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Encyclopedia > Septuagesima

Septuagesima (in full, Septuagesima Sunday) is the name given to the third from the last Sunday before Lent in the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches. The term was also sometimes applied to the period of the liturgical year which began on this day and lasted through Shrove Tuesday (with the following day being Ash Wednesday, when Lent begins). This period was also known as the Pre-Lenten season or Shrovetide. The next two Sundays were labelled Sexagesima and Quinquagesima, the latter sometimes also called Shrove Sunday. Sunday is considered either the first or the seventh day of the week, between Saturday and Monday, and the second day of the weekend in some cultures. ... Look up Lent on Wiktionary, the free dictionary In Western Christianity, Lent is the period before the Christian holy day of Easter. ... The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian body, with over 1. ... The term Anglican (from the Angles or English) describes those people and churches following the religious traditions developed by the established Church of England. ... The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. ... In the Christian calendar, Shrove Tuesday is the English name for the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, which in turn marks the beginning of Lent. ... In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ... Look up Lent on Wiktionary, the free dictionary In Western Christianity, Lent is the period before the Christian holy day of Easter. ... Sexagesima (in full, Sexagesima Sunday) is the name for the second Sunday before Ash Wednesday in the liturgical calendar of the Roman Catholic Church, and also in that of some Protestant denominations, particularly those with Anglican origins. ... Quinquagesima is the Roman Catholic name for the Sunday before Ash Wednesday. ...


Septuagesima comes from the Latin word for "seventieth," with Sexagesima and Quinquagesima equalling "sixtieth" and "fiftieth" respectively. The most logical explanation for the use of these terms is that they denote the approximate number of days between each and Easter (the actual respective numbers being 63, 56 and 49). Some have theorized, however, that Septuagesima may have been added to the liturgical calendar to commemorate the Babylonian Captivity, which lasted 70 years (there is evidence that some early Christians began fasting 70 days before Easter, but whether that custom originated from this is not entirely clear). At any rate, the 17-day period beginning on Septuagesima Sunday was intended to be observed as a preparation for the season of Lent, which of course is itself a period of spiritual preparation (for Easter); in many countries, however, Septuagesima Sunday marked the traditional start of the carnival season, culminating on Shrove Tuesday, reckoned as Mardi Gras in many places (most notably New Orleans). Latin is the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus from the dead after his death by crucifixion (see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year around AD 30-33. ... From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may be refer to, or include, an elaborate formal ritual (such as the Catholic Mass), a daily... Main article: Jew Jewish religion Etymology of Jew  · Who is a Jew? Jewish leadership  · Jewish culture Jewish ethnic divisions Ashkenazi (German and E. Europe) Mizrahi (Arab and Oriental) Sephardi (Iberian) Temani (Yemenite)  · Beta Israel Jewish populations Germany  · France  · Latin America Britain  · Famous Jews by country Jewish languages Hebrew: (Biblical / Modern... A Christian is a follower of Jesus of Nazareth. ... Fasting is the act of willingly (and generally briefly) abstaining from all food and in some cases drink, sexual intercourse, or any sexual desire (including masturbation), or in other cases from certain types or groups of food (e. ... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus from the dead after his death by crucifixion (see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year around AD 30-33. ... Look up Lent on Wiktionary, the free dictionary In Western Christianity, Lent is the period before the Christian holy day of Easter. ... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus from the dead after his death by crucifixion (see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year around AD 30-33. ... Swabian-Alemannic carnival clowns in Wolfach, Germany A carnival parade is a public celebration, combining some elements of a circus and public street party, generally during the Carnival Season. ... In the Christian calendar, Shrove Tuesday is the English name for the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, which in turn marks the beginning of Lent. ... Mardi Gras (French for Fat Tuesday) is the day before Ash Wednesday, and is also called Shrove Tuesday. It is the final day of Carnival (pronounced CAR-nuh-vul in English; car-nee-VAHL in most Romance languages – and in New Orleans, Louisiana, because of its French heritage). ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ...


In the Roman Catholic liturgy, the Alleluia ceases to be said during Mass on Septuagesima Sunday, not to be reinserted until Easter; the Old Testament reading authorized for the day was taken from Genesis and focused on Adam's fall and resulting expulsion from the Garden of Eden, while the Gospel reading contained the parable of the Prodigal Son. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Mass is a property of physical objects that, roughly speaking, measures the amount of matter they contain. ... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus from the dead after his death by crucifixion (see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year around AD 30-33. ... The Old Testament or the Hebrew Scriptures (also called the Hebrew Bible) constitutes the first major part of the Bible according to Christianity. ... Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ... This article is about the Biblical location. ... For the genre of Christian-themed music, see gospel music. ...


Pursuant to the terms of the new liturgical calendar adopted after the Second Vatican Council, Septuagesima, Sexagesima and Quinquagesima Sundays were dropped from the Novus Ordo-based calendar and the period encompassing them was added to the installment of Ordinary Time after Epiphany. This took effect in 1970; six years later the Anglican Churches (such as the Church of England and the Episcopal Church in the United States) followed suit, henceforth counting these Sundays as the last three "Sundays after Epiphany." However, traditional Catholics continue to celebrate this season both at Mass and in the Breviary. The Second Vatican Council, or Vatican II, was an Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ... Ordinary Time is a term used in the Christian (especially the Roman Catholic) liturgical calendar to refer, collectively, to two different seasons of the liturgical year. ... This article is about the Christian feast. ... 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Episcopal Church may refer to several members of the Anglican Communion, including: Episcopal Church in the United States of America Scottish Episcopal Church Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East Episcopal Church of Cuba idk of the Sudan Spanish Reformed Episcopal Church ... Traditional Catholic is a broad term used to describe many groups of Roman Catholics who follow more traditional aspects of the Catholic Faith. ... Mass is a property of physical objects that, roughly speaking, measures the amount of matter they contain. ... A breviary (from Latin brevis, short or concise) is a liturgical book containing the public or canonical prayers, hymns, the Psalms, readings, and notations for everyday use, especially for priests, in the Divine Office (i. ...


A version of the season still does exist in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar, and is known as TriĆ³dion (although it is only 15 days long and not 17 since the Eastern Orthodox Lent commences on a Monday instead of a Wednesday). Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... Look up Lent on Wiktionary, the free dictionary In Western Christianity, Lent is the period before the Christian holy day of Easter. ...


The earliest Septuagesima Sunday can occur is January 18 and the latest is February 22. January 18 is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of every year in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


Traditionally, purple vestments are worn during the period from Septuagesima Sunday through Shrove Tuesday. For those following the Novus Ordo calendar, green is used, as in the rest of Ordinary Time of which the change made it a part. Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Anglican Churches. ... Ordinary Time is a term used in the Christian (especially the Roman Catholic) liturgical calendar to refer, collectively, to two different seasons of the liturgical year. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Septuagesima - definition of Septuagesima in Encyclopedia (332 words)
Septuagesima (in full, Septuagesima Sunday) is the name formerly given to the third from the last Sunday before Lent in the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches.
Some have theorized, however, that Septuagesima may have been added to the liturgical calendar to commemorate the Babylonian Captivity, which lasted 70 years (there is evidence that some early Christians began fasting 70 days before Easter, but whether that custom originated from this is not entirely clear).
Purple vestments were worn during the period from Septuagesima Sunday through Shrove Tuesday until the aforementioned calendar reform took place; now green is used, as in the rest of Ordinary Time which the change made it a part.
Septuagesima (Catholic Encyclopedia) - BibleWiki (348 words)
Septuagesima is the ninth Sunday before Easter, the third before Lent known among the Greeks as "Sunday of the Prodigal" from the Gospel, Luke, xv, which they read on this day, called also Dominica Circumdederunt by the Latins, from the first word of the Introit of the Mass.
Septuagesima is today inaugurated in the Roman Martyrology by the words: "Septuagesima Sunday, on which the canticle of the Lord, Alleluja, ceases to be said".
On the Saturday preceding, the Roman Breviary notes that after the "Benedicamus" of Vespers two Alleluias are to be added, that thenceforth it is to be omitted till Easter, and in its place "Laus tibi Domine" is to be said at the beginning of the Office.
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