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Encyclopedia > Septennial Act

The Septennial Act 1715 was an Act of the Parliament of the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1715, to increase the maximum length of a Parliament (and hence between general elections) from 3 years to 7 years. In Westminster System parliaments, an Act of Parliament is a part of the law passed by the Parliament. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... The united Kingdom of Great Britain was created by the merger of the Kingdoms of Scotland and England in 1707 (see Act of Union 1707). ... Events September 1 - King Louis XIV of France dies after a reign of 72 years, leaving the throne of his exhausted and indebted country to his great-grandson Louis XV. Regent for the new, five years old monarch is Philippe dOrléans, nephew of Louis XIV. September - First of the... A general election is an election in which all members of a given political body are up for election. ...


The previous limit of 3 years had been set by the Triennial Act 1694 in the Kingdom of England. The ostensible aim of the Act was to reduce election expenses, but it also had the effect of keeping the Whig party, who had won the 1715 general election, in power for longer - and they won the eventual 1722 general election. The Triennial Act, of 1641, was a piece of legislation passed by the English Long Parliament, during the reign of King Charles I. The act requires that the Parliament meet for at least a fifty-day session once every three years. ... The Kingdom of England was a state on the island of Great Britain, covering roughly the southern two-thirds. ... This article is about the British Whig party. ...


It did not require Parliaments to last that long, but merely set a maximum length on their life. Most Parliaments until the formation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland did indeed last 6 or 7 years, with only two lasting for less time. The Union Flag, in its modern form, was first adopted in 1801. ...


The Act was amended in 1911 by the Parliament Act 1911 to change the limit to five years, and then again during the Second World War to extend the Parliament elected in the 1935 general election until the European war had ended in 1945. A database query syntax error has occurred. ... In the United Kingdom, Parliament Act refers to each of two Acts of Parliament, passed in 1911 and 1949 respectively. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The UK general election held on 14th November 1935 resulted in a large, though reduced, majority for the National Government now led by Stanley Baldwin. ... 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


See also: List of Parliaments of Great Britain, List of Parliaments of the United Kingdom This is a listing of sessions of the Parliament of Great Britain, tabulated with the elections to the House of Commons for each session, and the list of members of the House. ... This is a listing of sessions of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, tabulated with the elections to the House of Commons for each session, and the list of members of the House. ...


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Septennial Act 1715 information - Search.com (309 words)
Acts of Parliament of the Kingdom of England to 1600
The Septennial Act 1715 was an Act of the Parliament of the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1715, to increase the maximum length of a Parliament (and hence between general elections) from 3 years to 7 years.
The Act was amended in 1911 by the Parliament Act 1911 to change the limit to five years, and then again during the Second World War to extend the Parliament elected in the 1935 general election until the European war had ended in 1945.
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