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Encyclopedia > Septimius Severus
Septimius Severus
Emperor of the Roman Empire
Alabaster bust of Septimius Severus,
at Musei Capitolini, Rome
Reign April 14, 193 - February 197
(in competition with others);
February 197-198 (alone);
198 - 209 (with Caracalla);
209 - February 4, 211
(with Caracalla & Geta)
Full name Lucius Septimius Severus
Born April 11, 145(145-04-11)
Leptis Magna
Died February 4, 211 (aged 64)
Eboracum
Predecessor Didius Julianus
Successor Caracalla and Geta
Wife/wives Paccia Marciana, an African woman of Roman origin. Severus and Marciana married around 175 and she died before Severus married Domna. They had no children.
Julia Domna
Issue Caracalla and Publius Septimius Geta
Dynasty Severan
Father Publius Septimius Geta
Mother Fulvia Pia
Roman imperial dynasties
Severan dynasty

The Severan Tondo
Septimius Severus alone
Children
   Geta
   Caracalla
Septimius Severus, with Geta and Caracalla
Geta and Caracalla
Caracalla alone
Interlude, Macrinus
Elagabalus
Children
   Alexander Severus, adoptive
Alexander Severus

Lucius Septimius Severus (or rarely "Severus I") (b. Leptis Magna, April 11, 145 - d. York, February 4, 211) was a Roman general, and Roman Emperor from April 14, 193 to 211. He was born in what is now the Libyan part of Rome's historic Africa Province, making him the first emperor to be born in Africa. Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (710x1024, 149 KB) Alabaster bust of Roman Emperor Septimius Severus, at Musei Capitolini, Rome Photo taken by antmoose, June 4 2005. ... Michelangelos design for Capitoline Hill, now home to the Capitoline Museums. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events June 1 – Roman Emperor Didius Julianus is assassinated in his palace. ... Events Roman Emperor Septimius Severus sacks Ctesiphon and captures an enormous number of its inhabitants as slaves. ... Events Roman Emperor Septimius Severus sacks Ctesiphon and captures an enormous number of its inhabitants as slaves. ... Events Publius Septimius Geta receives the title of Caesar. ... Events Publius Septimius Geta receives the title of Caesar. ... Events Publius Septimius Geta receives the titles of Imperator and Augustus from his father, Roman emperor Septimius Severus. ... Caracalla (April 4, 186 – April 8, 217) was Roman Emperor from 211 – 217. ... Events Publius Septimius Geta receives the titles of Imperator and Augustus from his father, Roman emperor Septimius Severus. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 211. ... Caracalla (April 4, 186 – April 8, 217) was Roman Emperor from 211 – 217. ... Publius Septimius Geta (March 7, 189–December 211), was a Roman Emperor co-ruling with his father Septimius Severus and his older brother Caracalla from 209 to his death. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see number 145. ... Arch of Septimius Severus Market place Leptis Magna (or Lepcis Magna as it is sometimes spelled), also called Neapolis, was a prominent city of the Roman Empire. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 211. ... This article is about the English city. ... Didius Julianus Marcus Severus Didius Julianus (133–193) was emperor of the Roman Empire from 28 March until 1 June 193. ... Caracalla (April 4, 186 – April 8, 217) was Roman Emperor from 211 – 217. ... Publius Septimius Geta (March 7, 189–December 211), was a Roman Emperor co-ruling with his father Septimius Severus and his older brother Caracalla from 209 to his death. ... Events Pope Eleuterus succeeds Pope Soter (approximate date) Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius defeats the Marcomanni. ... Julia Domna (170-217) was member of the Severan dynasty of the Roman Empire. ... Caracalla (April 4, 186 – April 8, 217) was Roman Emperor from 211 – 217. ... Publius Septimius Geta (March 7, 189–December 211), was a Roman Emperor co-ruling with his father Septimius Severus and his older brother Caracalla from 209 to his death. ... The Severan dynasty is a lineage of Roman Emperors, reigning several decades from the late 2nd century to the early 3rd century. ... There were two people who had the name Publius Septimius Geta. ... The Severan dynasty is a lineage of Roman Emperors, reigning several decades from the late 2nd century to the early 3rd century. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1069x1087, 1311 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Alexander Severus Septimius Severus Caracalla Publius Septimius Geta Severan Tondo ... Severan Tondo, tondo of the Severan family, with portraits of Septimius Severus, Julia Domna, Caracalla, and Geta. ... Publius Septimius Geta (March 7, 189–December 211), was a Roman Emperor co-ruling with his father Septimius Severus and his older brother Caracalla from 209 to his death. ... Caracalla (April 4, 186 – April 8, 217) was Roman Emperor from 211 – 217. ... Publius Septimius Geta (March 7, 189–December 211), was a Roman Emperor co-ruling with his father Septimius Severus and his older brother Caracalla from 209 to his death. ... Caracalla (April 4, 186 – April 8, 217) was Roman Emperor from 211 – 217. ... Publius Septimius Geta (March 7, 189–December 211), was a Roman Emperor co-ruling with his father Septimius Severus and his older brother Caracalla from 209 to his death. ... Caracalla (April 4, 186 – April 8, 217) was Roman Emperor from 211 – 217. ... Caracalla (April 4, 186 – April 8, 217) was Roman Emperor from 211 – 217. ... Macrinus on an aureus. ... A bust depicting Elagabalus. ... Alexander Severus Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexandrus (October 1, 208- March 18?, 235), commonly called Alexander Severus, Roman emperor from 222 to 235, was born at Arca Caesarea in Palestine. ... Alexander Severus Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexandrus (October 1, 208- March 18?, 235), commonly called Alexander Severus, Roman emperor from 222 to 235, was born at Arca Caesarea in Palestine. ... Arch of Septimius Severus Market place Leptis Magna (or Lepcis Magna as it is sometimes spelled), also called Neapolis, was a prominent city of the Roman Empire. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see number 145. ... York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 211. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events June 1 – Roman Emperor Didius Julianus is assassinated in his palace. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...

Contents

Life

Rise to power

Septimius Severus was born and raised at Leptis Magna (modern Libya, southeast of Carthage, modern Tunisia, North Africa). Severus came from a wealthy, distinguished local family of Equestrian rank. Severus was of berber and Roman ancestry. Little is known of his father, Publius Septimius Geta, who held no major political status but had two cousins who served as consuls under emperor Antoninus Pius. Fulvia Pia, his mother, was of Roman descent. Her family moved from Italy to North Africa and was of the Fulvius gens, an ancient and politically influential clan, which was originally of plebeian status. His siblings were a younger Publius Septimius Geta and Septimia Pia. Severus’s maternal cousin was Praetorian Guard and consul Gaius Fulvius Plautianus.[1] Arch of Septimius Severus Market place Leptis Magna (or Lepcis Magna as it is sometimes spelled), also called Neapolis, was a prominent city of the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Carthage (disambiguation). ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... An equestrian (Latin eques, plural equites - also known as a vir egregius, lit. ... The Berbers (also called Imazighen, free men, singular Amazigh) are an ethnic group indigenous to Northwest Africa, speaking the Berber languages of the Afroasiatic family. ... There were two people who had the name Publius Septimius Geta. ... Titus Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus Pius (September 19, 86–March 7, 161) was Roman emperor from 138 to 161. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... Fulvius (fem. ... In Ancient Rome, the plebs was the general body of Roman citizens, distinct from the privileged class of the patricians. ... There were two people who had the name Publius Septimius Geta. ... The Praetorian Guard of Augustus - 1st century. ... Gaius or Lucius Fulvius Plautianus (? - 22 January 205 AD) was a Roman who lived in the second and third century AD. Plautianus was a member of gens Fulvius, a family of plebs status and the family were active in politics since the Roman Republic. ...


In 172, Severus was made a Senator by then emperor Marcus Aurelius. In 190 Severus became consul, and in the following year received from the emperor Commodus (successor to Marcus Aurelius) the command of the legions in Pannonia. The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. ... Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus (Rome, April 26, 121[2] – Vindobona or Sirmium, March 17, 180) was Roman Emperor from 161 to his death in 180. ... This article is about the Roman rank. ... Marcus Aurelius Commodus Antoninus (August 31, 161 – December 31, 192) was a Roman Emperor who ruled from 180 to 192. ... Legion redirects here. ... For other uses, see Pannonia (disambiguation). ...


On the murder of Pertinax by the troops in 193, they proclaimed Severus Emperor at Carnuntum, whereupon he hurried to Italy. The former emperor, Didius Iulianus, was condemned to death by the Senate and killed, and Severus took possession of Rome without opposition. Publius Helvius Pertinax (August 1, 126 - March 28, 193) was Roman emperor for a short period in 193. ... Carnuntum (Καρνοιις in Ptolemy) was an important Roman army camp in what is now Austria. ... Marcus Severus Didius Julianus (133 or 137–193) was Roman Emperor (28 March 193-1 June 193). ...


The legions of Syria, however, had proclaimed Pescennius Niger emperor. At the same time, Severus felt reasonable to offer Clodius Albinus, the powerful governor of Britannia who had probably supported Didius against him, the rank of Caesar, which implied some claim to succession. With his rearguard safe, he moved to the East and crushed Niger's forces at the Battle of Issus. The following year was devoted to suppressing Mesopotamia and other Parthian vassals who had backed Niger. When afterwards Severus declared openly his son Caracalla as successor, Albinus was hailed emperor by his troops and moved to Gallia. Severus, after a short stay in Rome, moved northwards to meet him. On February 19, 197, in the Battle of Lugdunum, with an army of 100,000 men, mostly composed of Illyrian, Moesian and Dacian legions, Severus defeated and killed Clodius Albinus, securing his full control over the Empire. Pescennius Niger as emperor. ... Clodius Albinus. ... The Battle of Issus was fought in 194 between the forces of Emperor Septimus Severus and his rival, Pescennius Niger. ... Caracalla (April 4, 186 – April 8, 217) was Roman Emperor from 211 – 217. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Roman Emperor Septimius Severus sacks Ctesiphon and captures an enormous number of its inhabitants as slaves. ... The battle of Lugdunum, also called the battle of Lyon, was fought on 19 February 197 at Lugdunum (modern Lyon, France), between the armies of the Roman Emperor Septimius Severus and of the Roman usurper Clodius Albinus. ... Location of Illyria Illyria (Albanian Iliria Land of the Free; Ancient Greek ; Latin Illyria [1] (see also Illyricum) was in Classical antiquity a region in the western part of todays Balkan Peninsula, founded by the tribes and clans of Illyrians, an ancient people who spoke the Illyrian languages. ... Moesia (Greek: , Moisia; Bulgarian: Мизия, Miziya; Serbian: Мезија, Mezija) is an ancient province situated in the areas of modern Serbia and Bulgaria. ... For other uses, see Dacia (disambiguation). ...


Emperor

Severus was at heart a soldier, and sought glory through military exploits. In 197 he waged a brief and successful war against the Parthian Empire in retaliation for the support given to Pescennius Niger. The Parthian capital Ctesiphon was sacked by the legions, and the northern half of Mesopotamia was restored to Rome. This article is about a military rank. ... Parthian Empire at its greatest extent, c60 BCE. The Parthian Empire was the dominating force on the Iranian plateau beginning in the late 3rd century BCE, and intermittently controlled Mesopotamia between ca 190 BCE and 224 CE. Parthia was the arch-enemy of the Roman Empire in the east and... Ctesiphon, 1932 Ctesiphon (Parthian and Pahlavi: Tyspwn as well as Tisfun, Persian: ‎, also known as in Arabic Madain, Maden or Al-Madain: المدائن) is one of the great cities of ancient Mesopotamia and the capital of the Parthian Empire and its successor, the Sassanid Empire, for more than 800 years... Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ...


His relations with the Roman Senate were never good. He was unpopular with them from the outset, having seized power with the help of the military, and he returned the sentiment. Severus ordered the execution of dozens of Senators on charges of corruption and conspiracy against him, replacing them with his own favorites. He also disbanded the Praetorian Guard and replaced it with one of his own, made up of 50,000 loyal soldiers mainly camped at Albanum, near Rome (also probably to grant the emperor a kind of centralized reserve). During his reign the number of legions was also increased from 25/30 to 33. He also increased the number of auxiliary corps (numerii), many of these troops coming from the Eastern borders. Additionally the annual wage for a soldier was raised from 300 to 500 denarii. The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. ... In a political sense, conspiracy refers to a group of persons united in the goal of usurping or overthrowing an established political power. ... The Praetorian Guard of Augustus - 1st century. ... Albano Laziale is a commune in the province of Rome, in Lazio (Latium). ... First row : c. ...


Although his actions turned Rome into a military dictatorship, he was popular with the citizens of Rome, having stamped out the rampant corruption of Commodus' reign. When he returned from his victory over the Parthians, he erected the Arch of Septimius Severus in Rome. Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A dictatorship is an autocratic form of government in which the government is ruled by a dictator. ... The Arch of Septimius Severus before the excavation of the Roman Forum, painted by Canaletto in 1742 (Royal Collection, UK) Lateral arched opening between the main arch and a side archway The Arch of Septimius Severus in 2005 The white marble Arch of Septimius Severus at the northeast end of...


According to the sources, however, after 197 Severus fell heavily under the influence of his prefect of praetorium, Gaius Fulvius Plautianus, who came to have the almost total control of most branches of the imperial administration. Plautianus' daughter, Fulvia Plautilla, was married to Severus's son, Caracalla. His excessive power came to an end in 205, when he was denounced by the Emperor's dying brother and killed. The two following praefecti, including the jurist Aemilius Papinianus, received however even larger powers. Gaius or Lucius Fulvius Plautianus (? - 22 January 205 AD) was a Roman who lived in the second and third century AD. Plautianus was a member of gens Fulvius, a family of plebs status and the family were active in politics since the Roman Republic. ... Publia Fulvia Plautilla, Fulvia Plautilla or Plautilla (around 188/189 AD - early 212 AD) was a Roman Princess, short time Roman Empress and the only wife to Roman Emperor Caracalla. ... Aemilius Papinianus (142-212) was a celebrated Roman jurist. ...


Starting from 208 Severus undertook a number of military actions in defence of Roman Britain against barbarian incursions and undertook reconstruction of Hadrian's Wall before falling severely ill in Eburacum (York). He died there on February 4, 211. Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... For other uses, see Barbarian (disambiguation). ... Hadrians Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Roman Empire across the width of modern-day England. ... York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 211. ...


Upon his death in 211, Severus was deified by the Senate and succeeded by his sons, Caracalla and Geta, who were advised by his wife Julia Domna. The stability Severus had provided the Empire was soon gone under their reign. Apotheosis - the posthumous transformation of a Roman emperor into a god, Theosis - being unified with God in East Orthodox theology of salvation, Assigning divine qualities to any mortal and, usually, worshipping that person as if they were a supernatural being. ... Caracalla (April 4, 186 – April 8, 217) was Roman Emperor from 211 – 217. ... Publius Septimius Geta (March 7, 189–December 211), was a Roman Emperor co-ruling with his father Septimius Severus and his older brother Caracalla from 209 to his death. ... Julia Domna (170-217) was member of the Severan dynasty of the Roman Empire. ...


Accomplishments

Though his military leanings were costly to the empire, Severus was the strong, able ruler that Rome needed at the time. He began a line of military emperors that would carry on for the following few rulers. His politics of expansion of the army's benefit were criticized by his contemporary Dio Cassius and Herodianus: in particular, they pointed out the increasing burden (in the form of taxes and vessations) the civilian population had to bear to maintain the new army. Dio Cassius Cocceianus (c. ... For the grammarian, see Aelius Herodianus. ...


Severus was also distinguished by his buildings. Apart from the triumphal arch in the Roman Forum carrying his full name, he also built the Septizodium in Rome and enriched greatly his native city of Leptis Magna (including another triumphal arch in occasion of his visit of 203). A fragment of the Septizonium is shown in this engraving dating to 1582 The Septizodium (also called Septizonium or Septicodium) was a building in ancient Rome. ... Arch of Septimius Severus Market place Leptis Magna (or Lepcis Magna as it is sometimes spelled), also called Neapolis, was a prominent city of the Roman Empire. ...

Aureus minted in 193 by Septimius Severus, to celebrate XIIII Gemina Martia Victrix, the legion that proclaimed him emperor.
Aureus minted in 193 by Septimius Severus, to celebrate XIIII Gemina Martia Victrix, the legion that proclaimed him emperor.

Septimius Severus, 193–211 AD. Aureus (7. ... Septimius Severus, 193–211 AD. Aureus (7. ... Aureus minted in 193 by Septimius Severus to celebrate XIIII Gemina Martia Victrix, the legion that proclamed him emperor. ... Events June 1 – Roman Emperor Didius Julianus is assassinated in his palace. ... Aureus minted by Septimius Severus to celebrate XIV Gemina Martia Victrix, the legion that proclamed him emperor. ...

Severus and Christianity

The reign of Severus provides an interesting example of the persecution meted out to Christians under the Roman Empire. Septimius allowed the enforcement of policies already long-established, which meant that Roman authorities did not intentionally seek out Christians, but when people were accused of being Christians they could either curse Jesus and make an offering to Roman gods, or be executed. Furthermore, wishing to strengthen the peace by encouraging religious harmony through syncretism, he tried to limit the spread of the two groups who refused to yield to syncretism by outlawing, on pain of death, conversion to Christianity or Judaism. Individual officials availed themselves of the laws to proceed with rigor against the Christians. Naturally the emperor, with his strict conception of law, did not hinder such partial persecution, which took place in Egypt and the Thebaid, as well as in Africa proconsularis and the East. Christian martyrs were numerous in Alexandria (cf. Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, ii. 20; Eusebius, Church History, V., xxvi., VI., i.). No less severe were the persecutions in Africa, which seem to have begun in 197 or 198 (cf. Tertullian's Ad martyres), and included the Christians known in the Roman martyrology as the martyrs of Madaura. Probably in 202 or 203 Felicitas and Perpetua suffered for their faith. Persecution again raged for a short time under the proconsul Scapula in 211, especially in Numidia and Mauritania. Later accounts of a Gallic persecution, especially at Lyon, are legendary. In general it may thus be said that the position of the Christians under Septimius Severus was the same as under the Antonines; but the law of this Emperor at least shows clearly that the rescript of Trajan had failed to execute its purpose. Look up Persecution in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Roman mythology can be considered as two parts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Religious conversion is the adoption of a new religious identity, or a change from one religious identity to another. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Thebaid is the region of ancient Egypt containing the thirteen southernmost nomes of Upper Egypt, from Abydos to Aswan. ... Africa Province, Roman Empire ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... Clement of Alexandria (Titus Flavius Clemens), was the first member of the Church of Alexandria to be more than a name, and one of its most distinguished teachers. ... Eusebius of Caesarea Eusebius of Caesarea (c. ... Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, anglicised as Tertullian, (ca. ... A martyrology is a catalogue or list of martyrs (or, more precisely, of saints), arranged in the calendar order of their anniversaries or feasts. ... Madaura may refer to: the city of Madaurus Lucius Apuleius of Madaura Category: ... Saint Felicitas (Felicita, Felicity) (†Carthage, 7 March 202) was the slave of Saint Perpetua, with whom together she was martyred, on 7 march 203 according to tradition. ... Among Christians, Vibia Perpetua is venerated as a martyr and saint. ... Left scapula - front view () Left scapula - rear view () In anatomy, the scapula, or shoulder blade, is the bone that connects the humerus (arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone). ... Numidia was an ancient Berber kingdom in North Africa that later alternated between a Roman province and a Roman client state, and is no longer in existence today. ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... This article is about the French city. ... The Antonines most often referred to were two successive Roman Emperors who ruled between A.D. 138 and 180: Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius, famous for their skilled leadership. ... A rescript is a document that is issued not on the initiative of the author, but in response (it literally means written back) to a specific demand made by its addressee. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Dio Cassius "Roman History, Volume IX, Books 71-80" ISBN 0674991966 Full text

Dio Cassius Cocceianus (c. ...

References

  • Anthony Birley. Septimius Severus: The African Emperor, 1998. ISBN 0-415-16591-1
  • Michael Grant. The Roman Emperors, 1985. ISBN 0-760-70091-5
  • Michael Grant. The Severans: The Changed Roman Empire, 1996. ISBN 0-415-12772-6

Professor Anthony Richard Birley was the Professor of Ancient History at University of Manchester (1974-90) and at University of Dusseldorf (1990-2002). ... Michael Grant (21 November 1914 – 9 August 2004) was a trained classicist who was one of the few classical historians to win respect from academics and a lay readership. ... Michael Grant (21 November 1914 – 9 August 2004) was a trained classicist who was one of the few classical historians to win respect from academics and a lay readership. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Septimius Severus
  • Scotia Invicta Account of the Severan expeditions in Scotland
  • Life of Septimius Severus (Historia Augusta at LacusCurtius: Latin text and English translation)
  • Books 74, 75, 76, and 77 of Dio Cassius, covering the rise to power and reign of Septimius Severus
  • De Imperatoribus Romanis Online encyclopedia of Roman Emperors
  • Arch of Septimius Severus in Rome
  • Arch of Septimius Severus in Lepcis Magna
  • Coins issued by Septimius Severus

}} Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Dio Cassius Cocceianus (c. ...

Preceded by
Didius Julianus
Roman Emperor
193–211
at first in competition with
Pescennius Niger and Clodius Albinus
with Caracalla (198–211)
and Geta (209–211)
Succeeded by
Caracalla and Geta
Persondata
NAME Severus, Septimius
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Lucius Septimius Severus
SHORT DESCRIPTION Roman emperor
DATE OF BIRTH April 11, 146
PLACE OF BIRTH Leptis Magna
DATE OF DEATH February 4, 211
PLACE OF DEATH Eboracum

is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Change of era name from Yongxi (1st year) to Benchu era of the Chinese Han Dynasty Change of emperor from Han Zhidi to Han Huandi of the Chinese Han Dynasty Births April 11 - Septimius Severus, Roman emperor Deaths Han Zhidi, emperor of Chinese Han Dynasty, poisoned Categories: 146 ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 211. ... This article is about the English city. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Septimius Severus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (814 words)
Lucius Septimius Severus, (April 11, 146-February 4, 211) was Roman emperor from April 9, 193 to 211.
Severus was born at Leptis Magna (sixty-two miles southeast of Carthage), on the north coast of Africa, and died at Eboracum (York), Britain.
Severus' family was of equestrian rank, and in 172 he seems to have been made a Senator by Marcus Aurelius.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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