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Encyclopedia > Selkirk
Selkirk
Gaelic: Sailcirc/Sailcraig
Scots: Selkirk
Location
OS grid reference: NT471288
Statistics
Population: 5,839
Administration
Council area: Scottish Borders
Constituent country: Scotland
Sovereign state: United Kingdom
Other
Police force: Lothian and Borders Police
Lieutenancy area: Roxburgh, Ettrick and Lauderdale
Former county: Selkirkshire
Post office and telephone
Post town: SELKIRK
Postal district: TD7
Dialling code: 01750
Politics
Scottish Parliament: Tweeddale, Ettrick and Lauderdale
UK Parliament: Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk
European Parliament: Scotland
Scotland

The Royal Burgh of Selkirk is a town in the Scottish Borders, which lies on the River Ettrick, a tributary of the River Tweed, famous for its salmon fishing. At the time of the 2001 census, its population was 5,839. Selkirk is a royal burgh in the Scottish Borders. ... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Scots is an Anglic variety spoken in Scotland, where it is sometimes called Lowland Scots to distinguish it from Scottish Gaelic spoken by some in the Highlands and Islands (especially the Hebrides). ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils. They have been in use since April 1, 1996, under the provisions of the Local Government etc. ... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... Constituent country is an official term used to describe three of the four principal component parts of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK): England; Scotland; Wales. ... Motto: , traditionally rendered in Scots as Wha daur meddle wi me?[1] and in English as No one provokes me with impunity. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Lothian and Borders Police are the police force for the Lothian and Borders regions of Scotland, including Edinburgh, Galashiels and Livingston. ... The Lieutenancy areas of Scotland are the areas used for the ceremonial lords-lieutenant, the monarchs representatives, in Scotland. ... Roxburgh, Ettrick and Lauderdale (Rosbrog, Eadaraig agus Srath Labhdair in Scottish Gaelic) is a Lieutenancy area of Scotland. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Selkirkshire or the County of Selkirk is a registration county of Scotland. ... This is a list of post towns in the United Kingdom, sorted by the postal area (the first part of the outward code of a postcode). ... This is a list of the post towns of the United Kingdom sorted in postcode sequence. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... The Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) has 73 constituencies, each electing one Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) by the first past the post system of election, and eight additional member regions, each electing seven additional member MSPs. ... Tweeddale, Ettrick and Lauderdale is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ... Scotland is divided into 59 constituencies of the United Kingdom Parliament - 19 Burgh constituencies and 40 County constituencies. ... Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk was created as a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the general election of 2005. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... Motto: , traditionally rendered in Scots as Wha daur meddle wi me?[1] and in English as No one provokes me with impunity. ... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... The River Ettrick flows through the villages of Ettrick, Ettrickbridge and the historic town of Selkirk in the Scottish Borders. ... There are other rivers with this name: see Tweed River The River Tweed at Abbotsford, near Melrose The River Tweed at Coldstream The River Tweed (156 kilometres or 97 miles long) flows primarily through the Borders region of Scotland. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ...


Selkirk may not be the largest burgh in the Scottish Borders, but it possesses a great amount of history, tradition and spirit;it was formerly the county town of Selkirkshire. A sign in Linlithgow, Scotland. ... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... A county town is the capital of a county in Ireland or the United Kingdom. ... Selkirkshire or the County of Selkirk is a registration county of Scotland. ...


The people of the town - 'Souters', named after the town's traditional shoe cobblers - are proud followers of all things related to the Borders, from their Common Riding and rugby. Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... The Hawick Common-Riding is the first of the Border festivals and celebrates both the capture of an English Flag in 1514 by the youth of Hawick at a place called Hornshole and the ancient custom of riding the marches or boundaries of the common land. ... A scrum Rugby union (often referred to as rugby, union or football) is one of the two codes of rugby football, the other being rugby league. ...


Selkirk's ancient past is one which encompasses many aspects of Scottish history, from being the site of the first Border abbey, to where William Wallace was declared Guardian of Scotland. The names of Bonnie Prince Charlie, The Marquess of Montrose and the Outlaw Murray have all contributed to create the town's unique historical tapestry. Stirling Castle has stood for centuries atop a volcanic crag defending the lowest ford of the River Forth. ... An abbey (from the Latin abbatia, which is derived from the Syriac abba, father), is a Christian monastery or convent, under the government of an Abbot or an Abbess, who serve as the spiritual father or mother of the community. ... William Wallace Sir William Wallace (c. ... The Guardians of Scotland were the de facto heads of state of Scotland during the First Interregnum of 1290-1292, and the Second Interregnum of 1296-1306. ... For the U.S. politician, see Charles E. Stuart Bonnie Prince Charlie Charles Edward Louis Philip Casimir Stuart (December 31, 1720 – January 31, 1788), was the exiled claimant to the thrones of Ireland, commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. Charles was the son of James Francis Edward Stuart, the... The title of Duke of Montrose was created in the peerage of Scotland in 1488 for David Lindsay. ... The incident of the Outlaw Murray refusing homage to the King, but finally giving way on being installed as Sheriff of Ettrick Forest, has long been considered by many to be merely picturesque legend perpetuated by the well known ballad. ...


Founded in the 6th century, the settlement of Selkirk was originally named Seleschirche, meaning 'Kirk in the Forest'. In 1113, King David I granted Selkirk large amounts of land, referring to Selkirk as 'mine old town'. This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ... Kirk can mean church in general or The Church of Scotland in particular. ... Events Pierre Abélard opens his school in Paris End of Kyanzitthas reign in Myanmar Alaungsithus reign begins in Myanmar Suryavarman Is reign begins in the Khmer Empire Bridlington Priory founded Births August 24 - Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou (died 1151) Stefan Nemanja, Serbian Grand Zupan Deaths... King David I (or Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim; also known as Saint David I or David I the Saint) (1084 – May 24, 1153), was King of Scotland from 1124 until his death, and the youngest son of Malcolm Canmore and of Saint Margaret (sister of Edgar Ætheling). ...


Selkirk grew on woollen industry, although now the town is perhaps best known for its glass manufacturing and bannocks. It has a museum and art gallery, and is associated with Mungo Park and Walter Scott. See Alpaca wool, Angora wool (of rabbits) and Cashmere wool (of goats) for information about other wools. ... Glass can be made transparent and flat, or into other shapes and colors as shown in this sphere from the Verrerie of Brehat in Brittany. ... A bannock is a bread thinner than a scone. ... The National Gallery in London, a famous museum. ... The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... Mungo Park Title illustration of (1859) Mungo Park (September 10, 1771 – 1806) was a Scottish explorer of the African continent. ... Portrait of Sir Walter Scott, by Sir Edwin Henry Landseer Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet (15 August 1771 – 21 September 1832) was a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet popular throughout Europe during his time. ...


In common with other Border towns, Selkirk town has an annual Common Riding, always held on the second Friday after the first Monday in June, at which the following Scots song can be heard: The Hawick Common-Riding is the first of the Border festivals and celebrates both the capture of an English Flag in 1514 by the youth of Hawick at a place called Hornshole and the ancient custom of riding the marches or boundaries of the common land. ... Scots is an Anglic variety spoken in Scotland, where it is sometimes called Lowland Scots to distinguish it from Scottish Gaelic spoken by some in the Highlands and Islands (especially the Hebrides). ...

Up Wi' The Souters O' Selkirk
'It's up wi' the Souters o' Selkirk,
An doun wi' the Earl o' Hume,
An here's tae a' the braw laddies
That weirs the single-soled shuin.
It's up wi' the Souters o' Selkirk,
For they are baith trusty an' leal,
An up wi' the lads o' the Forest,
An doun wi' the Merse tae the deil.'

Souters are entitled to wear the town colours of 'True Blue and Scarlett' on Common Riding day, as well as the colours chosen by the Standard Bearer, which change annually and can be worn by anyone. Berwickshire is a committee area of the Scottish Borders Council and a Lieutenancy area of Scotland, on the border with England. ... A standard-bearer is a person (soldier or civilian) who bears an emblem called an ensign or standard, i. ...

Contents

O' Floddenfield!

Statue of Fletcher out side Victoria Halls, Selkirk
Statue of Fletcher out side Victoria Halls, Selkirk

Selkirk men fought with William Wallace at Stirling Brig and Falkirk, and also with Robert the Bruce at Bannockburn, but it is Selkirk's connection with The Battle of Flodden (1513), her ready response to the call of the King, the brave bearing of her representatives on the fatal field, and the tragic return of the sole survivor, provide the Royal Burgh with its proudest memories. Image File history File links Vickyhalls. ... Image File history File links Vickyhalls. ... William Wallace Sir William Wallace (c. ... Combatants Scotland England Commanders Andrew de Moray William Wallace John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey Strength 6,400 infantry and 180 cavalry 6,350 infantry and 350 cavalry Casualties ? ? The Battle of Stirling Bridge was one of the series of conflicts of the Wars of Scottish Independence. ... Combatants Scotland England Commanders William Wallace Edward I of England Strength 500 cavalry, 9,500 infantry 2,000 cavalry, 12,000 infantry. ... Robert I, King of Scots, usually known as Robert the Bruce (July 11, 1274 – June 7, 1329, reigned 1306 – 1329), was, according to a modern biographer (Geoffrey Barrow), a great hero who lived in a minor country. ... Combatants Kingdom of Scotland Kingdom of England Commanders Robert Bruce Edward II of England Strength about 9,000 17,000-20,000 Casualties unknown unknown The Battle of Bannockburn (June 23, 1314 – June 24, 1314) was a significant Scottish victory in the Wars of Scottish Independence. ... Western side of the battlefield, looking south-south-east from the monument erected in 1910 (marked red in the key below). ... 1513 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The annual Common Riding commemorates Selkirk's main link with a turbulent past every June, Up to 500 riders saddle their horses at daybreak to commemorate the age-old custom of riding the Burgh Marches, the land of the town. The Casting of the Colours remembers the story of when over eighty men from the town marched to Flodden Field with their king, James IV. The Hawick Common-Riding is the first of the Border festivals and celebrates both the capture of an English Flag in 1514 by the youth of Hawick at a place called Hornshole and the ancient custom of riding the marches or boundaries of the common land. ... Mark or march (or various plural forms of these words) are derived from the Frankish word marka (boundary) and refer to an area along a border, e. ... James IV (March 17, 1473-September 9, 1513) - King of Scots from 1488 to 1513. ...


Only one returned, "Fletcher", bearing a blood-stained English flag, belonging to the Macclesfield regiment. On his return he cast the captured English standard around his head to describe that all others had perished in battle. This article is about a flag referring to the particular region of the U.K. properly known as England. ... Macclesfield is a market town in Cheshire, England with a population of around 50,688 (2001 census for Macclesfield urban sub-area). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Sir Walter Scott and Selkirk

Walter Scott's Courtroom in Selkirk Market Square
Walter Scott's Courtroom in Selkirk Market Square

Selkirk's past also includes the legendary Sir Walter Scott, and this is one connection that the town has put to great use. Image File history File links Scottscourtroom. ... Image File history File links Scottscourtroom. ... For the first Premier of Saskatchewan see Thomas Walter Scott Sir Walter Scott (August 14, 1771 - September 21, 1832) was a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet popular throughout Europe. ...


'Scott's Selkirk' transforms the town into a bustling Georgian Christmas market town, when all of the shops, pubs, restaurants and locals take on the atmosphere and appearance of the days of Scott.


With holly adorning shops and buildings, locals dressed in period costumes and horse and carriages travelling up and down, it is a special event worth taking in. Species Ilex ambigua - Sand Holly Ilex amelanchier - Swamp Holly Ilex aquifolium - European Holly Ilex bioritsensis Ilex buergeri Ilex canariensis - Small-leaved Holly Ilex cassine - Dahoon Holly Ilex centrochinensis Ilex ciliospinosa Ilex colchica Ilex collina Ilex corallina Ilex coriacea Ilex cornuta - Chinese Holly Ilex crenata - Japanese Holly Ilex cyrtura Ilex decidua...


The two-day winter festival also features street theatre and historical re-enactments from professional actors, stalls selling many local festive goods, musical performances and children's shows. It has been suggested that Street performer be merged into this article or section. ...


The Selkirk Grace

The Selkirk Grace, is a grace (prayer said before a meal) attributed to Robert Burns: Grace is a name for any of a number of short prayers said before a meal to bless and give thanks for it, in folk practices of Christianity and other religions. ... Robert Burns, preeminent Scottish poet Robert Burns (January 25, 1759 – July 21, 1796) was a poet and songwriter. ...


Today it is mainly used on special occasions, such as Burns' Night. A Burns Supper is a celebration of the life and poetry of the poet Robert Burns, author of the version of the Scots song Auld Lang Syne, which is generally sung at Hogmanay and other New Year celebrations around the English-speaking world. ...

Some hae meat and canna eat,
And some wad eat that want it,
But we hae meat and we can eat,
Sae the Lord be thankit.

William Wallace

"See approach proud Edwards power, Chains and slavery!"

The words of Robert Burns conjure up a vivid picture of the troubled times in which the forefathers of the Borderland lived at the end of the thirteenth century. Robert Burns, preeminent Scottish poet Robert Burns (January 25, 1759 – July 21, 1796) was a poet and songwriter. ... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...


After the death of Alexander III the hopes of the people of Scotland rested with the Maid of Norway. Her untimely death in 1290 left the country at the mercy of the English King. From that date until the crown was awarded to John Balliol, King Edward prosecuted remorselessly his schemes against the independence of Scotland. Alexander III (September 4, 1241 – March 19, 1286), King of Scots, also known as Alexander the Glorious, ranks as one of Scotlands greatest kings. ... Motto: , traditionally rendered in Scots as Wha daur meddle wi me?[1] and in English as No one provokes me with impunity. ... This article is about Margaret, Queen of Scots. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... John Balliol and his wife. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch wiener that was gigantic (1. ... Motto: , traditionally rendered in Scots as Wha daur meddle wi me?[1] and in English as No one provokes me with impunity. ...


The Scottish King, as a vassal in respect of his lands in England, paid homage to Edward and, in return, suffered many humiliations at the hands of his overlords. Scottish nobles and gentry, many from the Borderland, were compelled to swear allegiance to the "proud usurper." The list of monarchs of Scotland (Scottish Gælic: Rìghrean agus Bàn-rìghrean na h-Alba) concerns the Kingdom of Scotland (Alba) which was first unified as a state by Kenneth I of Scotland in 843. ... Look up vassal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For a description of the medieval homage ceremony see commendation ceremony Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ... The Peerage of Scotland is the division of the British Peerage for those peers created in the Kingdom of Scotland before 1707. ...


However, this reign of tyranny and oppression was destined to be overthrown by one of humble birth. From the West of Scotland came William Wallace, a Scots knight who led his countrymen in resistance to English domination. A tyrant (from Greek τυραννος) is a usurper of rightful power, possessing absolute power and ruling by tyranny. ... Motto: , traditionally rendered in Scots as Wha daur meddle wi me?[1] and in English as No one provokes me with impunity. ... William Wallace Sir William Wallace (c. ... Motto: , traditionally rendered in Scots as Wha daur meddle wi me?[1] and in English as No one provokes me with impunity. ...


No part of Scottish Borderland, perhaps, is more definitely associated with Wallace than the Forest of Ettrick. It was in Selkirk, supported by nobles and clergy, he was declared Guardian of the Kingdom of Scotland. Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Capital Edinburgh Government Monarchy Head of State King of Scots Parliament Parliament of Scotland Currency Pound Scots This article is about the historical state called the Kingdom of Scotland (843-1707). ...


Today in the 'forest kyrk' (the Kirk of the Forest), referred to in ancient times as the church of St Mary of the Forest, visitors can now visit this ancient site, which is also the final resting place to several relatives of Franklin D. Roosevelt, the 32nd President of the United States of America. Roosevelt, whose ancestors came from the area, named his famous dog Fala, after the nearby village of Falahill. Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1969 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... FDR with Fala at Warm Springs, Georgia. ... Falahill is a village in the Scottish Borders, at NT387563. ...


The Hungarian Connection

Annually, In March, Hungarians from across Scotland gather in the town's County Hotel for their national day celebrations. It was from the balcony of The County in December 1856, that Hungary's great patriot Lajos Kossuth addressed a large massed meeting of Borders sympathisers. It was part of a grand tour of the UK in which Kossuth raised awareness and funds for his subjugated Magyar people. Eight years earlier, he had led a Magyar revolution against the tyranny of Hapsburg rule. A plaque now stands outside The County Hotel, commemorating this occasion, and a wreath is laid every year to commemorate the struggle of the Magyar people 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Lajos (Louis) Kossuth (Ľudovít Košút in Slovakian) (Monok, September 19, 1802 – Turin, March 20, 1894) was a Hungarian lawyer, politician, and for a time was regent. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ...


Notable people of the Town

Mungo Park Monument located on Selkirk High Street
Mungo Park Monument located on Selkirk High Street

Image File history File linksMetadata Mungopark. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mungopark. ... Mungo Park Title illustration of (1859) Mungo Park (September 10, 1771 – 1806) was a Scottish explorer of the African continent. ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years). ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa. ... For the Texas Governor, see Jim Hogg James Hogg James Hogg (1770 - November 21, 1835) was a Scottish poet and novelist who wrote in both Scots and English. ... 1770 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Bobby Johnstone (1929 in Selkirk - 22 August 2001 in Selkirkshire, Scotland) was a Scottish football player, mainly remembered as one of the Hibs In Hibs rich history, no group of players has ever achieved greater fame than the Famous Five: Gordon Smith, Bobby Johnstone, Lawrie Reilly, Eddie Turnbull and Willie... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Largest win Scotland 9 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 March 1878) Worst defeat Uruguay 7 - 0 Scotland (Basel, Switzerland; 19 June 1954) World Cup Appearances 8 (First in 1954) Best result Round 1, all European Championship Appearances 2 (First... Sandy (Alexander) McMahon (1871- January 25, 1916) was a Celtic Football Club player. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Largest win Scotland 9 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 March 1878) Worst defeat Uruguay 7 - 0 Scotland (Basel, Switzerland; 19 June 1954) World Cup Appearances 8 (First in 1954) Best result Round 1, all European Championship Appearances 2 (First... Celtic Football Club (pronounced seltik, in IPA) AIM: CCP is a Scottish football club, competing in the Scottish Premier League, the highest form of competition in Scotland. ... For the former National Basketball Association player, see Andrew Lang (basketball). ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... James Marr Brydone Born in Selkirk, Scotland (1779 – 1866) was a Scottish surgeon who served in the British fleet at the Battle of Trafalgar. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Combatants United Kingdom First French Empire, Spain Commanders The Viscount Nelson † Pierre Charles Silvestre de Villeneuve Strength 27 ships of the line 33 ships of the line Casualties 449 dead 1,214 wounded 4,480 dead 2,250 wounded 7,000 captured 21 ships captured 1 ship blown up The... James Brown (J.B. Selkirk) (1832 – 1904) Scottish Poet and Essayist James Brown is now widely recongnised as one of Scotlands finest 19th century poets and essayists. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Peter Blake, British actor, was born on December 8, 1951, in Selkirk, Scotland. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... Rae Hendrie (b. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Tom Scott (October 12, 1854 – 31 July 1806) Born in Selkirk, Scotland Scott is often refered to as on of Britains greatest water-colourists. ... John Rutherford (1792 - 1866) was a U.S. political figure. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
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Selkirk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1134 words)
The Royal Burgh of Selkirk is a town in the Scottish Borders.
Selkirk's ancient past is one which encompasses many aspects of Scottish history, from being the site of the first Border abbey to where William Wallace, was declared Guardian of Scotland.
Selkirk's past also includes the legendary Sir Walter Scott, and this is one connection that the town has put to great use.
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