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Encyclopedia > Sepak Takraw
A child demonstrating sepak takraw.
A child demonstrating sepak takraw.

Sepak Takraw (Kick Volleyball, or just Takraw for short) is a sport native to Southeast Asia, resembling volleyball, except that it uses a rattan ball and only allows players to use their feet and head to touch the ball. A cross between soccer and volleyball, it is a popular sport in Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, Laos, Philippines and Indonesia. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (785x615, 65 KB) Summary The ball used for Sepak Takraw (Kick-Volley in asia) Myself picture (hand of a friend who want to be anonymous) Siren-Com 07:37, 4 December 2005 (UTC) Licensing File links The following pages link to... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (785x615, 65 KB) Summary The ball used for Sepak Takraw (Kick-Volley in asia) Myself picture (hand of a friend who want to be anonymous) Siren-Com 07:37, 4 December 2005 (UTC) Licensing File links The following pages link to... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Genera Calamus Calospatha Ceratolobus Daemonorops Eremospatha Eugeissonia Korthalsia Laccosperma Metroxylon Myrialepis Oncocalamus Pigafetta Plectocomia Plectomiopsis Raphia Zalacca Zalacella Rattan (from the Malay rotan), is the name for the roughly six hundred species of palms in the tribe Calameae, native to tropical regions of Africa, Asia and Australasia. ... Soccer redirects here. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ...


In Thailand, the game is simply called Takraw. It is also thuck thay (Lao: "twine" and "kick"), or sepak takraw (Malay: "kick" and "takraw" from Thai) [1] The Malay language, also known locally as Bahasa Melayu, is an Austronesian language spoken by the Malay people who are native to the Malay peninsula, southern Thailand, Singapore and parts of Sumatra. ...


Similar games include footbag net, footvolley, jianzi and sipa. Footbag net is a sport in which players kick a footbag over a five-foot-high net. ... Footvolley is a sport which combines field rules that are based on those of volleyball with ball-touch rules taken from football. ... Shuttlecock Player Jianzi (毽子) is a traditional Asian shuttlecock game which originated in ancient China in the Han dynasty. ... Sipa is the Philippines national and traditional native sport which dates backs to the Pre-Hispanic period. ...

Contents

History

Sepak takraw was almost definitely based on the Chinese game of cuju (a name which also means "kick ball"). The sport would have been brought in through early trade and had already become popular in Malaysia and Thailand by the early 1400s. Back then it was called Takraw in Thai or Sepak Raga (literally "kick rattan ball", because the ball is made of rattan) in Malay and played mainly by men and boys standing in a circle, kicking the ball back and forth between them. Cuju (Chinese: ) is an ancient sport similar to footbal (soccer), played in China as well as Korea and Japan. ... Genera Calamus Calospatha Ceratolobus Daemonorops Eremospatha Eugeissonia Korthalsia Laccosperma Metroxylon Myrialepis Oncocalamus Pigafetta Plectocomia Plectomiopsis Raphia Zalacca Zalacella Rattan (from the Malay rotan), is the name for the roughly six hundred species of palms in the tribe Calameae, native to tropical regions of Africa, Asia and Australasia. ... Not to be confused with the Malayalam language, spoken in India. ...


In Bangkok, murals at Wat Phra Kaew depict the Hindu god Hanuman playing takraw in a ring with a troop of monkeys. Other historical accounts mention the game earlier during the reign of King Naresuan of Ayutthaya. The game remained in its circle form for hundreds of years, and the modern version of sepak takraw began taking shape in Thailand sometime during early 1800s. In 1829, the Siam Sports Association drafted the first rules for takraw competition. Four years later, the association introduced the volleyball-style net and held the first public contest. Within just a few years, takraw was introduced to the curriculum in Siamese schools. The game became such a cherished local custom that another exhibition of volleyball-style takraw was staged to celebrate the kingdom’s first constitution in 1933, the year after Thailand abolished absolute monarchy. By the 1940s, the net version of the game had spread throughout Southeast Asia, and formal rules were introduced. In the Philippines the sport was called "Sipa", in Myanmar, or Burma, it was dubbed "Chinlone", in Laos "Kator", "cầu mây" in Vietnam and in Indonesia "Raga." [1] Location within in Thailand Coordinates: , Country Settled Ayutthaya Period Founded as capital 21 April 1782 Government  - Type Special administrative area  - Governer Apirak Kosayothin Area  - City 1,568. ... Western side of Wat Phra Kaew, viewed from within the grounds of the Grand Palace The Wat Phra Kaew (English Temple of the Emerald Buddha, Thai: ; full official name Wat Phra Sri Rattana Satsadaram, Thai: ) is regarded as the most sacred Buddhist temple in Thailand. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... This article is about a divine entity in Hinduism. ... Approximate worldwide distribution of monkeys. ... King Naresuan the Great (1555 - April 25, 1605, also sometimes called Naret or the Black Prince, Thai สมเด็จพระนเรศวรมหาราช) was king of Siam (today Thailand) from 1590 until his death in 1605. ... Ayutthaya (full name Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, Thai พระนครศรีอยุธยา; also spelled Ayudhya) city is the capital of Ayutthaya province in Thailand. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Absolute monarchy is a monarchical form of government where the monarch has the power to rule his or her land or country and its citizens freely, with no laws or legally-organized direct opposition in force. ... Sipa is the Philippines national and traditional native sport which dates backs to the Pre-Hispanic period. ... Chinlone (Burmese: ; MLCTS: ; IPA: ) is the traditional sport of Myanmar (Burma). ...


International play is now governed by ISTAF, the International Sepak Takraw Federation. The King's Cup Sepaktakraw World Championship is held every year in Thailand.


Rules and Regulation

Measurements of court and equipment often vary among tournaments and organizations that operate from a recreational to a competitive level; international competitive rules and regulation are used in this section.


The Court

Area of 13.4 m x 6.1 m free from all obstacles up to the height of 8 m measured from the floor surface (sand and grass court not advisable).


The width of the lines bounding the court should not be more than 0.04 m measured and drawn inwards from the edge of the court measurements. All the boundary lines should be drawn at least 3.0m away from all obstacles.


The Center line of 0.02 m should be drawn equally dividing the right and left court.


At the corner of each at the Center Line, the quarter circle shall be drawn from the sideline to the Center Line with a radius of 0.9 m measured and drawn outwards from the edge of the 0.9 m radius.


The Service Circle of 0.3 m radius shall be drawn on the left and on the right court, the center of which is 2.45 m from the back line of the court and 3.05 m from the sidelines, the 0.04 m line shall be measured and drawn outward from the edge of the 0.3 m radius.[2]


The Net

The net shall be made of fine ordinary cord or nylon with 0.06 m to 0.08 m mesh. The net shall be 0.7m in width and not shorter than 6.10 m in length and taped at 0.05 m from tape double at the top and sideline, called boundary tape.


The net shall be edged with 0.05 m tape double at the top and the bottom of the net supported by a fine ordinary cord or nylon cord that runs through the tape and strain over and flush with the top of the posts. The top of the net shall be 1.52 m (1.42 m for women) in height from the center and 1.55 m (1.45 m for women's) at the posts.[2]


The Sepaktakraw Ball

A sepak takraw ball made out of rattan.
A sepak takraw ball made out of rattan.

The Sepaktakraw ball shall be spherical in shape, made of synthetic fiber or one woven layer. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Sepaktakraw ball without synthetic rubber covering must consist of the following characteristics; Have 12 holes. Have 20 intersections. Has a circumference measuring not less from 0.42 meters (1 ft 4+12 in) to 0.44 m (1 ft 5+14 in) for men and from 0.43 m (1 ft 5 in) to 0.45 m (1 ft 5+34 in) for women. Has a weight that range from 170 grams (6 oz) to 180 grams (6.3 oz) for men and from 150 grams (5.3 oz) to 160 grams (5.6 oz) for women.


The ball can be in plain single colour, multi-colour, and luminous colours, but not in any colour that will impair the performance of the players.


The Sepak takraw ball can also be constructed of synthetic rubber or soft durable material for covering the ball, for the purpose of softening the impact of the ball on the player’s body. The type of material and method used for constructing the ball, or for covering the ball with rubber or soft durable covering must be approved by ISTAF before it can be used for any competition.


All world, international, regional competitions sanctioned by ISTAF, including but not limited to, the Olympic Games, World Games,Commonwealth Games, Asian Game and SEA Games, must be played with ISTAF approved sepaktakraw balls.[2]


The Players

A match is played by two Regus (teams), each consisting of three players.


One of the three players shall be at the back and he is called a “Tekong”. the player of sepak is 4 on 4


The other two players shall be in front, one on the left and the other on the right. The player on the left is called a “Left Inside” and the player on the right is called a “Right Inside”.[2]


The Start of Play and Service

The side that must serve first shall start the first set. The side that wins the first set shall have the options of “Choosing Service”.


The throw must be executed as soon as the Referee calls the score. If either of the "Inside" players throws the ball before the Referee calls the score, it must be a re thrown and a warning will be given to the thrower.


During the service, as soon as the Tekong kicks the ball, all the players are allowed to move about freely in their respective courts.


The service is valid if the ball passes over the net, whether it touches the net or not, and inside the boundary of the two net tapes and boundary lines of the opponent’s court.[2]


Faults

The Serving Side During Service

The "Inside" player who is making service throws, plays about with the ball (throwing up the ball, bumping, giving to other "Inside" player, etc.) after the call of score has been made by the Referee.


The "Inside" player lifts his feet or steps on the line or crosses over or touches the net while throwing the ball.


The “Tekong” jumps off the ground to execute the service.


The “Tekong” does not kick the ball on the service throw.


The ball touches his own player before crossing over the opponent court.


The ball goes over the net but falls outside the court.


The ball does not cross to the opponent side.


A player uses his hand or hands, or any other part of his arms to facilitate the execution of a kick even if the hand or arm does not directly touches the ball, but it touches other objects or surfaces instead when doing so.


Serving And Receiving Side During Service

Creating distracting manner or noise or shouting at his opponent.


For Both Sides During The Game

Any player who touches the ball on the opponent side.


Any part of player's body crosses over into opponent's court whether above or under the net except during the follow-through of the ball.


Playing the ball more than 3 times in succession.


The ball touches the arm


Stopping or holding the ball under the arm, between the legs or body.


Any part of the body or player's outfits e.g. shoes, jersey, head band etc., touches the net or the post or the Referee's chairs or falls into the opponent's side.


The ball touches the ceiling, roof or the wall (any objects).[2]


Scoring System

When either serving side or receiving side commits a fault, a point is awarded to the opponent side including making next service.


The winning point for a set is 21 points, unless the point is tied at 20-20, the set shall be decided on a difference of two points, up to a ceiling of 25 points. When the score is tied at 20-20, the Referee announces “Setting up to 25 points”.


The game is played in 2 sets with 2-minute rest in between.


If each "Regu" wins one set, the game shall be decided in the third set called "Tiebreak" with 15 points unless the point is tied at 14-14, then the set shall be decided on a difference of two points, up to a ceiling of 17 points. When the score is tied at 14-14, the Referee announces “Setting up to 17 points”.


Before the tiebreak set takes place, the Referee shall toss a disc or coin, and the side winning the toss shall have the option of “Choosing Service”. The change of sides takes place when one “Regu” reaches 8 points.[2]


Hoop Takraw

Hoop takraw is a variation being played in Thailand, where it is known as lawd buang or lawd huang. The play is similar to circle takraw, especially in its ballet-like moves and the emphasis on creativity, but the goal is to put the ball into a basket-shaped net with three hoop openings in a triangular formation suspended some five to six metres above ground. Each team is given an allotted time, usually 20 or 30 minutes, to put the ball in the basket as many times and as gracefully as they can. Like circle takraw, points are awarded for difficulty, so players break out their full repertoires of such expert manoeuvres as cross-legged jump kicks and other artistic kicks behind the back or with the sole of the foot as well as strikes with the elbows, shoulders and forehead.


Another version of the sport involves the use of bamboo scoops to both toss and catch a ball in a simple game of "catch." For other uses, see Bamboo (disambiguation). ...


References

  1. ^ a b Shawn Kelley (N/A). Takraw: A Traditional Southeast Asian Sport.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g International Sepaktakraw Federation (ISTAF) (2004). Sepaktakraw: Laws of the Game.
  • International Sepaktakraw Federation (ISTAF) (2004). Sepaktakraw: Laws of the Game. Retrieved on July 29, 2007.
  • Shawn Kelley (N/A). Takraw: A Traditional Southeast Asian Sport. Retrieved on July 30, 2007.

External links

  • English Sepak Takraw Association
  • USA Takraw Association
  • Gajah Emas Sepak takraw is ... exciting, fantastic, unusual, energetic, acrobatic, is an action Malaysia tradition games!
  • TAKRAW - A Traditional Southeast Asian Sport
  • Sepak Takraw Information (Association Berlin)
  • Takraw in Thailand
  • Rattan takraw balls
  • Sepak Takraw in Cologne and Europe
  • Videos: [1] and [2]
  • Sepak Takraw video - shot in Thailand



  Results from FactBites:
 
Sepak takraw (370 words)
Sepak takraw is originated and a popular ballgame in South East Asia.
Takraw ball is made of rattan or very hard plastic weighed approximately 250 grams.
The sepak takraw court and net are of the same standards as for badminton matches.
e-Magazine -- TAKRAW - A Traditional Southeast Asian Sport (1778 words)
Countless variations of takraw are played throughout the region, but the basic objective of each is to keep the hollow, grapefruit-sized ball from touching the ground by keeping it airborne with the feet, knees, head, shoulders, elbows — or nearly every part of the body except the hands.
Hoop takraw, known locally as lawd buang or lawd huang, is similar to circle takraw, especially in its ballet-like moves and the emphasis on creativity, but the goal is to put the ball into a basket-shaped net with three hoop openings in a triangular formation suspended some five to six metres above ground.
Like circle takraw, points are awarded for difficulty, so players break out their full repertoires of such expert manoeuvres as cross-legged jump kicks and other artistic kicks behind the back or with the sole of the foot as well as strikes with the elbows, shoulders and forehead.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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