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Encyclopedia > September 2003


2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2003. ...


A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with the length of 30 days. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See Also:

Presidential electoral votes by state. ... (Redirected from 2003 occupation of Iraq timeline) Timeline of events during U.S.-led occupation of Iraq, following 2003 invasion of Iraq, and relevant quotations about nature of occupation from officials. ... Timeline of Afghan history September 30, 2003 Afghan Central Bank governor Anwar Ul-Haq Ahadi announced that Afghans should use their own Afghani currency in daily transactions rather than U.S. dollars or Pakistani rupees. ... The 2003 California recall was a special election permitted under California law. ... Lord Hutton led the inquiry that concluded that Dr. David Kelly had taken his own life. ... Samuel K. Does government increasingly adopted an ethnic outlook as members of his Krahn ethnic group soon dominated political and military life in Liberia. ... North Korea has been attempting to obtain nuclear weapons since the late 1970s. ... The road map for peace is a plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict proposed by a quartet of international entities: the United States, the European Union, Russia, and the United Nations. ... Same-sex marriage is widely anticipated to be legalized across Canada by Bill C-38, which was introduced by Paul Martins Liberal government in the federal Parliament on February 1, 2005 and passed by the House of Commons on June 28 2005; C-38 is currently before the Senate... On March 7, 2003, the SCO Group (formerly known as Caldera Systems) filed a $1 billion lawsuit in the US against IBM for allegedly devaluing its version of the UNIX operating system. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terrorism[1][2]) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies, the aim of which, they have declared, is to destroy groups deemed to...

September 30, 2003

September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 92 days remaining, as the final day of September. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Air France Boeing 747 Air France (Compagnie Nationale Air France) is a subsidiary of Air France-KLM. Before the take-over of KLM, it was essentially the national airline of France, employing over 64,000 people. ... KLM (in full: Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij, literally Royal Aviation Company; usual English: Royal Dutch Airlines) is a subsidiary of Air France-KLM. Before its (agreed) take-over by Air France, KLM was the national airline of the Netherlands. ... Alitalia - Linee Aeree Italiane is the national Italian airline company, part of the Alitalia Group. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... Franz Fischler (born September 23, 1946) is an Austrian politician. ... A genetically modified organism is an organism whose genetic material has been deliberately altered. ... The World Trade Organization (WTO) is an international organization which oversees a large number of agreements defining the rules of trade between its member states (WTO, 2004a). ... Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 at Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ... Global mean surface temperatures 1856-2004 Global warming LEE ARNOLD IS GAY is a term used to describe an increase over time of the average temperature of Earths atmosphere and oceans. ... This article is about a journal. ... A pension (also known as superannuation) is a retirement plan intended to provide a person with a secure income for life. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Such term is not in Wikipedia. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and currently the 43rd President of the United States. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantanamo Bay indicated. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. ... External links Website of the Minister of Economy and Finance of Spain Categories: Stub | Spanish politicians ... His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: ; born April 16, 1927 as Joseph Alois Ratzinger in Marktl am Inn, Bavaria) is the 265th and reigning pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City. ... The Servant of God Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef Wojtyła [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005), reigned as pope of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City and of the Holy See for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his...

September 29, 2003

September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Honor killing is the practice of males killing their female relatives or spouses when the female relative or spouse is considered to have damaged the family honor through unwarranted sexual activity. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... General Pervez Musharraf (Urdu: ; born August 11, 1943, Delhi, India) became de facto Head of Government (using the title Chief Executive and assuming extensive powers) of Pakistan on October 12, 1999 following a bloodless coup détat. ... ... A foreign minister is a cabinet minister that helps to form foreign policy for sovereign nations. ... Faisal Mosque, located in Islamabad, the capital city of Pakistan, was built in 1986. ... Audio storage refers to techniques and formats used to store audio with the goal to reproduce the audio later using audio signal processing to something that resembles the original. ... Ayman al-Zawahiri (in Arabic, ايمن الظواهري) (born June 19, 1951) is a prominent member of the al-Qaeda group and formerly the head of the Egyptian Islamic Jihad paramilitary organization. ... Al Jazeera logo Al Jazeera (Arabic: ), meaning The Island or The (Arabian) Peninsula is an Arabic television channel based in Qatar. ... Al-Arabiya is an Arabic-language satellite news channel based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates which began broadcasting in February 2003, launched with an investment of $300 million from the Saudi-owned MBC, the Lebanese Hariri Group, and others. ... Outer space (also called just space), as a name for a region, refers to the relatively empty parts of the Universe, outside the atmospheres of celestial bodies. ... Technology (Gr. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (established 1958) is the government agency responsible for the United States of Americas space program and long-term general aerospace research. ... The Space Shuttle Columbia seconds after engine ignition, 1981 (NASA). ... (Redirected from 2003 occupation of Iraq timeline) Timeline of events during U.S.-led occupation of Iraq, following 2003 invasion of Iraq, and relevant quotations about nature of occupation from officials. ... For the band, see The Police. ... Military police (MPs) are the police of a military organization, generally concerning themselves with law enforcement and security. ... Tikrit (تكريت, also transliterated as Takrit or Tekrit) is a town in Iraq, located 140 km northwest of Baghdad on the Tigris river (at 34. ... Guerrilla (also called a partisan) is a term borrowed from Spanish (from guerra meaning war) used to describe small combat groups. ... A Coalition is an alliance between entities, during which they cooperate in joint action, each in their own self-interest. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The bayonet, still used in war as both knife and spearpoint. ... Soldier Firing the M224 60mm Mortar. ... Historically, artillery refers to any engine used for the discharge of projectiles during war. ... A shell is a projectile, which, as opposed to a bullet, is not solid but contains an explosive or other filling, though modern usage includes large projectiles without a filling. ... Rocket launcher is a vague term which could mean various things: a mobile launch platform for an ICBM or cruise missile a launcher for multiple smaller missiles, such as Stalins Organ a shoulder-launched missile weapon This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... General Name, Symbol, Number Uranium, U, 92 Chemical series Actinides Period, Block 7, f Density, Hardness 19050 kg/m3, 6 Appearance silvery-white metal Atomic properties Atomic weight 238. ... Tehran is a metropolis of 14 million situated at the foot of the towering Alborz range. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... IAEA The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... International relations (IR) is an academic and public policy field, a branch of political science, dealing with the foreign policy of states within the international system, including the roles of international organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... Tehran is a metropolis of 14 million situated at the foot of the towering Alborz range. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... Map of nuclear nations Nuclear proliferation is the spread from nation to nation of nuclear technology, including nuclear power plants but especially nuclear weapons. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Nuclear power is the industry and method of energy production from nuclear fission. ... Technology (Gr. ... A minister for foreign affairs, or foreign minister, is a cabinet minister that helps to form foreign policy for sovereign nations. ... Kamal Kharrazi (Persian: کمال خرازی) (born December 1, 1944 in Tehran), is the Iranian Minister of Foreign Affairs, serving since August 20, 1997. ... IAEA The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... International relations (IR) is an academic and public policy field, a branch of political science, dealing with the foreign policy of states within the international system, including the roles of international organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Madeleine Korbel Albright (born May 15, 1937 in Prague, Czechoslovakia), American diplomat, served as the 64th United States Secretary of State. ... Catch 22 can refer to: A book by Joseph Heller, or the movie based on the book; see Catch-22. ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... Bournemouth is a seaside resort in the county of Dorset on the south coast of England. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... An Intergovernmental Conference (IGC) is the formal procedure for negotiating amendments to the founding treaties of the European Union. ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in Leap years). ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... A natural disaster is the consequence or effect of a hazardous event, occurring when human activities and natural phenomenon (a physical event, such as a volcanic eruption, earthquake, landslide etc. ... The Maritimes or Maritime provinces are a region of Canada on the Atlantic coast, consisting of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. ... Duration: Sept. ... {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: E Mari Merces (Wealth from the Sea) City Symbol: Kingfisher Halifax Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia, Canada Location. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (One defends and the other conquers) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Lieutenant Governor Myra A. Freeman Premier John Hamm (PC) Area {{{TotalArea}}} km² (12th)  - Land 53,338 km²  - Water 1,946 km² (3. ... Motto: Parva Sub Ingenti (The small under the protection of the great) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Charlottetown Largest city Charlottetown Lieutenant Governor J. Léonce Bernard Premier Pat Binns (PC) Area 5,660 km² (13th)  - Land 5,660 km²  - Water 0 km² (0%) Population (2004)  - Population 137,900... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... The term blackout in peacetime refers to a cessation of electrical energy through electric power transmission systems. ... Duration: Sept. ... Motto: Parva Sub Ingenti (The small under the protection of the great) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Charlottetown Largest city Charlottetown Lieutenant Governor J. Léonce Bernard Premier Pat Binns (PC) Area 5,660 km² (13th)  - Land 5,660 km²  - Water 0 km² (0%) Population (2004)  - Population 137,900... Map of PEIs ridings showing winning parties and their popular vote. ... The PEI Progressive Conservative Party is one of two major political parties on Prince Edward Island. ... Patrick George Binns (Born October 8, 1948-) who was born in Weyburn Saskatchewan, is a Canadian politician and the Premier of Prince Edward Island. ... The Prince Edward Island Liberal Party is a centrist political party in the province of Prince Edward Island, Canada. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... Motto: Quaerite Primum Regnum Dei (Seek ye first the kingdom of God) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital St. ... Roger Grimes Roger D. Grimes (born May 2, 1950) is a Newfoundland and Labrador politician. ... The province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, conducted a general election in October 2003 to elect the 48 members of the House of Assembly. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... The Liberal Party of Newfoundland and Labrador is a political party in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Newfoundland and Labrador is a centre-right political party in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... The Newfoundland and Labrador New Democratic Party is a social democratic political party in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... The Labrador Party is a political party in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ...

September 28, 2003

September 28 is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... IAEA The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... The term blackout in peacetime refers to a cessation of electrical energy through electric power transmission systems. ... A massive power outage produced a blackout in parts of the northeastern United States and eastern Canada on Thursday, August 14, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... Motto: Oblast Municipality Municipal government City council (Київська Міська рада) Mayor Oleksandr Omelchenko Area 800 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 2,642,486 100% 3,299/km² Founded City rights around 5th century 1487 Latitude Longitude 50°27′ N 30°30′ E Area code +044 Car plates  ? Twin towns Athenes, Brussels, Budapest, Chicago... A task force is a temporary organization formed to work on a single defined task or activity. ... Nuclear materail consists of materials used in nuclear systems. ... Radioactive decay is the set of various processes by which unstable atomic nuclei (nuclides) emit subatomic particles. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... A natural disaster is the consequence or effect of a hazardous event, occurring when human activities and natural phenomenon (a physical event, such as a volcanic eruption, earthquake, landslide etc. ... Duration: Sept. ... {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: E Mari Merces (Wealth from the Sea) City Symbol: Kingfisher Halifax Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia, Canada Location. ... Outer space (also called just space), as a name for a region, refers to the relatively empty parts of the Universe, outside the atmospheres of celestial bodies. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... SMART-1. ... The Servant of God Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef WojtyÅ‚a [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005), reigned as pope of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City and of the Holy See for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his... A cardinal is an official of the second-highest rank of the Roman Catholic Church, inferior in rank only to the Pope. ... Cardinal Ouellet His Eminence Marc Cardinal Ouellet (born June 8, 1944) is a Roman Catholic cardinal, Archbishop of Quebec and Primate of Canada. ... The Diocese of Quebec is the oldest Catholic see in the New World north of Mexico. ... A primate in the Western Church is an archbishop or bishop who has authority not just over the bishops of his own province, as a Metropolitan does, but over a number of provinces, such as a national church. ...

September 27, 2003

September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 95 days remaining. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A natural disaster is the consequence or effect of a hazardous event, occurring when human activities and natural phenomenon (a physical event, such as a volcanic eruption, earthquake, landslide etc. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... Xinjiang (Chinese: æ–°ç–†; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsin1-chiang1; Postal Pinyin: Sinkiang; literal meaning: New Frontier; Uyghur: ), full name Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, is an autonomous region of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... International relations (IR) is an academic and public policy field, a branch of political science, dealing with the foreign policy of states within the international system, including the roles of international organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... Term of office: December 31, 1999 – Preceded by: Boris Yeltsin Succeeded by: Date of birth: October 7, 1952 Place of birth: Leningrad First Lady: Liudmila Putina Political party: None Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Путин   pronunciation?; born October 7, 1952) is a Russian politician and the current President of the Russian Federation. ... Main Lodge at Camp David during Nixon administration, February 9, 1971. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... St Stevens Tower - The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben London (see also alternative names) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ...

September 26, 2003

September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 96 days remaining. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... NLM (National Library of Medicine, contains resources for patients and healthcare professionals) Virtual Hospital (digital health sciences library by the University of Iowa) Online Medical Dictionary Collection of links to free medical resources Wikicities has a wiki about medicine: Medicine Categories: Medicine | Health ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... On March 7, 2003, the SCO Group (formerly known as Caldera Systems) filed a $1 billion lawsuit in the US against IBM for allegedly devaluing its version of the UNIX operating system. ... International Business Machines Corporation (IBM, or colloquially, Big Blue) (NYSE: IBM) (incorporated June 15, 1911, in operation since 1888) is headquartered in Armonk, New York, USA. The company manufactures and sells computer hardware, software, and services. ... The SCO Group, Inc. ... Tux, a penguin, is the official Linux mascot. ... In computing, an operating system (OS) is the system software responsible for the direct control and management of hardware and basic system operations. ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... One of the most contentious issues in the Arab-Israeli Conflict has been the Israeli policy of sponsoring, supporting, and/or tolerating the establishment of Jewish communities in areas that came under Israeli control as a result of the 1967 Six Day War. ... A recent view of the old city of Hebron Hebron (Arabic الخليل al-Ḫalīl; Hebrew חֶבְרוֹן, Standard Hebrew Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew Ḥeḇrôn: derived from the word friend) is a town in the West Bank, in an area known in Israel as Judea. ... This article is about the Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah. ... The emblem of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad shows a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip) superimposed on the images of the Dome of the Rock, two fists and two rifles. ... The road map for peace is a plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict proposed by a quartet of international entities: the United States, the European Union, Russia, and the United Nations. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The road map for peace is a plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict proposed by a quartet of international entities: the United States, the European Union, Russia, and the United Nations. ... The Seal of the United States Secretary of State The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Colin Luther Powell, (pronounced koh-lihn, born April 5, 1937) was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 26, 2005 under President George W. Bush. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... Soldier Firing the M224 60mm Mortar. ... Baquba (بعقوبه; also transliterated as Baqubah and Baqouba) is the capital of Iraqs Diyala province. ... Najaf (نجف in the Arabic language) is a city in Iraq, about 160 km south of Baghdad, located at 31. ... The FOX News Channel is a US cable and satellite news channel. ... CNN or Cable News Network is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1] [2] (although he currently is not recognized in CNNs official history). ... Entertainment is an amusement or diversion intended to hold the attention of an audience or its participants. ... Theatrical trailers are 2-3 minute advertisements for movies that play in cinemas before another movie. ... The Matrix Revolutions is the third film in the Matrix trilogy. ... International relations (IR) is an academic and public policy field, a branch of political science, dealing with the foreign policy of states within the international system, including the roles of international organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (born October 6, 1945) is a left-wing Brazilian politician. ... Fidel Castro Fidel Castro Ruz (born August 13, 1926), has led Cuba since 1959, when, leading the 26th of July Movement, he overthrew the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista, and transformed Cuba into the first Communist-led state in the Western Hemisphere. ... Reporters Without Borders, or RWB (French: Reporters sans frontières, or RSF) is an international non-governmental organization devoted to freedom of the press. ...

September 25, 2003

September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Common stereotype of a criminal A crime in a broad sense is an act that violates a political or moral law. ... Islam  listen? (Arabic: al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Shaikh (شيخ, also rendered as Sheik, Shaykh or Sheikh) is a word in the Arabic language meaning an elder or a revered old man. ... Sheikh Ahmed Ismail Yassin (~1937 — March 22, 2004) was the leader of Hamas until he was killed by an Israeli helicopter gunship. ... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... Islam  listen? (Arabic: al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ... In the court system of a state or of a subordinate regional entity, an appeals court is a court of second instance where a party to a case on which judgment has been entered can ask to have their case reheard if they suspect an error of law, fact, or... Stoning is a form of capital punishment in which a human is killed by having stones thrown at them repeatedly having a single stone of sufficient size placed upon them so as to prevent their breathing having a large door placed upon them and laden with stones being thrown from... Adultery is generally defined as consensual sexual intercourse by a married person with someone other than their lawful spouse. ... Amina Lawal is a Nigerian single mother. ... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... Business refers to at least three closely related commercial topics. ... Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE: EK) is a large multinational public company producing photographic equipment. ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... Weapons of Mass Destruction is also the name of rapper Xzibits 2004 album. ... Weapons of Mass Destruction is also the name of rapper Xzibits 2004 album. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and currently the 43rd President of the United States. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... A natural disaster is the consequence or effect of a hazardous event, occurring when human activities and natural phenomenon (a physical event, such as a volcanic eruption, earthquake, landslide etc. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... Hokkaidō (Japanese: 北海道, literal meaning: North Sea Route, Ainu: Mosir), formerly known as Ezo, is the second largest island of Japan. ... The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... Map of the Pacific Rim and List of the Pacific Rim Nations The Pacific Rim is a political and economic term used to designate the countries on the edges of the Pacific Ocean, as well as the various island nations within the region. ... State nickname: The Last Frontier, The Land of the Midnight Sun Other U.S. States Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Governor Frank Murkowski Official languages English Area 1,717,854 km² (1st)  - Land 1,481,347 km²  - Water 236,507 km² (13. ... State nickname: The Aloha State Other U.S. States Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Governor Linda Lingle Official languages Hawaiian and English Area 28,337 km² (43rd)  - Land 16,649 km²  - Water 11,672 km² (41. ... Technology (Gr. ... Electronic paper, or e-paper, is a technology that allows the text on a piece of paper to be re-written. ... Piece of paper Paper is a thin, flat material produced by the compression of fibres. ... Video is the technology of processing electronic signals representing moving pictures. ... Eindhoven is a municipality and a city located in the province of Noord-Brabant in the south of the Netherlands, originally at the confluence of the Dommel and Gender brooks. ... An ink is a liquid containing various pigments and/or dyes used for colouring a surface to render an image or text. ... Look up Electronic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Electronic can refer to many things: Objects related to electronics The band Electronic. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... // What is science? There are different theories of what science is. ... Outer space (also called just space), as a name for a region, refers to the relatively empty parts of the Universe, outside the atmospheres of celestial bodies. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Crust composition Oxygen 43% Silicon 21% Aluminium 10% Calcium 9% Iron 9% Magnesium 5% Titanium 2% Nickel 0. ... A Redstone rocket, part of the Mercury program A rocket is a vehicle, missile or aircraft which obtains thrust by the reaction to the ejection of fast moving exhaust gas from within a rocket engine. ... SMART-1. ... Ariane 5 liftoff from Kourou Ariane 5 is an expendable launch system, designed and manufactured under the authority of the European Space Agency (ESA) by EADS SPACE Transportation, the Prime Contractor, leading a consortium of many sub-contractors, and is operated and marketed by Arianespace as part of the Ariane... The Guiana space centre (French: Centre Spatial Guyanais) is a French/European spaceport near Kourou in French Guiana. ... MAP can refer to: Missouri Assessment Program Manifold Absolute Pressure, an important sensor in automobiles Austronesian languages (ISO 639 alpha-3, map) Maximum a posteriori estimator, a Bayesian statistics estimator Original abbreviation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe Mobile Application Part, an SS7-based protocol used in GSM networks Malawi... (Redirected from 2003 occupation of Iraq timeline) Timeline of events during U.S.-led occupation of Iraq, following 2003 invasion of Iraq, and relevant quotations about nature of occupation from officials. ... A rebellion is, in the most general sense, a refusal to accept authority. ... Insignia of an 0-4 in the U.S. Armed Forces In the US Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and the British Army, a major is a commissioned officer superior to a captain and inferior to a lieutenant colonel. ... The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ... On June 27, 2003 the U.S. Federal Trade Commission opened the National Do Not Call Registry. ... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... Categories: United States federal agencies | Stub ...

September 24, 2003

  • Terrorism: United States taking measures to deprive dollars from Hamas' hands. [57]
  • Swedish police arrests a new suspect in the murder of Anna Lindh. Per-Olof Svensson is no longer a suspect and has been released.
  • Belgium's highest court, Cour de Cassation, throws out case against Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and Israeli General Amos Yaron. Also, a case against former U.S. President George H. W. Bush (for war crimes in Iraq) and Secretary of State Colin Powell is dismissed. [58] [59]
  • Israeli-Palestinian conflict: A protest letter by a group of 27 Israeli pilots to the Israeli air force is publicized. In the letter, the pilots announce their refusal to fly further missions to bomb leaders of Palestinian terrorist groups in civilian areas. The pilots' letter calls the attacks "illegal and immoral". It draws quick condemnation from commentators, from politicians and from military leaders, with calls for severe punishment including jail, although a dismissal is considered the most likely result. The pilots' protest is a reaction to attacks like the one on Hamas leader Salah Shehade in July 2002, which killed Shehade, his bodyguard and 15 civilians, among them nine children. [60], [61], [62]
  • Computer and Communications Industry Association report, written by a handful of security experts, Microsoft's dominance in key technologies poses security risk and threatens the national infrastructure. Computer and Communications Industry Association states reliance on a single technology, such as the Windows operating system, threatens economic security and critical infrastructure. The paper warns that many security improvements planned by Microsoft are likely designed to deter customers from switching to another operating system. [63]
  • After several postponements the European Parliament finally passes a directive concerning the "patentability of computer-implemented inventions". The final text differs substantially from the original proposal and is seen as going a long way in addressing the concerns that it would legalize patents on software and business methods. The directive should now be under review by the Council of the European Union. [64] [65]
  • A federal judge ruled that the national "do-not-call" list against telemarketers is illegal. [66]
  • Islam in France: Two French muslim girls are excluded from school today over the wearing of the Islamic veil in schools. [67] [68]

September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... The dollar (represented by the symbol $) is the name of the official currency in several countries, dependencies and other regions (see list, below). ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Anna Lindh Photo: Pawel Flato Anna Lindh (June 19, 1957–September 11, 2003) was a Swedish Social Democratic politician, Minister for the Environment (1994–1998) and Minister for Foreign Affairs in the Swedish Government, from 1998 until her death. ... Per-Olof Svensson (born August 17, 1968) was a suspect in the assassination of Anna Lindh. ... A court is an official, public forum which a public power establishes by lawful authority to adjudicate disputes, and to dispense civil, labour, administrative and criminal justice under the law. ... The Cour de cassation is the main court of last resort in France. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... General is a military rank, in most nations the highest rank, although some nations have the higher rank of Field Marshal. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: J. Danforth Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush (born June... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Colin Luther Powell, (pronounced koh-lihn, born April 5, 1937) was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 26, 2005 under President George W. Bush. ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... The Israeli Air Force (IAF) (Hebrew: חיל האוויר Heyl haAvir) is the air force of the Israel Defense Forces. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT) headquartered in Redmond, Washington, USA, was founded in 1975 by Bill Gates and Paul Allen. ... Technology (Gr. ... Microsoft Windows is a range of operating environments for personal computers and servers. ... In computing, an operating system (OS) is the system software responsible for the direct control and management of hardware and basic system operations. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... The legislative acts of the European Union (EU) can have different forms: regulations, directives, decisions, recommendations and opinions. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a government to a person for a fixed period of time in exchange for the regulated, public disclosure of certain details of an invention. ... The tower of a personal computer (specifically a Power Mac G5). ... In lay terms, an invention is a novel device, material, or technique. ... Software patents and patents on computer-implemented inventions are a class of patents and one of many legal aspects of computing. ... The Council of the European Union forms, along with the European Parliament, the legislative arm of the European Union (EU). ... Islam is the second largest religion in France, with approximately 5 million adherents, after 45 million adherents to Catholicism, and before Protestantism (1 million), Buddhism (600 000), Judaism (525 000) and French Eastern Orthodoxy (150 000) (data: 2000-2003). ... Islam  listen? (Arabic: al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ... Frances Perkins wearing a veil after the death of president Roosevelt Veils are articles of clothing, worn almost exclusively by women, which cover some part of the head or face. ...

September 23, 2003

  • California recall: A federal appeals court overturns a three-judge panel's ruling and reinstates the original date for the recall election, October 7, 2003. The ACLU, whose suit was responsible for the original decision, will not appeal to the United States Supreme Court. [69]
  • United Nations: World Heads of State and Government convened at United Nations Headquarters in New York City for the start of the General Assembly's annual high-level debate. President of the United States George W. Bush urges the international community to help Iraq rebuild itself into a democracy with the "great power to inspire the Middle East." President Bush states a transformed Middle East would also benefit the entire world "by undermining the ideologies that export violence to other lands." President Bush also calls on the Security Council to adopt new anti-proliferation resolution "calling on all members of the UN to criminalize the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction," enacting strict export controls, and securing all sensitive material. [70]
  • Iraq: A new Gallup poll shows majority of Iraqis expect better life in 5 years. After foreign military occupation and the removal of Saddam Hussein, around two-thirds of Baghdad residents state the Iraqi dictator removal was worth the hardships they've been forced to endure. [71]
  • Iraq: A US-led coalition backed Iraqi Governing Council member, Iyad Allawi, announces restrictions of the operations of TV networks al-Jazeera and al-Arabiya. The networks are barred from reporting on official activities and news conferences and from entering ministries and office buildings for the next two weeks. The council claims they incited anti-occupation violence (by airing statements from resistance leaders; specifically broadcasting a video of "terrorists terrorizing Iraqis"), increased ethnic and sectarian tensions and were supportive of the lawless resistance. Allawi hopes the ban sends a "very clear message" to other stations. Al-Jazeera responds that it is trying to give a balanced view of the current situation in Iraq and that it considers its ethical standards to be similar to western ones. The Coalition Provisional Authority has not responded to inquiries about the announcement. [72], [73], [74], [75]
  • The Methuselah Foundation launches the Methuselah mouse contest, offering a prize to the team which can extend mouse lifespan the longest. The aim is to promote research which can offer insights into human longevity.
  • Blackout: A power shortcut lays the southern part of Sweden and the eastern part of Denmark dead from midday, leaving traffic chaos and other disruptions throughout the area. About 2-3 million people are affected. From 4 PM Copenhagen has power again. A Swedish nuclear power plant abruptly stopped producing power.
  • Space Shuttle program : Entire NASA flight safety panel resigns. All nine members of a panel formed to advise on space flight safety resigned. [76]

September 23 is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2003 California recall was a special election permitted under California law. ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The American Civil Liberties Union, or ACLU, is a non_governmental organization devoted to defending civil rights and civil liberties in the United States. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Though a term originally coined for Republican presidents, a head of state or chief of state is now universally known as the chief public representative of a nation-state, federation or commonwealth, whose role generally includes personifying the continuity and legitimacy of the state and exercising the political powers, functions... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York and abbreviated NYC) is the most populous city in the United States, and is at the center of international finance, politics, communications, music, fashion, and culture. ... The term general assembly can refer to The largest unit of organisation in the polity of a (national) Presbyterian church, containing several synods or presbyteries. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and currently the 43rd President of the United States. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... A Gallup Poll is an opinion poll frequently used by the mass media for representing public opinion. ... Belligerent military occupation, occurs when one nations military garrisons occupy all or part of the territory of another nation or recognized belligerent during an invasion (during or after a war). ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein Ê»Abd al-MajÄ«d al-TikrÄ«t, spelled Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 until 2003. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... The Iraqi Governing Council. ... Iyad Allawi Dr Iyad Allawi (اياد علاوي) (born 1945) is an Iraqi politician, and was the interim Prime Minister of Iraq prior to Iraqs 2005 legislative elections. ... Al Jazeera logo Al Jazeera (Arabic: ), meaning The Island or The (Arabian) Peninsula is an Arabic television channel based in Qatar. ... Al-Arabiya is an Arabic-language satellite news channel based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates which began broadcasting in February 2003, launched with an investment of $300 million from the Saudi-owned MBC, the Lebanese Hariri Group, and others. ... The seal of the CPA in Iraq // History of the CPA Following the 2003 invasion of Iraq, the Office for Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance (ORHA) was the organization established by the United States Government that acted as a caretaker administration in Iraq until civilian rule resumed on June 28, 2004. ... The Methuselah Mouse Prize is a contest started in Sept. ... Feral mouse Feral mouse A mouse is a mammal that belongs to one of numerous species of small rodents in the genus Mus and various related genera of the family Muridæ (Old World Mice). ... Longevity is long life or existence. ... The term blackout in peacetime refers to a cessation of electrical energy through electric power transmission systems. ... City nickname: none Location in Denmark Area  - Total  - Water 526 km² xxx km² xx% Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density 502,204 1,116,979 954/km2 [including water] xxx/km2 [land only] Time zone Eastern: UTC+1 Latitude Longitude 55°43 N 12°34 E Copenhagen (Danish: København) is... Nuclear power is the industry and method of energy production from nuclear fission. ... The Space Shuttle Columbia seconds after engine ignition, 1981 (NASA). ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (established 1958) is the government agency responsible for the United States of Americas space program and long-term general aerospace research. ...

September 22, 2003

September 22 is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Order: 7th Secretary-General Term of office: January 1, 1997–present Predecessor: Boutros Boutros-Ghali Successor: incumbent Born: April 8, 1938 Place of birth: Kumasi, Ghana Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ... The Prime Minister of Canada, the head of the Canadian government, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Right Honourable Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, PC (born January 11, 1934) was the twentieth Prime Minister of Canada, serving from November 4, 1993, to December 12, 2003. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anthropology (from the Greek word άνθρωπος = human) consists of the study of humankind (see genus Homo). ... The jaw is either of the two opposable structures forming, or near the entrance to, the mouth. ... A fossil Ammonite Fossils are the mineralized remains of animals or plants or other traces such as footprints. ... Binomial name Homo sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies Homo sapiens idaltu (extinct) Homo sapiens sapiens Human beings define themselves in biological, social, and spiritual terms. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Radiocarbon dating is the use of the naturally occurring isotope of carbon-14 in radiometric dating to determine the age of organic materials, up to ca. ... A year is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ...

September 21, 2003

September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Galileo being deployed after being launched by the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-34 mission Galileo was an unmanned spacecraft sent by NASA to study the planet Jupiter and its moons. ... Espionage is the practice of obtaining secrets (spying) from rivals or enemies for military, political, or economic advantage. ... The Washington Times is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1982 as a conservative alternative to the Washington Post by members of the controversial Unification Church. ... James Yee, Muslim U.S. Army chaplain James J. Yee (Chinese: 余百康 or 余优素福), was a Muslim U.S. Army chaplain and held the rank of captain. ... Islam  listen? (Arabic: al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ... A chaplain is a priest or a member of the clergy serving a group of people who are not organized as a mission or church. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantanamo Bay indicated. ... Espionage is the practice of obtaining secrets (spying) from rivals or enemies for military, political, or economic advantage. ... For the band, see The Police. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks carried out in the United States on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... Khalid Shaikh Mohammed (Arabic: خالد شيخ محمد; also transliterated as Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Khalid Shaikh Mohammad, and other ways) (March 1, 1964 or April 14, 1965 – present) was an important figure in Osama bin Ladens al-Qaeda organization, where he masterminded numerous plans and came to head the group... A Plan is a proposed or intended method of getting from one set of circumstances to another. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years). ... Osama bin Laden Usāmah bin Muhammad bin `Awad bin Lādin (born July 30 or March 10, 1957) (Arabic: ), commonly known as Osama bin Laden (Arabic: ), is the figurehead of al-Qaeda, an Islamist movement that has been involved in attacks against civilians and military targets around the world. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Order: 7th Secretary-General Term of office: January 1, 1997–present Predecessor: Boutros Boutros-Ghali Successor: incumbent Born: April 8, 1938 Place of birth: Kumasi, Ghana Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... United Nations General Assembly The United Nations General Assembly is one of the six principal organs of the United Nations. ... The Iraqi Governing Council. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Oil is a generic term for organic liquids that are not miscible with water. ... In international commerce and politics, an embargo is the prohibition of commerce and trade with a certain country. ... A missile (British English: miss-isle; U.S. English: missl) is, in general, a projectile—that is, something thrown or otherwise propelled. ... Technology (Gr. ... With an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... The Christian Social Union in Bavaria (CSU – ) is a conservative Germany. ... French Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin with Edmund Stoiber Arnold Schwarzenegger with Edmund Stoiber Dr. jur. ... The Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD – Sozialdemokratische Partei Deutschlands) is the second oldest political party of Germany still in existence and also one of the oldest and largest in the world, celebrating its 140th anniversary in 2003. ...

September 20, 2003

  • Israeli-Palestinian conflict: Israel says that the United Nations resolution on Yasser Arafat (passed 133-4 with 15 abstentions) "is meaningless. It is only a declaration and not legally binding." Yasser Arafat states it's of the "utmost importance" as a sign of international support for the Palestinians. Israel states Palestinians should focus their energy on fighting terrorism. Israel also insists that a new government being formed by incoming Palestinian Prime Minister Ahmed Qureia cut links to Arafat. Israel says Arafat is tainted by terrorism. Qureia's criticism of United States policy is the strongest sign yet he does not plan to challenge Arafat. [87] [88] [89] [90]
  • War on Terrorism: 17 people are killed by United States airstrikes in southeast Afghanistan's Zabul province (in particular the Shinkay district). Eight nomad women and children, two Taliban fighters, several collaborating nomads, and a Taliban commander (Mohammad Gul Niazai) are among the dead. [91] [92]
  • Occupation of Iraq: Two American soldiers are killed and 13 wounded in a mortar attack in Abu Ghraib, and another soldier dies in a roadside attack in Ramadi, bringing the number of U.S. deaths since the war began to 304, of which 165 occurred after President Bush's "mission accomplished" statement of May 1. [93] A member of the Governing Council, Dr. Aquila al-Hashimi, is shot in an assassination attempt (she dies five days later). United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan strongly condemns the attack and warns that it only undermines the country's political progress. [94]
  • European Union enlargement: Latvians vote overwhelmingly in favor of the Baltic country joining the European Union. [95]
  • Canadian Liberal Leadership Race: Early numbers from delegate-selection elections within the Liberal Party confirm Paul Martin will win an automatic first-round victory at the forthcoming leadership convention. Barring unforseen circumstances, Martin can now be expected to become Canada's 21st Prime Minister in February 2004. [96]

September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President1 of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Ahmed Ali Mohammed Qurei (or Qureia), also known as Abu Alaa, was the Speaker of the Palestinian Legislative Council and is currently Prime Minister and holds the security portfolio of the Palestinian Authority. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terrorism[1][2]) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies, the aim of which, they have declared, is to destroy groups deemed to... An airstrike is a military strike by air forces on an enemy ground position, which depending on the selected tactics may or may not be followed up by artillery, armor, and/or infantry units. ... Categories: Afghanistan geography stubs | Provinces of Afghanistan ... The video game console is called the Sega Nomad. ... Image of a woman on the Pioneer plaque sent to outer space. ... A male Caucasian toddler child A child (plural: children) is a young human. ... The Taliban (Pashtun and Persian: طالبان; students of Islam), also transliterated as Taleban, is an Islamist movement which ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, despite having diplomatic recognition from only three countries: the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. ... (Redirected from 2003 occupation of Iraq timeline) Timeline of events during U.S.-led occupation of Iraq, following 2003 invasion of Iraq, and relevant quotations about nature of occupation from officials. ... See also: Abu Ghraib prison and Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse Categories: Iraq-related stubs | Cities and towns in Iraq ... The Iraqi Governing Council. ... Aquila al-Hashimi (d. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... A large number of international organizations and other bodies have a Secretary General or Secretary-General as their chief administrative officers or in other administrative capacities. ... Order: 7th Secretary-General Term of office: January 1, 1997–present Predecessor: Boutros Boutros-Ghali Successor: incumbent Born: April 8, 1938 Place of birth: Kumasi, Ghana Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: European Union The European Union On-Line Official EU website, europa. ... Baltic states and the Baltic Sea The Baltic states or the Baltic countries is a term which nowadays refers to three countries in Northern Europe: Estonia Latvia Lithuania Prior to World War II, Finland was sometimes considered, particularly by the Soviet Union, a fourth Baltic state. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ... The Prime Minister of Canada, the head of the Canadian government, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ...

September 19, 2003

September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peace - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Order: 7th Secretary-General Term of office: January 1, 1997–present Predecessor: Boutros Boutros-Ghali Successor: incumbent Born: April 8, 1938 Place of birth: Kumasi, Ghana Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... The Japanese Peace Bell (cast on October 24, 1952) was a gift of the people of Japan (People of Nippon) to the United Nations on June 8, 1954 (despite that Japan had not yet been admitted to the United Nations). ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) generally include nuclear, biological, chemical and, increasingly, radiological weapons. ... Poverty is the state of being without, often associated with need, hardship and lack of resources across a wide range of circumstances. ... A disease is any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... A civil war is a war in which the competing parties are segments of the same country or empire. ... (Redirected from 2003 occupation of Iraq timeline) Timeline of events during U.S.-led occupation of Iraq, following 2003 invasion of Iraq, and relevant quotations about nature of occupation from officials. ... Lt. ... A Coalition is an alliance between entities, during which they cooperate in joint action, each in their own self-interest. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein Ê»Abd al-MajÄ«d al-TikrÄ«t, spelled Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 until 2003. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... In April 2003, the United States drew up a list of most-wanted Iraqis, consisting of the 55 members of the deposed Iraqi regime whom they most wanted to capture. ... Mosūl (Kurdish: Mûsil, Arabic: موصل, al Mawsil) or Nineveh (Syriac: ܢܝܢܘܐ) is a city in northern Iraq/Central Assyria. ... Duration: Sept. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Loyal it began, loyal it remains) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Area 1,076,395 km² (4th)  - Land 917,741 km²  - Water 158,654 km² (14. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ... The Honourable Sheila Maureen Copps, P.C. (born November 27, 1952, in Hamilton, Ontario) is a Canadian journalist and politician. ... The Right Honourable Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, PC (born January 11, 1934) was the twentieth Prime Minister of Canada, serving from November 4, 1993, to December 12, 2003. ... The Prime Minister of Canada, the head of the Canadian government, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... In computer security technology, a virus is a self-replicating program that spreads by inserting copies of itself into other executable code or documents (for a complete definition: see below). ... In computer security technology, a virus is a self-replicating program that spreads by inserting copies of itself into other executable code or documents (for a complete definition: see below). ... E-mail, or email, is short for electronic mail and is a method of composing, sending, and receiving messages over electronic communication systems. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT) headquartered in Redmond, Washington, USA, was founded in 1975 by Bill Gates and Paul Allen. ... Internet Explorer, abbreviated IE or MSIE, is a proprietary web browser made by Microsoft and currently available as part of Microsoft Windows. ... Computer security is the effort to create a secure computing platform, designed so that agents (users or programs) can only perform actions that have been allowed. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... Ayatollah (Arabic: آية الله; Persian: آیت‌الله) is a high title given to major Shia clergymen. ... Ayatollah Ahmad Jannati (احمد جنتی) is an Iranian politician and cleric and the Secretary of the Guardian Council, the body in charge of checking the Iranian legislature with the Constitution of Iran and Islamic laws (also known as sharia) and approving the candidates in various elections. ... A cleric is: A member of the clergy of a religion, especially one that has trained or ordained priests, preachers, or other religious professionals; or A member of a character class in Dungeons & Dragons and similar fantasy role-playing games. ... Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Opened for signature July 1, 1968 at New York Entered into force March 5, 1970 Conditions for entry into force Ratification by the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the United States, and 40 other signatory states. ... For meanings in specific fields, see protocol (computing) or protocol (cryptography). ... IAEA The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ...

September 18, 2003

  • International Atomic Energy Agency: Iranian officials gave signals that they do not intend to comply with a resolution passed by the United Nations's nuclear watchdog giving Tehran until the end of next month to come clean on its atomic programme. Parliamenetary speaker Mehdi Karrubi, a close ally of President Mohammad Khatami, said the IAEA resolution was "political" and that "the Iranian people will not accept giving in to the logic of force." [103]
  • Hurricane Isabel makes landfall on the east coast of the United States near Kill Devil Hill, North Carolina.
  • Canadian gay couple's marriage is not recognized in border crossing: Kevin Bourassa and Joe Varnell, two men married in Ontario, are prevented from using a family customs declaration form when attempting to board a plane at Toronto Pearson International Airport. The two gay men, on their way to a human rights conference in Georgia, abandoned their trip rather than use two separate forms for unmarried people. It is one of the first cases of practical discord between the same-sex marriage laws in Canada and the lack of same in the United States, and possibilities for legal or diplomatic action are being examined. [104] (See gay rights, same-sex marriage).
  • A passenger aboard a South African Airways jet tries to break into the cockpit during a flight from Cape Town to Atlanta. The passenger, James Drake, is arrested upon arrival. He had also been arrested in 1987 after trying to break into another airplane's cockpit.

September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... IAEA The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Tehran is a metropolis of 14 million situated at the foot of the towering Alborz range. ... Mehdi Karroubi (in Persian: مهدی کروبی) (born 1939?) is an Iranian politician, the chairman and a founding member of the Militant Clerics Society party. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... President Mohammad Khatami Hojjat ol-Eslam Seyyed Mohammad Khatami (حجت‌الاسلام سید محمد خاتمی; born October, 1943 in Ardakan, Yazd province) is the fifth and current President of Iran. ... Duration: Sept. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ... Toronto Pearson International Airport (YYZ), located in Mississauga, Ontario, immediately west of Toronto, is Canadas busiest airport and part of the National Airports System. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal sex. ... South African Airways (SAA), known simply as South African on their aircraft colour scheme, is South Africas largest domestic and international airline company. ... The central area of Cape Town as seen from Table Mountain. ... The Atlanta skyline as seen from Buckhead. ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

September 17, 2003

September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (established 1958) is the government agency responsible for the United States of Americas space program and long-term general aerospace research. ... Worship Apollo is considered to have dominion over the plague, light, healing, colonists, medicine, archery, poetry, prophecy, dance, reason, intellectualism and as the patron defender of herds and flocks. ... The Space Shuttle Columbia seconds after engine ignition, 1981 (NASA). ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Community college in Canada and the United States Junior college in Singapore ... Dyersburg is a city located in Dyer County, Tennessee. ... Richard Grasso was chairman and chief executive of the New York Stock Exchange from 1995 to 2003, the culmination of a career that began in 1968 when Grasso was hired by the Exchange as a floor clerk. ... New York Stock Exchange (June 2003) The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is the second largest stock exchange in the world. ... Wesley Clark Wesley Kanne Clark KBE (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general in the U.S. Army. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean Howard Brush Dean III, M.D. (born November 17, 1948) is a prominent American Democratic politician, currently serving as chairman of the Democratic National Committee. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... IAEA The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is a treaty, opened for signature on July 1, 1968, restricting the possession of nuclear weapons. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The New Democratic Party (French: Nouveau Parti démocratique) is a social democratic political party in Canada. ... Svend Robinson Svend Johannes Robinson (born March 4, 1952) is a Canadian politician and prominent activist for gay rights. ... Sexual orientation is the focus of a persons amorous or erotic desires, fantasies, and feelings, the gender(s) one is primarily oriented towards. ... Hate speech is a controversial term for speech intended to degrade, intimidate, or incite violence or prejudicial action against someone based on their race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, or disability. ... North Korean propaganda showing a soldier destroying the United States Capitol building. ...

September 16, 2003

September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ... Environmentalism is activism aimed at improving the environment, particularly nature. ... The Union of Concerned Scientists as defined on the UCS website: The Union of Concerned Scientists is a nonprofit partnership of scientists and citizens combining rigorous scientific analysis, innovative policy development, and effective citizen advocacy to achieve practical environmental solutions. ... A sport utility vehicle (SUV) or off-roader is a vehicle that combines the load-hauling and passenger-carrying capacity of a large station wagon or minivan with features designed for off-road driving. ... WNBA logo The Womens National Basketball Association or WNBA is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... The Detroit Shock is a professional womens basketball team that plays in the Womens National Basketball Association. ... The Los Angeles Sparks are a Womens National Basketball Association team that was formed in 1997, being one of the teams that participated in the leagues inaugural game. ... Per-Olof Svensson (born August 17, 1968) was a suspect in the assassination of Anna Lindh. ... Jack Ruby murdered the alleged assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, in a very public manner. ... Anna Lindh Photo: Pawel Flato Anna Lindh (June 19, 1957–September 11, 2003) was a Swedish Social Democratic politician, Minister for the Environment (1994–1998) and Minister for Foreign Affairs in the Swedish Government, from 1998 until her death. ... The Domain Name System or DNS is a system that stores information about host names and domain names in a kind of distributed database on networks, such as the Internet. ... Internet Software Consortium (ISC) was an organization that was founded by Rick Adams and Paul Vixie with funding from UUNET to develop and support a number of reference implementations of internet software. ... BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Domain, previously: Berkeley Internet Name Daemon) is the most commonly used DNS server on the Internet, especially on Unix-like systems, where it is a de facto standard. ... Same-sex marriage is widely anticipated to be legalized across Canada by Bill C-38, which was introduced by Paul Martins Liberal government in the federal Parliament on February 1, 2005 and passed by the House of Commons on June 28 2005; C-38 is currently before the Senate... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right_of_centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... Marriage is a relationship and bond between individuals that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal sex. ...

September 15, 2003

September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... VeriSign, Inc. ... A wildcard DNS record is a record in a DNS zone file that will match all requests for non-existent domain names, i. ... The 2003 California recall was a special election permitted under California law. ... The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States district courts: District of Alaska District of Arizona Central, Eastern, Northern, and Southern Districts of California District of Guam District of Hawaii District of Idaho District of Montana... San Francisco skyline. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... A recall election is a procedure by which voters can remove an elected official from office. ... Location in the state of California Formed 1850 Seat Los Angeles Area  - Total  - Water 10,517 km² (4,061 mi²) Population  - (2004)  - Density 10,179,716 (est) 967. ... A voting machine is a device to record and register votes to be counted as per any voting system, with or without printing a ballot for the voter to verify. ... Composite satellite image showing the progress of a hurricane weather system approaching the east coast of America Weather comprises all the various phenomena that occur in the atmosphere of a planet. ... Duration: Sept. ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... A cleric is: A member of the clergy of a religion, especially one that has trained or ordained priests, preachers, or other religious professionals; or A member of a character class in Dungeons & Dragons and similar fantasy role-playing games. ... Baath Party flag The Ba‘ath Parties (also spelled Baath or Ba‘th; Arabic: اﻟﺒﻌﺚ) comprise political parties representing the political face of the Ba‘ath movement. ... Ayatollah (Arabic: آية الله; Persian: آیت‌الله) is a high title given to major Shia clergymen. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... The Interior Minister is a member of a Cabinet in a Government. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the state capital of the German Bundesland of Bavaria. ... The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... The Federal President (German: Bundespräsident, formerly Reichspräsident) is Germanys head of state. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... The Federal Security Service of the Russian Federation (Федера́льная слу́жба безопа́сности Росси́йской Федера́ции or ФСБ, Federalnaya Sluzhba Bezopasnosti Rossiyskoy Federatsii, FSB) is a state security organisation in Russia, the successor to the KGB by way of the FSK (Federalnaya Sluzhba Kontrrazvedki (Федера́льная Слу́жба Контрразве́дки), Federal Counterintelligence Service). ... The Republic of Ingushetia (Russian: Республика Ингушетия; Ingush: ГIалгIай Мохк) is a federal subject of the Russian Federation (a republic). ... The Chechen Republic (Russian: Чеченская Республика; Chechen: Нохчийн Республика/Noxçiyn Respublika), also known as Chechnya (Russian: Чечня, Chechen: Нохчичьо/Noxçiyçö), Ichkeria, Chechnia or Chechenia, is currently a constituent republic of the Russian Federation. ...

September 14, 2003

September 14 is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: European Union The European Union On-Line Official EU website, europa. ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. ... A revolution is a relatively sudden and absolutely drastic change. ... A coup détat (pronounced kÅ« dā ta), or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: European Union The European Union On-Line Official EU website, europa. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... For other uses of the initials WTO, see WTO (disambiguation). ... The World Trade Organization (WTO) is an international organization which oversees a large number of agreements defining the rules of trade between its member states (WTO, 2004a). ... Canc n is a coastal city in Quintana Roo, Mexicos easternmost state. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A natural disaster is the consequence or effect of a hazardous event, occurring when human activities and natural phenomenon (a physical event, such as a volcanic eruption, earthquake, landslide etc. ... A wildfire, also known as a forest fire, vegetation fire, grass fire, or bushfire (in Australasia), is an uncontrolled fire in wildland often caused by lightning; other common causes are human carelessness and arson. ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Splendour without diminishment) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Area 944,735 km² (5th)  - Land 925,186 km²  - Water 19,549 km² (2. ... View of Kelowna, BC Kelowna (2001 population 96,288, metropolitan population 147,739) is a city on Okanagan Lake in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. ... Locator map for Kamloops, BC Kamloops is a city in central British Columbia, Canada at the confluence of the two branches of the Thompson River. ...

September 14, 2003

September 14 is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... Yetunde Price Yetunde Price (c. ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... Country: United States Residence: Palm Beach, Florida, USA Height: 61 (185 cm) Weight: 160 lbs. ... Country: United States Residence: Palm Beach, Florida, USA Height: 59 (1. ... Compton is a city located in southern Los Angeles County, California, USA. It is often considered to be the heart of the South Los Angeles area, also known as South Central Los Angeles before the name was changed in 2003. ... The Downtown Los Angeles skyline as seen from Hollywood. ...

September 12, 2003

September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are an originally Arabian ethnicity of the Caucasoid race widespread in the Middle East and North Africa. ... The Non-Aligned Movement, or NAM is an international organization of over 100 states which consider themselves not formally aligned with or against any major power bloc. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President1 of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Order: 7th Secretary-General Term of office: January 1, 1997–present Predecessor: Boutros Boutros-Ghali Successor: incumbent Born: April 8, 1938 Place of birth: Kumasi, Ghana Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... The Taoiseach (plural: Taoisigh) or, more formally, An Taoiseach, is the head of government of the Republic of Ireland and the leader of the Irish cabinet1. ... Patrick Bartholemew Ahern (Irish name: Pádraig Parthalán Ó hEachthairn) (born September 12, 1951), commonly called Bertie Ahern, is an Irish politician. ... The European Council, sometimes informally called the European Summit, is a meeting of the heads of state or government of the European Union, and the President of the European Commission (not to be confused with the Council of the European Union, or the Council of Europe). ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... Jacques René Chirac (born November 29, 1932) is a French politician. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Reuters (pronounced IPA: ) is a company supplying global financial markets and news media with a range of information products and transactional solutions, including real-time and historical market data, research and analytics, financial trading platforms, investment data and analytics plus news in text, video, graphics and photographs. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The nose, containing the flight crew and first-class section, landed in a farmers field near a tiny church in Tundergarth, Scotland Pan Am Flight 103 was blown up as it flew over Lockerbie, Scotland, on December 21, 1988, when 12–16 oz of plastic explosive was detonated in... Map of Ontarios ridings and their popular vote for their party elected The Ontario general election of 2003 was held on October 2, 2003, to elect the 103 members of the Legislative Assembly (Members of Provincial Parliament, or MPPs) of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... Ernest Eves (born June 17, 1946) was the twenty-third Premier of the province of Ontario, Canada, from April 15, 2002, to October 23, 2003. ... The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party (PC Party of Ontario, also known as Tories) is a right-of-centre political party in Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario Liberal Party is a centrist provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... The Honourable Dalton James Patrick McGuinty Jr. ... Dalton McGuinty A kitten On September 12, 2003, during the provincial election campaign in Ontario, Canada, a press release disseminated by the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party contained a line at the end that referred to rival Ontario Liberal Party leader Dalton McGuinty as an evil reptilian kitten-eater from another...

September 11, 2003

  • War on Terrorism : As the United States remembers the deadliest terrorist attack ever on its shores, the State Department warns that it is seeing "increasing indications that al-Qaida is preparing to strike United States interests abroad." The State Department issues a worldwide warning of possible al-Qaida attacks against United States interests. The United States State Department urges U.S. citizens and employees overseas to take special caution on the second anniversary of the September 11 Terrorist Attacks amid growing indications that al-Qaida is planning bigger attacks, "possibly involving nonconventional weapons such as chemical or biological agents." [129] [130] [131]
  • Swedish Foreign Minister Anna Lindh has died in hospital from stab wounds inflicted while she was shopping in a department store in the centre of Stockholm. In the wake of the incident, both the Yes and No Euro campaigns suspended their activities. [132]
  • Israeli-Palestinian conflict: The Israeli Security Cabinet votes in principle to expel Yasser Arafat, the chairman of the Palestinian Authority, from the West Bank. According to one source, the cabinet decided to ask the Israeli Defense Force to draw up a plan to expel Arafat. No timeline was specified, and Israeli government sources say that the decision was not to expel him immediately. The United States State Department criticises such a move as "unhelpful". Thousands of Palestinians travel to the presidential compound in Ramallah to protest at the Israeli decision. The Palestinian prime minister-designate, Ahmed Qurei, announces in response to the Israeli decision that he is halting efforts to form a government. Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov states an international force may be needed to end spiraling violence in the Palestinian territories. [133] [134] [135]
  • Scientists at MIT have achieved the lowest temperature ever recorded, half a billionth of a kelvin (0.5 nanokelvin) above absolute zero, in sodium gas. At that speed, atoms move about 12 cm/second.[136]

September 11 is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terrorism[1][2]) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies, the aim of which, they have declared, is to destroy groups deemed to... The following is a timeline of acts and failed attempts that can be considered terrorism. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... Citizenship is membership in a political community (originally a city but now a state), and carries with it rights to political participation; a person having such membership is a citizen. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... The chemical agent in the context of a work place hazard is a chemical that may be hazardous due to its physical or toxicological characteristics. ... A biological agent is an infectious disease that can be used in bioterrorism or biological warfare. ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who heads a government ministry or department (e. ... Anna Lindh Photo: Pawel Flato Anna Lindh (June 19, 1957–September 11, 2003) was a Swedish Social Democratic politician, Minister for the Environment (1994–1998) and Minister for Foreign Affairs in the Swedish Government, from 1998 until her death. ... Stockholm  listen? is the capital and the largest city of Sweden. ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President1 of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... Ramallah (Arabic: رام الله) is a West Bank city of approximately 57,000 residents, which is currently under Palestinian Authority control. ... Ahmed Ali Mohammed Qurei (or Qureia), also known as Abu Alaa, was the Speaker of the Palestinian Legislative Council and is currently Prime Minister and holds the security portfolio of the Palestinian Authority. ... A minister for foreign affairs, or foreign minister, is a cabinet minister that helps to form foreign policy for sovereign nations. ... Igor Sergeyevich Ivanov (Russian, Игорь Сергеевич Иванов) became Russias Minister of Foreign Affairs in 1998, succeeding Yevgeny Primakov. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a research institution and university located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts along the Charles River and across from Bostons Back Bay district. ... Temperature is the physical property of a system which underlies the common notions of hot and cold; the material with the higher temperature is said to be hotter. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude this page lists temperatures between 1 picokelvin (10-12 K) and 1 nanokelvin (10-9 K). ... Absolute zero is the highest temperature that can be obtained in any macroscopic system. ... General Name, Symbol, Number sodium, Na, 11 Series alkali metal Group, Period, Block 1 (IA), 3, s Density, Hardness 968 kg/m3, 0. ...

September 10, 2003

September 10 is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anna Lindh Photo: Pawel Flato Anna Lindh (June 19, 1957–September 11, 2003) was a Swedish Social Democratic politician, Minister for the Environment (1994–1998) and Minister for Foreign Affairs in the Swedish Government, from 1998 until her death. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years). ... Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of potential financial loss. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The word billion, and its equivalents in other languages, refer to one of two different numbers. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years). ... Terrorism is a controversial term with multiple definitions. ... Arabic (العربية) is a Semitic language, closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... Al Jazeera logo Al Jazeera (الجزيرة), meaning The Island or The (Arabian) Peninsula (whence also Algiers) is an Arabic television channel based in Qatar. ... Bottom view of VHS videotape cassette with magnetic tape exposed Videotape is a means of recording television pictures and accompanying sound onto magnetic tape as opposed to movie film. ... Osama bin Laden Usāmah bin Muhammad bin `Awad bin Lādin (born July 30 or March 10, 1957) (Arabic: ), commonly known as Osama bin Laden (Arabic: ), is the figurehead of al-Qaeda, an Islamist movement that has been involved in attacks against civilians and military targets around the world. ... A semi-automatic rifle is a type of rifle that, when the trigger is pulled, fires a bullet and loads another cartridge from a magazine, without the need to operate a bolt or other loading mechanism. ... Ayman al-Zawahiri (in Arabic, ايمن الظواهري) (born June 19, 1951) is a prominent member of the al-Qaeda group and formerly the head of the Egyptian Islamic Jihad paramilitary organization. ... A physician is a person who practices medicine. ... This article is about particular organizations known as Islamic Jihad. ... Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Al-Qaeda (Arabic: - al-Qā‘idah, the foundation or the base) is the name given to an international alliance of militant Islamist organizations. ... April is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... This article is about the month of May. ... Methods and media for sound recording are varied and have undergone significant changes between the first time sound was actually recorded for later playback until now. ... Ayman al-Zawahiri (in Arabic, ايمن الظواهري) (born June 19, 1951) is a prominent member of the al-Qaeda group and formerly the head of the Egyptian Islamic Jihad paramilitary organization. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein Ê»Abd al-MajÄ«d al-TikrÄ«t, spelled Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 until 2003. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... Imam is an Arabic word meaning Leader. The ruler of a country might be called the Imam, for example. ... Topography Map showing Bali within Indonesia Sunset at Jimbaran Beach, Bali Young Balinese Dancers Bali rice terraces Balis Sanur Beach Statue of Dewi Sri — Ubud, Bali Bali is an Indonesian island. ... Execution by firing squad is a method of capital punishment, especially in times of war. ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terrorism[1][2]) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies, the aim of which, they have declared, is to destroy groups deemed to... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Mahmoud al-Zahar is a co-founder of Hamas, and a member of Hamas leadership in the Gaza Strip. ... The city of Gaza is the principal city in the Gaza Strip. ... A bodyguard is a person who protects someone from personal assault, kidnapping, assassination, loss of confidential information, or other threats. ... The word ton or tonne is derived from the Old English tunne, and ultimately from the Old French tonne, and referred originally to a large cask with a capacity of 252 wine gallons, which holds approximately 2100 pounds of water. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Jihad (ǧihād جهاد) is an Islamic term, from the Arabic root word jahada (exerting utmost effort or to strive), which connotes a wide range of meanings: anything from an inward spiritual struggle to attain perfect faith to holy war. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terrorism[1][2]) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies, the aim of which, they have declared, is to destroy groups deemed to... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terrorism[1][2]) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies, the aim of which, they have declared, is to destroy groups deemed to... APEC can also stand for Atlantic Provinces Economic Council Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) is a group of Pacific Rim countries who meet with the purpose of improving economic and political ties. ... Terrorism is a controversial term with multiple definitions. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terrorism[1][2]) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies, the aim of which, they have declared, is to destroy groups deemed to... Mayor Datuk Ruslin Hasan District Kuala Lumpur District Area  - Total (City) 243. ... A penal code can be defined as that portion of a states laws that deal with defining the elements of particular crimes and specifying the punishment for each crime. ... The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC, also called the Dewey Decimal System) is a system of library classification developed by Melvil Dewey in 1876, and since greatly modified and expanded in the course of the twenty-two major revisions which have occurred up until 2004. ... Founded in 1967, OCLC Online Computer Library Center is a nonprofit, membership, computer library service and research organization dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the worlds information and reducing information costs. ... The Library Hotel [1] is a hotel in New York City, located at 299 Madison Avenue. ...

September 9, 2003

September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... List of Indiana Governors Jonathan Jennings Dem. ... Frank OBannon Frank Lewis OBannon (January 30, 1930–September 13, 2003) was an American politician who was Governor of Indiana from 1997 until his death. ... In medicine, a coma (from the Greek koma, meaning deep sleep) is a profound state of unconsciousness, which may result from a variety of conditions including intoxication (drug, alcohol or toxins), metabolic abnormalities (hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, etc. ... A stroke or cerebrovascular accident (CVA) occurs when the blood supply to a part of the brain is suddenly interrupted by occlusion (an ischemic stroke- approximately 90%of strokes) or by hemorrhage (a hemorrhagic stroke - approximately 10% of strokes). ... Chicago, Illinois — officially the City of Chicago and colloquially known as Chicago, the Second City and the Windy City — is the third largest city of the United States after New York City and Los Angeles and is the largest inland city of the nation. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Joe Kernan Joseph Eugene Kernan (born April 8, 1946), widely known as Joe Kernan, is an American politician who became the Governor of Indiana on September 13, 2003 upon the death of Frank OBannon. ... The Iraqi Governing Council. ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein Ê»Abd al-MajÄ«d al-TikrÄ«t, spelled Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 until 2003. ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Rishon Le Zion in 2002 Rishon LeZion, or Rishon LeZiyyon (ראשון לציון) is a city in Israel, on the central coastal strip, in the Center District of Israel, just south of Tel Aviv, and part of the Tel Aviv metropolitan area (Gush Dan). ... Jerusalem (Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם Yerushalayim; Arabic: القدس al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is an atypical form of pneumonia. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... Quarantine, a medical term (from Italian: quaranta giorni, forty days) is the act of keeping people or animals separated for a period of time before, for instance, allowing them to enter another country. ... West Nile virus is a newly emergent virus of the family Flaviviridae, found in both tropical and temperate regions. ... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... The Congressional Black Caucus is an organization representing African American members of the Congress of the United States. ... The FOX News Channel is a US cable and satellite news channel. ... Morgan State University, located in residential Baltimore, Maryland, awards Baccalaureate, Masters and Doctorate degrees. ... Nickname: Charm City Location in Maryland Founded  -Incorporated 30 July 1729  1797 County Independent city Mayor Martin OMalley (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 349. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ... Hard currency, in economics, refers to a currency in which investors have confidence, such as that of a politically stable country with low inflation and consistent monetary and fiscal policies, and one that if anything is tending to appreciate against other currencies on a trade-weighted basis. ... Montreal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport (Aéroport international Pierre-Elliott-Trudeau de Montréal) or Montreal-Trudeau for short, is an international airport serving Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Please visit and contribute to the Montreal Wikiportal See and add to this ongoing discussion about English Names in Montreal {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Concordia Salus (Salvation through harmony) Ville de Montréal, Québec, Canada Location. ... The Prime Minister of Canada, the head of the Canadian government, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... Name Pierre Elliott Trudeau Number Fifteenth First term April 20, 1968–June 4,1979 Second term March 3, 1980–June 30, 1984 Predecessor Lester Bowles Pearson Successors Joe Clark John Napier Turner Date of birth October 18, 1919 Place of birth Montreal, Quebec Date of death September 28, 2000 Spouse... During the 1960s, a terrorist group known as the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) launched a decade of bombings, robberies and attacks on government offices. ... The October Crisis was a series of dramatic events triggered by two terrorist kidnappings that occurred in Quebec, Canada, during the month of October, 1970. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

September 8, 2003

September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 2003 occupation of Iraq timeline) Timeline of events during U.S.-led occupation of Iraq, following 2003 invasion of Iraq, and relevant quotations about nature of occupation from officials. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and currently the 43rd President of the United States. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... The road map for peace is a plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict proposed by a quartet of international entities: the United States, the European Union, Russia, and the United Nations. ... Ahmed Ali Mohammed Qurei (or Qureia), also known as Abu Alaa, was the Speaker of the Palestinian Legislative Council and is currently Prime Minister and holds the security portfolio of the Palestinian Authority. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President1 of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA...

September 7, 2003

  • Israeli-Palestinian conflict: Israel's Prime Minister Ariel Sharon declares that Hamas leaders are "marked for death" and won't have a moment's rest, after Israel failed in an attempt to kill the top-ranking members of Hamas with a 550-pound bomb dropped on a Gaza City apartment.
  • Violence surges sharply in Indian-controlled Kashmir with a series of separatist attacks across the Himalayan region. This follows a bomb explosion on Saturday in the main wholesale market for fruit in the region, which killed six people and wounded 25.
  • Tennis: Andy Roddick defeated Spain's Juan Carlos Ferrero in straight sets (6-3, 7-6, 6-3) in the Men's Singles Final at the U.S. Open. This marks the first Grand Slam victory for the 21-year-old American.

September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The article is about the Middle Eastern city. ... Shown in green is the Kashmiri region under Pakistani control. ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... Country: United States Residence: Boca Raton, Florida, USA Height: 62 (187 cm) Weight: 190 lbs (86 kg) Plays: Right Turned pro: 2000 Highest singles ranking: 1 (11/3/2003) Singles titles: 17 Career Prize Money: $8,305,251 Grand Slam Record Titles: 1 Australian Open SF (2005) Roland Garros... Juan Carlos Ferrero (born February 12, 1980, in Onteniente, Spain) is a professional tennis player. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ...

September 6, 2003

  • Johns Hopkins researchers retract all results of a frequently-cited study which claimed that extensive and permanent brain damage occurred after just a single dose of Ecstasy. Due to a labelling mistake on the experimental drug vials, all but one of the animals involved in the study were not actually given Ecstasy at all, but were instead given the drug d-methamphetamine. [174]
  • War on Terrorism: European Union foreign ministers denounce the political wing of Hamas as a terrorist organization following the group's claim of responsibility for a truce-shattering bomb attack in Jerusalem. [175]
  • War on Terrorism: An Israeli warplane drops a relatively small bomb on a house in Gaza City (in an effort to avoid killing innocents, according to military sources who spoke to AP), lightly wounding Hamas founder Sheik Ahmed Yassin and 15 other people in an airstrike that Israeli officials confirm was an attempt to wipe out the Islamic group's top leaders as they assemble for a meeting. [176]
  • Natural disaster: Hurricane Fabian lashes Bermuda, causing heavy damage. It is the most powerful storm to hit the island in fifty years. [177]
  • Palestinian Authority: Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas submits his resignation to the President of the Palestinian Authority, Yasser Arafat. According to Palestinian sources, he will play a "caretaker" role of the position until a new prime minister is sworn in. [178]
  • Tennis: Justine Henin-Hardenne defeated fellow Belgian Kim Clijsters 7-5, 6-1 to win her first U.S. Open title. She had defeated Clijsters earlier this year to take the French Open as well.

September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Johns Hopkins (May 19, 1795 - December 24, 1873) was a Baltimore businessman, a Quaker, an abolitionist, and a philanthropist. ... MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine), most commonly known today by the street name ecstasy, is a synthetic entactogen of the phenethylamine family whose primary effect is to stimulate the secretion of large amounts of serotonin as well as dopamine and noradrenaline in the brain, causing a general sense of openness, empathy... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terrorism[1][2]) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies, the aim of which, they have declared, is to destroy groups deemed to... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Terrorism is a controversial term with multiple definitions. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terrorism[1][2]) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies, the aim of which, they have declared, is to destroy groups deemed to... The article is about the Middle Eastern city. ... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Sheikh Ahmed Ismail Yassin (~1937 — March 22, 2004) was the leader of Hamas until he was killed by an Israeli helicopter gunship. ... A natural disaster is the consequence or effect of a hazardous event, occurring when human activities and natural phenomenon (a physical event, such as a volcanic eruption, earthquake, landslide etc. ... Duration: Aug. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President1 of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held from the middle of May to the beginning of June in Paris, France, and is the second of the worlds Grand Slam tournaments. ...

September 5, 2003

  • Hong Kong's leader Tung Chee-hwa announces that he will indefinitely postpone plans for an extremely unpopular security bill which sparked massive public protests and would have granted the government broad powers to prosecute vaguely defined threats to national security. [179]
  • Palestinian Authority: Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas tells the Palestinian parliament to either support him or fire him, a move seen as making public for the first time his quarrel with Yasser Arafat. [180] VOA characterizes Mr. Abbas' ultimatum as the latest twist in a power struggle between him and Arafat, who is the President of the Palestinian Authority. [181]
  • A car explodes in Vaasa, Finland. One man was killed in this suicide bombing in the corner of a city centre square. This was the second bombing in Finland in a short time: in Jyväskylä an apartment building was bombed on Thursday and is in danger of collapsing. Next bombing was on Friday in Keuruu, where a summer cottage exploded. [182] [183] [184]
  • David Blaine begins a new stunt. He will stay in a small transparent capsule suspended 30 feet above the ground near Tower Bridge on London's River Thames without food for 44 days.[185]
  • A train goes off the rails at a roller coaster at Disneyland in Anaheim, California, killing one. [186]

September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tung Chee-hwa (Traditional Chinese: 董建華 Simplified Chinese: 董建华 Pinyin: Dǒng Jiànhuá) (born July 7, 1937, or the 29th day of the fifth month in the Chinese calendar) is the first Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... Hong Kong Basic Law Article 23 is the basis (parent statute) of a security law proposed by the Hong Kong Government. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President1 of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA... The Voice of America (VOA) is the official broadcasting service of the United States government. ... Vaasa (Vasa in Swedish, Wasa in Latin), is a city on the west coast of Finland. ... Location of Jyväskylä in Finland Jyväskylä is a city located in central Finland, 140 km from Tampere and 270 km from Helsinki, near Lake Päijänne and Lake Keitele. ... Keuruu is a municipality of Finland. ... David Blaine (born April 4, 1973) is an American illusionist and stunt performer born in Brooklyn, New York City. ... Tower Bridge Sequence showing the bridge opening Tower Bridge is a bridge in London, England, over the River Thames. ... St Stevens Tower - The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben London (see also alternative names) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Length 346 km Elevation of the source 110 m Average discharge entering Oxford: 17. ... A typical roller coaster The roller coaster is a popular amusement ride developed for amusement parks and modern theme parks. ... Disneyland is a theme park at Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California. ... This temporary page is being used to expand and convert the article Anaheim, California over to the new format agreed to at WikiProject Cities. ...

September 4, 2003

  • North Korea announces re-election of dictator Kim Jong Il as chairman of the National Defense Commission by a unanimous vote of the Supreme People's Assembly, a move dismissed as a propaganda stunt by Western observers, who nearly all regard the Supreme People's Assembly as a rubber stamp body. [187]
  • California legislature passes expanded domestic partnership bill. The state assembly approved a measure to extend nearly all the legal rights of married couples to people in same-sex partnerships. If signed by the governor, the bill will become law in 2005.[188]
  • The right wing British National Party (BNP) candidate Nicholas Geri, who is of Italian descent, wins a surprise victory in a local government by-election to Thurrock Borough Council in Essex. The Labour Party, which has a 21 seat majority on the Council, sees its candidate pushed into third place, behind the BNP and the Conservative Party. Turnout in the by-election was 22%. [189]
  • Singapore drops its 21-year ban on Cosmopolitan magazine and slightly relaxes its film censorship policy. Despite this move, the censorship board's surveyors found the Singaporean public largely does not want the country's tough censorship rules liberalized. [190]
  • Natural disaster: The Booth and Bear Butte forest fires in the Cascade Mountains, which had been 45% contained, explodes to burn an additional 20,000 acres (80 km²). Estimates of the size of this fire vary between 62,000 and 80,000 acres (250 and 320 km²). The resort community of Camp Sherman, where authorities allowed residents to return, is once again evacuated. [191]
  • A Dutch court rules that Karin Spaink's publication of the Fishman Affidavit on her website is legal in the Netherlands. [192]

September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kim Jong-il (born February 16, 1942) has been the leader of North Korea since 1994. ... The Supreme Peoples Assembly is the parliament of the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (North Korea). ... North Korean propaganda showing a soldier destroying the United States Capitol building. ... For alternative meanings for The West in the United States, see the U.S. West and American West. ... This article is about vulcanized rubber stamps. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... Domestic partner or domestic partnership identifies the personal relationship between individuals who are living together and sharing a common domestic life together but are not joined in any type of legal partnership, marriage or civil union. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... The British National Party (BNP) is the largest political party of the far-right in the United Kingdom. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... Thurrock is a unitary authority in England. ... This article is about the county of Essex in England. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the centre-right in the United Kingdom. ... The term cosmopolitan refers to an individual who retains cultural roots in his or her country of origin, yet has adopted a wide taste for other cultures, and so lives both a local and global life. ... Censorship is the systematic use of group power to broadly control freedom of speech and expression, largely in regard to secretive matters. ... A natural disaster is the consequence or effect of a hazardous event, occurring when human activities and natural phenomenon (a physical event, such as a volcanic eruption, earthquake, landslide etc. ... Fire in San Bernardino, California Mountains (image taken from the International Space Station) A wildfire, also known as a forest fire, vegetation fire, grass fire, or bushfire (in Australasia), is an uncontrolled fire in wildland often caused by lightning; other common causes are human carelessness and arson. ... Mount Adams in Washington state The Cascade Range is a mountainous region famous for its chain of tall volcanos called the High Cascades that run north-south along the west coast of North America from British Columbia to the Shasta Cascade area of northern California. ... Karin Spaink (born 1957 in Amsterdam) is a journalist, writer and feminist. ... The Fishman Affidavit is a set of court documents submitted by ex-Scientologist Steven Fishman in 1994 containing criticisms of the Church of Scientology and, controversially, substantial portions of the Operating Thetan course materials. ...

September 3, 2003

  • United States: Former Presbyterian minister Paul J. Hill is executed for his 1994 murder in Pensacola, Florida of an abortion doctor and his bodyguard. [202] [203]
  • Irish minister Frank Fahy accuses US Immigration authorities at Shannon Airport of acting 'disgracefully' in turning back a group of 13 Irish musicians travelling to attend New York benefit concert to raise money for a Irish cancer victim in the United States for treatment. Ireland's 2003 Eurovision Song Contest singer Mickey Joe Harte, one of the singers refused entry, said they were told they needed no visas in their case. However at Shannon, the musicans were suddenly told they needed work visas, though the event was for charity and they were providing their services 'free of charge'. Irish people travelling to the United States do not normally need visas except to get paid employment. The concert is scheduled for Friday. [204]
  • Miss Justice Mary Laffoy dramatically resigns as chairperson of the Laffoy Commission on Child Abuse, which is investigating evidence of child sex abuse in schools, orphanages and Catholic Church-run institutions over decades in Ireland. Her resignation followed one day after the Minister for Education, Noel Dempsey told RTÉ Radio that the Irish Government, worried by suggestions that the investigation would last more than a decade and cost hundreds of millions of euro, wanted to restructure the investigation to examine only a sample of the 1800 cases being investigated. The government has delayed publishing Justice Laffoy's resignation letter. Abuse victim and crusader against abuse Christine Buckey calls for Dempsey's resignation. Colm O'Gorman, of the child abuse charity One in Four, and himself a prominent survivor of abuse, calls on Taoiseach Bertie Ahern to publish all correspondence relating to the resignation. [205]
  • California recall: Five candidates (Lt. Governor Cruz Bustamante, California state senator Tom McClintock, Peter Camejo, Peter Ueberroth and Arianna Huffington) attended the first debate held for the recall election. Arnold Schwarzenegger was criticized for not turning up at the debate. Issues such as tax and campaign finance were brought up. [206]

September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 2003 occupation of Iraq timeline) Timeline of events during U.S.-led occupation of Iraq, following 2003 invasion of Iraq, and relevant quotations about nature of occupation from officials. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air, August 9, 1945. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Colin Luther Powell, (pronounced koh-lihn, born April 5, 1937) was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 26, 2005 under President George W. Bush. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Economics (deriving from the Greek words οίκω [okos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... Politics is the process and method of making decisions for groups. ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... Chamber of the Estates-General, the Dutch legislature. ... The Iraqi Governing Council. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... External links Abtahis English Weblog Abtahis Persian Weblog Mohammad Ali Abtahi and the cleric communitys share from the Internet, by Massoud Behnoud Categories: People stubs | 1960 births | Iranian clerics | Iranian Vice Presidents ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... President Mohammad Khatami Hojjat ol-Eslam Seyyed Mohammad Khatami (حجت‌الاسلام سید محمد خاتمی; born October, 1943 in Ardakan, Yazd province) is the fifth and current President of Iran. ... The United Nations, with its headquarters in New York City, is the largest international diplomatic organization. ... A diplomatic mission is a group of people from one nation state present in another nation state to represent the sending state in the receiving State. ... Tehran is a metropolis of 14 million situated at the foot of the towering Alborz range. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Rev. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... This article is about the inland city of Pensacola, Florida. ... Frank Fahy (1880-1953) was Ceann Comhairle (Chairman) of Dáil Éireann from 1932 to 1951. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... Shannon Airport (IATA Airport Code; SNN, ICAO Airport Code; EINN) is Irelands main transatlantic airport. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... When normal cells are damaged or old they undergo apoptosis; cancer cells, however, avoid apoptosis. ... Eurovision Song Contest 2003 logo. ... Mickey Joe Harte (born 1973) is an amateur club singer from Lifford, County Donegal, Ireland. ... The Roman Catholic Church believes its founding was based on Jesus appointment of Saint Peter as the primary church leader, later Bishop of Rome. ... Noel Dempsey (born January 1953), is a senior Irish Fianna Fáil politician and is currently the Minister for Communications, Marine & Natural Resources. ... Radio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ; Irish for Radio and Television of Ireland) is the national publicly-funded broadcaster of Ireland. ... The Taoiseach (plural: Taoisigh) or, more formally, An Taoiseach, is the head of government of the Republic of Ireland and the leader of the Irish cabinet1. ... Patrick Bartholemew Ahern (Irish name: Pádraig Parthalán Ó hEachthairn) (born September 12, 1951), commonly called Bertie Ahern, is an Irish politician. ... The 2003 California recall was a special election permitted under California law. ... Cruz Miguel Bustamante (born January 4, 1953) is an American politician. ... Thomas Miller McClintock (born July 10, 1956) is a Republican California State Senator. ... Peter Miguel Camejo (born December 31, 1939) is a financier, businessman, political activist, environmentalist, author, and one of the founders of the socially responsible investment movement. ... Peter Victor Ueberroth (born September 2, 1937 in Evanston, Illinois) is an American sports executive. ... Arianna Huffington talks to the media while campaigning for governor of California at UC Berkeley on September 11, 2003. ... Arnold Schwarzenegger 38th Governor of California Shown here as Governor of California, with the gubernatorial seal in the background. ... A tax is an involuntary fee paid by individuals or businesses to a state, or to functional equivalents of a state, including tribes, secessionist movements or revolutionary movements. ...

September 2, 2003


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What's New - September, 2003 (1019 words)
September 14, 2003: Don Rowlett reported a minor problem with a Graph Traverse program posted some time ago.
September 8, 2003: Dürer's Magic Square appeared in an engraving by Albrecht Dürer in 1514.
September 5, 2003: Thanks to sharp-eyed (and sharp) viewers, this seems to be program fix-up month.
2003 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4875 words)
September 10 - Swedish foreign minister Anna Lindh is stabbed in a Stockholm department store and dies the next day.
September 10 - Sweden rejects adopting the Euro in a referendum.
September 15 - The ELN kidnaps 8 foreign tourists in the Ciudad Perdida in Colombia; they demand a human rights investigation and release the last hostages 3 months later.
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