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Encyclopedia > Selim I
Selim I
Sultan of the Ottoman Empire
Portrait of the Sultan
Reign 15121520
Coronation 1512
Full name Yavuz Sultan Selim
Titles Ottoman Sultan,
Kayser-i Rûm (Roman Caesar),
Caliph,
The Servant of The Two Holy Shrines
Predecessor Bayezid II
Successor Suleiman I
Royal House House of Osman
Father Bayezid II

Selim I (Ottoman: سليم الأول, Turkish:I.Selim) (also known as "the Grim" or "the Brave", Yavuz in Turkish, the long name is Yavuz Sultan Selim)(October 10, 1465September 22, 1520) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1512 to 1520.[1] Selim carried the empire to the leadership of the Sunni branch of Islam by his conquests in Europe,Asia and Africa. He represents a short lasted but sudden change in the expansion policy of the empire which was working mostly against the West and the Beyliks before his reign.[2] Sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic title, with several historical meanings. ... For other uses, see Ottoman (disambiguation). ... Selim I of the Ottomans This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Year 1512 (MDXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1512 (MDXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... The Ottoman Dynasty (or the Imperial House of Osman) ruled the Ottoman Empire from 1281 to 1923, beginning with Osman I (not counting his father, ErtuÄŸrul), though the dynasty was not proclaimed until 1383 when Murad I declared himself sultan. ... Caesar (plural Caesars), Latin: Cæsar (plural Cæsares), is a title of imperial character. ... For main article see: Caliphate First of all, this system is invalid and is unlawful Islamicly. ... Sultan Beyazid II Bayezid II (1447/48 – May 26, 1512) (Arabic: بايزيد الثاني) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1481 to 1512. ... Suleiman I (Ottoman Turkish: Sulaymān, Turkish: ; formally Kanuni Sultan Süleyman in Turkish) (November 6, 1494 – September 5/6, 1566), was the tenth and longest‐serving Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, reigning from 1520 to 1566. ... House of Osman is the name to the administrative structure of the Ottoman Dynasty, which is part of state organization of the Ottoman Empire, however directly linked to dynasty. ... Sultan Beyazid II Bayezid II (1447/48 – May 26, 1512) (Arabic: بايزيد الثاني) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1481 to 1512. ... Ottoman Turkish (Turkish: or , Ottoman Turkish: ‎ ) was the variant of the Turkish language that was used as the administrative and literary language of the Ottoman Empire. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events July 13 - Battle of Montlhéry Troops of King Louis XI of France fight inconclusively against an army of the great nobles organized as the League of the Public Weal. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Ottoman (disambiguation). ... Year 1512 (MDXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The term Western world, the West or the Occident (Latin occidens -sunset, -west, as distinct from the Orient) [1] can have multiple meanings dependent on its context (e. ... Anatolian beyliks (also Turkmen beyliks, Tevâif-i mülûk (in Ottoman Turkish) were small Turkish emirates or muslim principalities (beylik) governed by tribal beys, which were founded in several locations of Anatolia as of the end of the 13th century. ...

Contents

War with the East

Selim attacked and destroyed the Mamluk Sultanate at the Battles of Marj Dabiq and al-Raydaniyya, which led to the annexation of Syria, Palestine and Egypt. He also extended Ottoman power to the holy cities of Mecca and Medina. The holiest sites of the Islamic world - the Great Mosque in Mecca and the Mosque of the Prophet in Medina - fell under his dominion when the Turks took Egypt and her Arabian provinces from the Mamluks. Rather than style himself the Hakim ul Haremeyn, or The Ruler of The Two Holy Shrines, he accepted the more pious title Khadim ul Haremeyn, or The Servant of The Two Holy Shrines.[3] [4] After the conquest of Egypt and the Holy Cities, Selim induced the vanquished Al-Mutawakkil III (1509–17), the last ruler of the Abbasid dynasty, to formally surrender the title of Caliph and its emblems, the sword and the mantle of Muhammad.[5] Having thus cemented his claim to the position of the "Guardian of the Faithful", Selim waged war against Persia, whose ruler Shah Ismail I claimed to be Caliph as well.[citation needed] The successful campaign which followed was a triumph for Selim, whose firmness and courage overcame the pusillanimity and insubordination of the Janissaries, the household troops of the Ottoman dynasty.[6][7] An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Holy Land or Palestine Showing not only the Old Kingdoms of Judea and Israel but also the 12 Tribes Distinctly, and Confirming Even the Diversity of the Locations of their Ancient Positions and Doing So as the Holy Scriptures Indicate, a geographic map from the studio of Tobiae Conradi... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Masjid al Haram Al-Masjid al-Haram (Arabic: ) is a very large mosque in the city of Makkah (Mecca). ... Masjid al-Nabawi or Mosque of the Prophet is the second holiest mosque in the Islamic world. ... Al-Mutawakkil III, reigned 1508 to 1516, and 1517, was the last caliph of the Abbasid dynasty. ... Abbasid Caliphate (Abbasid Khalifat) and contemporary states and empires in 820. ... For main article see: Caliphate First of all, this system is invalid and is unlawful Islamicly. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... Shah Ismail I, the founder of Safavid Dynasty of Iran pictured at battle against Abul-khayr Khan in a scene from the Tarikh-i alam-aray-i Shāh Ismāil Abul-Mozaffar bin Sheikh Haydar bin Sheikh Junayd SafawÄ« (Persian: - Azerbaijani: ) (July 17, 1487 - May 23, 1524), Shah... The Janissaries comprised infantry units that formed the Ottoman sultans household troops and bodyguard. ...

Success of Selim's Campaigns

During his rule, Selim expanded the 2,500,000 km² of Ottoman land to 6,500,000 km². After completely filling the royal treasury, he reportedly locked it with his own seal and decreed that "he who will fill the treasury more than this, may use his seal to lock it." The treasury remained locked with Selim's seal until the collapse of the Empire 400 years later.

Death and Legacy

After his return from his Egyptian campaign, Selim began to prepare an expedition against Rhodes. This campaign was cut short when he was overtaken by sickness and died in the ninth year of his reign. He was about fifty-five years of age. It is said that Selim succumbed to sirpence, a skin infection which he developed during his long campaigns on horseback. (Sirpence was an anthrax infection sometimes seen among leatherworkers and others who worked with livestock) Some historians claim that he was poisoned by the doctor tending to his infection.[8] Rhodes (Greek: Ρόδος Rhódhos; Italian Rodi; Ladino: Rodi or Rodes; Ottoman Turkish: Rodos) is the largest of the Dodecanese islands in terms of both land area and population, situated in eastern Aegean Sea. ... Anthrax bacteria. ...

Poetry

Selim was a distinguished poet who wrote both Turkish and Persian verse under the nickname mahlas Selimi; collections of his Persian poetry are extant today.[9] In one of his poems, he wrote; Persian literature is literature written in Persian, or by Persians in other languages. ...

A carpet is large enough to accommodate two sufis, but the world is not large enough for two Kings. Sufism (Arabic تصوف taṣawwuf) is a system of esoteric philosophy commonly associated with Islam. ...

Yavuz Sultan Selim

Titles

After claiming the Caliphate, Selim assumed the title Malik ul-Barreyn, wa Khakan ul-Bahrayn, wa Kasir ul-Jayshayn, wa Khadim ul-Haramayn - that is, King of the Two Lands (continents Europe and Asia), Khaganof the Two Seas ( Mediterranian and Indian Seas), Conqueror of the Two Armies ( European and Safavid armies), and Servant of the Two Holy Shrines. This title alludes to his dominions in Africa and Asia (namely, Egypt, Anatolia, and much of the Fertile Crescent), his control over the Mediterranean and Black seas, his defeat of both the Mamluk and Safavid armies, and his guardianship of the shrines of Mecca and Medina. Khagan or Great Khan (Old Turkic , alternatively spelled Chagan, Khaghan, Kagan, Qagan, Qaghan), is a title of imperial rank in the Mongolian and Turkic languages equal to the status of emperor and someone who rules a Khaganate (empire, greater than an ordinary Khan, but often referred to as such in...

Personality

By most accounts, Selim had a fiery temper and full-blooded personality.

References

  1. ^ Yavuz Sultan Selim Biography Retrieved on 2007-09-16
  2. ^ The Rise of the Turks and the Ottoman Empire Retrieved on 2007-09-16
  3. ^ Yavuz Sultan Selim Government Retrieved on 2007-09-16
  4. ^ The Classical Age, 1453-1600 Retrieved on 2007-09-16
  5. ^ The Rise of the Turks and the Ottoman Empire Retrieved on 2007-09-16
  6. ^ Yavuz Sultan Selim Government Retrieved on 2007-09-16
  7. ^ Selim I, Ottoman Sultan 2007-09-16
  8. ^ Yavuz Sultan Selim Biography Retrieved on 2007-09-16
  9. ^ Necdet Sakaoğlu, Bu Mülkün Sultanları, pg.127

  Results from FactBites:
 
Selim I - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (443 words)
Selim I (1465 September 22, 1520; also known as "the Grim" or "the Brave", Yavuz in Turkish) was the sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1512 to 1520.
The campaign which followed was a triumph for Selim, whose firmness and courage overcame the pusillanimity and insubordination of the Janissaries, the household troops of the Ottoman dynasty.
After Selim became master of the holy cities of Islam and captured Egypt along with the person of Al-Mutawakkil III, the last Caliph of the Abbasid dynasty who resided there, Selim induced him to formally surrender the title of caliph as well as its outward emblems, the sword and the mantle of the prophet.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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