of the Serbian capital Smederevo. ... RaÅ¡ka (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... Zeta was one of the first Montenegrin states in the Middle Ages. ... Zahumlje in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio Zahumlje, also known as the Land of Hum and Chelm, was a medieval principality located in todays Herzegovina (modern day Bosnia and Herzegovina), and southern Dalmatia (modern day Republic of Croatia). ... Travunia in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio Travunia (Travunija, Travunja; Latin: Terbounia) was a medieval Slavic realm centered at Trebinje in todays eastern Herzegovina (modern day Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro), and southern Dalmatia (modern day Republic of Croatia). ... Paganija or Pagania or Narenta or Neretva Pagania in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio Greek map of Serb lands in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio This was a medieval principality located in todays Northern Dalmatia. ... The Serbian Empire (Serbian: Српско Царство, Srpsko Carstvo) was a medieval empire in the Balkans that emerged from the medieval Serbian kingdom in the 14th century. ... Lazar Hrebeljanović, prince of Moravian Serbia (1371-1389) Moravian Serbia (Serbian: Moravska Srbija, Моравска Србија) was the most important of the Serbian states that emerged from the collapse of the Serbian Empire in the 14th century. ... This page is about the Battle of Kosovo of 1389; for other battles, see Battle of Kosovo (disambiguation). ... The Serbian Despotate (Serbian: Српска деспотовина or Srpska despotovina) was among the last Serbian states to be conquered by the Ottoman Empire. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Serbia (1718-1739) Serbia was a province of the Habsburg Monarchy from 1718 to 1739. ... KaraÄ‘orÄ‘e Petrović, leader of Serbian uprising in 1804 Serbia gained its autonomy from the Ottoman Empire in two revolutions in 1804 and 1815, though Turkish troops continued to garrison the capital, Belgrade until 1867. ... Principality of Serbia and Vojvodina of Serbia and TamiÅ¡ Banat in 1849 Serbian Principality was a state in the Balkans that came into existence as a result of First Serbian Uprising and Second Serbian Uprising between 1804 and 1816. ... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq... Combatants  Austria-Hungary Bulgaria  German Empire Serbia Montenegro Commanders Oskar Potiorek Nikola Zhekov Kliment Boyadzhiev Georgi Todorov Ivan Valkov August von Mackensen Radomir Putnik Živojin MiÅ¡ić Stepa Stepanović Petar Bojović Nicholas I The Serbian Campaign was fought from August 1914, when Austria-Hungary invaded Serbia at the outset of... Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbian, German (in Banat) Political structure Military administration Military Commander  - 1941 Franz Böhme  - 1941-1944 (?) (Unknown) Serbian government leader  - 1941 Milan Aćimović  - 1941-1944 Milan Nedić Historical era World War II  - Invasion of Yugoslavia April 1, 1941  - Military defeat May, 1944 Currency Serbian Dinar... The Republic of Užice (Serbo-Croatian: Užička Republika) was a short-lived military mini-state that existed in Autumn 1941 in the western part of Nazi-occupied Serbia. ... Anthem: Bože pravde (English: God of Justice) Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Serbian written with the Cyrillic alphabet1 Government Republic  - Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica  - President Boris Tadić Establishment    - Formation 814   - First Serbian Uprising 1804   - Internationally recognized July 13, 1878   - Kingdom of SCS created December 1, 1918   - SCG dissolved... Motto Brotherhood and Unity Anthem Hey, Slavs Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throughout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ... Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbian Government Republic President  - 1992 - 1993 Dobrica Ćosić  - 1993 - 1997 Zoran Lilić  - 1997 – 2000 Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević  - 2000 - 2003 Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Prime Minister  - 1992 - 1993 Milan Panić  - 1993 - 1998 Radoje Kontić  - 1998 - 2000 Momir Bulatović  - 2000 - 2001 Zoran Žižić  - 2001 - 2003 DragiÅ¡a Pe...

Kingdom of Yugoslavia ("First Yugoslavia")
See also: Kingdom of Yugoslavia

Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... Map of the Syrmia region Syrmia (Serbian: Srem (Cyrillic: Срем), Croatian: Srijem) is a fertile region of the Pannonian plain in Europe, between the Danube and Sava rivers. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Banat, Bačka and Baranja map The Banat, Bačka and Baranja was a de facto existing province of the Kingdom of Serbia and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes between October 1918 and March 1919. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Flag Anthem: Ubavoj nam Crnoj Gori, Onamo, namo! The Kingdom of Montenegro in 1913 Capital Cetinje Language(s) Serbian Religion Eastern Orthodox Government Monarchy King Nicholas I Historical era World War I  - Established 28 August, 1910  - Disestablished 26 November, 1918 Currency Montenegrin perper The Kingdom of Montenegro (Serbian: Краљевина Црнe Горe... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Flag Capital Zagreb Language(s) Slovenian and Serbo-Croatian Government Republic President¹ Anton KoroÅ¡ec Vice presidents¹ Ante Pavelić Svetozar Pribićević Historical era World War I  - Independence 29 October, 1918  - Joined Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes 1 December, 1918 ¹ President and vice presidents of the National Council. ... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... King Peter I of Serbia (Serbian Cyrillic: Петар I Карађорђевић, Petar I KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević) (29 June 1844 – 16 August 1921) was King of Serbia from 1903 to 1918 after which he became the first King of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. ... King Peter I of Serbia (Serbian Cyrillic: Петар I Карађорђевић, Petar I KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević) (29 June 1844 – 16 August 1921) was King of Serbia from 1903 to 1918 after which he became the first King of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. ...

World War II

Coup d'état and "Nedić's Serbia"

The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was in a precarious position in World War II. Fearing an invasion by Nazi Germany, Yugoslav Regent Prince Paul signed the Tripartite Pact with the Axis powers on 25 March 1941, triggering massive demonstrations in Belgrade. On March 27, Prince Paul was overthrown by a military coup d'état and replaced with the 17-year-old King Peter II. General Dušan Simović became Peter's Prime Minister and the Kingdom of Yugoslavia withdrew its support for the Axis. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Image:Prince Pavle of Yugoslavia. ... The Tripartite Treaty (1906) also refers to a 1906 treaty concerning the Nile river (see Hydropolitics in the Nile Basin. ... Black: Zenith of the Axis Powers Capital Not applicable Political structure Military alliance Historical era World War II  - Tripartite Pact September 27, 1940  - Anti-Comintern Pact November 25, 1936  - Pact of Steel May 22, 1939  - Dissolved 1945 This article is about the independent countries (states) that comprised the Axis powers. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image:Prince Pavle of Yugoslavia. ... Coup redirects here. ... Peter II of Yugoslavia, locally known as Kralj Petar II KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević (Serbian Cyrillic: Краљ Петар II Карађорђевић) (6 September 1923 – 3 November 1970), was the second, as well as the last, King of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... Black: Zenith of the Axis Powers Capital Not applicable Political structure Military alliance Historical era World War II  - Tripartite Pact September 27, 1940  - Anti-Comintern Pact November 25, 1936  - Pact of Steel May 22, 1939  - Dissolved 1945 This article is about the independent countries (states) that comprised the Axis powers. ...


In response to this Adolf Hitler launched an invasion of Yugoslavia on April 6. By 17 April, an unconditional surrender was signed in Belgrade. After the invasion, the Kingdom of Yugoslavia was dissolved and Serbia was set up as a Nazi German-occupied puppet state. In 1941, Serbia included present-day Central Serbia and the Banat. This German client state was popularly known as "Nedić's Serbia" due to its head of state, Milan Nedić. While this state formally recognized King Peter II of Yugoslavia as its monarch, he instead headed the Yugoslav government in exile which was generally recognized by the Allies. Hitler redirects here. ... “April War” redirects here. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... A puppet state is a state whose government, though notionally of the same culture as the governed people - owes its existence (or other major debt) to being installed, supported or controlled by a more powerful entity, typically a foreign power. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Map of Central Serbia Central Serbia (Serbian: Централна Србија or Centralna Srbija), also referred to as Serbia proper or Narrower Serbia (Serbian: Ужа Србија or Uža Srbija), is the region of Serbia that lies outside the northern autonomous province of Vojvodina and the southern UN protectorate of Kosovo (UNMIK). ... For other uses, see Banat (disambiguation) Banat region, 1941-1944 The Banat was a political entity established after occupation and partition of Kingdom of Yugoslavia by the Axis Powers. ... According to the notion of client states, just as a client of a corporation remains dependent on the corporation for a continued supply of products, and just as it is in the companys interest to make expendable products which need to be replaced regularly, client states of the two... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Milan Nedić Serbian Cyrillic Милан Недић (September 2, 1878 – 1946) was a Serbian soldier and politician who was a major collaborator during World War II. Nedić was born in Grocka, Serbia. ... Look up king in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Peter II of Yugoslavia, locally known as Kralj Petar II KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević (Serbian Cyrillic: Краљ Петар II Карађорђевић) (6 September 1923 – 3 November 1970), was the second, as well as the last, King of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. ... This article is about the independent states that comprised the Allies. ...


Not all of what is present-day Serbia was included as part of "Nedić's Serbia." Some of the contemporary Republic of Serbia was occupied by the Kingdom of Croatia, the Regency of Hungary, the Kingdom of Bulgaria, the Kingdom of Albania, and Fascist Italy. In addition to being occupied by the Wehrmacht, from 1941 to 1945, Serbia was the scene of a civil war between Royalist Chetniks commanded by Draža Mihailović and Communist Partisans commanded by Josip Broz Tito. Against these forces were arrayed Nedić's relatively weak units of the Serbian Volunteer Corps and Serbian State Guard. Serbia and Montenegro  -Serbia    -Kosovo and Metohia    -Vojvodina  -Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  - Total  - % water 88,361 km² n/a Population  - Total (1998)  - Density 11,206,847 126. ... Capital Zagreb Language(s) Croatian Religion Roman Catholicism Political structure Puppet-state King  - 1941-1943 Tomislav II Poglavnik  - 1941-1945 Ante Pavelić Legislature None Historical era World War II  - Established April 10, 1941  - Disestablished May 8, 1945 Population  - 1941 est. ... This article is about the European country. ... For other uses, see Bulgaria (disambiguation). ... Flag Anthem Himni i Flamurit Capital Tirana Language(s) Albanian Religion none Government Constitutional monarchy King  - 1939-1943 Victor Emmanuel III Lieutenant-general  - 1939-1943 Francesco Jacomoni di San Savino  - 1943 Alberto Pariani Historical era World War II  - Italian Invasion April 7, 1939  - Disestablished July 25, 1943 Currency frang ar... Anthem Marcia Reale dOrdinanza (Royal March of Ordinance)¹ The Kingdom of Italy at the height of its power in 1940. ... The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, a stylized version of the Iron Cross, the emblem of the Wehrmacht. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article is about the definition of the specific type of war. ... Monarchism is the advocacy of the establishment, preservation, or restoration of a monarchy as a form of government in a nation. ... The Chetniks (Serbian: Четници, ÄŒetnici) were a Royalist paramilitary formations operating in the Balkans before and during World Wars. ... Dragoljub Draža Mihailović (Serbian Cyrillic: Драгољуб Дража Михаиловић; Anglicised: Drazha Mihailovich ; also known as Чича or ÄŒiča) (April 27, 1893 - July 17, 1946) was a Serbian general now primarily remembered as leader of the resistance movement Yugoslav Royal Army in the Fatherland during World War II. After the war, he was tried... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Yugoslav Partisan Flag The Partisans (lat. ... Tito redirects here. ... SDK Amblem . ... Serbian State Guard (SDS) also known as nedićevci was the name of the military force that was used to complement the civil police units within Nedićs Serbia. ...

Memorial signs with Serbian claims of victim counts, situated on the Republika Srpska side of the Sava river
Memorial signs with Serbian claims of victim counts, situated on the Republika Srpska side of the Sava river

"Nedić's Serbia" was the home of several Nazi concentration camps, including: Banjica, Crveni krst, Sajmište, and Topovske Šupe. These camps were typically operated by the Germans with assistance from local collaborators. Not to be confused with Serbia. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... A concentration camp is a large detention centre created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ... Museum of Banjica concentration camp One of the concentration camps in Serbia. ... Crveni krst was a concentration camp located in the Serbian city of NiÅ¡, and it operated by the Serbian quisling government during the Second World War. ... The SajmiÅ¡te concentration camp was one of the complexes of German concentration camps in Serbia that were almost exclusive for Serbian Jews. ...


Persecution of Serbs in wartime-Croatia
Main article: World War II persecution of Serbs

Camps were not just set up in Serbia, but were located throughout what had been the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. Serbs, Jews, and Roma in the neighboring Independent State of Croatia (Nezavisna Država Hrvatska, or NDH, or Kingdom of Croatia) were subjected to large-scale persecution and killings, particularly in the infamous Jasenovac concentration camp. United States Holocaust Encyclopedia[35] and Jewish Virtual Library[36] estimate that there were between 53,000 and 96,000 Serb victims in Jasenovac and between 330,000 and 390,000 killed throughout this state. The Yad Vashem center reports that over 500,000 Serbs were killed in the entire NDH [37], with some 600,000 people of many nationalities and ethnicities murdered in one camp Jasenovac. [38] After the war, the official Yugoslav sources estimated over 700,000 victims, mostly Serbs.[clarify][citation needed] Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Languages Historical Jewish languages Hebrew, Yiddish, Ladino, others Liturgical languages: Hebrew and Aramaic Predominant spoken languages: The vernacular language of the home nation in the Diaspora, significantly including English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Russian Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Arabs and other Semitic groups For the Jewish religion, see Judaism. ... Languages Romani, languages of native region Religions Christianity, Islam Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) The Romani people (as a noun, singular Rom, plural Roma; sometimes Rrom, Rroma) or Romanies are an ethnic group living in many communities all over the world. ... Capital Zagreb Language(s) Croatian Religion Roman Catholicism Political structure Puppet-state King  - 1941-1943 Tomislav II Poglavnik  - 1941-1945 Ante Pavelić Legislature None Historical era World War II  - Established April 10, 1941  - Disestablished May 8, 1945 Population  - 1941 est. ... Capital Zagreb Language(s) Croatian Religion Roman Catholicism Political structure Puppet-state King  - 1941-1943 Tomislav II Poglavnik  - 1941-1945 Ante Pavelić Legislature None Historical era World War II  - Established April 10, 1941  - Disestablished May 8, 1945 Population  - 1941 est. ... Capital Zagreb Language(s) Croatian Religion Roman Catholicism Political structure Puppet-state King  - 1941-1943 Tomislav II Poglavnik  - 1941-1945 Ante Pavelić Legislature None Historical era World War II  - Established April 10, 1941  - Disestablished May 8, 1945 Population  - 1941 est. ... “Jasenovac” redirects here. ...


Communist Yugoslavia ("Second Yugoslavia")

On November 29, 1945, the "Constitutional Assembly" has proclaimed the abolishion of the Serbian-led monarchy- without a popular referendum[39] - and the royal family banned from returning to the country.[40][41] New communist dictatorship has been imposed, with Serbia as one of 6 federal units of the new state -"Second Yugoslavia," the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia (Socijalistička Federativna Republika Jugoslavija, or SFRJ). The Republic was led by Josip Broz Tito, an ethnic Croat, until his death in 1980. Serbia's borders have been decimated in other republics's interest; so called Serbia proper was only a fraction of Serbia's 1918 size (56,124km²), with Croatia surpassing Serbia in terms of territory (56,546km²). Further on, the Constitution of 1974 has stripped Serbia off its influence over its two regional parliaments in Kosovo and Vojvodina, allowing them to represent themselves independently from Belgrade in the federal Parliament.[42] is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ... The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ... Tito redirects here. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a south Slavic people mostly living in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (where theyre one of the constitutive nations). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The term Serbia proper is often used in English to refer to the part of Serbia that lies outside the northern and southern autonomous provinces of Kosovo and Vojvodina. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ...


Lazar Koliševski, a Macedonian, became President briefly upon Tito's death and was followed by others who also held office briefly as the SFRJ slowly dissolved. In 1989, the League of Communists of Serbia selected Slobodan Milošević to become the President of Serbia. Milošević was controversial in Yugoslavia because he opposed Kosovo's autonomy and that his rise to power through the Anti-bureaucratic revolution was done through mass protests which pushed out the leadership of the autonomous provinces and also the republic of Montenegro which installed politicians allied to Milošević. Milošević also aggravated the situation in post-Tito Yugoslavia by alleging that certain politicians in Yugoslavia were anti-Serb. His pressure to change the constitution to limit Kosovo's autonomy and endorsing a one-member-one-vote system in the Yugoslav League of Communists congress which would give a numerical majority to the Serbs deteriorated relations in the League of Communists which collapsed along republican lines. With Slovenia, Croatia, Macedonia [disambiguation needed], and Bosnia and Herzegovina all working to secede from the SFRJ, and no official leadership of the SFRJ from 1991 to 1992, the President of Serbia was essentially the same as being the President of Yugoslavia. Lazar KoliÅ¡evski (Лазар Колишевски) also Lazar Penev Kolishev (Лазар Пенев Колишев) (1914–2002) was a Communist political leader in Socialist Republic of Macedonia closely allied with Tito. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The League of Communists of Serbia was the Serbian branch of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia, the sole legal party of Yugoslavia from 1945 to 1990. ... MiloÅ¡ević redirects here. ... Presidential Standard of Serbia The President of Serbia is the head of state of the Republic of Serbia. ... The term Anti-bureaucratic revolution refers to a series of mass protests against governments of Yugoslavian republics and autonomous provinces during 1988 and 1989, which lead to resignation of leaderships of Kosovo, Vojvodina and Montenegro, and capture of power of politicians close to Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević. While its name is... // Macedonia may refer to: Macedonia (terminology), explanation of the term and the naming dispute Macedonia (region), a region of the Balkan peninsula which includes: Republic of Macedonia, a current state, also referred to as the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) Socialist Republic of Macedonia (1946-1991), a federal unit...


Federation of Serbia and Montenegro ("Third Yugoslavia") and the Kosovo War

By 1992, Slovenia, Croatia, Macedonia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina had all declared independence from Yugoslavia, resulting in the collapse of the SFRJ and the outbreak of war. In response, Serbia and Montenegro formed the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Savezna Republika Jugoslavija, or SRJ). The Serbian government initially supported the Serbs of Croatia and the Bosnian Serbs in the Yugoslav wars fought from 1991 to 1995. As a result, sanctions were imposed by the United Nations, which led to political isolation and economic decline of the SRJ.[43] Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbian Government Republic President  - 1992 - 1993 Dobrica Ćosić  - 1993 - 1997 Zoran Lilić  - 1997 – 2000 Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević  - 2000 - 2003 Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Prime Minister  - 1992 - 1993 Milan Panić  - 1993 - 1998 Radoje Kontić  - 1998 - 2000 Momir Bulatović  - 2000 - 2001 Zoran Žižić  - 2001 - 2003 DragiÅ¡a Pe... The Serbs of Croatia are the largest national minority in Croatia today since they currently comprise around of Croatias total population. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Belligerents Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo Liberation Army, NATO, UCPMB SFR Yugoslavia, Serbs of Bosnia and Herzegovina Serbs of Croatia Serb Volunteer Guard, FR Yugoslavia Commanders Janez JanÅ¡a, Franjo TuÄ‘man, Alija Izetbegović, Hashim Thaci, Wesley Clark, Javier Solana, Muhamet Xhemajli, Ridvan Chazimi-Leshi, Ali Ahmeti Borisav Jovi... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... International sanctions are actions taken by countries against others for political reasons, either unilaterally or multilaterally. ... UN redirects here. ...


In 1995, the Dayton Agreement was signed in Paris, France. This agreement ended the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the war in Croatia. For the time being, the SRJ was officially at peace. Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, also known as the Dayton Agreement, Dayton Accords, Paris Protocol or Dayton-Paris Agreement, is the peace agreement reached at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio in November 1995, and formally signed in Paris on December 14... This article is about the capital of France. ... Combatants  Bosnia and Herzegovina Volunteers from Islamic countries Croatian Community of Herzeg-Bosnia  Croatia Volunteers from Western Europe  Republika Srpska  Yugoslavia Various paramilitary units from FR Yugoslavia Volunteers from Eastern Europe Commanders Alija Izetbegović (President of Bosnia and Herzegovina) Sefer Halilović (Army chief of staff 1992-1993) Rasim Delić (Army... Combatants Croatian military Paramilitary organisations Republic of Serb Krajina Army Yugoslav Peoples Army Bosnian Serb Army Republic of Serbia Paramilitary organisations Commanders Franjo TuÄ‘man (President of Croatia) Anton Tus (Chief of Staff of Croatian Army 1991-1992) Janko Bobetko (Chief of Staff of Croatian Army 1992-1995) Atif...


Between 1998 and 1999, Serbia's official peace was broken when the situation in Kosovo worsened with continued clashes in Kosovo between the Serbian and Yugoslavian security forces on one side and the ethnic Albanian Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) on the other. What became known as the Kosovo War prompted "Operation Allied Force." This operation included aerial bombardment of Serbia by forces of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The bombings lasted for 78 days. The bombings were ended following negotiations on the border between the Republic of Macedonia and the SRJ. The negotiations were held between NATO spokesperson Mike Jackson and SRJ officials speaking on behalf of Milošević. It was agreed that Milošević would order the withdrawal of all SRJ security forces, including the military and the police, and agree to have them replaced by a body of international police. The agreement upheld Yugoslavian (later Serbian) sovereignty over Kosovo but replaced Serbian government of the province with a UN administration, the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK). NATO also agreed to end its demand to station NATO troops across the whole of the SRJ. This had been one of its demands at the Rambouillet negotiations prior to the bombing campaign.[44] Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Ushtria Çlirimtare e Kosovës. ... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... An USAF F-15E takes off from Aviano, Italy Operation Allied Force aka Kosovo-NATO War was NATOs military operation against Federal Republic of Yugoslavia that lasted from 24 March to 11 June 1999 and is considered a major part of Kosovo War. ... NATO 2002 Summit The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), sometimes called North Atlantic Alliance, Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for defence collaboration established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on April 4, 1949. ... For an explanation of terms related to Macedonia, see Macedonia (terminology). ... General Sir Michael Mike Jackson, GCB, CBE, DSO, ADC Gen (born 21 March 1944) is a British army officer, currently Chief of the General Staff. ... The United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo or UNMIK is an interim civilian administration in Kosovo, under the authority of the United Nations. ... The United Nations Mission in Kosovo or UNMIK is an interim civilian administration of the Serbian province (as part of Serbia and Montenegro) called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), under the authority of the United Nations. ...


Democratic transition

In September 2000, opposition parties claimed that Milošević committed fraud in routine federal elections. Street protests and rallies throughout Serbia eventually forced Milošević to concede and hand over power to the recently formed Democratic Opposition of Serbia (Demokratska opozicija Srbije, or DOS). The DOS was a broad coalition of anti-Milošević parties. On 5 October, the fall of Milošević led to end of the international isolation Serbia suffered during the Milošević years. Serbia's new leaders announced that Serbia would seek to join the European Union (EU). In October 2005, the EU opened negotiations with Serbia for a Stabilization and Association Agreement (SAA), a preliminary step towards joining the EU. For other uses, see September (disambiguation). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Democratic Opposition of Serbia was an alliance of political parties in Serbia, formed as an alliance against the ruling Socialist Party of Serbia and its leader, Slobodan Milosevic. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... The 5th October Overthrow (sometimes colloquialy called the Bulldozer Revolution) is a term refering to the series of events that occurred in 2000 in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, culminating in the downfall of Slobodan MiloÅ¡evićs regime on October 5, 2000. ... For other uses, see October (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A European Union Association Agreement (Association Agreement) is a treaty between the European Union (EU) and a non-EU country that creates a framework for co-operation between them. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: European Union The European Union On-Line Official EU website, europa. ...


From 2003 to 2006, Serbia has been part of the "State Union of Serbia and Montenegro." This union was the successor to the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SRJ). Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On 21 May 2006, Montenegro held a referendum to determine whether or not to end its union with Serbia. The next day, state-certified results showed 55.4% of voters in favor of independence. This was just above the 55% required by the referendum.[45] is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... Motto Brotherhood and Unity Anthem Hey, Slavs Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throughout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ... Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbian Government Republic President  - 1992 - 1993 Dobrica Ćosić  - 1993 - 1997 Zoran Lilić  - 1997 – 2000 Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević  - 2000 - 2003 Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Prime Minister  - 1992 - 1993 Milan Panić  - 1993 - 1998 Radoje Kontić  - 1998 - 2000 Momir Bulatović  - 2000 - 2001 Zoran Žižić  - 2001 - 2003 DragiÅ¡a Pe...

Republic of Serbia

On 5 June 2006, following the referendum in Montenegro, the National Assembly of Serbia declared the "Republic of Serbia" to be the legal successor to the "State Union of Serbia and Montenegro." [48] Serbia and Montenegro became separate nations. However, the possibility of a dual citizenship for the Serbs of Montenegro is a matter of the ongoing negotiations between the two governments. is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the country in Europe. ... The unicameral parliament of Serbia is known as the National Assembly of the Republic of Serbia (Serbian: Народна скупштина Републике Србије / Narodna skupština Republike Srbije). ... Serbs compose the second largest nation in the Republic of Montenegro after the Montenegrins (around 200,000), but are the largest in the entire Montenegrin community in the world, forming a 400,000 strong population and absolute majority in all Montenegrin citizens. ...


Government and politics

Main article: Politics of Serbia
See also: Foreign relations of Serbia, Elections in Serbia, Human rights in Serbia, and Constitutional status of Kosovo

On 4 February 2003 the parliament of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia agreed to a weaker form of cooperation between Serbia and Montenegro within a confederal state called Serbia and Montenegro. The Union ceased to exist following Montenegrin and Serbian declarations of independence in June 2006. Politics of Serbia and Montenegro takes place in a framework of a federal parliamentary republic, with a multi-party system. ... Due to the Montenegrin independence referendum from the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Serbia and Montenegro will be inhereted, along with all of its holdings, by the Republic of Serbia. ... Serbia elects on national level a legislature. ... Serbia has a UN facility at is Belgrade Airport for applicants for asylum in accordance with international policies. ... The constitutional status of Kosovo has been the subject of repeated political disputes since the region was incorporated into Serbia in 1912. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The National Assembly is either a legislature, or the lower house of a bicameral legislature in some countries. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Parliament of Serbia and Montenegro (Скупштина Србије и Црне Горе/SkupÅ¡tina Srbije i Crne Gore) is the national assembly of Serbia and Montenegro. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


After the ousting of Slobodan Milošević on 5 October 2000, the country was governed by the Democratic Opposition of Serbia. Tensions gradually increased within the coalition until the Democratic Party of Serbia (DSS) left the government, leaving the Democratic Party (DS) in overall control. MiloÅ¡ević redirects here. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Democratic Opposition of Serbia was an alliance of political parties in Serbia, formed as an alliance against the ruling Socialist Party of Serbia and its leader, Slobodan Milosevic. ... The Democratic Party of Serbia (Serbian: Демократска странка Србије or Demokratska stranka Srbije ) is the largest centre-right political party in Serbia. ... The Democratic Party (Serbian: Демократска странка or Demokratska stranka,  ) is the largest center-left political party in Serbia. ...


Serbia held a two-day referendum on October 28 and October 29, 2006, that ratified a new constitution to replace the Milošević-era constitution. A referendum on a proposed draft of the new Serbian constitution was held on October 28 and 29 October 2006 and has resulted in the draft constitution being approved by the Serbian electorate. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The current President of Serbia is Boris Tadić, leader of the center-left Democratic Party (DS). He was reelected with 50,5% of the vote in the second round of the Serbian presidential election held on 4 February 2008. Presidential Standard of Serbia The President of Serbia is the head of state of the Republic of Serbia. ... Boris Tadić (Serbian: ; born 15 January 1958) is the President of Serbia. ... The Democratic Party (Serbian: Демократска странка or Demokratska stranka,  ) is the largest center-left political party in Serbia. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


Serbia held Parliamentary elections on 21 January 2007. The right-wing Serbian Radical Party claimed victory, but no party has won an absolute majority. Following last-minute negotiations on the part of the DS and DSS political parties, an agreement was reached on the make-up of the country's new government on 11 May 2007 between DS, DSS and G17 Plus.[49] is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Serbian Radical Party (Serbian: Српска радикална странка or Srpska radikalna stranka, SRS) is a nationalist far-right political party in Serbia. ...


On 13 March, 2008 the Serbian government collapsed when "President Boris Tadic dissolved parliament Thursday and called early elections for May 11" [50] citing the growing rift between himself and nationalist Prime Minister Vojislav Kostunica over membership in the EU and Kosovo's Independence. The government's collapse came less than a month after ethnic Albanian majority Kosovo unilaterally proclaimed independence from Serbia, which considers the territory its historic heartland.


Administrative subdivisions

Serbia is divided into 24 districts plus the City of Belgrade. The districts and the City of Belgrade are further divided into municipalities. Serbia has 2 autonomous provinces: Vojvodina with (7 districts, 46 municipalities) and Kosovo and Metohija. Kosovo has declared independence but is still presently under the administration of the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo; international negotiations began in 2006 to determine its final status (See Kosovo status process); Kosovo declared its independence on 17 February 2008, which Belgrade opposes. Serbia map Serbia is made up of 108 municipalities. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Subdivisions of Serbia. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Districts and Municipalities of Serbia Serbia is made up of 108 municipalities (opÅ¡tina). ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Kosovo (known in Albanian as Kosova, in Serbian as Косово и Метохија / Kosovo i Metohija, and in English simply as Kosovo) is a province in southern Serbia. ... The United Nations Mission in Kosovo or UNMIK is an interim civilian administration of the Serbian province (as part of Serbia and Montenegro) called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), under the authority of the United Nations. ... Kosovo is the subject of a long-running political and territorial dispute between the Serbian (and previously, the Yugoslav) government and Kosovos largely ethnic-Albanian population. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


The part of Serbia that is neither in Kosovo nor in Vojvodina is called Central Serbia. Central Serbia is not an administrative division, unlike the two autonomous provinces, and it has no regional government of its own. In English this region is often called "Serbia proper" to denote "the part of the Republic of Serbia not including the provinces of Vojvodina and Kosovo", as the Library of Congress puts it.[51] This usage was also employed in Serbo-Croatian during the Yugoslav era (in the form of "uža Srbija", literally: "narrow Serbia"). Its use in English is purely geographical, without any particular political meaning being implied. Map of Central Serbia Central Serbia (Serbian: Централна Србија or Centralna Srbija), also referred to as Serbia proper or Narrower Serbia (Serbian: Ужа Србија or Uža Srbija), is the region of Serbia that lies outside the northern autonomous province of Vojvodina and the southern UN protectorate of Kosovo (UNMIK). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The term Serbia proper is often used in English to refer to the part of Serbia that lies outside the northern and southern autonomous provinces of Kosovo and Vojvodina. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Demographics

See also: Demographic history of Serbia, Demographic history of Vojvodina, and Demographic history of Kosovo
Ethnic map of Serbia according to the 2002 Census
Ethnic map of Serbia according to the 2002 Census
Serbia (excluding Kosovo) in 2002
Serbs
 
82.86%
Hungarians
 
3.91%
Bosniaks
 
1.82%
Roma
 
1.44%
Yugoslavs
 
1.08%
Other
 
9.79%


Serbia is populated mostly by Serbs. Significant minorities include Hungarians, Bosniaks, Roma, Croats, Czechs and Slovaks, Montenegrins, Macedonians, Bulgarians, Romanians, etc. The northern province of Vojvodina is ethnically and religiously diverse. Ethnic map of Serbia // Demographics of Serbia Population of Serbia (including Kosovo) Serbs 66% Albanians 17% Hungarians 3. ... Ethnic map of Serbia Demographics of Serbia Population of Serbia (including Kosovo) Serbs 66% Albanians 17% Hungarians 3. ... Vojvodinas demographic history reflects its rich history and its former location at the border of the Ottoman and Habsburg empires and at the confluence of various peoples, making it a hotbed of invasion, colonization, and assimilation processes. ... // Ottoman Rule 14th century The Dečani Charter from 1330[citation needed] contained detailed list of households and chartered villages in Metohija and northwestern Albania: 3 of 89 settlements were Albanian, the other being non-Albanian. ... Map of Central Serbia Central Serbia (Serbian: Централна Србија or Centralna Srbija), also referred to as Serbia proper or Narrower Serbia (Serbian: Ужа Србија or Uža Srbija), is the region of Serbia that lies outside the northern autonomous province of Vojvodina and the southern UN protectorate of Kosovo (UNMIK). ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... The definition of a minority group can vary, depending on specific context, but generally refers to either a sociological sub-group that does not form either a majority or a plurality of the total population, or a group that, while not necessarily a numerical minority, is disadvantaged or otherwise has... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Language(s) Bosnian Religion(s) Predominantly Islam Related ethnic groups Slavs (South Slavs) The Bosniaks or Bosniacs[1] (Bosnian: BoÅ¡njaci, IPA: ) are a South Slavic people, living mainly in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia) and the Sandžak region of Serbia and Montenegro, with a smaller autochthonous population also present... The Roma people (pronounced rahma, singular Rom, sometimes Rroma, and Rrom) along with the closely related Sinti people are commonly known as Gypsies in English, and as Tsigany in most of Europe. ... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Montenegrins (Serbian/Montenegrin: Црногорци/Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ...


According to the last official census[53] data collected in 2002, ethnic composition of Serbia is:

According to the poll conducted on 1 January 2006 by the Yugoslav Survey Society Serbia had 7,395,600 inhabitants - a 1.5% decrease comparing to the 2002 Census.[54] Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Hungarian may refer to: Hungary or the Kingdom of Hungary. ... Language(s) Bosnian Religion(s) Predominantly Islam Related ethnic groups Slavs (South Slavs) The Bosniaks or Bosniacs[1] (Bosnian: Bošnjaci, IPA: ) are a South Slavic people, living mainly in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia) and the Sandžak region of Serbia and Montenegro, with a smaller autochthonous population also present... Look up Roma in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Yugoslavs (Bosnian: Jugosloveni; Macedonian, Serbian Cyrillic: Југословени; Latinic: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) is an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ...


The census was not conducted in Serbia's southern province of Kosovo, which is under administration by the United Nations. According to the EU estimates however, the overall population is estimated at 1,350,000 inhabitants, of whom 90% are Albanians, 8% Serbs and others 2%.There are also around 200,000 Serbian and other refugees,who are expelled from Kosovo. Refugees and IDPs in Serbia form between 7% and 7.5% of its population – about half a million refugees sought refuge in the country following the series of Yugoslav wars (from Croatia mainly, to an extent Bosnia and Herzegovina too and the IDPs from Kosovo, which are the most numerous at over 200,000) [55] Serbia has the largest refugee population in Europe.[56] Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: European Union The European Union On-Line Official EU website, europa. ... What is Refugees? Refugees is a simple internet community that was created as a homeland and haven for the members of the message board MegaMassMedia. ... Belligerents Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo Liberation Army, NATO, UCPMB SFR Yugoslavia, Serbs of Bosnia and Herzegovina Serbs of Croatia Serb Volunteer Guard, FR Yugoslavia Commanders Janez JanÅ¡a, Franjo TuÄ‘man, Alija Izetbegović, Hashim Thaci, Wesley Clark, Javier Solana, Muhamet Xhemajli, Ridvan Chazimi-Leshi, Ali Ahmeti Borisav Jovi... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...

Cities
Belgrade, the capital city
Belgrade, the capital city
The main square in Niš
The main square in Niš
National Public Library in Priština.
National Public Library in Priština.

Major cities (over 50,000 inhabitants in urban area) — 2002 census data (2005/2006 data for Novi Sad/Belgrade[57]). This is a list of cities and towns in Serbia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata NoviBG_Nov30_2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata NoviBG_Nov30_2005. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Nis redirects here. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1674, 448 KB) This picture shows the National Public Library in Prishtina city. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1674, 448 KB) This picture shows the National Public Library in Prishtina city. ...

City Population
Urban Metropolitan
Belgrade 1,576,124 1,689,667
Priština 500,000 600,000
Novi Sad 255,071 333,895
Niš 236,722 252,131
Kragujevac 147,473 211,580
Subotica 99,471 147,758
Zrenjanin 79,545 131,509
Leskovac 78,030 156,252
Smederevo 77,808 109,867
Pančevo 77,087 127,162
Kruševac 75,256 131,368
Čačak 73,217 117,012
Užice 63,577 83,022
Valjevo 61,035 96,761
Kraljevo 57,411 121,707
Šabac 55,240 122,893
Vranje 55,052 87,288
Novi Pazar 54,604 85,249
Sombor 51,471 97,263

For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... The Palace of Youth building The building of the former Rilindja newspaper, also the tallest in PriÅ¡tina. ... For other uses, see Novi Sad (disambiguation). ... Nis redirects here. ... Location of Kragujevac within Serbia Coordinates: Country Serbia District Å umadija Municipalities 5 Founded 1476 Government  - Mayor Veroljub Stevanović (SDPO)  - Ruling parties SDPO Area  - City 835 km²  (322. ... Subotica city hall Subotica (Serbian: Суботица or Subotica, Hungarian: Szabadka, Croatian: Subotica, German: Maria-Theresiopel or Theresiopel, Slovak: Subotica, Rusin: Суботица, Romanian: Subotica or Subotita) is a city and municipality in northern Serbia and Montenegro, in the North Bačka District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... City Hall and monument of king Peter I of Yugoslavia Court House Zrenjanin (Serbian Cyrillic: Зрењанин) is a city and a municipality located in Serbia. ... Location of Leskovac within Serbia Coordinates: , Country District Settlements 144 Government  - Mayor Vladan Marinković (DS) Area [3]  - Municipality 1,025 km² (395. ... Location of Smederevo within Serbia Coordinates: , Country District Settlements 27 Government  - Mayor SaÅ¡a Radosavljević (DSS) Area [2]  - Municipality 484 km² (186. ... Church of Assumption in Pančevo Pančevo Banatsko Novo Selo Kačarevo Jabuka Glogonj Dolovo Starčevo Omoljica Ivanovo Banatski Brestovac Municipality of Pančevo ● Pančevo (Панчево) is a city and municipality located in Serbia at 44. ... Location of KruÅ¡evac within Serbia Coordinates: , Country District Settlements 101 Government  - Mayor Dragan Azdejković (DSS) Area [3]  - Municipality 854 km² (329. ... ÄŒačak (Serbian Cyrillic: Чачак) is a city located 140 km south from Belgrade in Serbia at 43°50 North, 20°20 East. ... Užice (Serbian Cyrillic: Ужице) is a town located in Serbia and Montenegro at 43. ... Valjevo postcard Valjevo (Serbian Cyrillic: Ваљево) is a city located in Serbia and Montenegro at 44. ... Kraljevo 2006 Kraljevo (Serbian Cyrillic: Краљево,  ) is a city and municipality located in Serbia at , built beside the river Ibar, 7 km west of its confluence with the Zapadna Morava; and in the midst of an upland valley, between the Kotlenik Mountains, in the north, and the Stolovi Mountains, in the... Location of Å abac within Serbia Coordinates: , Country District Settlements 52 Government  - Mayor MiloÅ¡ MiloÅ¡ević Area [1]  - Municipality 795 km² (307 sq mi) Population (2002 census)[2]  - Total 55,163  - Municipality 122,893 Time zone CET (UTC+1)  - Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2) Postal code Car plates Å A Area code... Vranje (Serbian Cyrillic: Врање, Bulgarian:Враня) is a town and municipality located in Serbia at 42. ... Centar,Novi Pazar Novi Pazar (Serbian Cyrillic: Нови Пазар,  ) is a city and municipality located in the RaÅ¡ka District of Serbia at 43. ... Location in Serbia-Montenegro [[Image:|150px|center|Map of Serbia-Montenegro highlighting the City of {{{common_name}}}]] General Information Mayor Dr. Jovan Slavković Land area  ? Population (2002 census) 50,950 (96,669 municipality) Population density (2002)  ? Coordinates [1] Area code +381 25 Subdivisions 16 settlements in the municipality License plate code...

Religion

Main article: Religion in Serbia
Serbia (excluding Kosovo) in 2002
religion percent
Eastern Orthodoxy
 
84.1%
Roman Catholicism
 
6.24%
Islam
 
4.82%
Protestantism
 
1.44%

For centuries straddling the religious boundary between Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicism, joined up later by the penetration of Islam, Serbia remains one of the most diverse countries on the continent. Centuries on, different regions of Serbia remain heavily cosmopolitan: Kosovo province houses a 90% Muslim community, Vojvodina province is 25% Catholic or Protestant, while Central Serbia and Belgrade regions are over 90% Orthodox Christian. ĐurÄ‘evi Stupovi Orthodox monastery, near Novi Pazar Bajrakli Mosque in Belgrade Synagogue in Belgrade Catholic Cathedral in Bačka Topola Uniate Church in ĐurÄ‘evo Protestant Theological College in Novi Sad Serbia is a multireligious country. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Map of Central Serbia Central Serbia (Serbian: Централна Србија or Centralna Srbija), also referred to as Serbia proper or Narrower Serbia (Serbian: Ужа Србија or Uža Srbija), is the region of Serbia that lies outside the northern autonomous province of Vojvodina and the southern UN protectorate of Kosovo (UNMIK). ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ...

Among the Eastern Orthodox churches, the Church of Serbia is the westernmost. According to the 2002 Census [53], 82% of the population of Serbia (excluding Kosovo) or 6,2 million people declared their nationality as Serbian, who are overwhelmingly adherents of the Serbian Orthodox Church. Other Orthodox Christian communities in Serbia include Montenegrins, Romanians, Macedonians, Bulgarians, Vlachs etc. Together they comprise about 84% of the entire population. Studenica The Studenica Monastery is the largest and richest Serbian Orthodox monastery. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ... The term Orthodox Christian refers to two Christian traditions: Oriental Orthodoxy, which separated from the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church in the 5th century; Eastern Orthodoxy, which the Roman Catholic church separated from in 1054 was the church that was started by the apostles. ... Montenegrins (Serbian/Montenegrin: Црногорци/Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Vlachs (also called Vallachians, Wallachians, Wlachs, Wallachs, Olahs or Ulahs, Macedonian: Власи Vlasi, Greek: , Albanian: Vllehë, Turkish: , Ukrainian: , Polish: ) is a blanket term covering several modern Latin peoples (linguistic) descending from the Latinised population in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe. ...


Catholicism is mostly present in Vojvodina (mainly in its northern part), where almost 20% of the regional population (belonging to different ethnic groups such as the Hungarians, Slovaks, Croats, Bunjevci, Czechs, etc) belong to this Christian denomination. There are an estimated 433,000 baptized Catholics in Serbia, roughly 6,2% of the population, mostly bounded to the northern province. As a Christian ecclesiastical term, Catholic—from the Greek adjective , meaning general or universal[1]—is described in the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: ~Church, (originally) whole body of Christians; ~, belonging to or in accord with (a) this, (b) the church before separation into Greek or Eastern and Latin or... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Hungarian may refer to: Hungary or the Kingdom of Hungary. ... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... The Catholic Church in the Bunjevac village of Stari Žednik Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The Roman Catholic Church is the largest religious denomination of Christianity with over one billion members. ...


Protestantism accounts for about 1,5 % of the country's population. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ...


Islam has a strong historic populous in the southern regions of Serbia - Raska region, several municipalities in the south-east. Bosniaks are the largest Muslim community in Serbia at about 140,000 (2%) + (Muslims over 30 000), followed by Albanians (1%), Turks, Arabs etc. For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This page is about a region in Serbia and Montenegro; for districts of the Ottoman Empire, see Sanjak. ... Language(s) Bosnian Religion(s) Predominantly Islam Related ethnic groups Slavs (South Slavs) The Bosniaks or Bosniacs[1] (Bosnian: Bošnjaci, IPA: ) are a South Slavic people, living mainly in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia) and the Sandžak region of Serbia and Montenegro, with a smaller autochthonous population also present... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predominantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Roman Catholicism, Alawite Islam, Druzism, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism Footnotes a Mainly in Antakya. ...


With the exile of Jews from Spain during the infamous Inquisition era thousands of both individuals and families escaping made their way through Europe to the Balkans. A goodly number settled in Serbia and became part of the general population. They were well accepted and during the ensuing generations the majority assimilated or became traditional or secular, rather than remain orthodox Jews as had been the original immigrants. Later on the wars that ravaged the region resulted in a great part of the Serbian Jewish population either being killed or escaping to Yugoslavia and Austria-Hungary.


Economy

Main article: Economy of Serbia
World Bank economy estimates for 2007
World Bank economy estimates for 2007

With a GDP for 2008 estimated at $81.892 billion ($10 985 per capita PPP), Republic of Serbia is considered an upper-middle income economy by the World Bank[58]. FDI (Foreign Direct Investment) in 2006 was $5.85 billion or €4.5 billion. FDI for 2007 reached $4.2 Billion while real GDP per capita figures are estimated to have reached $6 600 (October 2007).[59] The GDP growth rate showed increase by 6.3% (2005),[60] 5.8% (2006),[61] reaching 7.5% in 2007 as the fastest growing economy in the region.[62] This article deals with the economy of the Serbian part of the European state of Serbia and Montenegro. ... The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... Serbia and Montenegro  -Serbia    -Kosovo and Metohia    -Vojvodina  -Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  - Total  - % water 88,361 km² n/a Population  - Total (1998)  - Density 11,206,847 126. ... The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


At the beginning of the process of economic transition (1989), its favorable economic outlook in the region was hampered by politics, its economy being gravely impacted by the UN economic sanctions of 1992–95, as well as the sizable infrastructure and industry damage, suffered during the Kosovo war. Its problems were only augmented by losing the ex-Yugoslavia and Comecon markets. After the ousting of former Federal Yugoslav President Milošević in October 2000, the country experienced faster economic growth, and has been preparing for membership in the European Union, its most important trading partner. For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... Economic sanctions are economic penalties applied by one country (or group of countries) on another for a variety of reasons. ... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... A Soviet poster reading COMECON: Unity of Goals, Unity of Action The Council for Mutual Economic Assistance (COMECON / Comecon / CMEA / CEMA), 1949 – 1991, was an economic organization of communist states and a kind of Eastern Bloc equivalent to—but more inclusive than—the European Economic Community. ...

The recovery of the economy still faces many problems, among which unemployment (18,1%)[63] high export/import trade deficit and considerable national debt are most prominent. The country expects some major economic impulses and high growth rates in the next years. Serbia has been occasionally called a "Balkan tiger" because of its recent high economic growth rates, which averaged 6,6 % (in the past three years), with FDI at its record levels. Image File history File linksMetadata 100RSD_front. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 100RSD_front. ... Nikola Tesla (Serbian Cyrillic: ) (10 July 1856 – 7 January 1943) was a inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer, and electrical engineer. ... ISO 4217 Code RSD User(s) Serbia (including parts of Kosovo) Inflation 6. ...


Serbia grows about one-third of the world's raspberries and is the leading frozen fruit exporter.[64] Cultivated raspberries The raspberry (plural, raspberries) is the edible fruit of a number of species of the genus Rubus. ...


Infrastructure

Communications

89% of households in Serbia have fixed telephone lines, and 90% of the population have cell phones, accounting to 8 million users (Telekom Srbija – 5 million, Telenor and Vip mobile sharing the rest). 49% of households have computers, 27% use the internet, and 42% have cable TV. [65][66][67] Telephones - main lines in use: 2,685,400 (2004) Telephones - mobile cellular: 4,729,600 (2004) Telephone system: general assessment: NA domestic: NA international: country code - 381; satellite earth station - 1 Intelsat (Atlantic Ocean) Radio broadcast stations: AM 113, FM 194, shortwave 2 (1998) Television broadcast stations: more than 771... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Telekom Srbija is a telecommunication company based in Serbia, with its headquarters in Belgrade. ... ‎Telenor Serbia Telenor Serbia, previously named Mobtel and Mobi 63, is a Serbian wireless telecommunications service provider. ... Vip mobile is the third Serbian mobile network operator. ...


Transportation

Jat Airways, the national airline of Serbia

Serbia, in particular the valley of the Morava, is often described as "the crossroads between East and West", which is one of the primary reasons for its turbulent history. The Morava valley route, which avoids mountainous regions, is by far the easiest way of traveling overland from continental Europe to Greece and Asia Minor. Modern Serbia was the first among its neighbours to acquire railroads- in 1869 the first train arrived to Subotica, then Austria-Hungary[68] (by 1882 route to Belgrade and Nis was completed). Serbia, and in particular the valley of Morava is often described as the crossroad between the East and the West, which is one of primary reasons for its turbulent history. ... Jat Airways is the national airline of Serbia and the former national carrier of Yugoslavia, based in Belgrade. ... The Velika Morava or Great Morava (Serbian Cyrillic: Велика Морава) is a final section of the Morava (Cyrillic: Морава), the major river system in Serbia. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... Subotica city hall Subotica (Serbian: Суботица or Subotica, Hungarian: Szabadka, Croatian: Subotica, German: Maria-Theresiopel or Theresiopel, Slovak: Subotica, Rusin: Суботица, Romanian: Subotica or Subotita) is a city and municipality in northern Serbia and Montenegro, in the North Bačka District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Nis may refer to NiÅ¡, a city in Serbia and Montenegro miscapitalized NIS This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


European routes E65, E70, E75 and E80, as well as the E662, E761, E762, E763, E771, and E851 pass through the country. The E70 westwards from Belgrade and most of the E75 are modern highways of motorway / autobahn standard or close to that. As of 2005, Serbia has 1,481,498 registered cars, 16,042 motorcycles, 9,626 buses, 116,440 trucks, 28,222 special transport vehicles, 126,816 tractors, and 101,465 trailers.[69] Europes road system incorporates a series of European routes, which are numbered E1 and up. ... E65 is a name of a BMW car platform: BMW E65/E66 a European road: European route E65 This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... From west to east: La Coruña, Bilbao, San Sebastián, Bordeaux, Saint-Etienne, Lyon, Turin, Verona, Venice, Trieste, Ljubljana, Zagreb, Belgrade, TimiÅŸoara, Craiova, Bucarest, Rousse, Varna, Samsun, Trabzon, Poti. ... The E75 is part of the Trans European Road Network, which is a series of main roads in the European Union. ... Map of E80 within Portugal, Spain, France, Italy, Croatia, Montenegro, Serbia, Bulgaria and Turkey. ... The part of the European route E70 in Serbia spans approximately 205 kilometers (127 mi). ... The part of the European route E75 in Serbia spans approximately 600 kilometers (373 mi). ... Motorway symbol in UK, Australia, Spain, France and Ireland. ... This article is about the German, Austrian and Swiss road system. ...


The Danube River, central Europe's connection to the Black Sea, flows through Serbia. Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ...


There are 2 international airports in Serbia: Belgrade Nikola Tesla Airport and Niš Constantine the Great Airport. Belgrade Nikola Tesla Airport (Serbian: Аеродром Београд - Никола Тесла or Aerodrom Beograd - Nikola Tesla) (IATA: BEG, ICAO: LYBE) is Serbias busiest airport, also known as Surčin (Сурчин), after a nearby Belgrade suburb. ... NiÅ¡ Constantine the Great Airport (Serbian Ниш Константин Велики, Latin NiÅ¡ Konstantin Veliki) (IATA: INI, ICAO: LYNI), serves southern Serbia and the city of NiÅ¡. It is located four kilometers from the NiÅ¡ city centre and is Serbias second international airport. ...


The national airline carrier is Jat Airways and the railway system is operated by Serbian Railways. Jat Airways is the national airline of Serbia and the former national carrier of Yugoslavia, based in Belgrade. ... Serbian Railways (Serbian: Железнице Србије/Železnice Srbije) is the national railway carrier of Serbia. ...


Tourism

Main article: Tourism in Serbia
Felix Romuliana imperial palace, one of 8 UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Serbia
Felix Romuliana imperial palace, one of 8 UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Serbia

Tourism in Serbia is mostly focused on the villages and mountains of the country. The most famous mountain resorts are Zlatibor, Kopaonik, and the Tara. There are also many spas in Serbia, one the biggest of which is Vrnjačka Banja. Other spas include Soko Banja and Niška Banja. There is a significant amount of tourism in the largest cities like Belgrade, Novi Sad and Niš, but also in the rural parts of Serbia like the volcanic wonder of Đavolja varoš[70], Christian pilgrimage across the country[71] and the cruises along the Danube, Sava or Tisza. There are several popular festivals held in Serbia, such as the EXIT Festival (proclaimed the best European festival by UK Festival Awards 2007 and Yourope, the European Association of the 40 largest festivals in Europe) and the Guča trumpet festival. 2,2 million tourists visited Serbia in 2007, a 15% increase compared to 2006.[72] Serbia is situated in 2 geographic and cultural parts of Europe: Central Europe- Pannonian plain, and Southeastern Europe- Balkan peninsula. ... Gamzigrad is a town in Serbia, located south of the Danube river, near Zaječar. ... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ... Winter in Zlatibor Zlatibor (Cyrillic: ЗлатибoÑ€) is a mountain region situated in Serbia and Montenegro, in the western part of Serbia, a part of the Dinaric Alps. ... Tourist Center Kopaonik Is The Most Popular Ski Resort in Serbia Visit website: www. ... Tara mountain is located in western Serbia, from 1000 to 1,500 metres a. ... Vrnjačka Banja (Serbian Cyrillic: Врњачка Бања) is a a resort, mineral spa and municipality located in RaÅ¡ka District of Serbia. ... Panoramic view of Sokobanja Sokobanja (Serbian Cyrillic: Сокобања) is a well-known spa town and municipality situated in eastern Serbia. ... Niska Banja is spa 9 km eastern from Nis, and a few kilometers from main Nis-Sofia motorway. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Novi Sad (disambiguation). ... Nis redirects here. ... This article is about the religious or spiritual journey. ... This article is about the Danube River. ... Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... The Tisza or Tisa is one of the major rivers of Central Europe. ... EXIT (also known as State of EXIT) is an annual summer music festival in Petrovaradin fortress of Novi Sad, Serbia. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Guča (Serbian Cyrillic: Гуча) is a small town in Serbia. ...


Culture

Main article: Serbian culture
Miroslav Gospels, one of the oldest surviving documents written in Serbian Church Slavonic
Miroslav Gospels, one of the oldest surviving documents written in Serbian Church Slavonic
The White Angel in Mileševa monastery, 1230s, Latin period of Byzantine art
The White Angel in Mileševa monastery, 1230s, Latin period of Byzantine art

Serbia is one of Europe's most culturally diverse countries. The borders between large empires ran through the territory of today's Serbia for long periods in history: between the Eastern and Western halves of the Roman Empire; between Kingdom of Hungary, Bulgarian Empire, Frankish Kingdom and Byzantium; and between the Ottoman Empire and the Austrian Empire (later Austria-Hungary). As a result, while the north is culturally "Central European", the south is rather more "Oriental". Of course, both regions have influenced each other, and so the distinction between north and south is artificial to some extent. Serbian culture refers to the culture of Serbia as well as the culture of Serbs in other parts of the former Yugoslavia and elsewhere in the world. ... Image File history File links Miroslavs_Gospel. ... Image File history File links Miroslavs_Gospel. ... Miroslav Gospels (Serbian: Мирослављево Јевађеље or Miroslavljevo JevanÄ‘elje) is a 362-page illuminated manuscript Gospel Book on parchment, with very rich decorations. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1576x2062, 401 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Serbia MileÅ¡eva monastery ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1576x2062, 401 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Serbia MileÅ¡eva monastery ... The White Angel. ... MileÅ¡eva monastery. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The most famous of the surviving Byzantine mosaics of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople - the image of Christ Pantocrator on the walls of the upper southern gallery. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus The Western Roman Empire in 395. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... First Bulgarian Empire Second Bulgarian Empire This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Statue of Charlemagne (also called Karl der Große, Charles the Great) in Frankfurt, Germany. ... Byzantium (Greek: Βυζάντιον) was an ancient Greek city, which, according to legend, was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named after their king Byzas or Byzantas (Βύζας or Βύζαντας in Greek). ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... Anthem Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) The Austrian Empire Capital Vienna Language(s) German Hungarian Romanian Czech Slovakian Slovenian Croatian Serbian Italian Polish Ruthenian Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Ausgleich 1867 The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was a modern era successor empire founded... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... The approximate area of Mitteleuropa Mitteleuropa (Central/Middle Europe) is a German term approximately equal to Central Europe. ... The term the Orient - literally meaning sunrise, east - is traditionally used to refer to Near, Middle, and Far Eastern countries. ...


The Byzantine Empire's influence on Serbia was perhaps the greatest. Serbs are Orthodox Christians with their own national church—the Serbian Orthodox Church. They use both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets, as a result of both Eastern and Western influences. The monasteries of Serbia, built largely in the Middle Ages, are one of the most valuable and visible traces of medieval Serbia's association with the Byzantium and the Orthodox World, but also with the Romanic (Western) Europe that Serbia had close ties with back in Middle Ages. Most of Serbia's queens still remembered today in Serbian history were of foreign origin, including Hélène d'Anjou (a cousin of Charles I of Sicily), Anna Dondolo (daughter of the Doge of Venice, Enrico Dandolo), Catherine of Hungary, and Symonide of Byzantium. Byzantine redirects here. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ... The Cyrillic alphabet (or azbuka, from the old name of the first two letters) is an alphabet used for several East and South Slavic languages; (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Rusyn, Serbian, and Ukrainian) and many other languages of the former Soviet Union, Asia and Eastern Europe. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The majority of Serb Orthodox monasteries are in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and to a lesser extent in Croatia. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Тhe Serbian medieval history begins in the 5th century AD with the coming of the slavs on the Balkans, and ends with the occupation of Serbia by the Ottoman Empire in 1459 with the fall of the Serbian capital Smederevo. ... One of the first Serbian states, RaÅ¡ka, was founded in the first half of the 7th century on Byzantine territory by the Unknown Archont, the founder of the House of Vlastimirović; it evolved into the Serbian Empire under the House of Nemanjić. In the modern era Serbia has been... Hélène dAnjou and her son king Milutin, a fresco from Gračanica monastery Hélène dAnjou (Serbian Cyrillic: Јелена Анжујска, Serbian Latinic: Jelena Anžujska; 1230 - 1314) was a Serbian queen, wife of Serbian king Stefan UroÅ¡ I and mother of kings Dragutin and Milutin. ... Statue of Charles I of Anjou by Arnolfo di Cambio, Rome, Palazzo dei Conservatori. ... Grand Procession of the Doge, 16th century For about a thousand years, the chief magistrate and leader of the Most Serene Republic of Venice was styled the Doge, a rare but not unique Italian title derived from the Latin Dux, as the major Italian parallel Duce and the English Duke. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... Dandolo Preaching the Crusade, by Gustav Dore Tomb of Enrico Dandolo Enrico Dandolo (1107?-1205) was the Doge (1192-1205) of Venice during the Fourth Crusade. ... Byzantium (Greek: Βυζάντιον) was an ancient Greek city, which, according to legend, was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named after their king Byzas or Byzantas (Βύζας or Βύζαντας in Greek). ...


Serbia has eight cultural sites marked on the UNESCO World Heritage list: Stari Ras and Sopoćani monasteries (included in 1979), Studenica Monastery (1986), the Medieval Serbian Monastic Complex in Kosovo, comprising: Dečani Monastery, Our Lady of Ljeviš, Gračanica and Patriarchate of Pec- (2004, put on the endangered list in 2006), and Gamzigrad - Romuliana, Palace of Galerius, added in 2007. Likewise, there are 2 literary memorials added on the UNESCO's list as a part of the Memory of the World Programme: Miroslav Gospels, handwriting from the 12th century (added in 2005), and Nikola Tesla's archive (2003). A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Stari Ras (Old Ras), known at the time as Ras, was one of the first capitals of the medieval Serbian state of RaÅ¡ka, and the most important one for a long period of time. ... Sopocani is a small monastery on the outskirts of Novi Pazar. ... Studenica The Studenica Monastery is the largest and richest Serbian Orthodox monastery. ... Christ Carrying the Cross. ... Our Lady of LjeviÅ¡ (Serbian Bogorodica LjeviÅ¡ka/Богородица Љевишка) was a 12th century Serb Eastern Orthodox cathedral in the town of Prizren, Kosovo, Serbia and Montenegro. ... Gračanica (Serbian: Грачаница) is a Serbian Orthodox monastery located near the village of Gračanica in municipality of Lipljan in Kosovo. ... The Patriarchate of Peć (Serbian: Пећка патријаршија or Pećka PatrijarÅ¡ija; Albanian: Patrikana e Pejës) is a Serbian Orthodox monastery located near Peć, Kosovo, a Serbian province under UN administration. ... Gamzigrad is a town in Serbia, located south of the Danube river, near Zaječar. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Map showing the distribution of documentary heritages by State Parties as of 2005. ... Miroslav Gospels (Serbian: Мирослављево Јевађеље or Miroslavljevo JevanÄ‘elje) is a 362-page illuminated manuscript Gospel Book on parchment, with very rich decorations. ... Nikola Tesla (Serbian Cyrillic: ) (10 July 1856 – 7 January 1943) was a inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer, and electrical engineer. ...


Education

Main article: Education in Serbia
Headquarters of the Belgrade University, pictured in 1890
Headquarters of the Belgrade University, pictured in 1890

Education in Serbia is regulated by the Ministry of Education. Education starts in either pre-schools or elementary schools. Children enroll in elementary schools (Serbian: Osnovna škola / Основна школа) at age of 7 and it lasts for eight years. Education in Serbia is regulated by the Serbian Ministry of Education and Sports. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... University of Belgrade is the highest educational institution in Belgrade and Serbia. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ...


Roots to the Serbian education system date back to 11th and 12th centuries when first Catholic colleges were founded in Vojvodina (Titel, Bač). Medieval Serbian education however was mostly conducted through the Serbian Orthodox Monasteries (UNESCO protected Sopocani, Studenica, Patriarchate of Pec) starting from the rise of Raska in 12th century, when Serbs overwhelmingly embraced Orthodoxy rather than Catholicism. Catholic Church in Titel Abandoned church in Titel map of the Titel municipality and Å ajkaÅ¡ka region Titel (Serbian: Titel or Тител, Hungarian: Titel, German: Tittel and sometimes Theisshügel, Latin: Titulium), is a town and municipality in the South Bačka District of the Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Bač (Serbian:  ) is a town and municipality in South Bačka District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... A small and cursed monastery in the outskirts of Novi Pazar. ... Studenica The Studenica Monastery is the largest and richest Serbian Orthodox monastery. ... The Patriarchate of Peć (Serbian: Пећка патријаршија or Pećka PatrijarÅ¡ija; Albanian: Patrikana e Pejës) is a Serbian Orthodox monastery located near Peć, Kosovo, a Serbian province under UN administration. ... RaÅ¡ka (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in...


First university in Serbia was founded in revolutionary Belgrade in 1808 as a Great Academy, the precursor of the contemporary University of Belgrade. The oldest college (faculty) within current borders of Serbia dates back to 1778; founded in the city of Sombor, then Habsburg Empire, it was known under the name Norma and was the oldest Slavic Teacher's college in Southern Europe.[73] For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... The University of Belgrade (Serbian: Универзитет у Београду or Univerzitet u Beogradu) is the oldest and most important higher education institution in Belgrade and Serbia. ... Location in Serbia-Montenegro [[Image:|150px|center|Map of Serbia-Montenegro highlighting the City of {{{common_name}}}]] General Information Mayor Dr. Jovan Slavković Land area  ? Population (2002 census) 50,950 (96,669 municipality) Population density (2002)  ? Coordinates [1] Area code +381 25 Subdivisions 16 settlements in the municipality License plate code... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ...  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... The southern half of Europe is shown in shades of red. ...


Holidays

All holidays in Serbia are regulated by the Law of national and other holidays in Republic of Serbia (Zakon o državnim i drugim praznicima u Republici Srbiji). The following holidays are observed state-wide:[74]

Date Name Notes
January 1 / January 2 New Year's Day (Nova Godina) non-working holiday
January 7 Orthodox Christmas (Božić) non-working holiday
January 27 Saint Sava's Day - Spirituality day (Savindan - Dan Duhovnosti) working holiday (in memory on the founder of the Serbian Orthodox Church)
February 15 Statehood day - Candlemas (Dan državnosti - Sretenje) non-working holiday (in memory on the First Serbian Uprising)
April 25 Orthodox Great Friday (Veliki petak) non-working holiday (date for 2008 only)
April 26 Orthodox Great Saturday (Velika subota) non-working holiday (date for 2008 only)
April 27 Orthodox Easter (Vaskrs) non-working holiday (date for 2008 only)
April 28 Orthodox Easter Monday (Veliki ponedeljak) non-working holiday (date for 2008 only)
May 1 / May 2 Labour Day (Dan rada) non-working holiday
May 9 Victory Day (Dan pobede) working holiday
June 28 Saint Vitus' Day - Day of the fallen for the fatherland (Vidovdan - Dan Srba palih za otadžbinu) working holiday (in memory of the Battle of Kosovo in 1389)

Also, members of other religions have the right not to work on days of their holidays. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Candlemas (Russian: Sretenie, Spanish: Candelaria) is a Christian feast commemorating the purification of the Virgin Mary and the presentation of the infant Jesus in the Temple. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Easter Monday is the day after Easter Sunday and is celebrated as a holiday in some largely Christian cultures, especially Roman Catholic cultures. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about annual labour observances internationally. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Vidovdan (Видовдан) is a religious holiday, St. ... This page is about the Battle of Kosovo of 1389; for other battles, see Battle of Kosovo (disambiguation). ... Events February 24 - Margaret I defeats Albert in battle, thus becoming ruler of Denmark, Norway and Sweden June 28 - Battle of Kosovo between Serbs and Ottomans. ...


See also

Categories: | ... // During XVIII century, Serbs had fought the Turks jointly with the Austrian army on both sides of the Turkish border, and imprinted in their memory lay the 20-year Austro-Hungarian rule over Belgrade and the northern parts of Serbia. ... Coat of arms of Serbia This is a list of Serbian monarchs. ... Combatants  Austria-Hungary Bulgaria  German Empire Serbia Montenegro Commanders Oskar Potiorek Nikola Zhekov Kliment Boyadzhiev Georgi Todorov Ivan Valkov August von Mackensen Radomir Putnik Živojin MiÅ¡ić Stepa Stepanović Petar Bojović Nicholas I The Serbian Campaign was fought from August 1914, when Austria-Hungary invaded Serbia at the outset of... The Armed Forces of Serbia (Serbian:Војска Србије or Vojska Srbije The Armed Forces are assigned missions and tasks. ... This is a list of prominent ethnic Serbs and people from Serbia. ...

References

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  2. ^ http://www.b92.net/eng/news/politics-article.php?yyyy=2008&mm=04&dd=03&nav_id=49084
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  8. ^ Basic Climate Characteristics for the Territory of Serbia (English). Republic Hydrometeorological Service of Serbia.
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  18. ^ 200 godina ustanka
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  27. ^ Tells of typhus in Serbia
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  30. ^ Fourth of Serbia's population dead.
  31. ^ Asserts Serbians face extinction
  32. ^ Serbia restored
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  35. ^ Jasenovac
  36. ^ Jasenovac
  37. ^ http://www1.yadvashem.org/odot_pdf/Microsoft%20Word%20-%205930.pdf
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  42. ^ * Ustav SFRJ (1974) - text of the 1974 constitution (Serbian)
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  44. ^ Noam Chomsky (March 14, 2000). Another Way For Kosovo? (English). Le Monde diplomatique.
  45. ^ Montenegro chooses independence (English). CNN International (May 22, 2006).
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  47. ^ Borgna Brunner; David Johnson (2007). Timeline: The Former Yugoslavia (English). Infoplease.
  48. ^ Montenegro gets Serb recognition (English). BBC News (15 June 2006).
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  50. ^ Serbia calls snap vote over EU, Kosovo dispute (English). AFP (14 March 2008).
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  65. ^ U Srbiji baš zvoni (Serbian). Večernje novosti (15.05.2007).
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  67. ^ U Srbiji 27 odsto gradjana koristi Internet (Serbian). Poslovni Magazin (10. Maj 2007).
  68. ^ Geografski položaj (Serbian). City of Subotica (2006).
  69. ^ Registrovana drumska motorna i priključna vozila (Serbian). Statistical Office of the Republic of Serbia (2007).
  70. ^ Davolja Varos, Rock Formation (English). New7Wonders (July 7, 2007).
  71. ^ Pilgrimage of Saint Sava (English). Info Hub.
  72. ^ Turistički promet u Republici Srbiji u periodu januar-novembar 2007. godine (Serbian). National Tourism Organisation of Serbia (2007).
  73. ^ Sombor: History by dates (English). SOinfo.org.
  74. ^ Zakon o državnim i drugim praznicima u Republici Srbiji (Serbian) (2007-11-06). Retrieved on 2008-03-13.

The Country Studies are works published by the Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress ( USA), freely available for use by researchers. ... The U.S. Constitution, adopted in 1789 by a constitutional convention, sets down the basic framework of American government in its seven articles. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The World Factbook (ISSN 1553-8133; also known as the CIA World Factbook)[2] is an annual publication of the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with almanac-style information about the countries of the world. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Smithsonian castle, as seen through the garden gate. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The World Factbook (ISSN 1553-8133; also known as the CIA World Factbook)[2] is an annual publication of the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with almanac-style information about the countries of the world. ... Tanjug (Telegraphic Agency of New Yugoslavia) was founded on November 5, 1943. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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