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History of Japan ImageMetadata File history File links Satsuma-samurai-during-boshin-war-period. ... The written history of Japan began with brief appearances in Chinese history texts from the first century CE. However, archaeological research indicates that people were living on the islands of Japan as early as the upper paleolithic period. ...

Glossary The Japanese Paleolithic ) covers a period from around 100,000 [citation needed] to 30,000 BCE, when the earliest stone tool implements have been found, to around 12,000 BCE, at the end of the last Ice-age, which corresponds to the beginning of the Mesolithic Jomon Period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Jomon Period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yayoi Period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... The Nara period ) of the history of Japan covers the years from about AD 710 to 784. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Heian Period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Kamakura Period. ... The Kemmu Restoration (建武の新政; Kemmu no shinsei) was a period of Japanese history that occurred from 1333 to 1336 AD. It marks the three year period between the fall of the Kamakura shogunate and the rise of the Ashikaga shogunate, when Emperor Go-Daigo attempted to re-established Imperial control (but... The Muromachi period (Japanese: 室町時代, Muromachi-jidai, also known as the Muromachi era, the Muromachi bakufu, the Ashikaga era, the Ashikaga period, or the Ashikaga bakufu) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1336 to 1573. ... The Nanboku-cho period (Japanese: 南北朝時代, nanbokuchō-jidai, South and North courts period), also known as the Northern and Southern Courts period, spanning from 1336 to 1392, was a period that occurred during the early years of the Muromachi period of Japans history. ... The Azuchi-Momoyama period (Japanese: 安土桃山時代, Azuchi-Momoyama-jidai) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1568 to 1600. ... The Namban trade(Japanese: 南蛮貿易, nanban-bōeki, southern barbarian trade) or The Nanban trade period (Japanese: 南蛮貿易時代, nanban-bōeki-jidai, southern barbarian trade period) in Japanese history extends from the arrival of the first Europeans to Japan in 1543, to their near-total exclusion from the archipelago in 1650, under... The Edo period ), also called Tokugawa period, is a division of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1868. ... The Late Tokugawa Shogunate (Japanese: Bakumatsu) is the period between 1853 and 1867 during which Japan ended its isolationist foreign policy called sakoku and modernized from a feudal shogunate to the Meiji government. ... The Meiji period ) denotes the 45-year reign of Emperor Meiji, running from 8 September 1868 (in the Gregorian calendar, 23 October 1868) to 30 July 1912. ... The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to enormous changes in Japans political and social structure. ... The Taishō period (Japanese: 大正時代, Taishō-jidai, period of great righteousness) is a period in the history of Japan dating from 30 July 1912 to 25 December 1926. ... Japan participated in World War I ) from 1914-1917, as one of the major Entente Powers, played an important role in securing the sea lanes in South Pacific and Indian Oceans against the Kaiserliche Marine. ... The Shōwa period (Japanese: 昭和時代, Shōwa-jidai, period of enlightened peace) was the time in Japanese history when Emperor Hirohito reigned over the country, from December 25, 1926 to January 7, 1989. ... Japanese nationalism, also known as Japanese imperialism or Japanese nationalist ideology is a generic title, referring to a complex series of patriotic and nationalist ideas held in Japan. ... Capital Tokyo Language(s) Japanese Political structure Military occupation Military Governor of Japan  - 1945-1951 Douglas MacArthur  - 1951-1952 Matthew Ridgway Emperor  - 1926-1989 Hirohito Historical era Post-WWII  - Surrender of Japan August 15, 1945  - San Francisco Peace Treaty April 28, 1952 At the end of the Second World War... History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei Following the end of the Allied occupation in 1952... Heisei (Japanese: 平成) is the current era name in Japan. ... The Eco history of Japan is one of the most studied for its spectacular growth, first in the period from the late twentieth century that saw Japan become a world power and then again after the devastation of the Second World War when the island nation rose to become the... The history of education in Japan dates back at least to the sixth century, when Chinese learning was introduced at the Yamato court. ... The military history of Japan is characterized by a long period of feudal wars, followed by domestic stability, and then foreign conquest. ... The naval history of Japan traces back to early interactions with states on the Asian continent at the beginning of the medieval period, and reached a peak of activity during the 16th and 17th century at a time of cultural exchange with European powers during the Nanban trade period. ... This is the glossary of Japanese history including historical figures, events, places, policies and others. ...

The Warring States period (戦国時代 sengoku jidai?) was a time of social upheaval, political intrigue, and nearly constant military conflict in Japan that lasted roughly from the middle of the 15th century to the beginning of the 17th century. Sengoku was a time of nearly constant military conflict in Japan from the middle 15th to the early 17th century. ...


Although the Ashikaga shogunate had retained the structure of the Kamakura bakufu and instituted a warrior government based on the same social economic rights and obligations established by the Hōjō with the Jōei Code in 1232, it failed to win the loyalty of many daimyo, especially those whose domains were far from Kyoto. As trade with China grew, the economy developed, and the use of money became widespread as markets and commercial cities appeared. This, combined with developments in agriculture and small-scale trading, led to the desire for greater local autonomy throughout all levels of the social hierarchy. As early as the beginning of the 15th century, suffering and misery caused by natural disasters such as earthquakes and famines often served to trigger armed uprisings by farmers weary of debt and taxes. The Ashikaga shogunate (Jp. ... This wooden Kongorikishi statue was created during the Kamakura shogunate during 14th century Japan. ... The Hōjō clan (北条氏) in the history of Japan was a family of regents of the Kamakura Shogunate. ... // Canonization of Saint Anthony of Padua, patron of lost items Pope Gregory IX driven from Rome by a revolt, taking refuge at Anagni First edition of Tripitaka Koreana destroyed by Mongol invaders Battle of Agridi 15 June 1232 Arnolfo di Cambio, Florentine architect (died 1310) Manfred of Sicily (approximate date... Daimyo Matsudaira Katamori visits the residence of a retainer. ... Kyoto )   is a city in the central part of the island of HonshÅ«, Japan. ... An earthquake is the result of a sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ...


The Ōnin War (1467–1477), a conflict rooted in economic distress and brought on by a dispute over shogunal succession, is generally regarded as the onset of the Sengoku-jidai. The "eastern" army of the Hosokawa family and its allies clashed with the "western" army of the Yamana, and fighting in and around Kyoto lasted for nearly 11 years, after which it spread to outlying provinces. Marker at location of outbreak of ÅŒnin War The ÅŒnin War (応仁の乱 ÅŒnin no Ran) was a civil war from 1467 to 1477 during the Muromachi period in Japan. ... The Hosokawa clan is one of strong Shugo Daimyo. ... The Yamana clan of the Inaba province, were descendants of Minamoto Yoshishige. ...

Contents

Gekokujō

Not surprisingly, this upheaval resulted in the further weakening of central authority, and throughout Japan, regional lords, or daimyo, rose to fill the vacuum. In the course of this power shift, well established clans such as the Takeda and the Imagawa, who had ruled under the authority of both the Kamakura and Muromachi bakufu, were able to expand their spheres of influence. There were many, however, whose positions eroded and were eventually usurped by more capable underlings. This phenomenon of social meritocracy, in which capable subordinates rejected the status quo and forcefully overthrew an emaciated aristocracy, became known as gekokujō (下克上), which literally means "the underling conquers the overlord." One of the earliest instances of this phenomenon was Hōjō Sōun, who rose from relatively humble origins and eventually seized power in Izu province in 1493. Building on the accomplishments of Sōun, the Hōjō clan remained a major power in the Kantō region until its subjugation by Toyotomi Hideyoshi late in the Sengoku period. Other notable examples include the supplanting of the Hosokawa by the Miyoshi, the Shiba by the Oda, and the Toki by the Saito. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Imagawa Yoshimoto (今川義元, 1519-June 12, 1560) was one of the leading daimyo (feudal lords) in early Sengoku period Japan. ... Statue of Hōjō Sōun exists in front of Odawara station (Odawara, Japan) Hōjō Sōun 1432—September 8, 1519) was the first head of the late Hōjō clan, one of the major powers in Japans Sengoku period. ... 1493 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a Japanese name; the family name is Toyotomi Toyotomi Hideyoshi ) February 2, 1536 or March 26, 1537 – September 18, 1598) was a sengoku daimyo who unified Japan. ... The Hosokawa clan is one of strong Shugo Daimyo. ... The Miyoshi clan of the Awa Province of Shikoku entered the Sengoku Period as retainers under that of the Hosokawa. ... Common nicknames Shiba Country of origin Japan Classification Breed standards (external links) FCI, AKC, ANKC, KC(UK), NZKC The Shiba Inu is the smallest of the six original and distinct Japanese breeds of dog. ... Oda may refer to: Oda, Shimane, a city in Japan Oda, Harem, a room in a harem Oda (magazine), Turkish literary magazine Oda, a German slang-word for or The Oda clan, a Japanese feudal clan from the Sengoku period Oda, a Japanese family name A Norwegian female given name... The Toki clan ) was a powerful clan that ruled in Japan from the Kamakura Period to the Edo Period. ... Saito clan was a Japanese clan of Mino province following the Sengoku period of the 16th century. ...


Well organized religious groups also gained political power at this time by uniting farmers in resistance and rebellion against the rule of the daimyo. The monks of the Buddhist True Pure Land sect formed numerous Ikkō-ikki, the most successful of which, in Kaga Province remained independent for nearly 100 years. A silhouette of Buddha at Ayutthaya, Thailand. ... Jōdo Shinshū (淨土眞宗 True Pure Land School), also known as Shin Buddhism, is a branch of Pure Land Buddhism which was founded in Japan by the monk Shinran. ... The Japanese Ikkō-ikki ), literally single-minded leagues, were mobs of peasant farmers, monks, Shinto priests and local nobles, who rose up against samurai rule in the 15th and 16th centuries. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ...


Unification

Main article: Azuchi-Momoyama period
Battle of Kawanakajima in 1561
Battle of Kawanakajima in 1561

After nearly a century and a half of political instability and warfare, Japan was on the verge of unification by Oda Nobunaga, who had emerged from obscurity in the province of Owari (present-day Aichi Prefecture) to dominate central Japan, when in 1582 Nobunaga himself fell victim to the treachery of one of his own generals, Akechi Mitsuhide. This in turn provided Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who had risen through the ranks from ashigaru (footsoldier) to become one of Nobunaga's most trusted generals, with the opportunity to establish himself as Nobunaga's successor. Hideyoshi eventually consolidated his control over the remaining daimyo, and although he was ineligible for the title of Seii Taishogun because of his common birth, ruled as Kampaku. The Azuchi-Momoyama period (Japanese: 安土桃山時代, Azuchi-Momoyama-jidai) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1568 to 1600. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (590x828, 167 KB) An old Japanese painting depicting a battle during the Sengoku period [1] File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Battles of Kawanakajima Sashimono ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (590x828, 167 KB) An old Japanese painting depicting a battle during the Sengoku period [1] File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Battles of Kawanakajima Sashimono ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the company, see Aichi Steel Corporation. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This is a Japanese name; the family name is Toyotomi Toyotomi Hideyoshi ) February 2, 1536 or March 26, 1537 – September 18, 1598) was a sengoku daimyo who unified Japan. ... Minamoto no Yoritomo, the first shogun of the Kamakura shogunate Shōgun )   is supreme general of the samurai,a military rank and historical title in Japan. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ...


When, in 1598, Hideyoshi died without leaving a capable successor, the country was once again thrust into political turmoil, and this time it was Tokugawa Ieyasu who took advantage of the opportunity. Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I. April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu The Tokugawa clan crest This is a Japanese name; the family name is Tokugawa Tokugawa Ieyasu (previously spelled Iyeyasu) January 31, 1543 – June 1, 1616) was the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan which ruled from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until...

Japan in the late 16th century
Japan in the late 16th century

Hideyoshi had on his deathbed appointed a group of the most powerful lords in Japan — Tokugawa, Maeda, Ukita, Uesugi, Mōri — to govern as the Council of Five Regents until his infant son, Hideyori, came of age. An uneasy peace lasted until the death of Maeda Toshiie in 1599. Thereafter, Ishida Mitsunari accused Ieyasu of disloyalty to the Toyotomi name, precipitating a crisis that led to the Battle of Sekigahara. Generally regarded as the last major conflict of the sengoku-jidai, Ieyasu's victory at Sekigahara marked the end of the Toyotomi reign. Three years later, Ieyasu received the title Seii Taishogun, and established Japan's final shogunate, which lasted until the Meiji Restoration in 1868. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 621 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (930 × 898 pixel, file size: 102 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 621 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (930 × 898 pixel, file size: 102 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The council of five regents, also known as the five Tairō (五大老 go-tairō), was formed by Toyotomi Hideyoshi to rule Japan in the place of his son, Hideyori, until such time as he came of age. ... Year 1599 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants Forces loyal to Toyotomi Hideyori, many clans from Western Japan Forces of Tokugawa Ieyasu, Clans of Eastern Japan Commanders Ishida Mitsunari, Mōri Terumoto, others Tokugawa Ieyasu, others Strength 81,890 88,888 Casualties At least 40,000 dead Otani Yoshitsugu Shimazu Toyohisa Unknown; but not excessive The Battle... The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to enormous changes in Japans political and social structure. ...


Notable people

Famous Sengoku Daimyo

The contrasting personalities of the three leaders who contributed the most to Japan's final unification—Nobunaga, Hideyoshi, and Ieyasu—are encapsulated in a series of three well known senryu: This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a Japanese name; the family name is Toyotomi Toyotomi Hideyoshi ) February 2, 1536 or March 26, 1537 – September 18, 1598) was a sengoku daimyo who unified Japan. ... Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu The Tokugawa clan crest This is a Japanese name; the family name is Tokugawa Tokugawa Ieyasu (previously spelled Iyeyasu) January 31, 1543 – June 1, 1616) was the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan which ruled from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until... Senryū (川柳, literally river willow) is a Japanese form of short poetry similar to haiku in construction: three lines with 17 or fewer syllables in total. ...

  • Nakanunara, koroshiteshimae, hototogisu (If the cuckoo does not sing, kill it.)
  • Nakanunara, nakashitemiseyou, hototogisu (If the cuckoo does not sing, coax it.)
  • Nakanunara, nakumadematou, hototogisu (If the cuckoo does not sing, wait for it.)

Nobunaga, known for his ruthlessness, is the subject of the first; Hideyoshi, known for his resourcefulness, is the subject of the second; and Ieyasu, known for his perseverance, is the subject of the third verse.


Other notable daimyos include:

Bronze statue representing Takeda Shingen (left) and Uesugi Kenshin (right). Nagano, Japan
Bronze statue representing Takeda Shingen (left) and Uesugi Kenshin (right). Nagano, Japan

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (1603 × 1075 pixel, file size: 351 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (1603 × 1075 pixel, file size: 351 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Uesugi Kenshin February 18, 1530—April 19, 1578) was a warlord who ruled Echigo province in the Sengoku Period of Japan. ... Azai Nagamasa (浅井 長政 Azai Nagamasa) (1545 - August 28, 1573) was a son of Azai Hisamasa, from whom he took over in. ... Chōsokabe Motochika ) (1538–July 11, 1599) was a sengoku daimyo in Japan. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Statue of Hōjō Sōun exists in front of Odawara station (Odawara, Japan) Hōjō Sōun 1432—September 8, 1519) was the first head of the late Hōjō clan, one of the major powers in Japans Sengoku period. ... Imagawa Yoshimoto (今川義元, 1519-June 12, 1560) was one of the leading daimyo (feudal lords) in early Sengoku period Japan. ... Maeda Toshiie Maeda Toshiie (前田 利家 Maeda Toshiie; January 15, 1539 - April 27, 1599) was one of the leading generals of Oda Nobunaga following the Sengoku period of the 16th century extending to the Azuchi-Momoyama period. ... Mōri Motonari , 1497-1571) was a prominent daimyō in the west ChÅ«goku region during the Sengoku period of the 16th century. ... Saito Dosan (æ–Žè—¤ 道三 1494-1556) was the epitome of the daimyo that dramatically rose and also fell from power in Sengoku period Japan. ... Sanada Masayuki (真田 昌幸), (1544 (1547?) - 1608 (June 4, 1611?)) is the son of Sanada Yukitaka. ... Shimazu Yoshihiro (島津義弘; August 21, 1535-August 30, 1619) was the second son of Shimazu Takahisa and younger brother of Shimazu Yoshihisa. ... Tachibana Ginchiyo (1569-1602) the head of the Japanese clan of Tachibana during the Sengoku Period of the 16th century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Uesugi Kenshin February 18, 1530—April 19, 1578) was a warlord who ruled Echigo province in the Sengoku Period of Japan. ... Ukita Hideie (宇喜多秀家, 1573-1655) was the daimyo of Bizen and Mimasaka provinces (modern Okayama Prefecture), and one of the council of Five Elders appointed by Toyotomi Hideyoshi. ...

Other notable individuals

This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... FÅ«ma Kotarō (風魔小太郎) was the name adopted by the leader of the FÅ«ma clan ) of ninja during the Sengoku era of Japan. ... A portrait of Hattori Hanzō Hattori Hanzō ) (1541 – 1596), also known as Masanari or Masashige ), the son of Hattori Yasunaga, was a head of clan from Iga region of Japan, famous for its Ninja clan. ... Honda Tadakatsu (本多忠勝, 1548 – December 3, 1610), also called Honda Heihachirō (本多平八郎), was a general in the service of Tokugawa Ieyasu. ... Ii Naomasa (井伊 直政) (March 4, 1561 - March 24, 1602) was a general under the Sengoku period Daimyo, and later Shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu. ... Ishida Mitsunari (石田 三成 Ishida Mitsunari 1560 - November 6, 1600) was a samurai who led the West side in the Battle of Sekigahara. ... Naoe Kanetsugu ) (1560-1619) a notable retainer of the japanese clan of Uesugi following the Sengoku period to the Edo period of the 17th century of Japan. ... Maeda Keiji (前田 慶次 1543 - 1612) A feudal Japanese warrior who lived during the Sengoku period to the Azuchi-Momoyama period of the 16th century. ... It has been suggested that Timeline of Miyamoto Musashis life be merged into this article or section. ... Mori Ranmaru More Ranmaru (Born Mori Nagasada) was the son of Mori Yoshinari in the Mino region northeast of present day Nagoya. ... Oda Nobutada (織田信忠)(1557-1582) was the eldest son of Oda Nobunaga, and a samurai who fought in many battles of the Sengoku period. ... Saika Magoichi, also called Saiga Magoichi or in western order Magoichi Saiga/Saika, was the name given to the leader of the Saika Mercenaries. ... Sanada Saemon-no-Suke Yukimura , 1567 May 7, 1615) was a Japanese samurai, second son of the Sengoku period daimyo Sanada Masayuki (真田昌幸). His proper name was Sanada Nobushige (真田信繁), named after Takeda Shingens younger brother Takeda Nobushige (武田信繁), who was a brave and respected warrior. ... Sasaki Kojirō also known as GanryÅ« Kojirō) (1585? - April 13, 1612) was a prominent Japanese swordsman, born in the Fukui Prefecture, from the Sengoku and early Edo period. ... Shibata Katsuie (柴田 勝家) or Gonroku (-権六)(1530 – 1583) was a Japanese military commander during the Sengoku Period who served Oda Nobunaga. ... Shima Sakon (????-1600) a retainer of the japanese clans of Tsutsui and Toyotomi during the Azuchi-Momoyama Period of the 17th century. ...

In modern culture

Just as with the American "Wild West," the sengoku-jidai has been used as the setting for myriad books, films, anime, and video games. See the article Cultural references to the Sengoku period for more. This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


References

  • Mikiso Hane, Modern Japan: A Historical Survey (Westview Press, 1992)

External links

  • Sengoku Expo: Japanese Design, Culture in the Age of Civil Wars held in Gifu Prefecture, 2000-2001

< Nanboku-chō | History of Japan | Edo period > Anthony J. Bryant (born 1961 in Franklin, Indiana, USA) is the author of four books for Osprey Military Publishing on samurai history. ... The Nanboku-cho period (Japanese: 南北朝時代, nanbokuchō-jidai, South and North courts period), also known as the Northern and Southern Courts period, spanning from 1336 to 1392, was a period that occurred during the early years of the Muromachi period of Japans history. ... The written history of Japan began with brief appearances in Chinese history texts from the first century CE. However, archaeological research indicates that people were living on the islands of Japan as early as the upper paleolithic period. ... The Edo period ), also called Tokugawa period, is a division of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1868. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Muromachi period - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1485 words)
The Muromachi period (Japanese: 室町時代, Muromachi-jidai, also known as the Muromachi era, the Muromachi bakufu, the Ashikaga era, the Ashikaga period, or the Ashikaga bakufu) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1336 to 1573.
The period marks the governance of the Muromachi shogunate, also known as the Ashikaga shogunate, which was officially established in 1336 by the first Muromachi shogun Ashikaga Takauji.
The ensuing period of Ashikaga rule (1336–1573) was called Muromachi for the district of Kyoto in in which its headquarters were located after the third shogun Ashikaga Yoshimitsu established his residence there in 1378.
Sengoku period - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (793 words)
The Sengoku period (Japanese: 戦国時代, Sengoku-jidai) or Warring States period, was a period of civil war in the history of Japan that spans from the middle 15th to the early 17th centuries.
Sengoku jietai, made in 1979, and Sengoku jietai 1549 was set in the Sengoku period when soldiers of the JGSDF were transported through a time portal.
This period is the latter part of the Muromachi and the entire Azuchi-Momoyama periods of the History of Japan.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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