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Encyclopedia > Sejanus
Lucius Aelius Sejanus
20 BC31

Roman As depicting Tiberius, struck in 31, Augusta Bilbilis. The reverse reads Augusta Bilbilis Ti(berius) Caesare L(ucius) Aelio Seiano, marking the consulship of Seianus in that year.
Place of birth Volsinii, Etruria
Place of death Rome
Allegiance Roman Empire
Years of service 1 BC31
Rank Praetorian prefect
Unit Praetorian Guard
Other work Consul of the Roman Empire in 31

Lucius Aelius Seianus (or Sejanus) (20 BCOctober 18, 31 AD) was an ambitious soldier, friend and confidant of the Roman Emperor Tiberius. He served as Prefect of the Praetorian Guard from 14 AD until his death in 31. For a time he was the most influential and feared citizen of Rome and nearly succeeded in deposing Tiberius as Emperor. In 31, his intrigues were uncovered and Sejanus was executed along with his followers. Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC - 20s BC - 10s BC 0s 10s 20s 30s Years: 25 BC 24 BC 23 BC 22 BC 21 BC 20 BC 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15... Events Aelius Sejanus named co-Consul to the Emperor Tiberius Naevius Sutorius Macro becomes the leader of the Praetorian Guard after Sejanus is executed. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The As (plural Asses) was a bronze, and later copper, coin used during the Roman Republic and Roman Empire, named after the homonymous weight unit (12 unciae = ounces), but not immune to weight depreciation. ... Augusta Bilbilis was a city founded by the Romans in the province of Hispania Tarraconensis. ... Velzna was an Etruscan city in central Italy, the last Etruscan city to be taken by the Romans. ... The area covered by the Etruscan civilzation. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC - 0s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 6 BC 5 BC 4 BC 3 BC 2 BC 1 BC 1 2 3 4 // Events Births December 25 - Jesus (died about... Events Aelius Sejanus named co-Consul to the Emperor Tiberius Naevius Sutorius Macro becomes the leader of the Praetorian Guard after Sejanus is executed. ... Praetorian prefect (Latin Praefectus praetorio) was the constant title of a high office in the Roman state that changed fundamentally in nature. ... The Praetorian Guard of Augustus - 1st century. ... This article is about the highest office of the Roman Republic. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC - 20s BC - 10s BC 0s 10s 20s 30s Years: 25 BC 24 BC 23 BC 22 BC 21 BC 20 BC 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Aelius Sejanus named co-Consul to the Emperor Tiberius Naevius Sutorius Macro becomes the leader of the Praetorian Guard after Sejanus is executed. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Tiberius Caesar Augustus, born Tiberius Claudius Nero (November 16, 42 BC – March 16 AD 37), was the second Roman Emperor, from the death of Augustus in AD 14 until his own death in 37. ... Praetorian prefect (Latin Praefectus praetorio) was the constant title of a high office in the Roman state that changed fundamentally in nature. ... The Praetorian Guard of Augustus - 1st century. ... Events First year of tianfeng era of the Chinese Xin Dynasty. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5...

Contents

Family

Sejanus was born in 20 BC at Volsinii, in Etruria, to the family of Cosconia Lentuli Maluginensis and Lucius Seius Strabo,[1][2] an equestrian who became Praetorian Prefect under Augustus. By Roman custom he was known as Aelius Sejanus after his adoption into the more prestigious Aelian gens. The Aelii counted two consuls among their family, Quintus Aelius Tubero (11 BC) and Sextus Aelius Catus (4 AD), who was the father of Aelia Paetina, future wife of Claudius. Sejanus' uncle was Junius Blaesus, a military commander who became proconsul of Africa in 21 AD and earned triumphal honors by crushing the rebellion of Tacfarinas.[3] Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC - 20s BC - 10s BC 0s 10s 20s 30s Years: 25 BC 24 BC 23 BC 22 BC 21 BC 20 BC 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15... Velzna was an Etruscan city in central Italy, the last Etruscan city to be taken by the Romans. ... The area covered by the Etruscan civilzation. ... Lucius Seius Strabo or Lucius Aelius Strabo was a Roman Knight who came from Vulsinii (modern Orvieto, Italy). ... An equestrian (Latin eques, plural equites - also known as a vir egregius, lit. ... Augustus Caesar Caesar Augustus (Latin: IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·AVGVSTVS)¹ (23 September 63 BC – 19 August AD 14), known earlier in his life as Gaius Octavius or Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, was the first Roman Emperor and is traditionally considered the greatest. ... ... Aelius was the nomen of the ancient Roman gens Aelia. ... GENS is an open source emulator for the Sega Genesis (Sega Megadrive). ... Quintus Aelius Tubero was a Roman consul in 11 BC. He was most likely the father of Sextus Aelius Catus, who was himself consul in 4 AD. His granddaughter was Aelia Paetina, who married future Emperor Claudius in 28. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC 12 BC 11 BC 10 BC 9 BC 8 BC 7 BC 6 BC... Sextius Aelius Catus (consul of 4 AD) was father of Aelia Paetina, second wife of the emperor Claudius from 28 AD to about 31 AD (when Aelias adoptive brother Sejanus fell from power). ... For other uses, see 4 (disambiguation). ... Aelia Paetina (flourished first century) was the second wife of the future emperor Claudius. ... For other persons named Claudius, see Claudius (disambiguation). ... Quintus Junius Blaesus (? – 31 AD) was a Roman proconsul who governed the Africa Province from 21 to 23. ... For the Miocene ape, see Proconsul (genus) Under the Roman Empire a proconsul was a promagistrate filling the office of a consul. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... This article is about the year 21. ... A Roman Triumph was a civil ceremony and religious rite of ancient Rome, held to publicly honour the military commander (dux) of a notably successful foreign war or campaign and to display the glories of Roman victory. ... Tacfarinas was a Numidian military leader who rebelled against Rome. ...


According to the ancient historian Tacitus, Sejanus was also a former favourite of the wealthy Apicius,[1] whose daughter may have been Sejanus' first wife Apicata. With Apicata, he had three children,[4] two sons and one daughter: Strabo, Capito Aelianus and Junilla.[2] Marcus Gavius Apicius was a notorious Roman gourmet and lover of luxury who lived in the 1st century AD. He is sometimes mistakenly said to be the author of the Roman cookbook Apicius, which was actually compiled about 300 years later; there is in fact no early evidence that Apicius...


Rise to power

Praetorian Prefect

Roman imperial guard, bas-relief from the Julio-Claudian period. Sejanus rose to power as Prefect of the Praetorian guard.
Roman imperial guard, bas-relief from the Julio-Claudian period. Sejanus rose to power as Prefect of the Praetorian guard.

Little is known about the life Sejanus led prior to 14 AD, but according to Tacitus, he accompanied Gaius Caesar, adopted grandson of Augustus, during his campaigns in Armenia in 1 BC.[1] It was upon the accession of Tiberius in 14 AD, that Sejanus was appointed prefect of the Praetorian Guard as the colleague of his father Strabo, and began his rise to prominence. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bas relief is a method of sculpting which entails carving or etching away the surface of a flat piece of stone or metal. ... Template:Julio-Claudian Dynasty The Julio-Claudian Dynasty refers to the first five Roman Emperors: Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero. ... Praetorian prefect (Latin Praefectus praetorio) was the constant title of a high office in the Roman state that changed fundamentally in nature. ... The Praetorian Guard of Augustus - 1st century. ... Events First year of tianfeng era of the Chinese Xin Dynasty. ... Gaius Julius Caesar Vipsanianus (20 BC - AD 4), most commonly known as Gaius Caesar, was the oldest son of Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa and Julia the Elder. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC - 0s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 6 BC 5 BC 4 BC 3 BC 2 BC 1 BC 1 2 3 4 // Events Births December 25 - Jesus (died about... Tiberius Caesar Augustus, born Tiberius Claudius Nero (November 16, 42 BC – March 16 AD 37), was the second Roman Emperor, from the death of Augustus in AD 14 until his own death in 37. ... Praetorian prefect (Latin Praefectus praetorio) was the constant title of a high office in the Roman state that changed fundamentally in nature. ... The Praetorian Guard of Augustus - 1st century. ...


The Praetorian Guard was an elite unit of the Roman army which had been formed by Augustus in 27 BC, with the specific function to serve as a bodyguard to the emperor and members of the imperial family. Much more than a guard however, the Praetorians also managed the day-to-day care of the city, such as general security and civil administration.[5] Of political significance was the fact that their presence served as a constant reminder of the substantial armed force which served as the basis to the emperor's power.[5] Augustus was careful however to uphold the republican veneer of this regime, and only allowed nine cohorts to be formed (one less than in a normal Roman legion), which were inconspicuously scattered across various lodging houses in the city, and commanded by two prefects. The Roman army is the set of land-based military forces employed by the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and later Roman Empire as part of the Roman military. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC - 20s BC - 10s BC 0s 10s 20s 30s Years: 32 BC 31 BC 30 BC 29 BC 28 BC 27 BC 26 BC 25 BC 24 BC 23 BC 22... Bodyguards of Viktor Yushchenko (far left) after leaving Gdansk city hall. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus Roman provinces on the eve of the assassination of Julius Caesar, c. ... A cohort (from the Latin cohors, plural cohortes) is a fairly large military unit, generally consisting of one type of soldier. ... The Roman Legion (from Latin , from lego, legere, legi, lectus — to collect) is a term that can apply both as a transliteration of legio (conscription or army) to the entire Roman army and also, more narrowly (and more commonly), to the heavy infantry that was the basic military unit of...


When Strabo was assigned to the governorship of Egypt in 15 AD, Sejanus became the sole commander of the Praetorians and instigated reforms that helped shape the guard into a powerful tool of the principate.[6] In 20 the scattered encampments inside the city were centralized into a single garrison just outside Rome[7][8] and the number of cohorts was increased from nine to twelve,[5] one of which now held the daily guard at the palace. The practice of joint leadership between two prefects was abandoned, and Sejanus himself appointed the centurions and tribunes.[7] With these changes in effect, Sejanus now commanded the complete loyalty of a force of around 12,000 soldiers, all of which were at his immediate disposal. The facade of Augustus was no longer maintained, and Tiberius openly displayed the strength of the guard at parades.[9] A Roman governor was an official either elected or appointed to be the chief adminstator of Roman law throughout one or more of Ancient Romes many provinces. ... For other uses, see 15 (disambiguation). ... The Principate is, according to its etymological derivation from the Latin word princeps, meaning chief or first, the political regime dominated by such a political leader, whether or not he is formally head of state and/or head of government. ... Events Roman Empire Tiberias is built on the Sea of Galilee by Herod Antipas, in honour of Tiberius. ... Castra Praetoria are the ancient barracks (castra) of the Praetorian Guard of Imperial Rome. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law Tribune (from the Latin: tribunus; Greek form tribounos) was a title shared by 2-3 elected magistracies and other governmental and/or (para)military offices of the Roman Republic and Empire. ...


Feud with Drusus

Bust of Drusus the Younger, son of Tiberius. In a conspiracy that involved his own wife Livilla, Drusus was poisoned in 23 by agents of Sejanus.
Bust of Drusus the Younger, son of Tiberius. In a conspiracy that involved his own wife Livilla, Drusus was poisoned in 23 by agents of Sejanus.

In his capacity of Praetorian prefect Sejanus quickly became a trusted advisor to Tiberius. By 23 he already exerted a considerable influence over the emperor's decisions, who referred to Sejanus as "my partner in my toils".[7] By this time he had been raised to the rank of praetor, a position which was not normally granted to Romans of the equestrian class.[6] A statue had been erected in his honor in the Theatre of Pompey.[10] and in the Senate his followers were advanced with public offices and governorships.[7] However this privileged position caused resentment among the senatorial class and the imperial family, in particular earning him the enmity of Julius Caesar Drusus, Tiberius' son. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 479 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1254 × 1570 pixel, file size: 815 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Portrait of Julius Caesar Drusus (13 BC-23 AD). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 479 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1254 × 1570 pixel, file size: 815 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Portrait of Julius Caesar Drusus (13 BC-23 AD). ... Drusus the Younger, son of Tiberius. ... (Claudia) Livia Julia (Classical Latin: LIVIA•IVLIA[1]), most commonly known by her family nickname of Livilla (the little Livia) (circa 13 BC–AD 31) was the only daughter of Nero Claudius Drusus and Antonia. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law Praetor was a title granted by the government of Ancient Rome to men acting in one of two official capacities: the commander of an army, either before it was mustered or more typically in the field, or an elected... An equestrian (Latin eques, plural equites - also known as a vir egregius, lit. ... Artist rendition of the front exterior of the Theatre of Pompey The Theatre of Pompey (Latin Theatrum Pompeium, Italian: Teatro di Pompeo) is an ancient building of the Roman Republic era, built around 55 BC, once the worlds largest theater. ... The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. ... Drusus the Younger, son of Tiberius. ...


The history of Sejanus and Drusus dated back to at least 15 AD. That year a mutiny had broken out among legions posted in Pannonia and Germania. While his adopted son Germanicus restored order in Germania, Tiberius' own son Drusus was sent to quell the uprising in Pannonia, accompanied by Sejanus and two Praetorian cohorts.[11] In part due to what the soldiers believed to be bad omens, Drusus quickly managed to restore the stability in the army and publicly put the chief instigators to death. The camp was purged of mutineers by the Praetorians and the legions returned to the winter barracks.[12] Despite this success, the following years witnessed a growing animosity between Drusus and Sejanus. For other uses, see 15 (disambiguation). ... Mutiny is the act of conspiring to disobey an order that a group of similarly-situated individuals (typically members of the military; or the crew of any ship, even if they are civilians) are legally obliged to obey. ... The Roman Legion (from Latin , from lego, legere, legi, lectus — to collect) is a term that can apply both as a transliteration of legio (conscription or army) to the entire Roman army and also, more narrowly (and more commonly), to the heavy infantry that was the basic military unit of... Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. ... Map of the Roman Empire and the free Germania, Magna Germania, in the early 2nd century For other uses, see Germania (disambiguation). ... Germanicus Julius Caesar (24 May 15 BC–October 10, 19 AD) was a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty of the early Roman Empire. ... A cohort (from the Latin cohors, plural cohortes) is a fairly large military unit, generally consisting of one type of soldier. ... Examples of omens from the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493): natural phenomena and strange births. ... Basic ideal plan of a Roman castrum. ...


Since the accession of Tiberius Drusus had been systematically groomed as the successor of his father, successfully commanding legions in Illyricum in 18,[13] and sharing the consulship with Tiberius in 21.[14] In practice however it was still Sejanus who was the second man in the empire, and he was ambitious to further expand his power. As early as 20, Sejanus had sought to solidify his connection with the imperial family by betrothing his daughter Junilla to the son of Claudius, Claudius Drusus.[15] At the time the girl was only 4 years old but the marriage was nonetheless prevented when the boy accidentally died a few days later of asphyxiation.[16] The Roman Empire ca. ... Ë‘ This article is about the year 18. ... This article is about the year 21. ... For other persons named Claudius, see Claudius (disambiguation). ... Suffocation redirects here, for the band, see Suffocation (band). ...


When this failed it seems Sejanus turned his attention toward eliminating Drusus. By 23 the enmity between the two men had reached a critical point. During an argument Drusus had struck him with his fist,[4] and he openly lamented that "a stranger was invited to assist in the government while the emperor's son was alive".[17] With Tiberius already in his sixties, there was a real possibility of Drusus succeeding his father in the near future. To secure his position Sejanus secretly plotted against him and succeeded in seducing his wife Livilla.[4] With her as an accomplice Drusus was slowly poisoned and died of seemingly natural causes on September 13 23.[18] Events Rome Greek geographer Strabo publishes Geography, a work covering the world known to the Romans and Greeks at the time of Emperor Augustus - it is the only such book to survive from the ancient world. ... (Claudia) Livia Julia (Classical Latin: LIVIA•IVLIA[1]), most commonly known by her family nickname of Livilla (the little Livia) (circa 13 BC–AD 31) was the only daughter of Nero Claudius Drusus and Antonia. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Consolidation of power

Bust of Emperor Tiberius (Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen). During the twenties Tiberius became increasingly embittered with Roman politics and eventually withdrew to the island of Capri, leaving the administration largely in the hands of Sejanus.
Bust of Emperor Tiberius (Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen). During the twenties Tiberius became increasingly embittered with Roman politics and eventually withdrew to the island of Capri, leaving the administration largely in the hands of Sejanus.

The loss of his son was a major blow to Tiberius, both personally and politically. Over the years he had grown increasingly disillusioned with the position of princeps, and by sharing the tribunician powers with Drusus in 22 had prepared to relent some of his responsibilities in favour of his son.[19] With these hopes now dashed, Tiberius relied more than ever on Sejanus in matters of government, and looked toward the sons of Germanicus as future heirs.[18] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 440 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1656 × 2256 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 440 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1656 × 2256 pixel, file size: 1. ... Tiberius Caesar Augustus, born Tiberius Claudius Nero (November 16, 42 BC – March 16 AD 37), was the second Roman Emperor, from the death of Augustus in AD 14 until his own death in 37. ... The Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek is an art museum in Copenhagen, Denmark. ... Copenhagen (IPA: or ; Danish: IPA: ) is the capital of Denmark and the countrys largest city. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s Years: 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Sometimes the 20s is used as shorthand for the 1920s, the 1820s, or other such decades... Capri (Italian pronunciation Cápri, usual English pronunciation Caprí) is an Italian island off the Sorrentine Peninsula. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law Tribune (from the Latin: tribunus; Greek form tribounos) was a title shared by 2-3 elected magistracies and other governmental and/or (para)military offices of the Roman Republic and Empire. ... Gaius Sulpicius Galba becomes consul. ... Germanicus Julius Caesar (24 May 15 BC–October 10, 19 AD) was a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty of the early Roman Empire. ...


Germanicus himself had died in 19 in somewhat suspicious circumstances in Syria.[20] Following his death, his wife Agrippina returned to Rome with their five children and became increasingly involved with a group of senators who opposed the growing power of Sejanus. Her relations with Tiberius became increasingly fraught as she made it clear that she believed that he was responsible for the death of Germanicus.[21] The climate was further poisoned by the hatred that Tiberius' mother Livia Augusta felt for her, since Agrippina's ambition, to be the mother of emperors and thus Rome's first woman, was an open secret.[22] To Sejanus personally, Agrippina's sons Nero, Drusus and Gaius Caligula were considered a direct threat to his power.[22] For other uses, see number 19. ... Agrippina the Elder, wife of Germanicus (Vipsania) Agrippina (PIR1 V 463) 14 BC – 18 October AD 33), most commonly known as Agrippina Major or Agrippina the Elder, was one of the most prominent women in the Roman Empire in the early 1st century AD. She was the daughter of Marcus... Livia Drusilla, after 14 AD called Livia Augusta (Classical Latin: LIVIA•DRVSILLA, later LIVIA•AVGVSTA[1]) (58 BC-AD 29) was the wife of Caesar Augustus (also known as Octavian) and the most powerful woman in the early Roman Empire, acting several times as regent and being Augustus faithful advisor. ... Nero Julius Caesar Germanicus (AD 6–AD 30) was a close relative to the Roman Emperors of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. ... Drusus Caesar , also referred to as Drusus III, (7 - 33 AD) was a member of a noble family of ancient Rome. ... Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (August 31, 12 – January 24, 41), more commonly known by his nickname Caligula, was the third Roman Emperor and a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, ruling from 37 to 41 CE. During his brief reign, Caligula focused much of his attention on ambitious construction...


Meanwhile, Sejanus again attempted to marry into the Julio-Claudian family. Having divorced Apicata two years earlier he requested marriage with Livilla in 25, possibly with an eye towards placing himself, as an adopted Julian, in the position of a potential successor.[23] The Emperor denied this request, warning Sejanus that he was in danger of overstepping his rank.[24] Alarmed by this sudden denigration Sejanus changed his plans and began to isolate Tiberius from Rome. By fueling his paranoia towards Agrippina and the Senate he induced the emperor to withdraw to the countryside of Campania, which he did in 26, and finally to the island of Capri, where he would spend the remainder of his life until his death in 37.[25] Guarded by the Praetorians, Sejanus easily controlled all information that passed between Tiberius and the capital.[26] Template:Julio-Claudian Dynasty The Julio-Claudian Dynasty refers to the first five Roman Emperors: Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero. ... Events Han dynasty was restored in China as Liu Xiu proclaimed himself emperor, start of jiangwu era (->56). ... Julius (fem. ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Campania (disambiguation). ... Events Pontius Pilate is appointed as Prefect of Judaea. ... Capri (Italian pronunciation Cápri, usual English pronunciation Caprí) is an Italian island off the Sorrentine Peninsula. ... Events March 18 - The Roman Senate annuls Tiberius will and proclaims Caligula Roman Emperor. ...


Despite the withdrawal of Tiberius from Rome's political scene, the presence of his mother Livia seems to have checked Sejanus' overt power for a time. According to Tacitus, her death in 29 changed all that.[27] Sejanus began a series of purge trials of senators and wealthy equestrians in the city, removing those capable of opposing his power as well as extending the imperial (and his own) treasury. Networks of spies and informers brought the victims to trial with false accusations of treason, and many chose suicide over the disgrace of being condemned and executed.[28] Among those who perished were Asinius Gallus, a prominent senator and opponent of Tiberius who was linked to Agrippina's faction.[29] Agrippina herself and two of her sons, Nero and Drusus were arrested and exiled in 30, and later starved to death in suspicious circumstances.[30] Only Gaius, as the last remaining son of Germanicus, managed to survive the purges of Sejanus by moving to Capri with Tiberius in 31.[31] Livia Drusilla, after 14 AD called Livia Augusta (Classical Latin: LIVIA•DRVSILLA, later LIVIA•AVGVSTA[1]) (58 BC-AD 29) was the wife of Caesar Augustus (also known as Octavian) and the most powerful woman in the early Roman Empire, acting several times as regent and being Augustus faithful advisor. ... 29 is my favourite colour!!!!!!!! Events Romans captured Sofia. ... The Roman Senate (Lat. ... Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ... Traitor redirects here. ... Gaius Asinius Gallus was an ambitious Roman senator with family connections to the Julio-Claudian house. ... Exile (band) may refer to: Exile - The American country music band Exile - The Japanese pop music band Category: ... Events The Sermon on the Mount (according to proponents of the 33 theory) April 7 - Crucifixion of Jesus (suggested date, but it is also suggested that he died on April 3, AD 33) Births Quintus Petillius Cerialis, brother-in-law of Vespasian Deaths April 7 - Judas Iscariot, disciple of Jesus... A female child during the Nigerian-Biafran war of the late 1960s, shown suffering the effects of severe hunger and malnutrition. ... Events Aelius Sejanus named co-Consul to the Emperor Tiberius Naevius Sutorius Macro becomes the leader of the Praetorian Guard after Sejanus is executed. ...


Downfall

Denunciation

In 31, despite his equestrian rank, Sejanus shared the consulship with Tiberius in absentia,[32] and finally became betrothed to Livilla. The emperor had not been seen in Rome since 26. Sejanus was de facto ruler of the Roman Empire, and senators and equestrians openly courted his favour as if he were such.[33] His birthday was publicly observed and statues were being erected in his honour.[33] With most of the political opposition crushed, Sejanus felt his position was unassailable. As Cassius Dio describes: This article is about the highest office of the Roman Republic. ... For in absentia medical care, see Health care delivery. ... (Claudia) Livia Julia (Classical Latin: LIVIA•IVLIA[1]), most commonly known by her family nickname of Livilla (the little Livia) (circa 13 BC–AD 31) was the only daughter of Nero Claudius Drusus and Antonia. ... A childs first birthday party. ...

Sejanus was so great a person by reason both of his excessive haughtiness and of his vast power, that, to put it briefly, he himself seemed to be the emperor and Tiberius a kind of island potentate, inasmuch as the latter spent his time on the island of Capreae.[34]

Through years of crafty intrigues and indispensable service to the emperor, Sejanus had worked himself up to become the most powerful man in the empire. By the end of 31, he would be arrested, summarily executed and his body unceremoniously cast down the Gemonian stairs. Exactly how his sudden downfall came about is unclear. Ancient historians disagree about the nature of his conspiracy, whether it was Tiberius or Sejanus who struck first, and in which order the subsequent events transpired.[35] Modern historians consider it unlikely that Sejanus plotted to seize the imperial power for himself, and rather might have aimed at overthrowing Tiberius to serve as a regent to Tiberius Gemellus, son of Drusus, or possibly even Gaius Caligula.[35] Unfortunately the relevant section pertaining to this period in the Annals of Tacitus has been lost. According to Josephus however, it was Antonia, the mother of Livilla, who finally divulged the intrigues of Sejanus to Tiberius, in a detailed letter she dispatched to Capri in the care of her freedman Pallas.[36] The Gemonian Stairs (Scalae Gemoniae in Latin) were a flight of steps located in the ancient city of Rome. ... Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ... Tiberius Gemellus, son of Drusus the Younger and Livilla Tiberius Julius Caesar Nero , known as Tiberius Gemellus, (10 October AD 19–AD 37 or 38) was the son of Drusus and Livilla, the grandson of Tiberius, and the cousin of Gaius Caligula. ... Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (August 31, 12 – January 24, 41), more commonly known by his nickname Caligula, was the third Roman Emperor and a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, ruling from 37 to 41 CE. During his brief reign, Caligula focused much of his attention on ambitious construction... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 AD),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... Julia Antonia Cretica Minor (the younger) (31 January 36 BC - September/October 37 AD) or Antonia the Younger or simply known as Antonia. ... poop. ... Marcus Antonius Pallas (c. ...


Further details concerning Sejanus' fall are provided by Cassius Dio, writing nearly 200 years after the facts in his Roman History. It appears that, when Tiberius heard to which extent Sejanus had already usurped power in Rome, he immediately took steps to remove him from power, but realised that an outright condemnation could provoke Sejanus in attempting a coup against him.[28] Instead he addressed a number of contradictory letters to the Senate, some of which praised Sejanus and his friends, others which suddenly denounced them. Alternatingly, Tiberius announced he would arrive in Rome the very next day or claimed he was at the point of death.[37] The ensuing confusion was successful in alienating Sejanus from many of his supporters. With the intentions of the emperor no longer clear, it was now deemed a safer course of action at Rome to withdraw from overt support to Sejanus until the matter was clearly settled.[38] Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Look up Usurper in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... // A coup dÉtat (pronounced ), or simply coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, often through illegal means by a part of the state establishment — mostly replacing just the high-level figures. ...


When it became clear to Tiberius that popular support for Sejanus was not as strong as he had feared, his next step was to chose Naevius Sutorius Macro, a Praetorian officer, to replace Sejanus and accomplish his downfall.[39] On October 18 31, Sejanus was summoned to a Senate meeting by a letter from Tiberius, ostensibly to bestow the tribunician powers upon him. At dawn he entered the Senate, but while the letter was being read Macro assumed control of the Praetorian Guard, and members of the vigiles (Roman police and fire department) led by Graecinius Laco surrounded the building.[39] The senators at first congratulated Sejanus, but when the letter, which first digressed into completely unrelated matters, suddenly denounced him and ordered his arrest, he was immediately surrounded and escorted to prison.[40] Quintus Naevius Sutorius Macro (or Quintus Naevius Cordus Sutorius Macro) (21 BC - 38 AD) was the Prefect of the Roman Praetorian Guard after the execution of Aelius Sejanus in October, 31. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Vigiles or more properly the Vigiles Urbani (watchmen of the City) or Cohortes Vigilum (cohorts of the watchmen) were the firefighters and police of Ancient Rome. ...


Execution and aftermath

In 31, Sejanus was arrested and condemned to death. The Senate issued damnatio memoriae on him; his statues were destroyed and his name obliterated from all public records. The above coin from Augusta Bilbilis has the words L. Aelio Seiano erased.
In 31, Sejanus was arrested and condemned to death. The Senate issued damnatio memoriae on him; his statues were destroyed and his name obliterated from all public records. The above coin from Augusta Bilbilis has the words L. Aelio Seiano erased.

The same evening, the Senate convened at the Temple of Concord and summarily condemned Sejanus to death. He was led from prison, strangled and his body cast onto the Gemonian stairs, where the crowd tore it to pieces.[41] Riots ensued in which mobs hunted down and killed anyone they could link to the terror regime of Sejanus. The Praetorians in turn resorted to looting when they were accused of having conspired with their former prefect.[42] Following an issue of damnatio memoriae by the Senate, his statues were torn down and his name obliterated from all public records. On October 24, Sejanus' eldest son Strabo was arrested and executed.[35] Upon learning of his death, Apicata committed suicide on October 26, after addressing a letter to Tiberius claiming that Drusus had been poisoned, with the complicity of Livilla.[43][41] The accusations were further corroborated with confessions from Livilla's slaves, who admitted to having administered the poison to Drusus.[44] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Tondo of the Severan family, with portraits of Septimius Severus, Julia Domna, Caracalla, and Geta. ... Public records refers to information that has been filed or recorded by public agencies, such as corporate and property records. ... now. ... A garrote (alternative spellings include garotte and garrotte) is a handheld weapon, most often referring to a ligature of chain, rope, or wire used to strangle someone to death. ... The Gemonian Stairs (Scalae Gemoniae in Latin) were a flight of steps located in the ancient city of Rome. ... Looting (which derives via the Hindi lut from Sanskrit lung, to rob), sacking, plundering, or pillaging is the indiscriminate taking of goods by force as part of a military or political victory, or during a catastrophe or riot, such as during war,[1] natural disaster,[2] or rioting. ... Tondo of the Severan family, with portraits of Septimius Severus, Julia Domna, Caracalla, and Geta. ... Public records refers to information that has been filed or recorded by public agencies, such as corporate and property records. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Enraged upon learning the truth, Tiberius soon ordered more executions. Livilla herself committed suicide or, as legend would have it, was forcibly starved to death by her own mother Antonia.[41] The remaining children of Sejanus, Capito Aelianus and Junilla were executed in December of that year.[2][45] According to the ancient historians, because there was no precedent for the capital punishment of a virgin, Junilla was violated before her execution with the rope around her neck.[45][41] Their bodies were likewise thrown down the Gemonian stairs. At the beginning of the following year, damnatio memoriae was passed on Livilla.[46] In Roman times, Vestal Virgins were strictly celibate or they were punished by death. ...


Although Rome at first rejoiced at the demise of Sejanus, the city quickly plunged into more extensive trials, as Tiberius relentlessly persecuted all those who could in any way be tied to the schemes of Sejanus or had courted his friendship.[47] The Senatorial ranks were decimated. Hardest hit were those families with political ties to the Julians. Even the imperial magistracy was not exempted from Tiberius' wrath.[48] Arrests and executions were now supervised by Naevius Sutorius Macro.[49] The political turmoil would continue until the death of Tiberius in 37, after which he was succeeded by Gaius Caligula. Events March 18 - The Roman Senate annuls Tiberius will and proclaims Caligula Roman Emperor. ... Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (August 31, 12 – January 24, 41), more commonly known by his nickname Caligula, was the third Roman Emperor and a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, ruling from 37 to 41 CE. During his brief reign, Caligula focused much of his attention on ambitious construction...


Legacy

Praetorian Guard

Augustus's death on August 19, 14 marked the end of Praetorian calm, the only time the Praetorian Guard did not use its military strength to play a part in the politics of Rome to force its own agenda. Augustus would be the sole emperor that would command the Praetorians' complete loyalty. The reforms of Tiberius and Sejanus turned the guard into a powerful but double-edged force that became as much a safeguard as a threat to its own commanders.[5] The reality of this was seen in 31 when Tiberius was forced to rely upon members of the vigiles against his own guard.[39] Although the Praetorian Guard proved faithful to the aging Tiberius, their potential political power had been made clear. is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events First year of tianfeng era of the Chinese Xin Dynasty. ...


The power Sejanus attained in his capacity as prefect proved Maecenas right in his prediction to Augustus that it was dangerous to allow one man to command the guard.[50] Cassius Dio notes that after Sejanus, no other prefect except Gaius Fulvius Plautianus would rise to such influence.[51] Gaius or Cilnius Maecenas (70 - 8 BC) was a confidant and political advisor to Augustus Caesar, as well as an important sponsor of young poets. ... Gaius or Lucius Fulvius Plautianus (? - 22 January 205 AD) was a Roman who lived in the second and third century AD. Plautianus was a member of gens Fulvius, a family of plebs status and the family were active in politics since the Roman Republic. ...


Nevertheless, following his death the guard began to play an increasingly ambitious and bloody role in the Empire. With the right amount of money, or at will, they assassinated emperors, bullied their own prefects, or turned on the people of Rome. In 41 Caligula was killed by conspirators from the senatorial class and from the Guard. The Praetorians placed Claudius on the throne, daring the Senate to oppose their decision.[52] Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent. ... Events January 24 - Roman Emperor Gaius Caesar (Caligula), known for his eccentricity and cruel despotism, is assassinated by his disgruntled Praetorian Guards. ... For other persons named Claudius, see Claudius (disambiguation). ...


Historiography

With the exception of Velleius Paterculus, ancient historians have been universally condemning on Sejanus, although accounts differ to which extent Sejanus was manipulated by Tiberius or the other way around.[35] Suetonius Tranquilius asserts that Sejanus was merely an instrument of Tiberius to hasten the downfall of Germanicus and his family, and that he was quickly disposed of once he ceased to be useless.[53] Tacitus on the other hand attributes much of the decline Tiberius' rule after 23 to the corrupting influence of Sejanus, although he is generally also harsh on Tiberius himself.[54] Marcus Velleius Paterculus (c. ... A historian is an individual who studies history and who writes on history. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... Gaius Cornelius Tacitus Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus (c. ... Events Rome Greek geographer Strabo publishes Geography, a work covering the world known to the Romans and Greeks at the time of Emperor Augustus - it is the only such book to survive from the ancient world. ...


Among the writers of the time which fell victim to the regime of Sejanus and its aftermath were the historian Velleius Paterculus and the poet Phaedrus. Phaedrus was suspected of having alluded to Sejanus in his Fables, and received some unknown punishment short of death (Cf. Fables I.1, I.2.24, and I.17).[55] Velleius Paterculus was a historian and contemporary of Sejanus whose two volume The Roman History details a history of Rome from the fall of Troy until the death of Livia Augusta in 29. In his work he praises both Tiberius and Sejanus, even defending the latter's high position in the government despite his equestrian rank.[56] How much of Paterculus' writing is due to genuine admiration, prudence or fear remains an open question, but it has been conjectured that he was put to death as a friend of Sejanus.[57] Marcus Velleius Paterculus (c. ... Phaedrus, ¹ (15 B.C. – AD 50), Roman fabulist, was by birth a Macedonian and lived in the reigns of Augustus, Tiberius, Gaius and Claudius. ... Phaedrus, ¹ (15 B.C. – AD 50), Roman fabulist, was by birth a Macedonian and lived in the reigns of Augustus, Tiberius, Gaius and Claudius. ... Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ...


Writing only a few years later, Philo, a leading figure in Alexandria's Jewish community, remembered Sejanus as "desiring to destroy our nation".[58] Philo (20 BC - 50 AD), known also as Philo of Alexandria and as Philo Judaeus And as Yedidia, was a Hellenized Jewish philosopher born in Alexandria, Egypt. ... Nickname: Alexandria on the map of Egypt Map of Alexandria Coordinates: , Country Egypt Founded 334 BC Government  - Governor Adel Labib Population (2001)  - City 3,500,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Twin Cities  - Baltimore  United States  - Cleveland  United States  - ConstanÅ£a  Romania  - Durban  South Africa... Languages Historical Jewish languages Hebrew, Yiddish, Ladino, others Liturgical languages: Hebrew and Aramaic Predominant spoken languages: The vernacular language of the home nation in the Diaspora, significantly including English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Russian Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Arabs and other Semitic groups For the Jewish religion, see Judaism. ...


Sejanus in later literature

The fall of Sejanus was turned into a play by Ben Jonson in 1603, entitled Sejanus: His Fall. An anonymous contemporary also covered him 4 years later, in the 1607 play The Tragedy of Claudius Tiberius Nero. For other persons of the same name, see Ben Johnson (disambiguation). ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Perhaps most famously, his rise and fall were featured in the I, Claudius novels by Robert Graves, as well as the subsequent television adaptation. In this series, he is played by Patrick Stewart. I, Claudius is a novel by Robert Graves, (ISBN 067972477X) first published in 1934, dealing sympathetically with the life of the Roman Emperor Claudius and the history of the Julio-Claudian Dynasty and Roman Empire, from Julius Caesars assassination in 44 BC to Caligulas assassination in 41 AD... Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... I, Claudius, 1976 was a BBC Television adaptation of Robert Gravess I Claudius and Claudius the God. ... Patrick Stewart OBE (born July 13, 1940) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated English film, television and stage actor. ...


The fourth book in the Marcus Corvinus series by David Wishart is entitled Sejanus, also dedicated to his fall from power and his death. Marcus Valerius Mesalla Corvinus, the main protagonist in David Wisharts series of detective novels set in Imperial Rome, is thinly based on a real historical character, but as the author admits, considerable liberties have been taken. ... David Wishart is a Scottish author. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b c Tacitus, Annals IV.1
  2. ^ a b c Adams, Freeman (1955). "The Consular Brothers of Sejanus.". The American Journal of Philology 76: 70–76. Retrieved on 2007-07-23. 
  3. ^ Tacitus, Annals III.72, III.73
  4. ^ a b c Tacitus, Annals IV.3
  5. ^ a b c d Bingham, Sandra J. [1997] (1999). The praetorian guard in the political and social life of Julio-Claudian Rome (PDF), Ottawa: National Library of Canada. ISBN 0-612-27106-4. Retrieved on 2007-05-23. 
  6. ^ a b Cassius Dio, Roman History LVII.19
  7. ^ a b c d Tacitus, Annals IV.2
  8. ^ Syme believes Tacitus delayed mention of these reforms until the year 23 for stylistic reasons. The actual date the Castra Praetoria was founded may have been 20 AD. See Syme, Ronald (1958). Tacitus, Volume 1, p424, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-814327-3
  9. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LVII.22
  10. ^ Seneca the Younger, Essays, To Marcia On Consolation XXII.4
  11. ^ Tacitus, Annals I.24
  12. ^ Tacitus Annals I.29, I.30
  13. ^ Tacitus, Annals II.44, II.62
  14. ^ Tacitus, Annals III.31
  15. ^ Tacitus, Annals III.29
  16. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Claudius 27
  17. ^ Tacitus, Annals IV.7
  18. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals IV.8
  19. ^ Tacitus, Annals III.56
  20. ^ Tacitus, Annals II.72
  21. ^ Tacitus, Annals IV.52, IV.53, IV.54
  22. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals IV.12
  23. ^ Tacitus, Annals IV.39
  24. ^ Tacitus, Annals IV.40
  25. ^ Tacitus, Annals IV.57, IV.67
  26. ^ Tacitus, Annals IV.41
  27. ^ Tacitus, Annals V.3
  28. ^ a b Cassius Dio, Roman History LVIII.4
  29. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LVIII.3
  30. ^ Tacitus, Annals, VI.23VI.25
  31. ^ Tacitus, Annals VI.3
  32. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Tiberius 65
  33. ^ a b Cassius Dio, Roman History LVIII.1
  34. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LVIII.5
  35. ^ a b c d Boddington, Ann (January 1963). "Sejanus. Whose Conspiracy?". The American Journal of Philology 84 (1): 1–16. Retrieved on 2007-07-23. 
  36. ^ Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews XVIII.6.6
  37. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LVIII.6
  38. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LVIII.7, LVIII.8
  39. ^ a b c Cassius Dio, Roman History LVIII.9
  40. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LVIII.10
  41. ^ a b c d Cassius Dio, Roman History LVIII.11
  42. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LVIII.12
  43. ^ A recovered fragment of the Fasti Ostiensis confirms that Cassius Dio erred in his account on the deaths of Sejanus' family (Dio, LVIII.11). The eldest son Strabo was executed on October 24, Apicata committed suicide on October 26, and the remaining children were executed sometime in December. See Freeman, Adams (1955), "The Consular Brothers of Sejanus" for the Latin inscription.
  44. ^ Tacitus, Annals IV.11
  45. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals V.9
  46. ^ Tacitus, Annals VI.2
  47. ^ Tacitus, Annals VI.19
  48. ^ Tacitus, Annals VI.10
  49. ^ Tacitus, Annals VI.29
  50. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LII.24
  51. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LVIII.14
  52. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Claudius 10
  53. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Tiberius 55
  54. ^ Tacitus, Annals III.7, VI.51
  55. ^ Phaedrus, Fables Book III, preface
  56. ^ Velleius Paterculus, Roman History II.127-128
  57. ^ Cruttwell, C.T. (1877). A History of Roman Literature. Oxford, Book 3, chapter 1.
  58. ^ Philo, On the Embassy to Gaius XXIV

Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Portable Document Format (PDF) is the file format created by Adobe Systems, in 1993, for document exchange. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ...

References

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Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Portable Document Format (PDF) is the file format created by Adobe Systems, in 1993, for document exchange. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Biographical sketches

Preceded by
Lucius Seius Strabo
Praetorian prefect
14-31
Succeeded by
Naevius Sutorius Macro
Preceded by
Marcus Vinicius and Lucius Cassius Longinus
Consul of the Roman Empire together with Tiberius
31
Succeeded by
Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus and Lucius Arruntius Camillus Scribonianus

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sejanus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (595 words)
Sejanus was born at Volsinii, in Etruria, to the family of Lucius Seius Strabo, an equestrian who became praetorian prefect under Augustus.
Sejanus felt his position was unassailable, and plotted to seize power for himself.
Sejanus’ victims included the poet Phaedrus, who was suspected of alluding to him in his Fables and received some unknown punishment short of death.
Tiberius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4273 words)
Sejanus hailed from Volsinii in Etruria, from the equites family of Lucius Seius Strabo, who also shared the Praetorian Prefecture until 15 when his father was promoted to be Prefect of Egypt, the pinnacle of an equestrian career under the Principate.
Sejanus enjoyed powerful connections to Senatorial houses and had been a companion to Gaius Caesar on his mission to the East, from 1 BC-4.
Sejanus created an atmosphere of fear in Rome, controlling a network of informers and spies whose incentive to accuse others of treason was a share in the accused's property after their conviction and death.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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