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Encyclopedia > Serb

Serbs (in the The Serbian language or Serb language is one of the standard versions of the Central-South Slavic diasystem, formerly (and still frequently) called Serbo-Croatian. Serbian is used primarily in Serbia-Montenegro, Republika Srpska and by Serbs everywhere. Serbian (српски) Spoken in: Serbia and Montenegro... Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. They speak Slavic languages and reside chiefly in the east of that continent, but are also found in Asia. Contents // 1 Ethno-cultural subdivisions 2 The Slavic homeland debates 3 Naming and etymologies 4 Early... Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro ( Serbian: Србија и Црна Гора, often abbreviated as SCG) is the name of the union of Serbia and Montenegro, two former Yugoslav republics united since 2003 in a loose confederation. It is located on the west... Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. Its capital is Sarajevo and it was formerly one of the six federal units constituting Yugoslavia. The republic gained its... Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Contents

Population

Most Serbs live in the traditional Serbian heartland of Serbia and Montenegro ( Serbian: Србија и Црна Гора, often abbreviated as SCG) is the name of the union of Serbia and Montenegro, two former Yugoslav republics united since 2003 in a loose confederation. It is located on the west... Serbia and Montenegro. Large Serb populations also live in The Republic of Croatia is a crescent-shaped country in Europe bordering the Mediterranean, Central Europe and the Balkans. Its capital is Zagreb. In recent history, it was a republic in the SFR Yugoslavia, but it achieved independence in 1991. It is a candidate for membership of the European Union... Croatia (largely in the entity that during the 1990s constituted the internationally unrecognized The Republic of Serbian Krajina (Republika Srpska Krajina, RSK) was an internationally unrecognized Serbian republic in Croatia. Established in 1991, its main portion was overrun by Croatian forces in 1995; a rump remained in existence in Eastern Slavonia until its peaceful reincorporation into Croatia in 1998. Contents // 1 The origins... Republic of Serbian Krajina) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. Its capital is Sarajevo and it was formerly one of the six federal units constituting Yugoslavia. The republic gained its... Bosnia and Herzegovina (where they are a -1... constituent nation), principally in the Republika Srpska Република Српска (In detail) (In detail) Today, Republika Srpska is the poorer political entity in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Miscellaneous 1994 Postage Stamp In 1992, the new government of RS issued postage stamps and currency -- prized... Republika Srpska, one of the country's two entities. Much smaller Serb In sociology and in voting theory, a minority is a sub-group that is outnumbered by persons who do not belong to it. Minority only makes sense in the context of a unified society or group. This can be used to refer to people of a different language, nationality, religion... minorities also exist in Република Македонија Republika Makedonija ( Details) (Details) National motto: None Official languages Macedonian2 Capital Skopje President Branko Crvenkovski Prime Minister Vlado Buckovski Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 145th 25,713 km² 1... Macedonia, The Republic of Slovenia ( Slovenian: Republika Slovenija) is a coastal sub-Alpine country in south central Europe bordering Italy to the west, the Adriatic Sea to the southwest, Croatia to the south and east, Hungary to the northeast, and Austria to the north. Republika Slovenija ( Flag) ( Coat of Arms) National... Slovenia, Romania (formerly spelled Rumania or Roumania; Romanian: România) is a country in southeastern Europe. It is bordered by Ukraine and Moldova in the northeast, Hungary in the west and Serbia and Bulgaria to the south along the Danube river. Romania has a stretch of sea coast on the... Romania, Albania is a Mediterranean country in southeastern Europe. It is bordered by Montenegro in the north, Serbia ( Kosovo) in the north-east, the Republic of Macedonia in the east, and Greece in the south, has a coast on the Adriatic Sea in the west, and a coast on the Ionian... Albania and The Republic of Hungary (Magyar Köztársaság) or Hungary (Magyarország) is a landlocked country in Central Europe, bordered by Austria, Slovakia, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia. It is known locally as the Country of the Magyars. Magyar Köztársas... Hungary. A lot of Serbs also live in the This diaspora of Serbian people was caused mostly by the Ottoman Turks, and the recent diaspora was by the Yugoslav wars. A small part of it was caused as a result of Politics, especially when the Communist Party came into power. Categories: Stub ... diaspora, notably in The Federal Republic of Germany ( German: Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is one of the worlds leading industrialised countries, located in the heart of Europe. Due to its central location, Germany has more neighbours than any other European country: these are Denmark in the north, Poland and the Czech Republic in the... Germany, The Republic of Austria ( German: Republik Österreich) is a landlocked country in Central Europe. It borders Germany and the Czech Republic to the north, Slovakia and Hungary to the east, Slovenia and Italy to the south, and Switzerland and Liechtenstein to the west. The state is a representative democracy... Austria, The Swiss Confederation or Switzerland is a landlocked federal state in Europe, with neighbours Germany, France, Italy, Austria and Liechtenstein. The country has a strong tradition of political and military neutrality, but also of international co-operation, and is home to many international organisations. Confoederatio Helvetica (CH), the Latin version... Switzerland, The word Usa has more than one meaning: U.S.A. - The United States of America Usa, Oita - A city in Japan This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an article link referred you here, you... USA, Canada is an independent sovereign state in northern North America, the northern-most country in the world, and the second largest in total area. Bordering the United States, its territorial claims extend north into the Arctic Ocean as far as the North Pole. Canada is a federation of ten provinces... Canada and Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only one to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/ Oceania. It also includes a number of secondary islands, the largest of which is Tasmania, an Australian State. Australia is... Australia.


The largest urban populations of Serbs in the former Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all south Slavic languages) is a term used for three separate but successive political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe. Translated, the name means Land of the South Slavs (jug in Jugoslavija means south). The first was a... Yugoslavia are to be found in Belgrade (disambiguation). Belgrade ( Serbian, Београд, Beograd), is the capital ( 2003–) of Serbia and Montenegro and Yugoslavia ( 1918– 2003). The city lies on the outfall of the Sava river to the Danube river in northern central Serbia, at 44.83° N 20... Belgrade (1,500,000), Novi Sad - Нови Сад (read more) Motto: none Executive government Mayor (Gradonačelnik) City council (Skupština Grada) Mayor Maja Gojković Area 235.6 km² Population  - total  - density 215,659 (2002) 812/km² Founded City status 1694 1748 Area code... Novi Sad about (250,000), Niš (Ниш, the Roman Naissus; see below) is a city in Serbia and Montenegro (formerly Yugoslavia), 43.3° N 21.9° E, on the river Nišava, 2004 population 374,300, according to the World Gazeteer (see external link). The city covers the area of about... Niš (200,000) and Banja Luka (Бања Лука) Mayor Dragoljub Davidović Area  - Total 93.2 km (57.9 mi ) Population  - City (2002)  - Metro (2002) 196,500. 220,000. Time zone Central European: UTC+1 Latitude Longitude 44 78 N 19 E Banja Luka is... Banja Luka in Bosnia (200,000). Abroad, This article is about the largest city of Illinois. For other uses of the term, see Chicago (disambiguation). A partial view of Downtown Chicago Chicago is the third largest city in the United States, with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 US Census. When combined... Chicago and the surrounding parts of State of Illinois (Flag of Illinois) (Seal of Illinois) State nickname: The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich Official languages English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4.0%) Population (2000... Illinois has the largest Serb population followed by City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada (in detail) (in detail) Motto: Diversity Our Strength Map of Ontario Counties, Toronto being red Area: 641 sq. km. Distance - East to West: 43 km. Distance - South to North : 21 km. Population  - Total (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Cdn. CD Rank:  - Cdn. Mun... Toronto and Southern Ontario (Flag of Ontario) (Coat of Arms of Ontario) Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Area 1,076,395 km² (4th)  - Land 917,741... Ontario. Serbs constitute over two thirds of the population of Serbia and Montenegro ( Serbian: Србија и Црна Гора, often abbreviated as SCG) is the name of the union of Serbia and Montenegro, two former Yugoslav republics united since 2003 in a loose confederation. It is located on the west... Serbia and Montenegro, about 6,5 million. Another 2 million live in neighbouring countries of the The Balkans is the historic and geographic name used to describe southeastern Europe (see the Definitions and boundaries section below). The region has a combined area of 550,000 km² and a population of around 53 million. The countries of Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, mainland Greece, the (Former Yugoslav) Republic of... Balkans. The number of Serbs in the diaspora is not known but is estimated to be anywhere from 1,5 to 3,5 million including people of Serbian descent. The total number of Serbs thus ranges anywhere from 10 to 12 million, depending solely on the estimation used for the diaspora.


Culture

Contribution to humanity

Serbs have played a prominent role in the development of the The Mona Lisa Although today the word art usually refers to the visual arts, the concept of what art is has continuously changed over centuries. Perhaps the most concise definition is its broadest—art refers to all creative human endeavors, excluding actions directly related to survival and reproduction. From... arts and For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). Science is both a process of gaining knowledge, and the organized body of knowledge gained by this process. The scientific process is the systematic acquisition of new knowledge about a system. This systematic acquisition is generally the scientific method, and the... sciences. Prominent individuals have included the scientists Nikola Tesla Pioneer in the study of electricity Born July 10, 1856 Smiljan, Gospić, Military Frontier, Austria-Hungary Died January 7, 1943 New York City, New York, USA Nikola Tesla (July 10, 1856 - January 7, 1943) was a physicist, inventor, and electrical engineer of unusual intellectual brilliance and practical... Nikola Tesla, Mihajlo Pupin. Mihajlo Idvorski Pupin (1854 October 9 - March 12, 1935) (A.k.a Michael I. Pupin) Serbian-American physicist who devised a means of greatly extending the range of long-distance telephone communication by placing loading coils (of wire) at predetermined intervals along the transmitting wire (this research was... Mihajlo Pupin, Portrait of Jovan Cvijic by Uros Predic Jovan Cvijic (Serbian Јован Цвијић) (1865. - 1927.), greatest Serbian geographer, president of Serbian Royal Academy, rector of Belgrade University Jovan Cvijic was born on october 11. (september 29. by old calendar) 1865. in Loznica... Jovan Cvijic, Milutin Milanković (1879-1958) Milutin Milanković (a.k.a. Milankovitch) (May 28, 1879, Dalj near Osijek, (Austria-Hungary) – December 12, 1958, Belgrade) was a Serbian geophysicist, best known for his theory of ice ages, relating variations of the Earths orbit and long-term climate change, now... Milutin Milanković and Mileva Marić (1875 - 1948) was a Serbian mathematician, and Albert Einsteins first wife. She was Einsteins companion, colleague, and confidante: the degree of her participation in his discoveries is contested. Mileva was born in Titel in Vojvodina, Serbia from a Serbian family. During her early years at... Mileva Maric (mathematician and For other uses of the name Einstein, please see Einstein (disambiguation) Portrait of Albert Einstein taken by Yousuf Karsh on February 11, 1948 Albert Einstein ( March 14, 1879 – April 18, 1955) was a theoretical physicist who is widely regarded as the greatest scientist of the 20th century. He proposed... Albert Einstein's first wife), Rudjer Joseph Boscovich (first name also sometimes spelled Roger in English; Italian Ruggero Giuseppe Boscovich; Croatian and Serbian Ruđer Josip Bošković, Руђер Јосип Бошковић) (May 18, 1711 – February 13... Rudjer Boscovich's father was Serb; the actress Milla Jovovich? Militza Natasha Jovovich a.k.a. Milla Jovovich (born December 17, 1975) was born in Kiev, Ukraine to Serb father Bogić Jovović and Russian mother Galina Loginova Jovović. She is an actress, musician and model (frequently referred to as a supermodel). Her last name is... Mila Jovović (half Serbian, half Russians (Русские - Russkie) are an East Slavic ethnic group, primarily living in Russia and neighboring countries. The English term Russians is also used to refer to citizens of Russia, regardless of their ethnicity (see demographics of Russia for information on other nationalities inhabiting Russia... Russian). In the The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States, two Serbs are The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. Many of the worlds best players play in the NBA, and the overall standard of the competition is considerably higher than any other professional competition... NBA stars: Divac playing for the representation Vlade Divac is an NBA player born on February 3, 1968 in Prijepolje, Yugoslavia (now Serbia and Montenegro). He plays the position of center. He began his professional basketball in then-Yugoslavia playing for Partizan Belgrade. Drafted into the NBA in 1989, he played for... Vlade Divac and Stojakovic playing for the Kings Predrag Peđa Stojaković (born June 9, 1977) is a basketball star for the NBAs Sacramento Kings. He is one of the leagues top small forwards, and a prolific scorer, especially from three-point range. Stojaković was born in Slavonska... Peja Stojaković.


The mother of the last (Eastern) Roman Emperor is the title historians use to refer to the ruler of the Roman Empire. It was not actually used, and there was never actually any single office corresponding to it. Rather, the title Roman Emperor is a convenient shorthand for a complicated collection of offices and powers. In... Roman Emperor Constantine XI Paleologus (sometimes numbered Constantine XII or Constantine XIII), also known as Constantine Drageses, (February 8, 1404 - May 29, 1453) was the last reigning emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 1449 to his death. Constantine was born in Constantinople, the eighth of ten children of Manuel II and Helena... Constantine XI Paleologos Dragases was Serbian princess Helene Dragas, and he liked to be known by her Serbian surname of Dragas.


According to the The National Enquirer is a national American supermarket tabloid. It is often regarded as being sensationalist and carrying many esoteric stories. Articles usually center around sensational claims about celebrities. The Enquirer is descended from a former New York tabloid, the New York Enquirer. Since 1971 it has been based in... National Enquirer, author Ian Fleming Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908–August 12, 1964) is the British author, best remembered for writing the James Bond series of novels. Contents // 1 Biography 2 Selected works 2.1 James Bond novels 2.2 Childrens story 2.3 Non-fiction 3 External links Biography... Ian Fleming patterned For the ornithologist see James Bond (ornithologist). James Bond, also known as 007 (double-oh seven), is a sophisticated fictional character and British spy created by writer Ian Fleming. Bond is the main protagonist in numerous novels and short stories by Fleming, and later by Kingsley Amis, John Pearson, John... James Bond after Tricycle was the codename of both Dusko Popov (Душко Попов), and the network with which he was involved. Popov was despatched to the United States by the Abwehr to gather information. Popov made contact with the FBI and explained what he had... Dusko Popov, a Serbian double agent nicknamed Tricycle.


Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky composed Slavonic March (Marche Slave) in 1876 known at first as the “Serbo-Russian March” based on Serbian folk melodies as “Come, my dearest, why so sad this morning?”.


For more famous Serbs, see This is list of Serbs and people in some way connected to Serbs or Serbia. This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. Contents // 1 Serbs 1.1 Artists 1.1.1 Writers 1.1.2 Poets 1.1.3 Painters and sculptors 1.1.4 Film arts... List of Serbs.


Language

Most Serbs speak the The Serbian language or Serb language is one of the standard versions of the Central-South Slavic diasystem, formerly (and still frequently) called Serbo-Croatian. Serbian is used primarily in Serbia-Montenegro, Republika Srpska and by Serbs everywhere. Serbian (српски) Spoken in: Serbia and Montenegro... Serbian language, a member of the The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages) comprise the languages of the Slavic peoples. They form a distinct group of Indo-European languages, with speakers in most of Eastern Europe, in much of the Balkans, in parts of Central Europe, and in the northern part of Asia. Contents // 1 Branches... South Slavic group of languages. While the Serbian identity is to some extent linguistic, apart from the The Cyrillic alphabet (or azbuka, from the old name of the first letters) is an alphabet used to write six natural Slavic languages (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian, and Ukrainian) and many other languages of the former Soviet Union, Asia and Eastern Europe. Letters of the Cyrillic alphabet А A... Cyrillic alphabet which they use along with Latin alphabet, the language is very similar to the standard The Croatian language is a language of the western group of South Slavic languages which is used primarily by the Croats. It is one of the standard versions of the Central-South Slavic diasystem, formerly (and still frequently) called Serbo-Croatian. Croatian is based on the Štokavian dialect (with... Croatian (see Official languages in Bosnia, Croatia and Serbia and Montenegro differ in: Contents // Morphology There are three variants of the Štokavian dialect that stem from different reflex of proto-Slavic vowel jat. The jat appears in modern dialects in the following way: the Church Slavonic word for child, dě... Differences in official languages in Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia) and many linguists consider it part of a common Serbo-Croatian srpskohrvatski - српскохрватски hrvatskosrpski - хрватскосрпски Spoken in: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro, and others Region: The Balkans Total speakers: approx. 17... Serbo-Croatian language.


There are several variants of Serbian language. The older forms of Serbian are Old Serbian and Russo-Serbian, a version of the The Church Slavonic language (ru: церковнославя́нский язы́к, tserkovnoslavyánskiy yazík) is the liturgical language of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, Russian Orthodox Church, Serbian Orthodox Church and other... Church Slavonic language).


Some members of the This diaspora of Serbian people was caused mostly by the Ottoman Turks, and the recent diaspora was by the Yugoslav wars. A small part of it was caused as a result of Politics, especially when the Communist Party came into power. Categories: Stub ... Serbian diaspora do not speak the language (mostly in the US, Canada and UK) but are still considered Serbs by ethnic origin or descent.


Non-Serbs who studied the Serbian language include such prominent individuals as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 26, 1749–March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. As a writer, Goethe was one of the paramount figures of German literature and European Romanticism during and around the 18th... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. He is wearing a WWI-era British Army uniform in this photograph. John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was the author of The Hobbit and its sequel The Lord of the Rings. He attended King Edwards School, Birmingham... J. R. R. Tolkien; see This is list of Serbs and people in some way connected to Serbs or Serbia. This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. Contents // 1 Serbs 1.1 Artists 1.1.1 Writers 1.1.2 Poets 1.1.3 Painters and sculptors 1.1.4 Film arts... list of Serbian language speakers, learners, etc.


Surnames

Most Serbian surnames have the Family name affixes are a clue for family name etymology and determining ethnic origin of a person. This is a list of typical affixes. Prefixes ap -- son of, Welsh Da -- from, Italian De -- the, Dutch; of, French, Italian Degli -- of the, Italian. Here the is a masculine plural object starting... surname suffix -ić ( This article is about the alphabet officially used in linguistics. The NATO phonetic alphabet (alpha bravo) had informally been called the International Phonetic Alphabet. The International Phonetic Alphabet is a phonetic alphabet used by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes... IPA: /itj/, Cyrillic: -ић). This is often Transcription may be one of the following: In linguistics, transcription is the conversion of spoken words into written language. In genetics, transcription is the process of copying DNA to RNA by an enzyme called RNA polymerase (RNAP). In music transcription is either notating an unnotated piece, common in ethnomusicology, or... transcribed as -ic. Serbian names have before often been transcribed with a phonetic ending, -ich or -itch. This form is often associated with Serbs from before the early 20th century: hence Milutin Milanković is usually referred to, for historical reasons, as Milutin Milanković (1879-1958) Milutin Milanković (a.k.a. Milankovitch) (May 28, 1879, Dalj near Osijek, (Austria-Hungary) – December 12, 1958, Belgrade) was a Serbian geophysicist, best known for his theory of ice ages, relating variations of the Earths orbit and long-term climate change, now... Milutin Milankovitch.


The -ić suffix is a The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages) comprise the languages of the Slavic peoples. They form a distinct group of Indo-European languages, with speakers in most of Eastern Europe, in much of the Balkans, in parts of Central Europe, and in the northern part of Asia. Contents // 1 Branches... Slavic A diminutive ia a formation of a word used to convey a sense of smaller size and/or affection (see nickname). A diminutive can also be a prefix or suffix (usually a suffix) added to a word in order to convey such a sense. See also Apocopation. Contents // 1 English... diminutive, originally functioning to create A patronymic is a personal name based on the name of ones father. A personal name based on the name of ones mother is a matronymic. In Slavic languages, endings such as -vich (-vić) are used to form patronymics. For example, in Russian a man named Ivan... patronymics. Thus the surname Petrić signifies little Petar, as does, for example, a common prefix A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. In English ones family name is generally written after ones given name, leading to the term last name. The word surname is name prefixed by the... Mac ("son of") in Scottish and Irish names. It is estimated that some two thirds of all Serbian surnames end in -ić but that some 80% of Serbs carry such a surname with many common names being spread out among tens and even hundreds of non-related extended families.


Other common surname suffixes are -ov or -in which is the Slavic Grammatical cases List of grammatical cases Abessive case Ablative case Absolutive case Adessive case Allative case Causal case Causal-final case Comitative case Dative case Dedative case Delative case Disjunctive case Distributive case Distributive-temporal case Elative case Essive case Essive-formal case Essive-modal case Excessive case Final case... possessive case suffix, thus Nikola's son becomes Nikolin, Petar's son Petrov, and Jovan's son Jovanov. The two suffixes are often combined.


The most common surnames are Nikolić, Petrović, Jovanović.


Religion

The Serbian identity is based on Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. During the first millennium of Christendom, differences developed between the Christian East and West. By the 11th century, this had culminated in a Great Schism, separating the Roman Catholic Church... Orthodox Christianity and on the Early history The Serbs migrated to the Balkans during the reign of Byzantine emperor Heraclius (610-641). Unknown to them at the time, the Serbs had settled on both sides of the line of Roman emperor Theodosius I. The region they had settled had for centuries been alternatively under the... Serbian Orthodox Church, to the extent that some Serb Nationalism is an ideology that creates and sustains a nation as a concept of a common identity for groups of humans. According to the theory of nationalism, the preservation of identity features, the independence in all subjects, the wellbeing, and the glory of ones own nation are fundamental values... nationalists claim that those who are not its faithful are not Serbs. This is wrong: conversion of the south The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. They speak Slavic languages and reside chiefly in the east of that continent, but are also found in Asia. Contents // 1 Ethno-cultural subdivisions 2 The Slavic homeland debates 3 Naming and etymologies 4 Early... Slavs from paganism to Christianity took place before the In Christianity, the East-West Schism, usually called the Great Schism (though this latter term sometimes refers to the Western Schism of 1378), was the event that separated Eastern Orthodoxy and Western Catholicism in 1054. The two churches split along doctrinal, theological, linguistic, political, and geographic lines. They remain, for... Great Schism, the split between the Greek East and the Catholic West. After the Schism, those who lived under the Orthodox A sphere of influence is a metaphorical region of political influences surrounding a country or a region of economic influence around an urban area. It is also known as an SOI. When a country falls into anothers sphere of influence that country frequently becomes subsidiary to the more powerful... sphere of influence became Orthodox and those who lived under the Catholic sphere of influence became Catholic means universal or whole. Early Christians used the term to refer to the whole undivided Church. Accordingly, all Christians lay claim to the term, including Protestants, who often do not capitalize it. The Church fathers and the historic creeds used it to distinguish the mainstream body of orthodox Christian... Catholic. Some Ethnologyis a genre of cultural anthropology and| anthropological study, involving the systematic comparison of the beliefs and practices of different societies. Among its goals are the reconstruction of human history, and the formulation of laws of culture and culture change, and the formulation of generalizations about human nature. List... ethnologists consider that the distinct Serb and Croatian identities relate to religion rather than ethnicity. With the arrival of the Osmanlı İmparatorluğu Devlet-i Aliye-i Osmaniye Ottoman Coat of Arms The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto El Muzaffer Daima The Ever Victorious (as written in tugra) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital İstanbul ( Constantinople/Asitane/Konstantiniyye ) Sovereigns Sultans of the... Ottoman Empire, some Serbs and Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a south Slavic people mostly living in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (where theyre one of the constitutive nations). Autochthonous Croat minorities exist in Vojvodina (northern Serbia) and in the Austrian province of Burgenland as well as bordering areas of western Hungary and Slovakia. There... Croats converted to This article forms part of the seriesIslam Vocabulary of Islam Five Pillars Profession of faith Prayer · Alms · Fasting Pilgrimage to Mecca Jihad (See Sixth pillar of Islam) Major Figures Muhammad Prophets of Islam Caliph · Shia Imam · The Mahdi Companions of Muhammad Holy Cities Events Mecca ·... Islam. This was particularly--but not wholly--so in Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. Its capital is Sarajevo and it was formerly one of the six federal units constituting Yugoslavia. The republic gained its... Bosnia.


The best known Catholic means universal or whole. Early Christians used the term to refer to the whole undivided Church. Accordingly, all Christians lay claim to the term, including Protestants, who often do not capitalize it. The Church fathers and the historic creeds used it to distinguish the mainstream body of orthodox Christian... Catholic Serb is Ivo Andric; (hr/sr-lat:Ivo Andrić; sr-cyr:Иво Андрић) (October 9, 1892 in Dolac near Travnik (Bosnia and Herzegovina) - March 13, 1975 in Belgrade, then Yugoslavia), a Serbian-Croatian novelist, short story writer, and Nobel Prize winner from former Yugoslavia... Ivo Andrić and the best known A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. The word Muslim means one who submits and implies complete submission to the will of God ( Allah). Muslims believe that nature is itself Islamic, since it follows natural laws placed by God. Thus, a Muslim strives to surrender to God... Muslim Serb is probably either Mehmed Pasha Sokolović (in Turkish Sokollu Mehmet Paşa) (1505 or 1506-June 30, 1579) was born in the village of Sokolovići near the town of Visegrad in Bosnia of Serbian parents. Little Sokolović was taken away from his parents at the age of six... Mehmed Paša Sokolović or Mehmed Meša Selimović, Yugoslav prose writer who lived in Bosnia and Serbia, was one of the greatest 20th century novelists of Southeastern Europe. He was born on April 26, 1910 in Tuzla, Bosnia, where he graduated from elementary school and high school. In 1930, he enrolled to... Meša Selimović.


Symbols

The The Serbian flag is a tricolour with Pan-Slavic colors. It consists of three equal horizontal fields, red on the top, blue in the middle and white on the bottom. State flag National flag The flag is a reversed Flag of Russia. This is not an accident but an intention... Serbian flag is a red-blue-white A tricolour is a flag or banner having three colours, usually in approximately equal size (horizontally or vertically) and lacking additional symbols. One of the first tricolours is the Tricolore of France. Contents // 1 List of typical tricolours 1.1 African 1.2 American 1.3 Asian 1.4 European... tricolour. It is oftenly combined with one or both of the other Serb symbols.

Serbia has new flag File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. Click on date to download the file or see the image uploaded on that date. (del) (cur) 08:24, 1 Dec 2004 . . Millosh (7597 bytes) (Serbia...
Serbia has new flag File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. Click on date to download the file or see the image uploaded on that date. (del) (cur) 08:24, 1 Dec 2004 . . Millosh (7597 bytes) (Serbia... Enlarge
Serbian flag
This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. It may be ineligible for copyright or in the public domain. In other cases, it is believed that these images may be exhibited on Wikipedia under the fair use provision of United States copyright law. coatserbiahttp... Serbian coat of arms
This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. It may be ineligible for copyright or in the public domain. In other cases, it is believed that these images may be exhibited on Wikipedia under the fair use provision of United States copyright law. coatserbiahttp... Enlarge
Serbian coat of arms
  • The white two-headed eagle was the A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. Coat of Arms of Serbia. Modern usage may see these designs as carved or painted... coat of arms of the Nemanjić (Serbian Немањић; also Nemanjid) was a medieval Serb ruling dynasty. The dynasty was named after Stefan Nemanja, though it began shortly before him. It gave sixteen Serbian monarchs between 1166 and 1371. The family crest was a bicephalic argent eagle on a... House of Nemanjić.
  • The The Serbian Cross (Srpski Krst) contains a Christian cross, on each four corners of the cross is the Cyrillic letter с which is equivalent to the Latin letter s. The four с represent the term Samo Sloga Srbina Spašava which in English translates to only unity will save... Serbian cross. If displayed on a field, traditionally it is on red field, but could be used with no field at all.

Both the eagle and the cross, besides being the basis for various Serbian A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. Coat of Arms of Serbia. Modern usage may see these designs as carved or painted... coats of arms through history, are bases for the symbols of various Serbian organisations, political parties, institutions and companies. The cross, being easy to draw, is often For the handwriting system, see Graffiti (Palm OS). Graffiti is a type of deliberate human markings on property. Graffiti can take the form of art, drawings, or words, and is illegal vandalism when done without the property owners consent. Its origin can be traced back to ancient civilizations such... spraypainted, carrying an obvious political signature.


Serbian folk attire varies, mostly because of the very diverse Physical map of the Earth (Medium) (Large 2 MB) Geography is the scientific study of the locational and spatial variation in both physical and human phenomena on Earth. The word derives from the Greek words γη or γεια (Earth) and γραφει... geography and The climate (ancient Greek: κλίμα) is the weather averaged over a long period of time. A descriptive saying is that climate is what you expect, weather is what you get. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) glossary definition is: Climate in a narrow sense is... climate of the territory inhabited by the Serbs. Some parts of it are, however, common:

  • A traditional shoe that is called the opanak. It is recognisable by its distinctive tips that spiral backward. Each region of Serbia has a different kind of tips.
  • A traditional hat that is called the A WWI poster; two soldiers on the right wear Šajkačas The Šajkača, the Serbian national hat, originated in the 18th century. It was originally worn by the Serbian river fleet in the service of the Habsburg Empire (known as the šajkaši... šajkača. It is easily recognisable by its top part that looks like the letter V or like the bottom of a boat (viewed from above), after which it got its name. It gained wide popularity in the early (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 20th century as it was the hat of the Serbian army in the Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. Battle aftermath. Remains of the Chateau Wood World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, the War of the Nations, and the War to End All Wars, was a world conflict occurring from 1914 to... First World War. It is still worn everyday by some villagers today, and it was a common item of headgear among Republika Srpska Република Српска (In detail) (In detail) Today, Republika Srpska is the poorer political entity in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Miscellaneous 1994 Postage Stamp In 1992, the new government of RS issued postage stamps and currency -- prized... Bosnian Serb military commanders during the This is the history of Bosnia and Herzegovina. See also the history of Yugoslavia, history of Europe, and history of present_day nations and states. Contents // 1 Ancient history 2 Middle Ages 3 Ottoman era 4 19th and 20th century 5 Post_Yugoslav Bosnia 5.1 Bosnian War 5.2 Bosnia after... Bosnian War in the Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Years: 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Contents // 1 Events and trends 1.1 Technology 1.2 Science 1.3 War, peace and politics 1.4 Economics 1.5 Culture 1... 1990s.

Customs

The Serbs are a highly family-oriented society. A peek into a Serbian dictionary and the richness of The Serbian language is among the most rich in kinship terminology. The Serbs being a family oriented people who employ terms whose equivalents can seldom be found in any foreign language, including other closely related Slavic languages. Some explain this by pointing to the fact that of all the Slavs... their terminology related to kinship speaks volumes.


Of all The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. They speak Slavic languages and reside chiefly in the east of that continent, but are also found in Asia. Contents // 1 Ethno-cultural subdivisions 2 The Slavic homeland debates 3 Naming and etymologies 4 Early... Slavs and Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. During the first millennium of Christendom, differences developed between the Christian East and West. By the 11th century, this had culminated in a Great Schism, separating the Roman Catholic Church... Orthodox Christians, only Serbs have the custom of Slava (sr. Слава) is a Serb custom of celebrating a family saint. Of all Slavs and Orthodox Christians, only Serbs have the custom of slava. The custom could also be found among some Russians and Albanians of Serbian origin although it has generally been lost in... slava. The custom could also be found among some Russians (Русские - Russkie) are an East Slavic ethnic group, primarily living in Russia and neighboring countries. The English term Russians is also used to refer to citizens of Russia, regardless of their ethnicity (see demographics of Russia for information on other nationalities inhabiting Russia... Russians and The Albanians or Shqiptarë are a people of the western Balkan peninsula, speaking the Albanian language and numbering today approximately six million worldwide. The Albanians are called Shqipetaret in Albanian language, which is freely translated as The Sons of Eagles. The flag of Albania includes a bicephalic eagle. Due... Albanians of Serbian origin although it has often been lost in the last century. Slava is celebration of a saint; unlike most customs that are common for the whole people, each family separately celebrates its own saint (of course, there is a lot of overlap) who is considered its protector. A slava is inherited from father to son and each household may only have one celebration which means that the occasion brings all of the family together.


Though a lot of old customs are now no longer practised, many of the customs that surround Serbian wedding still are.


The traditional Serbian dance is a Circle dance, is the most common name for a style of dance usually done in a circle without partners to musical accompaniment. It became popular in the alternative, feminist and new age aspects of western culture in the 1980s and 1990s and continues today. The circle is probably the oldest... circle dance called Kolo is a collective folk dance, where a group of people (usually several dozen, at the very least three) hold each other by the hands or around the waist dancing, ideally in a circle, hence the name. There is almost no movement above the waist. The dance is accompanied by... kolo. It is a collective dance, where a group of people (usually several dozen, at the very least three) hold each other by the hands or around the waist dancing, ideally in a circle, hence the name. The same dance, with the same name, is also traditional among the Croats. Similar circle dances also exist in other cultures of the region.


Serbs have their own customs regarding Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. According to the Christian gospels, Jesus was born to Mary in Bethlehem, where she and her... Christmas. Early in the morning of the day of the Christmas Eve the head of the family would go to a forest in order to cut badnjak, a young This article is about oaks (Quercus). The Australian tree known as desert-oak is unrelated, and instead belongs to the genus Allocasuarina. OAK is also the three-letter IATA airport code for Oakland International Airport in Oakland, California USA. See also Oak, Nebraska, USA. Oaks Foliage and acorns of Quercus... oak, the oaktree would then be brought into the church to be blessed by the priest. Then the oaktree would be stripped of its branches with combined with wheat and other grain products would be burned in the fireplace. The burning of the badnjak is a ritual which is most certainly of pagan origin and it is considered a sacrifice to God (or the old pagan gods) so that the coming year may bring plenty of food, happiness, love, luck and riches. Nowadays, with most Serbs living in towns, most simply go to their church service to be given a small parcel of oak, wheat and other branches tied together to be taken home and set afire. The house floor and church is covered with Alternate meanings: Hay, New South Wales, Hay-on-Wye Bales of hay on a farm near Ames, Iowa Hay is dried grass (and pasture flowers) used to feed domestic animals at places or times where there is not enough (fresh) grass or when fresh grass by itself is too rich... hay, reminding worshippers of the This article is about the building; for another meaning, see stability. A stable is a building in which livestock, usually horses, are kept. It most commonly means a building that is divided into separate stalls for individual animals. Used metaphorically from this origin, a stable is a collection of people... stable in which This article is about the figure known by both Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ. For other usages, see Jesus (disambiguation). This 11th-century portrait is one of many images of Jesus in which a halo with a cross is used. Jesus of Nazareth (b. about 6–4 BC... Jesus was born.


Christmas Day itself is celebrated with a feast, necessarily featuring roasted piglet as the main meal. Another Christmas meal is a deliciously sweet cake made of wheat, called Koljivo (also called žito, which means grain in Serbian; in Romanian: colivă) is a traditional meal made by cooking whole (or sometimes ground) wheat seeds, with some sugar and ground nuts added. It is used in several religious rituals, for example it is carried and consumed on the... koljivo whose consumption is more for ritual than nourishment. One crosses oneself first, then takes a spoonful of the cake and savours it. But the most important Christmas meal is Cesnica is bread made on the Christmas morning. A coin is put in to the bread. During the lunch family members break the cesnica and the one who founds coin in the piece of bread is considered to be most fortune that year. But the head of the family has... česnica, a special kind of bread. The bread contains a coin; during the This article is part of the Meals series Common meals... Breakfast Elevenses Brunch Lunch Tea Dinner Supper Dessert See also... Cuisine | Kitchens Wikibooks: Cookbook Lunch is a meal that is taken at noon or in the early afternoon. The term is short for luncheon (see below). Lunch is a newer... lunch, the family breaks up the bread and the one who finds the coin is said to be assured of an especially happy year.


Christmas is not associated with presents like in the West is most commonly a noun, adjective, or adverb indicating direction or geography. West is the direction towards which the sun sets at the equinox. It is one of the four cardinal points of the compass, upon which it is considered the opposite of East, and at right angles to... West, although it is the day of Saint Nicholas the Wonderworker St. Nicholas, with his crozier and miter, as he appears on a German holy card. Bishop of Myrra, Defender of Orthodoxy, Wonderworker, Holy Hierarch Born 3rd Century, Patara Died 6 December 343, Myra Venerated in All Christianity Major shrine St. Nicholas’s relics are held... St Nicolas, the protector saint of children, to whom presents are given. However, under Communist rule, most Serbian families give presents on New Year's day. Santa Claus (Deda Mraz) and the Christmas tree are also seen in Serbia, but are imports from the West.


Religious Serbs also celebrate other religious holidays and even non-religious people often celebrate Easter (also called Pascha) is generally accounted the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed March or April each year to celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead (after his death by crucifixion; see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year, almost two... Easter (on the Orthodox date).


Serbs also celebrate This page deals with the annual event. For the band, see The New Year. The New Year is an event that happens when a culture celebrates the end of one year and the beginning of the next. Cultures that measure yearly calendars all have New Year celebrations. Modern new year... New Year on December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. It is the final day of the Gregorian year. December Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15... December 31st of the The Julian calendar was introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, taking force in 45 BC or 709 ab urbe condita. It was chosen after consultation with the Alexandrian astronomer Sosigenes and was probably designed to approximate the tropical year, known at least since Hipparchus. It has a regular year... Julian Calendar and the Orthodox New Year (currently on January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 351 days remaining (352 in leap years). Celebrated as New Years Day by those still following the Julian calendar. January Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6... January 14th of the The Gregorian calendar is the calendar currently used in the Western world. A modification of the Julian calendar, it was first proposed by the Neapolitan doctor Aloysius Lilius, and was decreed by Pope Gregory XIII, for whom it was named, on February 24, 1582 (Note: The papal bull Inter gravissimas... Gregorian Calendar).


For Serbian meals, see Serbian cuisine.


Name

The Linguistics Theoretical linguistics Phonetics Phonology Morphology Syntax Semantics Lexical semantics Stylistics Prescription Pragmatics Applied linguistics Sociolinguistics Generative linguistics Cognitive linguistics Computational linguistics Historical linguistics Etymology List of linguists Etymology is the study of the origins of words. Some words have been derived from other languages, possibly in a changed form... etymology of the word "Serb" (root: Srb) is not known. Numerous theories exist, but neither could be said to be certain or even probable:

  1. Some believe that the name is of Sarmatian horseman Sarmatians, Sarmatae or Sauromatae (the second form is mostly used by the earlier Greek writers, the other by the later Greeks and the Romans) were a people whom Herodotus (4.21-117) in the 5th century BC put on the eastern boundary of Scythia beyond the Tanais (Don... Sarmatian/ The Iranian languages are a part of the Indo European language family. The Iranian language group is part of the larger Indo-Iranian language subfamily and accounts for some of the oldest-recorded Indo-European languages. Indo-Iranian languages originated around modern Afghanistan, and split into the Iranian, Indo-Aryan... Iranian origin. Of which word exactly is unclear.
  2. Some believe that the name comes from the word sebar or peasant. However, as peasants did not exist in pre-medieval times while the name did, this seems unlikely.
  3. Others say that the name comes from saborac or co-fighter. This could make sense but the words are too far apart. It is possible that saborac comes from sebar (that sebar sometimes meant co-fighter), which would make this theory more interesting but there is not much basis for this claim either.
  4. Some [1]  (http://www.rastko.org.yu/rastko-lu/jezik/hsuster-srbin.html) believe that the name comes from srkati, to suck in, referring to people so closely united as if they share mother's milk.
  5. Also, others argue that all The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. They speak Slavic languages and reside chiefly in the east of that continent, but are also found in Asia. Contents // 1 Ethno-cultural subdivisions 2 The Slavic homeland debates 3 Naming and etymologies 4 Early... Slavs originally called themselves Serbs, and that Serbs (and Sorbian national flag The Sorbs (also Lusatians or Lusatia Serbs) are a relatively small west Slavic people, living as a minority in the region known as Lusatia in the German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). They belong to the same language group as the Poles, Czechs... Sorbs) are simply the last Slavs who retained the name. If this is true, it still fails to explain the origin of the Slavic name (most of the above may apply).
Enlarge
All the places in the world with names beginning with "Srb" are concentrated around Serbia and Sorbia

However, one thing is certain: the name is very old. It is clearly a self-identification and not a given name as its root cannot be found in western European languages.


It is interesting that the etymology of the name of the Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a south Slavic people mostly living in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (where theyre one of the constitutive nations). Autochthonous Croat minorities exist in Vojvodina (northern Serbia) and in the Austrian province of Burgenland as well as bordering areas of western Hungary and Slovakia. There... Croats (root: Hrv) is also unknown. Some suggest that the names actually originate from the same root: indeed, the roots are distinctly similar (Srb/Hrv). However, it is not known whether this is merely coincidental or indicative of a common origin.


Regardless of the origin, the age and rarity of the name allows for certain historical conclusions based partly on it (for example, see Gordoservon below).


While The Ukrainians are a Slavic people of central-eastern Europe. They are the descendants of several peoples who inhabited the vast area extending from north of the Black Sea to the borders of Russia, Poland, Moldova, Belarus and Slovakia. Ukraine had a very turbulent history, a fact justified by its... Ukrainians and krajischniks (their names coming from Slavic word for "mark") or The Slovaks are a western Slavic ethnic group that primarily inhabits Slovakia and speaks the Slovak language. There are approximately 5 million autochthonous Slovaks in Slovakia, around 300,000 in the Czech Republic, around 100,000 in Hungary, around 80,000 in Serbia, mostly in Vojvodina, around 20,000 in... Slovaks and Slovenians or Slovenes (Slovenian Slovenci, singular Slovenec, feminine Slovenka) are a South Slavic people primarily associated with Slovenia and the Slovenian language. Most Slovenians today live within the borders of the independent Slovenia (circa 2,000,000). There are autochthonous Slovenian minorities in northeastern parts of Italy (100,000), southern... Slovenes (obvious variations of "Slavs") need not be related, Serbs and Sorbian national flag The Sorbs (also Lusatians or Lusatia Serbs) are a relatively small west Slavic people, living as a minority in the region known as Lusatia in the German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). They belong to the same language group as the Poles, Czechs... Sorbs may well be. Some have taken this to the extreme, creating theories that link Serbs with Sarmatian horseman Sarmatians, Sarmatae or Sauromatae (the second form is mostly used by the earlier Greek writers, the other by the later Greeks and the Romans) were a people whom Herodotus (4.21-117) in the 5th century BC put on the eastern boundary of Scythia beyond the Tanais (Don... Sarmatians, Sremska Mitrovica (Сремска Митровица) is a city located in the Vojvodina province of Serbia and Montenegro at 44.98° North, 19.61° East. In 2003 the city had a total population of 39,200. Its name... Sirmium, Serbona, Siberian federal subjects of Russia Siberia ( Russian: Сиби́рь, common English transliterations: Sibir, Sibir; possibly from the Mongolian for the calm land) is a vast region of Russia and northern Kazakhstan constituting almost all of northern Asia. It extends eastward from the Ural Mountains to... Siberia and so on. These do, however, tend to be something of a fringe view.


Relation with Sorbs

The obvious similarities in their names leads some to conclude that Serbs and Sorbian national flag The Sorbs (also Lusatians or Lusatia Serbs) are a relatively small west Slavic people, living as a minority in the region known as Lusatia in the German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). They belong to the same language group as the Poles, Czechs... Sorbs are related peoples. Indeed, in the Serbian language Sorbs are called Luzicki Srbi (Serbs of Lusatia (German Lausitz, Upper Sorbian Łužica, Lower Sorbian Łužyca, Polish Łużyce, Czech and Serbian Lužice), sometimes called Sorbia comprises a region in the southern parts of Brandenburg and eastern parts of Saxony, Germany. Part of the region was ceded... Lusatia) and north of them were even Beli Srbi (White Serbs).


Exactly what are relations between Serbs and Sorbs is not certain:

  1. Some believe that Serbs came to Balkan from Lusatia (German Lausitz, Upper Sorbian Łužica, Lower Sorbian Łužyca, Polish Łużyce, Czech and Serbian Lužice), sometimes called Sorbia comprises a region in the southern parts of Brandenburg and eastern parts of Saxony, Germany. Part of the region was ceded... Sorbia.
  2. Some believe that Serbs came to Balkans and Sorbs to Sorbia from joint ancient fatherland. Where this fatherland might be is also uncertain.
  3. Some believe that Serbs and Sorbs were one people sometimes but have separated even before they moved to Serbia/Sorbia.
  4. If we accept the claim that all Slavs have called themselves Serbs, then Serbs and Sorbs need not have nothing more in common than any other two Slavic peoples.

Regardless of which is correct, Serbs and Sorbs of today are very different peoples, with different customs, tradition and religion. The Serbian language or Serb language is one of the standard versions of the Central-South Slavic diasystem, formerly (and still frequently) called Serbo-Croatian. Serbian is used primarily in Serbia-Montenegro, Republika Srpska and by Serbs everywhere. Serbian (српски) Spoken in: Serbia and Montenegro... Serbian language has perhaps more in common with Russian (русский язык  listen?) is the most widely spoken of the Slavic languages. Russian belongs to the group of Indo-European languages, and is therefore related to Sanskrit, Greek, and Latin, as well as the modern Germanic, Romance, and Celtic... Russian then with This article or section should be merged with List of Sorbian languages The Sorbian languages are members of the West Slavic branch of languages spoken in eastern Germany. They are also known as Wendish or Lusatian. Their collective ISO 639-2 code is wen. There are two literary languages: Upper... Sorbian.


Toponyms

Some of the In geography and cartography, a toponym is a place name, a geographical name, a proper name of locality, region, or some other part of Earths surface or its natural or artificial feature. Toponymy is the taxonomic study of place names; see that articles for a list of related articles... toponyms which are named after Serbs are:

  • Republika Srpska Република Српска (In detail) (In detail) Today, Republika Srpska is the poorer political entity in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Miscellaneous 1994 Postage Stamp In 1992, the new government of RS issued postage stamps and currency -- prized... Republika Srpska
  • ( In detail) ( In detail) Serbia and Montenegro  -Serbia    - Kosovo and Metohia    - Vojvodina  - Montenegro Official language Serbian 1 Capital Belgrade Area  - Total  - % water 88,361 km² n/a Population  - Total ( 2002) census - without Kosovo  - Density 7.498.001... Serbia
  • Serbia and Montenegro ( Serbian: Србија и Црна Гора, often abbreviated as SCG) is the name of the union of Serbia and Montenegro, two former Yugoslav republics united since 2003 in a loose confederation. It is located on the west... Serbia and Montenegro
  • Srb
  • Srbac
  • Srbica (Serbian: Србица; Albanian: Skenderaj) is a city in the province of Serbia called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia) located at 42° 44 48 N, 020° 47 19 E. It is the largest city in Drenica. Adem Jashari, a KLA terrorist commander is born in... Srbica
  • Srbijanci
  • Srbina
  • Srbinjak
  • Foča (Фоча), known from 1992 to 2004 as Srbinje (Србиње), is a town at Drina, in the Herzegovina region of Republika Srpska. It is now populated mostly by Serbs, however the 1991 census data shows that 40% of the town... Srbinje
  • Srbobran
  • Srbinci
  • Srbislavci
  • Srbljani
  • Srbljanovići
  • Srbljanska Glavica
  • Srbobran
  • Srbotina
  • Srbovac
  • Srbska Kamenica
  • Srbovo
  • Srpce
  • Srpenica
  • Srpska (village in This article is about the republic in Serbia-Montenegro, Europe. For the city in Brazil, see Montenegro, Brazil. Република Црна Гора Republika Crna Gora (In detail) (In detail) Serbia and Montenegro  -Serbia    ... Montenegro)
  • Srpska Crnja is a Serbian town in central-east Banat along side border with Romania. It is located in Torontal Country, Central Banat District, Province of Vojvodina, Republic of Serbia. It is about 150 km from capital city of Belgrade, 113 km from Novi Sad, 9 km south-east of... Srpska Crnja
  • Srpska Čuka
  • Srpska Klarija
  • Srpska Zelinja
  • Srbski Klanac
  • Srpski Babuù
  • Srpski Čuntić
  • Srpski Itebej
  • Srpski Miletić
  • Srpske Moravice (changed by Croats in 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. Years: 1988 1989 1990 - 1991 - 1992 1993 1994 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1991 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1991 to Moravice)
  • Srpski Padej
  • Srpski Rid
  • Srpsko Polje
  • Srpsko Seliùste

Anthroponyms

Some of the anthroponyms which contain "Serb" are:

  • A given name specifies and differentiates between members of a group of individuals, especially a family, all of whose members usually share the same family name. The given name may be single, or several names may be given (the latter are known as middle names). In the latter case, one... First names:
    • Srba
    • Srbislav
    • Srboje
    • Srboljub
  • A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. In English ones family name is generally written after ones given name, leading to the term last name. The word surname is name prefixed by the... Last names:
    • Srbić
    • Srbović

History

Early references to "Serboi"

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Serb lands in the 9th century, according to De Administrando Imperio is a scholarly work from ca. 950 by Byzantine emperor Constantine VII. Its name is translated as On the Administration of the Empire and was meant to give his successors advice on running the ethnically-mixed empire as well as how to fight external enemies. Wikisource has... De administrando imperio

The tribal designation Serboi first appears in the (1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century - other centuries) The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 99. Contents // 1 Events 2 Significant persons 3 Inventions, discoveries, introductions 4 Decades and years Events Beginning of Christianity Spread of the Roman Empire Masoretes adds vowel pointings to the... 1st century Geography of This article is about the geographer and astronomer Ptolemy. For Alexander the Greats general, see Ptolemy I of Egypt. For others named Ptolemy or Ptolemaeus, see Ptolemy (disambiguation). Claudius Ptolemaeus, given contemporary German styling, in a 16th century engraved book frontispiece Claudius Ptolemaeus (Greek: Κλαύδ... Ptolemy (book 5, 9.21) to designate a tribe dwelling in Sarmatian horseman Sarmatians, Sarmatae or Sauromatae (the second form is mostly used by the earlier Greek writers, the other by the later Greeks and the Romans) were a people whom Herodotus (4.21-117) in the 5th century BC put on the eastern boundary of Scythia beyond the Tanais (Don... Sarmatia, probably on the Lower For other meanings of the word Volga see Volga (disambiguation) Volga Волга Length 3,690 km Elevation of the source 225 m Average discharge  ? m³/s Area watershed 1.35 million km² Origin Valdai Hills Mouth Caspian Sea Basin countries Russia The Volga river (Russian... Volga River. The name reappears, in the form Serbioi, in the ( 9th century - 10th century - 11th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. Contents // 1 Events 2 Significant people 3 Inventions, discoveries, introductions 4 Decades and years Events The beginning of the Medieval Warm... 10th century scholar-emperor Constantine VII Porphyrogenitos (the Purple-born) ( 905 – November 9, 959) was the son of Byzantine emperor Leo VI and nephew of Alexander III. He earned his nickname as the legitimate (or more accurately legitimized) son of Leo, as opposed to the others who claimed the throne during his lifetime... Constantine VII Porphyrogenitos' advice on running an empire, De Administrando Imperio is a scholarly work from ca. 950 by Byzantine emperor Constantine VII. Its name is translated as On the Administration of the Empire and was meant to give his successors advice on running the ethnically-mixed empire as well as how to fight external enemies. Wikisource has... De administrando imperio (32.1-16), and in the continuation of Theophanes (died 817 or 818) was a Byzantine monk and chronicler. He was born in the 750s of iconodule aristocratic parents, but was orphaned at an early age, and the emperor Constantine V saw to his education and upbringing. His chronicle preserves a vibrant childhood memory of icebergs created from... Theophanes' history, the Theophanes Continuatus (288.17-20), usually in the same context as the Croatians, Zachlumians, and other peoples of Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. Pannonia was located in the territory of present-day countries: Austria, Croatia, Hungary, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovenia... Pannonia and Dalmatia (Croatian Dalmacija, Italian Dalmazia, Serbian Далмација) is a region of Croatia on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, spreading between the island of Pag in the northwest and the Bay of Kotor in the southeast. The inner Dalmatia (Dalmatinska Zagora... Dalmatia.


The name of the Serbs has been identifed with the earliest verifiable historical reference to a Slavic people comes from The writings of Procopius of Caesarea (500 ? - 565 ?), in Palestine, are the primary source of information for the rule of the emperor Justinian. He was the author of a history in eight books of the wars fought by Justinian I, a panegyric on Justinians public works throughout... Procopius, who describes a group of people called Spali or Spori. The name Spori of is clearly related to the Sorbian national flag The Sorbs (also Lusatians or Lusatia Serbs) are a relatively small west Slavic people, living as a minority in the region known as Lusatia in the German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). They belong to the same language group as the Poles, Czechs... Sorbs of Lusatia (Germany) and the Serbs of Balkan.


In the manuscript of the anonymous The Bavarian Geographer is anonymous medieval document prepared in ca. 850 probably in Regensburg and stored in the Munich library (both cities in Bavaria). It is entitled a Description of Cities and Lands North of Danube and it contains a list of the tribes in Central-Eastern Europe east of... Bavarian geographer was written: "...Zeruiani (the Serbs), whose kingdom is so great, that from them all the Slav peoples came into being and are said to originate from them."


Constantine VII gives an unlikely derivation of the name from the Latin (lingua Latina) Spoken in: Vatican City Region: Italic peninsula Total speakers: none native Ranking: not ranked Genetic classification: Indo-European   Italic   Latin Official status Official language of: Vatican City Regulated by: Roman Catholic Church Language codes ISO 639-1 la ISO 639-2 lat SIL LTN... Latin 'servi', which he explains as 'douloi' (slaves) of Roman emperors. He relates that the Serboi are descended from the "unbaptized" (pagan) Serboi who lived in the place called Boiki near Frankia ( Bohemia is also a place in the State of United States of America: see Bohemia, New York. Bohemia (Čechy in Czech, Böhmen in German) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. With an area of 52,750 sq... Bohemia?), and that they claimed the protection of Emperor Flavius Heraclius Augustus (c. 575 - February 11, 641) was Byzantine Emperor from October 5, 610 to February 11, 641. He was the son and namesake of the powerful Armenian Exarch of Africa, who had been one of East Roman Emperor Maurices key generals in the 590 war with Persia... Heraclius (reigned Years: 606 607 608 609 - 610 - 611 612 613 614 Decades: 580s 590s 600s - 610s - 620s 630s 640s Centuries: 6th century - 7th century - 8th century Contents // 1 Events 2 Births 3 Deaths 4 See also Events October 4 - Heraclius arrives by ship from Africa at Constantinople, overthrows Byzantine Emperor Phocas... 610- Years: 637 638 639 640 - 641 - 642 643 644 645 Decades: 610s 620s 630s - 640s - 650s 660s 670s Centuries: 6th century - 7th century - 8th century Events Founding of the city of Fostat, later Cairo, in Egypt. Revolt against Byzantine emperor Heraclonas; he is deposed and his brother Constans II becomes... 641), who settled them in the province of The White Tower The Arch of Galerius Map showing the Thessaloníki prefecture Thessaloníki (Θεσσαλονίκη) is the second-largest city of Greece and is the principal city and the capital of the Greek region of Macedonia. The city is... Thessalonica. Constantine's assertion is regarded with some scepticism by modern scholars; since the Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. In the sense of the Common Era... 19th century it has been commonly held that Serbs came to the The Balkans is the historic and geographic name used to describe southeastern Europe (see the Definitions and boundaries section below). The region has a combined area of 550,000 km and a population of around 53 million. The countries of Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, mainland Greece, the (Former... Balkan peninsula in the (5th century — 6th century — 7th century — other centuries) Contents // 1 Events 2 Significant persons 3 Inventions, discoveries, introductions 4 Decades and years Events The first academy of the east the Academy of Gundeshapur founded in Persia by the Persian Shah Khosrau I. Irish colonists and invaders, the... 6th century. Kekaumenos, the (10th century - 11th century - 12th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. In the history of European culture, this period is considered part of the High Middle Ages. Contents // 1 Events 2 Significant... 11th century Byzantine general, locates the Serboi on the Sava also Save (German Save, Hungarian Száva) is a river in Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. It is 940 km long and drains 95,720 km2 of surface area. In Roman times the river was named Savus. The Sava... Sava River (268.28), as does The Russian Primary Chronicle (Russian: Повесть временных лет, Povest vremennykh let, which is often translated in English as Tale of Bygone Years), is a history of the early East Slavic state, Kievan Rus, from... The Chronicle of Nestor, but this is not considered particularly reliable.


The Slavs came to the Balkans from a broad region in central and eastern Europe, which extended from the rivers The Elbe River (Czech Labe, Sorbian/Lusatian Łobjo, Polish Łaba, German Elbe) is one of the major waterways of central Europe. It originates in the North West Czech Republic before traversing much of Germany and finally emptying into the North Sea. the Elbe Contents // 1 Geography 2 Cities... Elbe in the west to the This article is about the river. See also Dnipro launch vehicle for the rocket, or Dnepr (motorcycle). Dnieper Length 2,290 km Elevation of the source - m Average discharge - m³/ s Area watershed 516,300 km² Origin Russia Mouth Black Sea Basin countries Russia, Belarus, Ukraine The Dnieper... Dnieper in the east and from a point which touched the This is about the terrestrial mountain range. There is also a lunar range called the Montes Carpatus. Satellite image of the Carpathians The Carpathian Mountains are the eastern wing of the great central mountain system of Europe curving 1500 km (~900 miles) along the borders of the Czech Republic, Slovakia... Carpathian mountains in the south and the river External links Wikimedia Commons has multimedia related to: Neman Categories: Belarus-related stubs | Rivers of Belarus | Rivers of Lithuania | Russian rivers ... Niemen in the north. Different tribes settled in different parts of the Balkan peninsula, subsequently developing their distinct identities. A mention of the Serbian name in Years: 676 677 678 679 - 680 - 681 682 683 684 Decades: 650s 660s 670s - 680s - 690s 700s 710s Centuries: 6th century - 7th century - 8th century Contents // 1 Events 2 Births 3 Deaths 4 Heads of states Events October 10 - Battle of Kerbela November 12 - The Sixth Ecumenical Council opens in... 680 is about a city of Gordoservon in Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to... Asia Minor where "some Slavic tribes" have settled. Gordoservon appears to be a distorted spelling of Grad Srba, "City of Serbs" in The Serbian language or Serb language is one of the standard versions of the Central-South Slavic diasystem, formerly (and still frequently) called Serbo-Croatian. Serbian is used primarily in Serbia-Montenegro, Republika Srpska and by Serbs everywhere. Serbian (српски) Spoken in: Serbia and Montenegro... Serbian.


Their settlement in the Balkans appears to have taken place between Years: 606 607 608 609 - 610 - 611 612 613 614 Decades: 580s 590s 600s - 610s - 620s 630s 640s Centuries: 6th century - 7th century - 8th century Contents // 1 Events 2 Births 3 Deaths 4 See also Events October 4 - Heraclius arrives by ship from Africa at Constantinople, overthrows Byzantine Emperor Phocas... 610 and Years: 636 637 638 639 - 640 - 641 642 643 644 Decades: 610s 620s 630s - 640s - 650s 660s 670s Centuries: 6th century - 7th century - 8th century Events May 28 - Severinus becomes pope, but dies the same year. December 24 - Severinus is succeeded by John IV. Muslims capture Alexandria. Tulga succeeds his... 640. Constantine VII Porphyrogenitos (the Purple-born) ( 905 – November 9, 959) was the son of Byzantine emperor Leo VI and nephew of Alexander III. He earned his nickname as the legitimate (or more accurately legitimized) son of Leo, as opposed to the others who claimed the throne during his lifetime... Constantine VII The Byzantine Empire had a complex system of aristocracy and bureaucracy. Most of the offices and titles were honorifics only, as the emperor was the sole ruler. Over the more than 1000 years of the empires existence, different titles were adopted and discarded, and many lost or gained prestige... Porphyrogenitos writes in De Administrando Imperio is a scholarly work from ca. 950 by Byzantine emperor Constantine VII. Its name is translated as On the Administration of the Empire and was meant to give his successors advice on running the ethnically-mixed empire as well as how to fight external enemies. Wikisource has... De Administrando Imperio that the Serbs recieved in Rascia / Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. The present Raška is the area of south-central Serbia, in... Raska, Zachumlie/ Zahumlje, also known as the Land of Hum, was a medieval principality located in todays Herzegovina. Zahumlje, at various times, bordered the lands of Narenta/Pagania to the west and southwest, Travunja to the east and southeast, and probably Bosnia to the north. Categories: Historical stubs | Serbian history | History... Zahumlje, Trebounia/Travunia, Zeta can refer to: Zeta (letter), a letter of the Greek alphabet. Hence, Riemann zeta function Zeta (river), a river in Montenegro. Zeta (state), the medieval name of Montenegro. YellowTAB Zeta, an Operating System. Zeta (wine variety), a Furmint-Bouvier cross found in the Tokaj region. Lightburn Zeta, a brand... Zeta/ Duklja (Latin: Doclea or Dioclea, after the town of Dioclea) was a vassal state of Byzantium until it won its independence in 1042, ruled by the Vojislavljevic Dynasty, located in Zeta, or modern Montenegro and northern Albania including the city of Shkodër. Doclea the name of the region during... Duklja, Bosnia/ The source of the Bosna river on the outskirts of Sarajevo. The Bosna is the third longest river in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and is considered one of the countrys three major internal rivers, along with the Neretva and Vrbas. The river flows for 271 kilometers (168 miles) and is... Bosna and Pagania/Paganija. Serbia was then ruled mostly by the House of Vlastimirovic which, under Caslav Klonimirovic managed to unite these lands into a confederacy by the early 10th century.The first certain data on the state of the Serboi, Serbia, dates to the ( 8th century - 9th century - 10th century - other centuries) Contents // 1 Events 2 Significant people 3 Inventions, discoveries, introductions 4 Decades and years Events Beowulf might have been written down in this century, though it could also have been in the 8th century Reign of Charlemagne, and concurrent (and controversially labeled... 9th century. The episcopal lists of This article is about the Byzantine Emperor. There is also an article on Pope Leo VI Leo VI the Wise (September 19, 866 - May 11, 912) was Byzantine emperor from 886 to 912. He inherited from his father Basil I an empire that was much larger and stronger than it... Leo VI mention bishops of Drougoubiteia and the Serboi. Envoys of the Serboi arrived at the court of the Emperor Painting of Basil II, from an 11th century manuscript. Basil II Bulgaroktonus (in Greek Basilios Bulgaroktonos, written Βασίλειος Βουλγαροκτόνος, lived 958_ December 15, 1025), Byzantine emperor (January 10, 976... Basil II, around Years: 989 990 991 992 - 993 - 994 995 996 997 Decades: 960s 970s 980s - 990s - 1000s 1010s 1020s Centuries: 9th century - 10th century - 11th century Events July 4 - Saint Ulrich of Augsburg canonized Births Deaths Categories: 993 ... 993.


In the 11th century there was probably a Themes (singular thema) were administrative units of land in the Byzantine Empire. During the late sixth and early seventh centuries AD, the Byzantine Empire was under assault. The Persian Empire was pressing it from the south and east, assaulting Syria, Egypt, and Anatolia. Slavs and Avars raided Greece and disputed... thema of Serbia: a seal impression of Constantine Diogenes, strategos of Serbia, is preserved. Around Years: 1037 1038 1039 - 1040 - 1041 1042 1043 Decades: 1010s 1020s 1030s - 1040s - 1050s 1060s 1070s Centuries: 10th century - 11th century - 12th century 1040 state leaders Events August 14 - King Duncan I is killed in battle against his first cousin and rival Macbeth. The latter succeeds him as Scottish Monarch... 1040 Theophilos Erotikos was the governor of the Serboi until he was expelled by Stefan Voislav, who reportedly conquered the territory of the Serboi and became its 'archon'. T. Wasilewski ( 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April 1.5 May 1.6 June 1.7 July 1.8 August 1.9 September 1.10 October 1.11 November... 1964) surmised that this theme was the same as Sirmium, whereas Dj. Radojcic (-1... 1966) thinks that it was Raska, only temporarily governed by the Byzantines.


Medieval history

The Serbs were The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once (a political shift as much as a spontaneous mass shift in individual consciences), also includes the practice of converting pagan cult practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... Christianized in several waves between the ( 6th century - 7th century - 8th century - other centuries) Contents // 1 Events 2 Significant persons 3 Inventions, discoveries, introductions 4 Decades and years Events Islam starts in Arabia, the Quran is written, and Arabs subjugate Syria, Iraq, Persia, Egypt, North Africa and Central Asia to Islam. Sutton Hoo ship burial... 7th and ( 8th century - 9th century - 10th century - other centuries) Contents // 1 Events 2 Significant people 3 Inventions, discoveries, introductions 4 Decades and years Events Beowulf might have been written down in this century, though it could also have been in the 8th century Reign of Charlemagne, and concurrent (and controversially labeled... 9th century with the last wave taking place between Years: 863 864 865 866 - 867 - 868 869 870 871 Decades: 830s 840s 850s - 860s - 870s 880s 890s Centuries: 8th century - 9th century - 10th century Events September: Basil I becomes sole ruler of the Byzantine Empire. September: Patriarch Photius I of Constantinople is removed from office and banished; Ignatius is... 867 and Years: 870 871 872 873 - 874 - 875 876 877 878 Decades: 840s 850s 860s - 870s - 880s 890s 900s Centuries: 8th century - 9th century - 10th century Events March 13 - The bones of Saint Nicephorus are interred in the Church of the Apostles, Constantinople. Ingólfur Arnarson arrives as first permanent viking... 874.


During and after that period, Serbs struggled to gain independence from the The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. In certain specific contexts, usually referring to the centuries that marked the fall of the Western Roman Empire, it is also often referred to as the Eastern... Byzantine. The first Serb states were Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. The present Raška is the area of south-central Serbia, in... Rascia or Raska and Zeta was one of the first Serb states, now in Montenegro. It was named after the river Zeta. See also History of Montenegro Duklja Categories: Historical stubs | Montenegro ... Zeta. Their rulers had a varying degree of autonomy, until virtual independence was achieved under Saint Sava (1175 or 1176 - January 12, 1235 or 1236), originally the prince Rastko Nemanjic (son of the Serbian king Stefan Nemanja and brother of Stefan Prvovencani, founder of the Serbian medieval state), is the first Serb archbishop (1219-1233) and the most important saint in the Serbian Orthodox Church... Saint Sava, who became the first head of the Early history The Serbs migrated to the Balkans during the reign of Byzantine emperor Heraclius (610-641). Unknown to them at the time, the Serbs had settled on both sides of the line of Roman emperor Theodosius I. The region they had settled had for centuries been alternatively under the... Serb Orthodox Church and his brother Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. meaning: Stephen the first-crowned) or Stefan II, Nemanja (Стефан Првовенчани, Стефан II, Немања) (d. September 24, 1228) was the... Stefan Prvovencani, who became the first Serb This article treats the generic title monarch. For the origins of the word king and its English use, see Germanic king. For other meanings of the word, see Monarch (disambiguation) A monarch is a type of ruler or head of state. The word derives from Greek monos archein, meaning one... king. Serbia did not exist as a state of that name but was, rather, the region inhabited by the Serbs; its kings and tsars were called the "King of the Serbs" or "Tsar of the Serbs", not "King of Serbia" or "Tsar of Serbia". The medieval Serbian state is nonetheless often (if anachronistically) referred to as "Serbia".


( In detail) ( In detail) Serbia and Montenegro  -Serbia    - Kosovo and Metohia    - Vojvodina  - Montenegro Official language Serbian 1 Capital Belgrade Area  - Total  - % water 88,361 km² n/a Population  - Total ( 2002) census - without Kosovo  - Density 7.498.001... Serbia reached its A golden age is period in a field of endeavour where great tasks were accomplished. The term originated from early Greek and Roman poets who used to refer to a time when mankind lived in a utopia and was pure. Within sequences or cycles of eras, the golden age stands... golden age under the Nemanjić (Serbian Немањић; also Nemanjid) was a medieval Serb ruling dynasty. The dynasty was named after Stefan Nemanja, though it began shortly before him. It gave sixteen Serbian monarchs between 1166 and 1371. The family crest was a bicephalic argent eagle on a... House of Nemanjic, with the Serbian state reaching its apogee of power in the reign of Tsar Stefan Uroš IV Dušan Silni (the mighty) (Цар Стефан Душан Силни) (around 1308-December 20, 1355) was a Serb king (September 8, 1331-1346) and tsar (1346-December 5, 1355). Du... Tsar Stefan Uros Dusan. Serbia's power subsequently dwindled amid interminable conflict between the nobility, rendering the country unable to resist the steady incursion of the Osmanlı İmparatorluğu Devlet-i Aliye-i Osmaniye Ottoman Coat of Arms The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto El Muzaffer Daima The Ever Victorious (as written in tugra) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital İstanbul ( Constantinople/Asitane/Konstantiniyye ) Sovereigns Sultans of the... Ottoman Empire into south-eastern World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. It is conventionally considered a continent, which, in this case, is more of a cultural distinction than a geographic one. ( National Geographic, however, officially recognises... Europe. The This page is about the Battle of Kosovo of 1389; for other battles, see Battle of Kosovo (disambiguation) The Battle of Kosovo Polje was fought on St. Vitus Day of 1389 (June 15 in Julian calendar) between Serbs and Balkan Allies and the Ottoman Empire. The historical reality of this... Battle of Kosovo in Years: 1386 1387 1388 - 1389 - 1390 1391 1392 Decades: 1350s 1360s 1370s - 1380s - 1390s 1400s 1410s Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Events February 24 - Margaret I seizes Albert, thus becoming ruler of Denmark, Norway and Sweden June 15 - Battle of Kosovo between Serbs and Ottomans. Both the Serbian... 1389 is commonly regarded in Serbian national mythology as the key event in the country's defeat by the Turks, although in fact Ottoman rule was not fully imposed until some time later. After Serbia fell, the kings of Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. Its capital is Sarajevo and it was formerly one of the six federal units constituting Yugoslavia. The republic gained its... Bosnia used the title of "King of the Serbs" until Bosnia was also overrun.


Ottoman domination

As Christians, the Serbs were regarded as a "protected people" under Ottoman law but in practice were treated as second-class citizens and often harshly treated. They were subjected to considerable pressure to convert to This article forms part of the seriesIslam Vocabulary of Islam Five Pillars Profession of faith Prayer · Alms · Fasting Pilgrimage to Mecca Jihad (See Sixth pillar of Islam) Major Figures Muhammad Prophets of Islam Caliph · Shia Imam · The Mahdi Companions of Muhammad Holy Cities Events Mecca ·... Islam; some did, while others Migration occurs when living things move from one biome to another. In most cases organisms migrate to avoid local shortages of food, usually caused by winter. Animals may also migrate to a certain location to breed, as is the case with some fish. The species that periodically migrate are called... migrated to the north and west, to seek refuge in Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k.u.k. monarchy), was a dualistic state (1867–1918) in which the Kingdom of Hungary enjoyed self-government and representation in joint affairs (principally foreign relations and defence) with the western and northern lands of the Austrian Empire... Austria-Hungary.


At the beginning of the Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. In the sense of the Common Era... 19th century, the First Serbian Uprising was an uprising at the beginning of the 19th century in which Serbs living in Belgrade Pashaluk in the Ottoman Empire, led by Karadjordje, managed to liberate the Pashaluk for a significant time, which eventually led to the creation of modern Serbia. Contents // 1 Background 2 The... First Serbian Uprising succeeded in liberating at least some Serbs, for a limited time. The Second Serbian Uprising was much more successful, creating a powerful Serbia that became a modern European For related meanings see also Monarch (disambiguation) A monarchy, (from the Greek monos, one, and archein, to rule) is a form of government that has a monarch as Head of State. The distinguishing characteristic of monarchies is that the Head of State holds his office for life, unlike in republics... kingdom.


20th century Serbs

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Serbs in Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. Its capital is Sarajevo and it was formerly one of the six federal units constituting Yugoslavia. The republic gained its... BiH as per 1991 census data. Current situation is different due to war and ethnic cleansing. Serbs noted in red and light red and by letter S where there was no clear majority.

At the beginning of the (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 20th century, many Serbs were still under foreign rule – that of the Ottomans in the south and of the Austrians in the north and west. The southern Serbs were liberated in the The Balkan Wars were two wars in South-eastern Europe in 1912-1913 in the course of which the Balkan League (Serbia, Montenegro, Greece, and Bulgaria) first conquered Ottoman-held Macedonia and most of Thrace and then fell out over the division of the spoils, Bulgaria suffering defeat at the... First Balkan War of 1912 is a leap year starting on Monday. Years: 1909 1910 1911 - 1912 - 1913 1914 1915 Decades: 1880s 1890s 1900s - 1910s - 1920s 1930s 1940s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1912 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics... 1912, while the question of Austrian Serbs' independence was the spark that lit the Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. Battle aftermath. Remains of the Chateau Wood World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, the War of the Nations, and the War to End All Wars, was a world conflict occurring from 1914 to... First World War two years later. A Serb Nationalism is an ideology that creates and sustains a nation as a concept of a common identity for groups of humans. According to the theory of nationalism, the preservation of identity features, the independence in all subjects, the wellbeing, and the glory of ones own nation are fundamental values... nationalist Gavrilo Princip Princip being arrested after the shooting Gavrilo Princip ( July 25, 1894 – April 28, 1918) was a Bosnian Serb nationalist who killed Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria, and his wife Countess Sophie in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914, prompting the Austrian action against Serbia that led to World... Gavrilo Princip killed the Austro-Hungarian archduke Franz Ferdinand links to here. For its other meanings see: Franz Ferdinand (disambiguation) Archduke Franz Ferdinand (right) with his family. His Imperial and Royal Highness Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Este (sometimes called Francis Ferdinand in English) ( December 18, 1863 – June 28, 1914) was born in Graz, Austria and... Franz Ferdinand in Downtown Sarajevo and the Miljacka river. Sarajevo is the capital and largest city of Bosnia and Herzegovina, located at 43°52N and 18°25E. According to a 1991 census, its population was 429,672; currently estimated at around 400,000. The city is considered one of the most... Sarajevo, initiating a chain of declarations of war that produced a continent-wide conflict. During the war, the Serbian army fought fiercely, eventually retreated through Albania is a Mediterranean country in southeastern Europe. It is bordered by Montenegro in the north, Serbia ( Kosovo) in the north-east, the Republic of Macedonia in the east, and Greece in the south, has a coast on the Adriatic Sea in the west, and a coast on the Ionian... Albania to regroup in Greece (disambiguation). Greece, formally called the Hellenic Republic ( Greek: Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), is a country in the southeast of Europe on the southern tip of the Balkan peninsula. It has land boundaries with Bulgaria, the... Greece and launched a counter-offensive through The huge equestrian statue of Alexander the Great, king of ancient Macedon, on the waterfront at Thessaloniki, capital of Greek Macedonia Macedonia is a geographical and historical region of the Balkan peninsula in south-eastern Europe with an area of around 67,000 square kilometres and a population of 4... Macedonia. Though they were eventually victorious, the war devastated Serbia and killed a huge proportion of its population – by some estimates, over the half of the male Serbian population died in the conflict, influencing the region's Demographics comprises selected characteristics of a population (age and income distribution and trends, mobility, educational attainment, home ownership and employment status, for instance) for purposes of social studies. It is also used in marketing, marketing research, opinion research, political research, and the study of consumer behaviour. This article primarily discusses... demographics to this day.


After the war, the The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. Coat of arms of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia Contents // 1 History 2 List of Kings 3 Internal divisions 4 See also 5 External link History The kingdom was formed in 1918 under... Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later called Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all south Slavic languages) is a term used for three separate but successive political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe. Translated, the name means Land of the South Slavs (jug in Jugoslavija means south). The first was a... Yugoslavia) was created. Almost all Serbs now finally lived in one state. The new state had its capital in Belgrade (disambiguation). Belgrade ( Serbian, Београд, Beograd), is the capital ( 2003–) of Serbia and Montenegro and Yugoslavia ( 1918– 2003). The city lies on the outfall of the Sava river to the Danube river in northern central Serbia, at 44.83° N 20... Belgrade and was ruled by a Serbian king; it was, however, unstable and prone to ethnic tensions. An interesting, if somewhat pro Serb, window on Yugoslavia between the wars is provided by Rebecca West was the pseudonym of Cecily (or Cicily) Isabel Fairfield (December 25, 1892- March 15, 1983), a British-Irish feminist and writer famous for her novels and for her relationship with H. G. Wells. She was born in County Kerry, Ireland. Her Irish journalist father deserted her Scottish mother... Rebecca West's classic of travel literature, "Black Lamb & Grey Falcon".


During Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (60,000 ft) into the air. August 9, 1945 World War II was a global conflict that started in 7 July 1937 in Asia and 1 September 1939 in Europe and lasted until 1945, involving the majority of the... Second World War, the The Axis Powers is a term for those participants in World War II opposed to the Allies. The three major Axis powers, Germany, Italy, and Japan, referred to themselves as the Rome– Berlin– Tokyo axis. The Axis powers were ultimately defeated in the end of World War II... Axis Powers occupied Yugoslavia, dismembering the country. Serbia was occupied by the Germans, while in Bosnia and Croatia they were put under the rule of the The Italians are a Latin ethnic group primarily associated with Italy and the Italian language. There are around 62 million autochthonous Italians in Italy, around 550,000 in Switzerland, as well as some smaller groups in Slovenia and Croatia. There is a notable Italian diaspora in the United States (cf... Italians and the fascist The Ustaše (often spelled Ustashe in English; singular Ustaša or Ustasha) was a Croatian right-wing organisation put in charge of the Independent State of Croatia by the Axis Powers in 1941. They pursued nazi/fascist policies and were subsequently expelled by the communist Yugoslav partisans... Ustase regime in the This article is part of the History of Croatia series. Before the Croats Medieval Croatian state Union with Hungary Habsburg Empire First Yugoslavia Croatia during WWII Second Yugoslavia Modern Croatia The Independent State of Croatia (Nezavisna Država Hrvatska, NDH) was a Nazi/Fascist puppet state in World War... Independent State of Croatia. Under Ustase rule in particular, they were subjected to systematic Genocide has been defined as the deliberate killing of people based on their ethnicity, nationality, race, religion, or (sometimes) politics, as well as other deliberate actions leading to the physical elimination of any of the above categories. There is disagreement over whether the term genocide ought to be used for... genocide in which hundreds of thousands were killed.


After the war, the The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. It was formed in 1945 from remains of the pre-war Kingdom of Yugoslavia under the name Democratic Federal Yugoslavia, in 1946 it changed its name to Federal Peoples Republic of Yugoslavia and... Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was formed. As with the pre-war Yugoslavia, the country's capital was at Belgrade. ( In detail) ( In detail) Serbia and Montenegro  -Serbia    - Kosovo and Metohia    - Vojvodina  - Montenegro Official language Serbian 1 Capital Belgrade Area  - Total  - % water 88,361 km² n/a Population  - Total ( 2002) census - without Kosovo  - Density 7.498.001... Serbia was the largest republic, however, the This article is part of the Communism series. Schools of communism Marxism Leninism Trotskyism Marxism-Leninism Stalinism Maoism Anarcho-Communism Titoism Left communism Council communism Eurocommunism Communist parties Cuba China Vietnam USSR Yugoslavia USA Germany Italy Indonesia Socialist States Cuba Vietnam North Korea Laos Socialist Revolutions Nepal Civil War Other... Communist regime of Josip Broz Tito Marshal Josip Broz Tito Born May 7, 1892 Kumrovec, Zagorje, Croatia Died May 4, 1980 Ljubljana, Slovenia Josip Broz Tito (May 7, 1892 - May 4, 1980) was the ruler of Yugoslavia between the end of World War II and his death in 1980. Contents // 1 Early years... Josip Broz Tito diluted its power by establishing two autonomous provinces in Serbia, Kosovo (disambiguation). Kosovo Аутономна покрајина Косово и Метохија Kosova Official languages Albanian, Serbian Capital Priština Area  - Total  - % water... Kosovo and Autonomna Pokrajina Vojvodina Аутономна Покрајина Војводина (In detail) (In detail) Serbia and Montenegro  -Serbia    -Kosovo and Metohia    -Vojvodina  ... Vojvodina.


Communist Yugoslavia collapsed in the early Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Years: 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Contents // 1 Events and trends 1.1 Technology 1.2 Science 1.3 War, peace and politics 1.4 Economics 1.5 Culture 1... 1990s, with four of its six republics becoming independent states. This led to several bloody The Yugoslav wars were a series of violent conflicts in the territory of the former Yugoslavia that went on in the 1990s. They comprised two series of successive wars affecting all of the six former Yugoslav republics. Conflicts in the west War in Slovenia (1991) — a short 10-day... civil wars as the large Serbian communities in The Republic of Croatia is a crescent-shaped country in Europe bordering the Mediterranean, Central Europe and the Balkans. Its capital is Zagreb. In recent history, it was a republic in the SFR Yugoslavia, but it achieved independence in 1991. It is a candidate for membership of the European Union... Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. Its capital is Sarajevo and it was formerly one of the six federal units constituting Yugoslavia. The republic gained its... Bosnia attempted to remain within Yugoslavia, which now consisted of only Serbia and Montenegro ( Serbian: Србија и Црна Гора, often abbreviated as SCG) is the name of the union of Serbia and Montenegro, two former Yugoslav republics united since 2003 in a loose confederation. It is located on the west... Serbia and Montenegro. Another war broke out in Kosovo (disambiguation). Kosovo Аутономна покрајина Косово и Метохија Kosova Official languages Albanian, Serbian Capital Priština Area  - Total  - % water... Kosovo (see The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called... Kosovo War) after years of tensions between Serbs and The Albanians or Shqiptarë are a people of the western Balkan peninsula, speaking the Albanian language and numbering today approximately six million worldwide. The Albanians are called Shqipetaret in Albanian language, which is freely translated as The Sons of Eagles. The flag of Albania includes a bicephalic eagle. Due... Albanians. Results of all the wars were unfavourable for Serbs, Croats, Bosnians and Albanians. Hundreds of thousands of Serbs were expelled or fled in widespread The term ethnic cleansing refers to various policies of forcibly removing people of another ethnic group. At one end of the spectrum, it is virtually indistinguishable from forced emigration and population transfer, while at the other it merges with deportation and genocide. At the most general level, however, ethnic cleansing... ethnic cleansing.


Subgroups

These notable Serbian subgroups are commonly recognised:

  1. The word Montenegrins may also refer to all residents of Montenegro, regardless of nationality. The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. Parts of this article are self-contradictory. Please see the talk page if you wish to help repair it. Montenegrins... Montenegrins ( This article is about the republic in Serbia-Montenegro, Europe. For the city in Brazil, see Montenegro, Brazil. Република Црна Гора Republika Crna Gora (In detail) (In detail) Serbia and Montenegro  -Serbia    ... Montenegro)
  2. Catholic Serbs such as the Bunjevci (singular Bunjevac, pronounced Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz resp.) are a South ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka/Bácska (today northern Serbia or Vojvodina) and southern Hungary (particularly in the Baja region). They are Roman Catholic by faith... Bunjevci, Janjevci are inhabitants of the Kosovo town of Janjevo and surrounding villages, located near Pristina as well as villages centered around Letnica near Vitina (Papare, Vrmez, Vrnavo Kolo). The Janjevci as a specific group are one of two Roman Catholic South Slavic regional subgroups in Kosovo. The Janjevci are descended... Janjevci and The Krašovani (Serb. cyr.Крашовани, also Karaševci/Карашевци) are an ethnic subgroup living in the Romanian Banat around the town of Caraşova (Caraševo). What distinguishes this... Krašovani
  3. Muslim Serbs such as the The Gorani are an ethnic group living in a region called Gora (Slavic for Mountain) just south of Prizren in the Serbian province of Kosovo-Metohia, currently under NATO and United Nations administration. They also make the majority in the Sara mountain range. The Gorani are Slavic by origin and... Gorani ( Gorani could be the name of: Gorani, a village in the prefecture of Laconia Gorani, people and the English name of their language (actually Goranski) living in Kosovo and Metohia, a province of Serbia Gorani, a small group of Kurds and their dialect of the Kurdish language in Iran and... Gora region of The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. Kosovo Косово и Метохија Kosova Official languages Albanian, Serbian Capital Pristina Area  - Total  - % water 10,887 km² n/a Population... Kosovo and Metohija)

Some Serbs, mostly living in This article is about the republic in Serbia-Montenegro, Europe. For the city in Brazil, see Montenegro, Brazil. Република Црна Гора Republika Crna Gora (In detail) (In detail) Serbia and Montenegro  -Serbia    ... Montenegro and Herzegovina (natively Херцеговина/Hercegovina) is a historical region in the Dinaric Alps that composes the southern part of present-day Bosnia and Herzegovina. Terrain is mostly hilly, karst except for the central valley of the river Neretva. Largest city is... Herzegovina are organised in This article is on the social structure. There are also articles on the biological tribe, the musical group Tribe, and the Tribes video game series. Viewed historically or developmentally, a tribe consists of a social formation existing before the development of, or outside of, states. Many people use the term... tribes. See Following the disintegration of the medieval Serbian state of the Nemanjici and the Ottoman subjugation of Serb-inhabitted lands an old system of clan organization sprung in many Dinaric areas such as Montenegro, Herzegovina, the Highlands, Krajina, Bosnia and Serbia. This clan system has survived to this day mostly in... list of Serbian tribes.


References on Ancient and Medieval Serbs

  • Ernst Schwartz, Das Vordringen der Slawen nach Western, Südost-Forschungen, Band XV, Mönchen 1956
  • Ernestus Brotuff, Chronica von den Salz-Bornen und Erbauung der Hall an der Sala... (Weiland J.J. 1554) in zwei Büchern Verfaset und Fleiss beschrieben. Hall in Sachsen 1679
  • Franz Martin Pelzels Geschichte der Böhmen, von ältesten bis auf die neuesten Zeiten. Aus den besten einheimischen und auswärtigen Geschichtsschreibern, Kroniken und gleichzeitigen Handschriften zusammen getragen, Erster Theil, Vierte fortgesetzte Auflage, Prag 1817
  • Franz Grabler. Aus dem Geschichtswerk des Laonikos Chalkokondilos. Europa im XV. Jahrhundert von Byzantinern gesehen. Byzantinische Geschichtsschreiber, Graz-Wien-Köln (1954)
  • Friderici Wideburgii, Origines et antiquitates Marggraviatus Misnici... Halae Salicae 1734
  • Franc. Xav. El. B. De Pejacsevich, Historia Serviae seu colloquia XIII de Statu Regni et religionis Serviae ab exordio ad finem, sive a saeculo VII ad XV. Auetore F.X. El. B. de Pejacsevich. Colocae MDCCXCVI (1796)
  • Howorth. The Spread of the Slaves, The Journal of the Antropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, vol. IX, London 1880, Part III The Northern Serbs or Sorabiens and the Obodriti
  • Martin Kromer, De origine et rebus gestis Polonorum Iibri XXX (1555
  • Mauro Orbini, II regno De gli Slavi Hoggi corrottamente detti Schü-voni... In Pesaro MDCI (1601)
  • Monumenta Germaniae Historica... Edidit G.H. Pertz. Tomus I-VI 1826-1844
  • Nikolaus Volrab, Chronica von den Antiquiteten des Keisrlichen Stiftes/der Römische Burg und Stadt Marseburg... (Budišin 1556)
  • Neuve Chronica Türkischer Nation von Türken selbst beschrieben Frankfurt am Mayn 1590
  • Pomponii Melae de Chorographia Iibri tres recognovit Caroli;:- Fnck. Lipsiae 1880
  • P.J. Schafariks, Slawische Alterthümer, II, Leipzig 1844
  • Heinrich Kunstmann, Über die Herkunft der Polen von Balkan. Die Welt der Slawen, Halbsjahresschrift für Slavistik, Jahrgang XXIX, Heft 2, IV F. VIII, 2. München 1984
  • Hana Skalovä, Topografickä mapa üzemi Obodricü a Veletu-Luticu ve svetle mistnfch Jmen. Vznik a pocätky Slovanü. Pracha 1965
  • Joan Christopori de Jordan... De originibus Slavicis... Vindobonae MDCCXLV (1745)
  • Joannes Simoni Vandalia a 1598. scripta. Mon. Ren germ, praecipue Cimbricarum et Megapolensium... T. I, Lipsiae 1739
  • Joannis Bacmeisteri... Animadversiones Genealogico-Chronologico-hi-storico in Mareschalci Thurii Annalium Herulorum et Vandalorum Hbros septem. У збирци: Mon. ined. R.G. praecipue Cimbricarum, et Megapolensium... erui... Ernestus Joachim de Westphalen... Tomus I, Lipisae 1739
  • Johann Georg Essigs Kurze Einleitung zu der allgemeinen und besonderen Welthistorie, aufs neue übersehen, vermehrt, und bis auf gegenwärtige Zeit fortgesetzte, von M. Johann Christian Walz, Prof. der Historie am Her-zogl. Gimnasio. Zehnte Ausgabe, Stuttgart 1777
  • Karl Gottlob Anton, Erste Linien eines Versuches über die alten Slawen Ursprung, Sitten, Gebräuche, Meinungen und Kenntnisse. Ausgearbeitet von K.G. Anton, D. Leipzig 1783
  • Karl Gottlob Anton, Geschichte der Teutschen Nazion, Erster Theil... Geschichte der Germanen, Leipzig 1793
  • Karl Penka, Origines Ariacae, Linguistisch-ethnologische Untersuchungen zur ältesten Geschichte der arischer Völker und Sprache. Wien und Te-schen 1883
  • Laskaris Kananos, Die Nordlandreise des Laskaris Kanons (Byz. Geschichtsschreiber)
  • Ludwig Giesebrecht, Wendische Geschichten von der Karolingerzeit, Baltische Studien, Sechsten Jahrgang, Zweites Heft, Stettin 1839
  • Lubomir E. Havlik, Einige Fragen der Ethnogcnese der Slawen im Lichte der römischen und byzantinischer Historiographie (1. Hälfte des 1. Jahrtausends), Berichte II (1970), Band III, Berlin 1973
  • Blondi Flavii Foroiuliensis Historiarum de inclinatione Romanorum. Impressarum Venetiis Thomam Alexandrinum anno Salutis MCCCCLXXXiiii (1484) Kalendis Julii. Tu i Abreviatio Pii Pont max. supra decades Blondi ab Inclinatione Imperii usque ad tempora Joannis Vicesimi tertii Pont. max.
  • Chronica von dem Antiquiteten des Stifftes/der Romische Burg und Stadt Marseburg/an der Salach by Türingen/mit viel alten schöne Historien und Geschichten/als sich etwan vor alten Zeiten in Sachsen/Türingen/Meis-sen/und zu Wenden begeben... Gedruckt zu Budisin durch Nicolaum Wolrab MDLVI (1556)
  • Chronicon HoIIandiae de Hollandorum Repub. et Rebus Gestis com-mentarii Hugonis Grolii, Jani Dovsae patris, Jani Dovsae filii, Lugduni Ba-tavorum 1617
  • Conjectus introduetionis, in notitiam Regni Hungriae Geographicam, Historicam, Politicam et Chronologicam, inde a prima Gentis et Regionis Hungaricae Originibus usque ad aetatem nostram. Breviter et succinte, per successions temporum, produetam Studio et Opera Joannis Tomka Szäszky, Posonii 1759
  • Caroli Sigoni Histriarum de Occidentali imperio, libri XX... Cum Indice copiosissime rerum et Verborum, Basileae MDLXXIX (1579)
  • Christophori Cellarii Smalkandcnsis Geographia Antiqua... 1687
  • Chronici Zelandiae libri duo. Auetore Jacobo Eyndio. Domino Haem-stode et Midolburgi. Ex officino moulertiana MDCXXXIV (1634)
  • Codex Pomeraniae diplomaticus. Herausgegeben von D. Karl Friedrich Wilhelm Hasselbach... und D. Johann Gottfried Ludwig Kosegarten, Greifswald 1862
  • Chronicon Mundi (Correct Title): Regisrum huius operis libri chroni-corum cum figuris et imaginibus ab initio mundi. Norimbergae MCCCCXCIII (1493)
  • Chronici Carionis a Philippo Melanthone aueti et expositi... (1532). Anno 1581, 1593 [Wittebergae] MOXCIII (1593)
  • Cyriacus M. Spangenberg, Quenfurtische Chronica. Historischer Bericht, von der Aelten und Loblichen Herrschaft Quernfurt in Sachsen... vor und nach der Geburt Christi... In vier Bücher zusammengebracht durch M. Cyr. Spang. MDXC (1590)
  • Dauidis Chytrej Chronicon Saxoniae et vicini orbis aretoi. Pars prima. Ab anno Christi 1500 usque ad 1524 cum indice. Rostochii anno CIDIDXCII (1592)
  • Dissertatio de Lecho et Slavorum origine video meliora, proboque. Acta Societatis Jablonovianae de Slavis Lecho Czechoque. Item de Veris Zichis. Anni CIDIDCCLXXI (1771)
  • C. Desjardins: Physisch-Statistisch und Politischer Atlas von Europa, C. Desjardins, Wien, 1838.
  • Über die Abkunft der Slawen nach Lorenz Surowiecki von Paul Joseph Schaffarik, Doct. der Phil. und der f. k. Mag., Prof. am Gymnasium der Griech. n. un. Gemeinde in Neusatz, und der kön. Ges. der Freunde der Wiss. in Warschau, der Gel. Ges. an der Univ. in Krakau und der Gross-herz. lat. Soc. in Jena corr. Mitgliede. Leipzig, 1843
  • Kiepert's Handatlas, Dietrich Reimer, Berlin, 1860.
  • A. Stieler: Handatlas, Justus Perthes, Gotha, 1866
  • Kiepert's Atlas Antiques, Geographisches Institut, Weimar, 1884
  • Nikodim Milaš: Православна Далмација (OrtodoxDalmatia), Izdavačka knjižarnica Novi Sad, 1901
  • Кonstantin Jeriček: Историја Срба (History of Serbs), I-II, (photoiphya), Слово љубве, Београд, 1978
  • Early references to Serboi: A.Kazhdan, Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium (1991), vol.3, pp.1875f.
  • Ivo Vukicevich: Rex Germanorum Populos Sclavorum (An Inquiry into the Origin and Early History of the Serbs/Slavs of Sarmatia, Germania and Illyria), Universiyu Center Press, Santa Barbara, 2001

  Results from FactBites:
 
Human Rights Watch: Abuses Against Serbs And Roma In The New Kosovo (August 1999) (10480 words)
Serbs displaced inside Kosovo are mostly concentrated in Serb majority villages and towns such as Kosovo Polje, Dobratin (Lipljan/Liplan municipality), Gracanica (Pristina municipality), Velika Hoca (Orahovac/Rahovec municipality), and Gorazdevac (Pec/Peje municipality).
Serb residents of Dobratin village told Human Rights Watch that Dragan Madenovic, a forty-year-old night watchman, was killed in the village of Donja Gusterica (Lipljan municipality) on June 23.
On June 23, the body of Milenko Lekovic, a Serb professor for the economics faculty, was found in the faculty's basement, along with the bodies of Miodrag Mladenovic, a Serb guard in the building, and Jovica Stamenkovic, a Serb waiter from a cafe in the building.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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