FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Seinfeld" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Format Sitcom
Created by Larry David
Jerry Seinfeld
Starring Jerry Seinfeld
Jason Alexander
Julia Louis-Dreyfus
Michael Richards
Country of origin United States
No. of seasons 9
No. of episodes 180 (including two-part episodes and clip shows) (List of episodes)
Production
Executive
producer(s)
Fred Barron (Season 1)
Larry David (Seasons 2-7)
Ben A. Scott
Howard West
George Shapiro
Andrew Scheinman
Jerry Seinfeld (Seasons 8-9)
Location(s) New York City
Running time 21 Minutes (syndication),
22 Minutes (original)
Broadcast
Original channel NBC
Original run July 5, 1989May 14, 1998
External links
Official website
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

Seinfeld is an Emmy Award-winning American situation comedy that originally aired on NBC from July 5, 1989 to May 14, 1998, lasting nine seasons. Many of its catchphrases have entered into the popular culture lexicon. The show led the Arthur Nielsen Media Research Ratings in its sixth and ninth seasons and finished among the top two (along with NBC's ER) every year from 1994 to 1998.[1] In 2002, TV Guide named Seinfeld as the greatest American television program of all time.[2] A 2006 sitcom industry poll conducted by the United Kingdom's Channel 4 voted Seinfeld as the third best sitcom ever, ranking behind Frasier and Fawlty Towers.[3] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about a genre of comedy. ... Lawrence Gene David, (born July 2, 1947 in Brooklyn, New York) better known as Larry David, is an Emmy-winning actor, writer, comedian, producer and film director. ... This article is about the comedian. ... This article is about the comedian. ... Jason Alexander (born Jason Scott Greenspan on September 23, 1959) is a Jewish American television, cinema and musical theatre actor, best known for his role as George Costanza on the hit television series Seinfeld. ... This article is about the American actress. ... For other persons named Michael Richards, see Michael Richards (disambiguation). ... Seinfeld logo The following is an episode list for the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... Fred Barron is a television producer who has created shows such as the popular BBC sitcom My Family. ... Lawrence Gene David, (born July 2, 1947 in Brooklyn, New York) better known as Larry David, is an Emmy-winning actor, writer, comedian, producer and film director. ... George Shapiro, left, in 2006 George Shapiro is an American Talent Manager and multiple Emmy and Golden Globe winning television producer. ... This article is about the comedian. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the television network. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of television-related events in 1989. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 1998 in television involved some significant events. ... An Emmy Award. ... This article is about a genre of comedy. ... This article is about the television network. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of television-related events in 1989. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 1998 in television involved some significant events. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ... Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ... Arthur Charles Nielsen, Sr. ... Nielsen Media Research (NMR) is a U.S. firm, headquartered in New York City, and operating primarily from Oldsmar, FL, which measures media audiences, including television, radio and newspapers. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ... ER is an Emmy-winning American serial medical drama created by novelist Michael Crichton and set primarily in the emergency room of fictional County General Hospital in Cook County, Chicago, Illinois. ... The year 1994 in television involved some significant events. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An Opinion poll is a survey of public opinion from a particular sample or pool. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Frasier is an American sitcom starring Kelsey Grammer as psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane. ... Fawlty Towers is a British sitcom made by the BBC and first broadcast on BBC2 in 1975. ...


The eponymous series was created by Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David, with the former starring as a fictionalized version of himself. Set predominantly in an apartment block on New York City's Upper West Side (but shot mostly in Los Angeles, California), the show features a host of Jerry's friends and acquaintances, which include George Costanza, Elaine Benes and Cosmo Kramer. Seinfeld was produced by Castle Rock Entertainment and distributed by Columbia Pictures Television and Columbia TriStar Television (now Sony Pictures Television). It was largely co-written by David and Seinfeld with inputs from numerous script writers, including Larry Charles, Peter Mehlman, Gregg Kavet, Andy Robin, Carol Leifer, David Mandel, Jeff Schaffer, Steve Koren, Jennifer Crittenden, Tom Gammill, Max Pross, Charlie Rubin, Alec Berg, and Spike Feresten. An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, who has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery, or other item. ... This article is about the comedian. ... Lawrence Gene David, (born July 2, 1947 in Brooklyn, New York) better known as Larry David, is an Emmy-winning actor, writer, comedian, producer and film director. ... For the actor, see Jerry Seinfeld. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Upper West Side is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that lies between Central Park and the Hudson River above West 59th Street. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... George Louis Costanza is a fictional character in the United States-based television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Jason Alexander. ... Elaine Marie Benes is a fictional character on the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus. ... Cosmo Kramer is a fictional character on the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Michael Richards. ... The current Castle Rock Entertainment logo. ... Columbia Pictures Television logo, used from 1992-2001. ... Columbia TriStar Television logo Columbia TriStar Television, Inc. ... SPT logo Sony Pictures Television, Inc. ... Larry Charles (1956 - ) is an American television writer, director and producer. ... Peter Mehlman is a television writer and producer. ... Gregg Kavet is a writer and director who worked on NBCs Seinfeld for several seasons with collaborator Andy Robin. ... Andy Robin is a writer and director who worked on NBCs Seinfeld for several seasons with collaborator Gregg Kavet, penning many episodes, including The Junior Mint, The Jimmy, and The Fatigues, which won the Writers Guild Award for Episodic Comedy. ... Carol Leifer Carol Leifer (born July 27, 1956 in Long Island, New York) is a comedian best known as Jerry Seinfelds ex-girlfriend, as well as the basis for the character Elaine Benes on the television show, Seinfeld. ... David Mandel (1971-) is an executive producer of Curb Your Enthusiasm. ... Steven Wayne Koren was one of the writers of the movies Bruce Almighty, SuperStar, and A Night at the Roxbury, and wrote for Saturday Night Live and Seinfeld. ... Jennifer Crittenden is a television sitcom writer. ... Tom Gammill (1957 - ) and Max Pross (1957 - ) are an Emmy Award-winning American comedy writing team. ... Tom Gammill (1957 - ) and Max Pross (1957 - ) are an Emmy Award-winning American comedy writing team. ... This page has few or no links to other articles. ... Alec Berg is a comedy writer, best known as a writer for the sitcom Seinfeld. ... Spike Feresten is an American television writer and personality. ...

Contents

Overview

Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David pitched Seinfeld as a "show about nothing," similar to the self-parodying "show within a show" of Season 4 episodes "The Pilot, Part 1" and "Part 2". Seinfeld stood out from the typical family- or coworker-driven TV sitcoms of its time. None of the principal Seinfeld characters were related by blood or worked together. The episodes of most sitcoms revolve around a central theme or contrived comic situations, whereas most episodes of Seinfeld focused on the minutiae of daily life, such as waiting in line at the movies, going out for dinner, buying a suit, and coping with the petty injustices of life. Some viewers hold the belief that the world view presented in Seinfeld is somewhat consistent with the philosophy of nihilism, the view that life is pointless.[4] The Pilot, Part 1 is the sixty-third episode of the sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Pilot, Part 2 is the sixty-fourth episode of the sitcom Seinfeld. ... This article is about a genre of comedy. ... Minutiae, in fingerprinting terms, are the points of interest in a fingerprint, such as bifurcations (a ridge splitting into two) and ridge endings. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... This article is about the philosophical position. ...

Tom's Restaurant, a diner at 112th St. and Broadway in Manhattan, referred to as Monk's Cafe in the show. Google Street View
Tom's Restaurant, a diner at 112th St. and Broadway in Manhattan, referred to as Monk's Cafe in the show. Google Street View

Originally, the show began with Jerry Seinfeld delivering his stand-up comedy routine, which was set in a comedy night club. The theme of his act is loosely based on the plot of each episode. Originally, his stand-up act would bookend an episode, for a while even functioning as cutscenes during the show. By Season 4, the cutscenes in the middle of the episodes became less common and by Season 6, the clips that ended the shows also became less common. By Season 8, the stand-up act was cut out entirely as the plots expanded and required more time. The show's main characters, and many secondary characters, were modeled after Seinfeld's and David's real-life acquaintances. Other recurring characters were based on well-known, real-life counterparts, such as the Soup Nazi (based on Soup Kitchen International manager Al Yeganeh), Jacopo Peterman of the J. Peterman catalogue (nominally based on John Peterman), and George Steinbrenner, the owner of the New York Yankees. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1682x1121, 199 KB) Toms Restaurant, a primary location for the American comedy Seinfeld. Photo credit: Wally Gobetz File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Seinfeld User:GeeJo... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1682x1121, 199 KB) Toms Restaurant, a primary location for the American comedy Seinfeld. Photo credit: Wally Gobetz File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Seinfeld User:GeeJo... Toms Restaurant is a New York City diner located at 2880 Broadway between W. 112th and W. 113th in Morningside Heights. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... B. J. Novak in a stand-up comedy routine at Olde English sketch comedy in June 2007. ... The Soup Nazi is the title of the 116th episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld, which was the 6th episode of the 7th season. ... Soup Kitchen International Soup Kitchen International was a well-known soup restaurant at 259-A West 55th Street, near 8th Avenue, in Manhattan, New York City, run by Al Yeganeh. ... Jacopo Peterman (normally referred to as J. Peterman or simply Peterman) is a secondary character on the television show Seinfeld. ... John Peterman is a well-known catalogue and retail entrepreneur from Lexington, Kentucky, who operates The J. Peterman Company. ... George Michael Steinbrenner III (born July 4, 1930 in Rocky River, Ohio), often known as The Boss, is an American billionaire businessman and the principal owner of Major League Baseballs New York Yankees. ... George Michael Steinbrenner III (born July 4, 1930 in Rocky River, Ohio), often known as The Boss, is an American billionaire businessman and the principal owner of Major League Baseballs New York Yankees. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as...


In most Seinfeld episodes, one story thread is presented at the beginning, involving the characters in separate and unrelated situations. Rapid scene-shifts between story lines move the story forward. By Season 4, the episodes ended by having all of the separate story lines converge—often unexpectedly. Despite the separate plot strands, the narratives reveal "consistent efforts to maintain [the] intimacy" between the small cast of characters.[cite this quote]


The show kept a strong sense of continuity—characters and plots from past episodes were frequently referenced or expanded upon. Occasionally, story arcs would span multiple episodes and even entire seasons. Larry David, the show's head writer and executive producer for the first seven seasons, was praised for keeping a close eye on minor details and making sure the main characters' lives remained consistent and believable. He would later make use of season-long story arcs in his next series, Curb Your Enthusiasm. In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... Lawrence Gene David, (born July 2, 1947 in Brooklyn, New York) better known as Larry David, is an Emmy-winning actor, writer, comedian, producer and film director. ... Curb Your Enthusiasm is an American sitcom starring Seinfeld writer, co-creator, and executive producer Larry David as himself. ...


The show stood apart from other sitcoms of the time for not placing a shred of importance on the characters learning moral lessons. In effect, the characters are often morally indifferent or callous. It was often said that the mantra of the show's producers was: "No hugging, no learning."[5] For other uses, see Mantra (disambiguation). ...


Main characters

  • Jerry Seinfeld (himself)—Jerry is the show's central character who comes across as a "clean freak". He is obsessed with orderliness and is a bit of a "germophobe". In the show, Jerry makes a living as a stand-up comedian. His apartment is the center of a world visited by his eccentric friends George, Elaine, and Kramer. He is often seen as "the voice of reason" amid all the insanity generated by the people in his world.[6] Plot lines often involve Jerry's romantic relationships; he typically finds "stupid reasons to break up" with women. While seemingly the 'normal' one amongst his friends, his character's neurosis reveals itself in his obsessive cleanliness, narcissism, and steadfast immaturity. His favorite superhero is Superman and there are various references to it in the series.
  • George Costanza (Jason Alexander)—George is Jerry's best friend since school. He is cheap, dishonest, and often jealous of others' achievements. He is often portrayed as a loser who is insecure about his capabilities. He often lies about his profession, relationship, and almost everything else, which usually creates trouble for him later. He often uses an alias ("Art Vandelay"), when lying or assuming a fake identity. George was once succinctly described by Elaine as a "short, stocky, slow-witted, bald man". He fantasizes of being an architect. He often does questionable things which others might also do but often gets caught in the act (such as urinating in a parking garage).[7]
  • Elaine Benes (Julia Louis-Dreyfus)—Elaine is intelligent and assertive, but superficial. She sometimes has a tendency to be very honest with people, which often gets her into trouble.[8] She often gets caught up in her boyfriends' habits, her eccentric employers' unusual demands, and the unkindness of total strangers. A recurring plot line for Elaine is her frustrating inability to find Mr. Right; she also goes through an on/off relationship with David Puddy throughout Season 9. She used to date Jerry, and remains his close friend. One of Elaine's trademark maneuvers is her forceful shove when she receives good or shocking news while using her catch phrase "get out!". She is seen as the intellectual stronghold of the group of friends.
  • Cosmo Kramer (Michael Richards)—Kramer is Jerry's "wacky neighbor" and friend. His trademarks include his humorous upright pompador hairstyle, vintage clothing, and his energetic sliding bursts through Jerry's apartment door. Elaine refers to him as a 'hipster doofus'. At times he acts naive, dense, and almost child-like, yet randomly shows astonishing insight into human behavior. Though he never seems to have held a 'real' job, he often makes a bundle on some wacky scheme. He often dreams of ridiculous schemes to make money, some of which include a pizza place where "you make your own pie", a cologne that smells like "the beach", authoring a coffee-table book about coffee-tables (for which he appeared on Live with Regis and Kathie Lee), and designing a brassiere for men called the "Bro" (or Manssiere according to Frank Costanza).[9] Kramer consistently goes out of his way to help total strangers.

For the actor, see Jerry Seinfeld. ... This article is about the comedian. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... George Louis Costanza is a fictional character in the United States-based television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Jason Alexander. ... Jason Alexander (born Jason Scott Greenspan on September 23, 1959) is a Jewish American television, cinema and musical theatre actor, best known for his role as George Costanza on the hit television series Seinfeld. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... The Parking Garage is the twenty-third episode of the situation comedy Seinfeld. ... Elaine Marie Benes is a fictional character on the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus. ... This article is about the American actress. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ... Cosmo Kramer is a fictional character on the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Michael Richards. ... For other persons named Michael Richards, see Michael Richards (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pizza (disambiguation). ... Cologne (German: , IPA: ; local dialect: Kölle ) is Germanys fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Munich, and is the largest city both in the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the major European metropolitan areas with more than... Categories: TV Spin-offs | Television talk shows | Television stubs ... Bra - front Bra - back A brassiere ( ; , commonly referred to as a bra, ) is an article of clothing that covers, supports, and elevates the breasts. ...

Secondary characters

Main article: Minor characters in Seinfeld

There are numerous recurring minor characters in Seinfeld. The most prominent are:

  • Newman (portrayed by Wayne Knight)—An overweight, despicable postal worker. He is Kramer's accomplice and Jerry's nemesis and is a neighbor of both (Apartment 5E). He will go out of his way to make Jerry's life miserable. He is usually greeted contemptuously by Jerry with "Hellooo, Newman!," to which he responds with "Hello, Jerry!" in similar fashion. He is always plotting against Jerry, always eating and being obnoxious in Jerry's apartment. He is the most frequently recurring male character, from his first appearance in the show's second season all the way through the last episode.
  • Morty Seinfeld (originally portrayed by Phil Bruns, but later replaced by Barney Martin) and Helen Seinfeld (portrayed by Liz Sheridan)—They are Jerry's parents. Morty is a retired raincoat salesman and famous for obstinately sticking to his convictions; Helen cannot understand why anyone would not like her son. They always feel that Jerry is not making enough money and try to help him out financially. These two characters are based on Jerry's biological parents.
  • Frank Costanza (originally portrayed by John Randolph, replaced by Jerry Stiller) and Estelle Costanza (portrayed by Estelle Harris)—They are George's eccentric parents. George usually blames them for his current mental state and failure to succeed in life. They are known for their violent temper, often leading to yelling and constant verbal fights. They make many appearances from seasons 4 to 9.
  • Uncle Leo (portrayed by Len Lesser)—He is Jerry's uncle and Helen's brother. He personifies the eccentric old man and often tries to demean Jerry with comparisons to his own purportedly successful son. He has a habit of grabbing the person with whom he is conversing by the arm. He always brags about his son, Jeffrey (who never makes an appearance on the show), who works for the Parks Department. Uncle Leo is seen in seasons 2 to 9 occasionally.
  • Susan Ross (played by Heidi Swedberg)—George's fiancée and a former NBC executive. She tries to become friends with Elaine and Jerry in one episode but can't tolerate their inane chatter. She worked for NBC in season 4 and was engaged to George in season 7. She dies in the last episode of season 7, from licking the poisonous glue of their wedding invitation envelopes. She is the most frequently recurring female character in seasons 4 and 7, and has a cameo role in the season 9 episode titled "The Betrayal".
  • George Steinbrenner (voiced by Larry David, portrayed by Lee Bear, who is only seen from behind)—He is George's boss and owner of the New York Yankees. Steinbrenner's face is never shown on the show. He is parodied for his arrogance and lack of touch with the realities of running of a baseball team. A recurring gag is for him to call George into his office, then proceed to ramble on about inane topics as George slowly walks out the door. In edited scenes, the real George Steinbrenner makes a cameo appearance and goes out with Elaine. The scenes were cut due to time constraints and are available on the season 7 DVD. He usually appears from the finale of season 5 to 9.
  • J. Peterman (played by John O'Hurley)—He is one of Elaine's eccentric bosses. Peterman owns the J. Peterman apparel company and Elaine works on the catalog released by the company. Using the florid style of a treasure hunting adventurer, he typically announces his journeys to exotic locations in search of unique clothing. He is usually seen making an appearance from the finale of season 6 to season 9.
  • Kenny Bania (portrayed by Steve Hytner)—Bania is a fellow stand up comedian. Jerry hates Bania, because he is so annoying. Bania's trademark "Hey Jerry!" is often treated by Jerry and his friends with annoyance and indifference. Kenny Bania appears in various episodes throughout seasons 6 through 9.
  • David Puddy (portrayed by Patrick Warburton)—Puddy is Elaine's on-again, off-again boyfriend. He is a competent auto mechanic, but also an airhead with numerous quirks, most notably his squinting, staring, and insatiable appetite for high fives. He calls himself a Christian and he is known for his short, unapologetic delivery and unflinching assuredness. He is seen in seasons 6 and 9.
  • Mickey Abbott (portrayed by Danny Woodburn)—A friend of Kramer's and a "little person", he has aspirations to be an actor ("The Wait Out", "The Burning") and competes for women with Kramer ("The Yada Yada"). He makes appearances from Season 5-9.
  • Jackie Chiles (portrayed by Phil Morris)—Jackie is Kramer's lawyer. He has a secretary named Suzy and sets up appointments for his clients with an unseen "Dr. Bison". He also speaks with a rapid-fire delivery and tends to overuse grandiose adjectives like 'preposterous' and 'outrageous'. Chiles is a caricature of the late Johnnie Cochran. He is seen occasionally in seasons 7 to 9.
  • Justin Pitt (portrayed by Ian Abercrombie)—Usually referred to as "Mr. Pitt," he was Elaine's demanding boss during the sixth season. He hired her because she reminded him of Jackie Onassis. He makes his appearance throughout Season 6 as well as "The Finale".
  • Tim Whatley (played by Bryan Cranston)—Jerry's dentist, he appears in Seasons 6, 8 and 9. Elaine accuses him of regifting in "The Label Maker", and he converts to Judaism and begins to make references to the Jewish people as if he is a lifelong Jew in "The Yada Yada".
  • Sue Ellen Mischke (portrayed by Brenda Strong)—She is known as the "Braless Wonder" due to her habit of not wearing a brassiere. She is the heiress to the Oh Henry! candy bar fortune. Out of spite, Elaine gives her a bra as a birthday gift which Sue Ellen wears as a top. She repeatedly attempts to better Elaine, but was finally betrayed in her appearance in "The Betrayal". She makes appearances in seasons 7 to 9.

Newman is a recurring character on the television show Seinfeld, played by Wayne Knight from 1991 until the shows finale in 1998. ... Wayne Knight (born August 7, 1955) is an American actor, known for his roles as Newman in the TV sitcom Seinfeld, Dennis Nedry in Jurassic Park, and as police officer Don Orville in the sitcom 3rd Rock from the Sun. ... A postal worker is one who works for a post office, such as a mail carrier. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Mortimer Morty Seinfeld, played by Barney Martin, is a fictional character on the US television sitcom Seinfeld (1989-1998). ... Philip Bruns (born May 2, 1931) is an American actor. ... Barney Martin (March 3, 1923 – March 21, 2005) was an American actor. ... Helen Seinfeld, played by Liz Sheridan, is a fictional character on the US television sitcom Seinfeld (1989-1998). ... Liz Sheridan (born April 10, 1929 in Westchester County, New York) is an American actress. ... The raincoat, a garment worn to protect the upper body from rain, is a compromise between fashion and utility. ... Frank Costanza (played by Jerry Stiller) is a fictional character on the US television sitcom Seinfeld (1989-1998). ... John Randolph (June 1, 1915[1] - February 24, 2004) was a prolific Tony Award-winning American film, television and stage actor. ... Jerry Stiller (born June 8, 1927) is an American, Emmy Award-Nominated comedian and actor. ... Estelle Costanza (played by Estelle Harris) is a fictional character on the US television sitcom Seinfeld (1989-1998). ... Estelle Harris (born April 4, 1932 in New York City), is an American actress who is best known for her supporting role as Estelle Costanza, Georges (Jason Alexander) mother, and Franks (Jerry Stiller) wife on the long-running TV sitcom Seinfeld. ... Uncle Leo is Jerry Seinfelds uncle, a bit character who is, even by Seinfield universe standards, eccentric. ... Leonard King Len Lesser (born December 3, 1922) is an American actor best known for his role as Uncle Leo on Seinfeld after having joined the cast during the second season. ... Susan licking the envelopes which featured in the finale of Season 7 (The Invitations.) Susan Biddle Ross is a fictional character on the situation comedy Seinfeld played by Heidi Swedberg. ... Heidi Swedberg (born March 3, 1966 in Honolulu, Hawaii) is an American actress best known as Susan Ross, the ill-fated fiancee of George Costanza on the TV series Seinfeld. ... This article is about the television network. ... The Betrayal is the one-hundred and sixty-fourth episode of the hit NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... George Michael Steinbrenner III (born July 4, 1930 in Rocky River, Ohio), often known as The Boss, is an American billionaire businessman and the principal owner of Major League Baseballs New York Yankees. ... Lawrence Gene David, (born July 2, 1947 in Brooklyn, New York) better known as Larry David, is an Emmy-winning actor, writer, comedian, producer and film director. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... George Michael Steinbrenner III (born July 4, 1930 in Rocky River, Ohio), often known as The Boss, is an American billionaire businessman and the principal owner of Major League Baseballs New York Yankees. ... A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... Jacopo Peterman (normally referred to as J. Peterman or simply Peterman) is a secondary character on the television show Seinfeld. ... John Gerald OHurley (born October 9, 1954, in Kittery, Maine) is an American actor and popular television personality who is perhaps best known for his recurring role as Jacopo Peterman on the 1990s NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... John Peterman is a well-known catalog and retail entrepreneur from Lexington, Kentucky, who operates The J. Peterman Company. ... Kenny Bania from The Soup Kenny Bania (pronounced BAN-yuh) is a fictional character on the situation comedy Seinfeld played by Steve Hytner. ... Steve Hytner (sometimes credited as Stephen Hytner) is an American actor best known for his role as Kenny Bania in Seinfeld. ... David Puddy, usually just called Puddy, is a fictional character played by Patrick Warburton in the situation comedy Seinfeld. ... Patrick J. Warburton (born November 14, 1964) is an American television actor and voice artist. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Danny Woodburn (born July 26, 1964) is an American actor. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... The Wait Out is the one-hundred and thirty-third episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Burning is the sixteenth episode of the ninth season of Seinfeld. ... The Yada Yada is the one-hundred and fifty-third episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... Phil Morris as Jackie Chiles Jackie Chiles is a fictional attorney portrayed by American actor Phil Morris in the NBC television program Seinfeld. ... Phil Morris (born April 4, 1959 in Iowa City, Iowa) is an American TV and movie actor. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Johnnie Cochran, January, 2001; Phoenix, AZ; ACLU dinner at which he received lifetime achievement award Johnnie L. Cochran, Jr. ... Justin Pitt in The Mom & Pop Store. ... Ian Abercrombie (born September 11, 1936 in London) is an English actor. ... Jacqueline Bouvier redirects here. ... Tim Whatley, in The Mom & Pop Store. ... Bryan L. Cranston (born March 7, 1956 in San Fernando Valley, California) is an Award-winning American actor, voice actor, writer and director, best known in his role as Hal, the father of the family in the Fox Network television situation comedy Malcolm in the Middle. ... X-rays can reveal if a person has cavities Dentistry is the practical application of knowledge of dental science (the science of placement, arrangement, function of teeth) to human beings. ... Regifting is the act of taking a gift that has been received and giving it to somebody else, sometimes in the guise of a new gift. ... The Label Maker is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Yada Yada is the one-hundred and fifty-third episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... Brenda Strong (born March 25, 1960 in Brightwood, Oregon, USA) is an American actress. ... An Oh Henry! bar. ... The Betrayal is the one-hundred and sixty-fourth episode of the hit NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ...

Notable guest appearances

See List of Seinfeld minor characters for a complete list of celebrities who played themselves and other guest stars in minor roles.

Besides its regularly recurring characters, Seinfeld featured numerous celebrities who appeared as themselves or as girlfriends, boyfriends, bosses and other acquaintances. Many of those who made guest appearances would become household names later in their careers, or were comedians and actors who were well-known for previous work.


Plot

Seinfeld violated several conventions of mainstream television. The show, which (correctly or not) is often described as "about nothing",[10][11][12] became the first television series since Monty Python's Flying Circus to be widely described as postmodern.[13] Several elements of Seinfeld fit in with a postmodern interpretation. The show typically is driven by humor dispersed with superficial conflict and characters with strange dispositions. Look up mainstream in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the television series. ... Postmodernism (sometimes abbreviated Po-mo[1]) is a term originating in architecture, literally after the modern, denoting a style that is more ornamental than modernism, and which borrows from previous architectural styles, often in a playful or ironic fashion. ...


The characters were "thirty-something singles ... with no roots, vague identities, and conscious indifference to morals".[14] Usual conventions, such as isolating the characters from the actors playing them and separating the characters' world from that of the actors and audience, were broken. One such example is the story arc in which the characters promote a television sitcom series named Jerry. The show within the show, titled Jerry was much like Seinfeld, in which Seinfeld played himself, and that the show was "about nothing". Jerry was launched in the Season 4 finale, but unlike Seinfeld, it was not picked up as a series. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Many episodes revolved around the characters becoming involved in the lives of others to typically disastrous results. However, regardless of the damage they caused, they never gained anything from the experience and continued to be selfish, egocentric people. On the set, the notion that the characters should not develop or improve throughout the series was expressed as the "no hugging, no learning" rule. This quote is almost referenced in an episode ("The Secret Code") where Kramer says to Jerry, "Well the important thing is, you learned something," to which Jerry replies, "No I didn't." Unlike most sitcoms, there are no moments of pathos; the audience is never made to feel sorry for any of the characters. Even Susan's death in the series elicits no genuine emotions from anyone in the show. The Secret Code is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ...


The Seinfeld community can draw on a large amount of in-slang, "a lexicon of Seinfeldian code words and recurring phrases, that evolved around particular episodes".[13] The show has propelled many catchphrases such as Yada Yada Yada, master of your domain, and Festivus into daily life conversations.[15][16][17] For other uses, see Slang (disambiguation). ... The Yada Yada is the one-hundred and fifty-third episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Festivus is an annual holiday invented by Readers Digest writer and editor Dan OKeefe. ...


Also, nearly every episode is based on the writers real life experiences rather than writing stories which leads to a resolution. Like "The Revenge" is based on Larry's experience at Saturday Night Live [18]. "The Smelly Car" is based on Peter Mehlman's friend who is a lawyer that couldn't get the bad smell out of his car. "The Strike" is based on Dan O'Keefe's dad who made up his own holiday Festivus [19]. However other stories takes a different turn in a number of ways. "The Chinese Restaurant" is simply waiting for a table for the whole episode. "The Boyfriend" revolves around Keith Hernandez extending to two episodes [20]. "The Betrayal" is based on Pinter's play in which the story uses reverse chronology[21]. HMS Revenge, built at a cost of £4,000 at the Royal Dockyard of Deptford in 1577 by Mathew Baker, Master Shipwright, was to usher in a new style of ship building that would revolutionize naval warfare for the next three hundred years. ... The Smelly Car is the sixty-first episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Strike (also known as Strike!) was one of the long-running series of Comic Strip Presents. ... The Chinese Restaurant was the 16th episode of Seinfeld. ... The Betrayal is the one-hundred and sixty-fourth episode of the hit NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ...


Evolution

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

Seasons 1 to 3: The early years

The show premiered as The Seinfeld Chronicles on July 5, 1989, on NBC. The pilot was not very well received. After it aired, a pickup by the NBC network did not seem likely and the show was actually offered to Fox, which declined to pick it up. However, Rick Ludwin, head of late night and special events for NBC, diverted money from his budget, and the next four episodes ("Male Unbonding", "The Stakeout", "The Robbery", and "The Stock Tip") were filmed.[22] These episodes were highly-rated as they followed Cheers on Thursdays at 9:30 p.m., and the series was finally picked up. At one point, NBC considered airing these episodes on Saturdays at 10:30PM, but instead gave that slot to a short-lived sitcom, FM. The Seinfeld Chronicles (also known as Good News, Bad News and originally Stand Up) is the pilot episode of the NBC series, Seinfeld. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the television network. ... FOX redirects here. ... Male-Unbonding was the second episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld to be made, and the fourth to be shown. ... The Stakeout is the second episode to air of the NBC comedy Seinfeld. ... The Robbery is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Stock Tip is the fifth episode of Seinfeld. ... This article is about the TV series. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ...


Seinfeld was championed by television critics in its early seasons, even as it was yet to cultivate a substantial audience. Early episodes such as "The Chinese Restaurant", "The Pony Remark", "The Parking Garage", and "The Subway", tended to be more realistic than the later ones, and dealt with the minutiae of daily life, such as getting stuck on the subway or waiting for their turn in a Chinese restaurant. The Chinese Restaurant was the 16th episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Pony Remark is the seventh episode of the hit NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Parking Garage is the twenty-third episode of the situation comedy Seinfeld. ... The Red Dot was the 30th episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ...


Seasons 4 to 5: Seinfeld's prime

Season 4 marked the sitcom's entry into the Nielsen Ratings Top 30, coinciding with several popular episodes, such as "The Bubble Boy", "The Outing", "The Airport", and "The Junior Mint". This was the first season to use a story arc, in which Jerry and George try to create their own sitcom, Jerry. When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ... The Bubble Boy is the 47th episode of the American sitcom Seinfeld, as well as the nickname of Donald Sanger, one of the characters in the episode. ... The Outing is the fifty-seventh episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... This article is about the Seinfeld episode, for info about airports in general see airport. ... The Junior Mint is the 60th episode of the American sitcom Seinfeld. ...


Much publicity followed the controversial episode, "The Contest", an Emmy Award-winning episode written by co-creator Larry David, whose subject matter (masturbation) was considered inappropriate for primetime network television. To circumvent this taboo, the word "masturbation" was never used in the script itself, instead substituted by a variety of oblique references. Midway through that season Seinfeld was moved from its original 9 p.m. time slot on Wednesdays to 9:30 p.m. on Thursdays, following Cheers again, which gave the show even more popularity. The show won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series in 1993, beating out its family-oriented competitor Home Improvement, which at the time was a big hit for NBC's rival ABC. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An Emmy Award. ... Woman masturbating, 1913 drawing by Gustav Klimt. ... This article is about the TV series. ... For other uses, see Home Improvement (disambiguation). ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ...


Season 5 was also a ratings-hit as it consisted of many popular episodes such as "The Mango", "The Puffy Shirt" starring Aislinn Roberts as the low talker, "The Lip Reader" with Marlee Matlin in the title role, "The Marine Biologist", "The Hamptons", and "The Opposite". Another story arc was used in which George returns to live with his parents for the entire season and later, creation of a coffee table book by Kramer. The show was again nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series, but lost to the Cheers spin-off Frasier, which was only in its first season. Seinfeld was nominated for the same award every year for the rest of its run but would keep losing to Frasier. The Mango is the sixty-fifth episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Puffy Shirt is the second episode of Seinfelds fifth season. ... The Lip Reader is the seventieth episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... Marlee Beth Matlin (born August 24, 1965) is an Academy Award-winning American actress who is almost completely deaf. ... For the profession, see Marine biology. ... The Hamptons is the eighty-fifth episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Opposite is the eighty-sixth episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld, which was also the 22nd and final episode of Season 5. ... Coffee table book on coffee table A coffee table book is a hardcover book that rests on a coffee table or similar surface in an area where guests sit and are entertained, thus inspiring conversation or alleviating boredom. ... Frasier is an American sitcom starring Kelsey Grammer as psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane. ...


Seasons 6 to 7: Maintaining the top

With Season 6, Andy Ackerman replaced Tom Cherones as the director of the show. Even so, the series remained well-regarded and produced some of its most famous episodes, such as "The Fusilli Jerry", "The Chinese Woman", "The Jimmy", "The Face Painter", and "The Switch", which finally revealed Kramer's first name, Cosmo. Story arcs used in this season was Elaine working as a personal assistant to her eccentric boss Mr. Pitt, as well as George's parents' separation which ended by the next season. This was also the first season in which Seinfeld reached Number 1 in the Nielsen Ratings. Image credit: Tom Keller Andy Ackerman is a director and producer who is best known for his work on Seinfeld and the HBO series Curb Your Enthusiasm. ... Tom Cherones is a director and producer of several TV series including Seinfeld and The Pitts. ... The following is an episode guide for the NBC series, Seinfeld. ... The Chinese Woman is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Jimmy is the one-hundred fifth episode of the hit NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Face Painter is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Switch is the 97th episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ...


With Season 7, the show has reached its creative peak. Another story arc created this season consisted of George getting engaged to his former girlfriend Susan Ross, whose last appearance was in Season 4. He spends most of the season regretting the engagement and trying to get out of it. Garnering its highest ratings yet, Seinfeld went on to produce some of its most famous episodes—namely "The Soup Nazi", "The Secret Code", "The Maestro", and "The Rye" among others. It has been suggested that Soup Nazi be merged into this article or section. ... The Secret Code is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Maestro is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Rye is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ...


Seasons 8 to 9: Without Larry David

The show's ratings were still going very strong in its final two seasons (8 and 9), but its critical standing suffered[23]. Larry David left at the end of Season 7, (although he continued to voice Steinbrenner in Season 8), so Seinfeld assumed David's duties as showrunner, and, under the direction of a new writing staff, Seinfeld became more of a fast-paced, absurdist show. The humor began to rely heavily on slapstick, and storylines occasionally delved into fantasy, an example being "The Bizarro Jerry", when Elaine is torn between exact opposites of her friends or when Jerry dates a woman who has the now-famed "man hands". Some notable episodes from season 8 include "The Little Kicks" showing Elaine's horrible dancing, "The Yada Yada", "The Chicken Roaster", and "The Comeback". For other uses, see Slapstick (disambiguation). ... The Bizarro Jerry is the 137th episode of the American television sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Little Kicks is the 138th episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Yada Yada is the one-hundred and fifty-third episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Chicken Roaster is the 142nd episode of the sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Comeback is the 147th episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ...


Season 9 included episodes such as "The Merv Griffin Show", "The Butter Shave", "The Betrayal" (the backwards episode), and "The Finale", which was written by Larry David. The last season included a story arc in which Elaine has an on/off relationship with David Puddy. Despite being offered to return for another season, Seinfeld decided to end the show after its ninth season. The Merv Griffin Show is the sixth episode of the ninth season of Seinfeld. ... The Butter Shave is the first episode of the ninth season of Seinfeld. ... The Betrayal is the one-hundred and sixty-fourth episode of the hit NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Finale is the name given to the final two episodes of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... David Puddy, usually just called Puddy, is a fictional character played by Patrick Warburton in the situation comedy Seinfeld. ...


Ending

After nine years on the air, NBC and Jerry Seinfeld announced on December 26, 1997, that the series would end production the following spring. The announcement made the front page of all the major New York newspapers, including the New York Times. Jerry Seinfeld was even featured on the cover of Time magazine's first issue of 1998.[24] The Finale is the name given to the final two episodes of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... TIME redirects here. ...


The series ended with a 75-minute episode (cut down to 60 minutes in syndication, in two parts) written by co-creator and former executive producer Larry David, which aired on May 14, 1998. Before the finale, a one-hour retrospective clip show was aired which included memorable scenes from the show's past nine seasons. In broadcasting, syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast radio shows and television shows to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...

Jerry Seinfeld on the cover of TIME magazine in 1998.

It was also the first episode since the finale of Season 7, "The Invitations", to feature opening and closing stand-up comedy acts by Jerry Seinfeld. The finale was filmed in front of an audience of NBC executives and additional friends of the show. The press and the public were shut out of the filming for the sake of keeping its plot secret, and all those who attended the taping of finale signed written "vows of silence".[25] The secrecy only seemed to increase speculation on how the series would end. Various accounts suggested that Jerry and Elaine get married while more cynical fans favored Julia Louis-Dreyfus' suggestion that the foursome die in a car accident after all their wishes come true. The producers of the show tweaked the media about the hype, spreading a false rumor about Newman ending up in the hospital and Jerry and Elaine sitting in a chapel, presumably to marry.[26] Image File history File links JseinfeldTIME.JPG Summary Fair use for Jerry Seinfeld The image linked here is claimed to be used under fair use in the article Jerry Seinfeld for the following reasons: The cover is being used in an original encyclopedic article on the life of Jerry Seinfeld... Image File history File links JseinfeldTIME.JPG Summary Fair use for Jerry Seinfeld The image linked here is claimed to be used under fair use in the article Jerry Seinfeld for the following reasons: The cover is being used in an original encyclopedic article on the life of Jerry Seinfeld... TIME redirects here. ... The Invitations is the final episode of the seventh season of Seinfeld. ...


The episode aired on the same day that Frank Sinatra died, and its airing may have been somewhat overshadowed by this event, but nonetheless it enjoyed a huge audience, estimated at 76 million viewers (58 percent of all viewers that night) making it the third most watched finale in television history. However, the finale received mixed reviews from both critics and fans of the show. The actual finale poked fun at the many rumors that were circulating, seeming to move into several supposed plots before settling on its true storyline—a lengthy trial in which Jerry, George, Elaine and Kramer are prosecuted for violating a "Good Samaritan law" and are sentenced to jail. The last conversation in this final episode repeats the very first conversation from the pilot episode, discussing the positioning of a button on George's shirt. In the finale, the characters vaguely recall having the conversation before. Sinatra redirects here. ...


According to Forbes magazine, Seinfeld's annual earning from the show in 2004 was $267 million.[27] He was reportedly offered $5 million per episode to continue the show into its tenth season but he refused.[1] As of July 2007, he is still the second highest earner in the television industry, earning $60 million a year.[28] The show itself became the first television series to command more than $1 million a minute for advertising–a mark previously attained only by the Super Bowl.[29] USD redirects here. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ...


Awards and nominations

Main article: Seinfeld awards and nominations

Seinfeld has received awards and nominations in various categories throughout the mid-90s. It was awarded the Emmy for "Outstanding Comedy series" in 1993, Golden Globe Award for "Best TV-Series (Comedy)" in 1994 and Screen Actors Guild Award for "Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series" in 1995, 1997 and 1998. Apart from these, the show was also nominated for an Emmy award from 1992 to 1998 for "Outstanding Comedy series", Golden Globe award from 1994 to 1998 for "Best TV-Series (Comedy)", and Screen Actors Guild Award for "Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series" from 1995 to 1998. An Emmy Award. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Ratings History

Season Ranking Viewership
Four (1992–93) 25 12,754,700[30]
Five (1993–94) 3 18,274,800[31]
Six (1994–95) 1 19,652,400[32]
Seven (1995–96) 2 20,330,800[33]
Eight (1996–97) 2 19,885,000[34]
Nine (1997–98) 1 21,266,000[35]

After Seinfeld

The "Seinfeld curse"

Louis-Dreyfus, Alexander and Richards have attempted unsuccessfully to launch new sitcoms as title-role characters. Despite decent acclaim and even some respectable ratings, almost every show was cancelled quickly, usually within the first season. This gave rise to the term Seinfeld curse to describe the failure of a sitcom by an actor following massive success on an ensemble show. Shows specifically cited regarding the Seinfeld curse are Julia Louis-Dreyfus' Watching Ellie, Jason Alexander's Bob Patterson and Listen Up! and Michael Richards' The Michael Richards Show. This phenomenon was mocked in Larry David's hit HBO show Curb Your Enthusiasm, in which Larry David brings up the idea to Jason Alexander that he should do a show about Alexander's inability to shake the 'George' title in order to move on with his career. When David and Alexander begin feuding in the show, Larry David takes the idea to Julia Louis-Dreyfus. They plan to work on a show called Aren't you Evelyn? but Larry David blows their chances with every network they meet, causing Julia to bow out of the idea. A promotional cast photo from the shows first season. ... Bob Patterson was a 2001 television sitcom starring and written by Jason Alexander, who had previously been one of the leading castmembers in Seinfeld. ... Listen Up is a CBS television series that first aired in September 2004. ... The Michael Richards Show was a short-lived sitcom that debuted on NBC in 2000. ... Lawrence Gene David, (born July 2, 1947 in Brooklyn, New York) better known as Larry David, is an Emmy-winning actor, writer, comedian, producer and film director. ... Curb Your Enthusiasm is an American sitcom starring Seinfeld writer, co-creator, and executive producer Larry David as himself. ...


Since the end of the program, Alexander has acted in film, theater and television, including guest appearances on Larry David's HBO series Curb Your Enthusiasm.


Louis-Dreyfus also appeared on Curb Your Enthusiasm and has received on-screen and voice credits in television (such as Arrested Development) and the Disney/Pixar animated film A Bug's Life. Louis-Dreyfus stars in the CBS sitcom The New Adventures of Old Christine, which debuted in March 2006 to strong ratings and has been consistent ever since. The show was also renewed for a second season. Its 35 episodes make it the longest running show starring a Seinfeld alumnus since Seinfeld ended. Louis-Dreyfus also received an Emmy Award for lead actress in a comedy series for her role as Christine. In her acceptance speech, Louis-Dreyfus held up her award and exclaimed, "I’m not somebody who really believes in curses, but curse this, baby!"[36] The show was also renewed for its third season, and returned as a midseason replacement through the 2007-08 season. The "Seinfeld curse" was discussed in the opening of Saturday Night Live episode on May 13, 2006, hosted by Louis-Dreyfus. Alexander and Seinfeld also appeared in this episode of Saturday Night Live. Richards continues to appear in new film and television work as well. In November 2006, controversy arose concerning racial epithets Richards shouted at black hecklers during a live comedy show.[37] He apologized for his statements a few days later on the Late Show with David Letterman at the request of Jerry Seinfeld. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California, United States, and is notable for its eight Academy Awards. ... A Bugs Life is a computer animated film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Buena Vista Distribution in the United States on November 25, 1998, in Australia on January 12, 1999 and in the United Kingdom on February 5, 1999. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... The New Adventures of Old Christine is a CBS situation comedy starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus, which debuted as a midseason replacement on March 13, 2006. ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... A midseason replacement is a television show that premieres in the second half of a television season usually between January and April. ... SNL redirects here. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see November (disambiguation). ... A slur can be anything from an insinuation or critical remark to an insult. ... A heckler is a person who shouts an uninvited comment, usually disparaging, at a performance or event, or interrupting set-piece speeches, for example at a political meeting. ... Late Show redirects here. ...


"It's so completely idiotic … It's very hard to have a successful sitcom," Larry David once said of the curse.[38]


Another scene

On the November 1, 2007, episode of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Jerry Seinfeld mentioned the possibility of filming one last scene, after they leave prison. He mentioned he is far too busy to do it now, but did not announce what the scene would entail as it is still a possibility they will do it.[39] In commentary from the final season DVD, Jerry Seinfeld outlines that he and Jason Alexander spoke about this scene being in Monks Coffee Shop, with George saying “That was brutal” in reference to their team's stint in jail. is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Daily Show is a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning American satirical television program produced by and airing on Comedy Central. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


Consumer products

A recurring feature of Seinfeld was its use of specific products, especially candy, as plot points. These might be a central feature of a plot (e.g. Junior Mints, Twix, Jujyfruits, Snickers, Nestlé Chunky, Oh Henry! and Pez), or an association of a candy with a guest character (e.g. Oh Henry! bars), or simply a conversational aside (e.g. Chuckles, Twinkies). Non-candy products featured in Seinfeld include Rold Gold pretzels (whose advertisements at the time featured Jason Alexander), Kenny Rogers Roasters (a chicken restaurant chain), Oreo Cookies, Ben & Jerry's, H&H Bagels, Drake's Coffee Cakes, Ring Dings, Pepsi, Mello Yello, Snapple, Bosco Chocolate Syrup, Cadillac, Saab, Ford Escort, Tyler Chicken, Specialized Bicycles, BMW, Volvo, Toyota, Tupperware, Calvin Klein, Klein Bicycles, Ovaltine, Arby's, TV Guide, Trump Tower, the board games Risk, Boggle, Trivial Pursuit, Scrabble, and Battleship, Entenmann's and the J. Peterman clothing catalog. The computers in Jerry's apartment are always Apple Macintosh; the featured model changed every few seasons to reflect Apple's latest offerings. Also seen throughout the show's run were many different brands of cereal. A notable exception to this pattern is the use of a fictional whiskey brand called "Hennigan's". One product placement, for Snapple, was inserted as a parody of product placement; when offered some by Elaine in the middle of a conversation, the character Babu Bhatt's (owner of a Pakistani restaurant named as "Dream Cafe") brother declines, calling the drink "too fruity". For other uses, see Candy (disambiguation). ... A box of Junior Mints. ... North American Twix Logo North American Twix Twix opened Inside candy Twix is a chocolate snack or candy bar made by Mars, Inc. ... Jujyfruits are a quasi-gummi candy manufactured in the United States by Heide Candy Company, a subsidiary of Farleys & Sathers Candy Co. ... Snickers (original) Snickers (original) Snickers is a chocolate bar made by Mars, Incorporated. ... Nestlé Chunky is a candy bar known for its distinctive thick trapezoid shape, consisting of milk chocolate with raisins and roasted peanuts. ... An Oh Henry! bar. ... For other uses, see PEZ (disambiguation). ... An Oh Henry! bar. ... This article is about the confectionery. ... A Twinkie is a Golden Sponge Cake with Creamy Filling created by Hostess, and baked by Continental Baking Co, which is owned by Kansas City-based Interstate Bakeries Corporation. ... Rold Gold is the name of a brand of pretzels, now owned by Frito-Lay. ... Kenny Rogers Roasters is an oven-cooked chicken restaurant started in 1991 in the United States by country music musician Kenny Rogers and former Kentucky Fried Chicken owner and original developer John Y. Brown, Jr. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Ben & Jerrys is a brand of ice cream, frozen yogurt, sorbet, and ice cream novelty products, manufactured by Ben & Jerrys Homemade Holdings, Inc. ... H&H Bagels is a popular bagel company in New York City, founded in 1972 by Helmer Toro. ... Drakes is a baking company in New Jersey owned by the Interstate Bakeries Corporation, which makes cake, such as Yodels, Devil Dogs, Yankee Doodles, Sunny Doodles, Ring Dings, Funny Bones, and Drakes coffee cake. ... Pepsi Cola is a non-alcoholic carbonated beverage produced and manufactured by PepsiCo. ... This article is about the soft drink. ... Snapple is a beverage company based in Rye Brook, New York that produces a variety of teas and fruit drinks which are sold in glass bottles, soda-style cans, and plastic bottles. ... Bosco Chocolate Syrup is a brand of chocolate syrup first produced in 1928. ... For other uses, see Cadillac (disambiguation). ... Saab is a line of automobiles manufactured by Saab Automobile AB, and is currently a wholly-owned subsidiary of the General Motors Corporation. ... See also Ford Escort (Europe). ... Tyson Foods, Inc. ... Specialized Bicycles is a major manufacturer of bicycles and bicycle equipment, based in Morgan Hill, California. ... For other uses, see BMW (disambiguation). ... Volvo Cars is the luxury car maker using the Volvo Trademark. ... This article is about the automaker. ... Tupperware logo A Tupperware storage container. ... This article is about the corporation Calvin Klein Inc. ... Ovaltine is a brand of sweetened milk flavoring product made with sugar (except in Switzerland), malt extract, cocoa, and whey. ... Arbys is a fast food restaurant chain in the United States and Canada that is a wholly owned subsidiary of Triarc. ... TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ... Trump Tower Trump Tower Trump Tower is a 68 story skyscraper in New York City. ... Risk is a commercial strategic board game, produced by Parker Brothers (now a division of Hasbro). ... Typical game contents and scoring example. ... Trivial Pursuit is a board game where progress is determined by a players ability to answer general knowledge, popular culture questions. ... The verb to scrabble also means to scratch, scramble or scrape about: see Wiktionary:scrabble. ... For other uses, see Battleship (disambiguation). ... Entenmanns is a bakery brand now owned by Canadian company George Weston Limited. ... J. Peterman can refer to the following people: John Peterman, operator of the The J. Peterman Company The J. Peterman Company, an apparel company Jacopo Peterman, a fictional version of John Peterman, portrayed by John OHurley on the television sitcom, Seinfeld Categories: ... Apple Inc. ... Snapple is a beverage company based in Rye Brook, New York that produces a variety of teas and fruit drinks which are sold in glass bottles, soda-style cans, and plastic bottles. ...


The show's creators claim that they were not engaging in a product placement strategy for commercial gain. One of the motivations for the use of real-world products, quite unrelated to commercial considerations, is the comedy value of funny-sounding phrases and words. "I knew I wanted Kramer to think of watching the operation like going to see a movie," explained Seinfeld writer/producer Andy Robin in an interview published in the Hollywood Reporter. "At first, I thought maybe a piece of popcorn falls into the patient. I ran that by my brother, and he said, 'No, Junior Mints are just funnier.'"[40]


Many advertisers capitalized on the popularity of Seinfeld. American Express created a webisode in which Jerry Seinfeld and an animated Superman (voiced by Patrick Warburton, who played the role of David Puddy) into its commercial. Another advertisement featured Jason Alexander in a Chrysler commercial. In this, Alexander behaves much like his character George, and his relationship with Lee Iacocca plays on his George's relationship with George Steinbrenner. Similarly, Michael Richards was the focus of a series of advertisements for Vodafone which ran in Australia where he dressed and behaved exactly like Kramer, including the trademark bumbling pratfalls. American Express (NYSE: AXP), sometimes known as AmEx or Amex, is a diversified global financial services company, headquartered in New York City. ... A webisode is an episode of a television show that airs initially as an Internet download or stream as opposed to first airing on broadcast or cable television. ... Patrick J. Warburton (born November 14, 1964) is an American television actor and voice artist. ... For other uses, including the Chrysler Brand, see Chrysler (disambiguation). ... Lido Anthony Lee Iacocca (born October 15, 1924) is an American industrialist most commonly known for his revival of the Chrysler Corporation in the 1980s[1], serving as President and CEO from 1978 and additionally as chairman from 1979, until his retirement at the end of 1992. ... George Michael Steinbrenner III (born July 4, 1930 in Rocky River, Ohio), often known as The Boss, is an American billionaire businessman and the principal owner of Major League Baseballs New York Yankees. ... Vodafone Group Plc is a mobile network operator headquartered in Newbury, Berkshire, England, UK. It is the largest mobile telecommunications network company in the world by turnover and has a market value of about £84. ...


DVD releases

Main article: Seinfeld DVD releases

On November 6, 2007, "Seinfeld: The Complete Series" was released on DVD. The set included a 2007 reunion of the four main cast members and Larry David. The list of US release dates of each season is given below: All seasons of Seinfeld have been released on DVD by Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

Season Date of US release
Seasons 1 to 3 November 23, 2004
Season 4 May 17, 2005
Seasons 5 and 6 November 22, 2005
Season 7 November 21, 2006
Season 8 June 5, 2007
Season 9 November 6, 2007

is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

Music

A signature of Seinfeld is its theme music. Composed by Jonathan Wolff, it consists of distinct solo sampled bass guitar riffs which open the show and connect the scenes, often accompanied by a "percussion track" composed of mouth noises, such as pops and clicks. Jonathan Wolff is the composer of the theme music for numerous TV shows, including Seinfeld and Will & Grace. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ...


Seinfeld lacked a traditional title track and the riffs were played over the first moments of dialogue or action. They vary throughout each episode and are played in an improvised funk style with slap bass. An additional musical theme with an ensemble, led by a synthesized mid-range brass instrument, ends each episode.


In The Note, the first episode of Season Three, the bumper music featured a scatting female jazz vocalist who sang "Easy to Beat". Jerry Seinfeld and executive producer Larry David both liked Wolff's additions, and three episodes were produced with the new style music. However, they had neglected to inform NBC and Castle Rock of the change, and when the season premiere aired, they were surprised and unimpressed, and requested that they return to the original style. The subsequent two episodes were redone, leaving this episode as the only one with the additional music elements[41]. In the commentary of The Note, Julia Louis-Dreyfus facetiously suggests it was removed because the lyric "Easy to Beat" related too closely to the low ratings at the time.[42] The Note is a summary and analysis of political news stories and trends published every weekday morning by ABCNews. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In the final three seasons (7, 8, and 9), the bits were tweaked slightly to give them more frenetic rhythms and the occasional hint of guitar. Throughout the show, the main theme could be re-styled in different ways depending on the episode. For instance, in "The Betrayal," in which part of the episode takes place in India, the theme is heard played on a sitar. Diagram of some sitar parts. ...


Non-original music featured in the show:

Song Artist Episode Notes
"Vesti la giubba" Ruggero Leoncavallo "The Opera" and "The Keys" It plays close to the opera.
The Godfather theme Nino Rota "The Bris" The episode ends with this theme.
Selected music from "The Barber of Seville" Gioachino Rossini "The Barber" The music replaces Seinfeld main slap bass music.
"Wouldn't It Be Nice" The Beach Boys "The Hamptons" Cover version performed by another band
Superman theme John Williams "The Race" and "The Clip Show, Part 1" Played when Jerry wins the race and during past reflection of Seinfeld episodes.
Sonata No. 8 Op. 13 "Pathetique" Ludwig van Beethoven "The Pez Dispenser" Elaine laughs through this music.
"Everybody's Talkin'" Harry Nilsson "The Mom & Pop Store" Similar to Midnight Cowboy with Kramer and Jerry.
"Hello" Lionel Richie "The Voice", "The Engagement" and "The Invitations" The song shows a reflection of their life.
"Downtown" Petula Clark "The Bottle Deposit, Part 1" George looks for clues about his work assignment when Wilhelm mentions the song to him.
"Morning Train (9 to 5)" Sheena Easton "The Bizarro Jerry" and "The Butter Shave" Kramer and George in separate episodes have brief stints in going to work.
"Shining Star" Earth, Wind & Fire "The Little Kicks" and "The Bookstore" Elaine does the infamous dry heave dance to this song.
"Adagio for Strings" Samuel Barber "The Fatigues" Frank Costanza has a flashback of his days as a cook in the Korean War. This scene (and its music) is a reference to Platoon.
"Desperado" and "Witchy Woman" Eagles "The Checks" Elaine's boyfriend gets obsessed with "Desperado" while Elaine tries to offer "Witchy Woman" as "their" song (a doctor later "zones out" to the latter).
The Greatest American Hero"[43] Joey Scarbury "The Susie" George's answering machine was to this tune but with different words.
"Three Times a Lady" The Commodores "The Pothole" Newman sings this song.
"Mañana (Is Good Enough For Me)" Jackie Davis "The Blood" Appears when Kramer and Newman are making sausages and Kramer returning the blood.
"Slow Ride" Foghat "The Slicer" Elaine tunes into her bedside radio and offers up a few characteristic dance moves.
"In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" Iron Butterfly "The Slicer" Elaine makes an attempt to phone the repairman.
"Mexican Radio" Wall of Voodoo "The Reverse Peephole" Kramer sings this as he is reversing his peephole. It is also featured at the end of the episode after the credits.
"Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)" Green Day "The Clip Show, Part 2" Behind the scenes throughout the series.
"Funiculì, Funiculà" Luigi Denza "The Maestro" Plays in the scene where Elaine jumps into the Maestro's car and he begins conducting.
"Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough" Michael Jackson "The Clip Show, Part 2" Clips of the gang dancing in the series.

Vesti la Giubba (Put on the costume) is a famous tenor aria performed as part of the opera Pagliacci, written and composed by Ruggiero Leoncavallo, and first performed in 1892. ... Ruggiero Leoncavallo (April 23, 1857- August 9, 1919) was an Italian opera composer. ... The Opera is an epsiode of Seinfeld. ... For the archipelago in south Florida, see Florida Keys. ... This article is about the 1972 film. ... Nino Rota (December 3, 1911 – April 10, 1979) was an Italian composer best known for his work on film scores, notably The Godfather series and the films of Federico Fellini. ... The Bris is the sixty-ninth episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... For the Beaumarchais play, see The Barber of Seville (play). ... Gioachino Rossini. ... The Barber is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... Wouldnt It Be Nice is the opening song on the classic 1966 album Pet Sounds and one of the most widely recognized songs by the American pop group The Beach Boys. ... The Beach Boys is an American rock and roll band. ... The Hamptons is the eighty-fifth episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... For the series of films, see Superman (film series). ... For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ... The Race is the 96th episode of the Seinfeld television series, the tenth episode of season six. ... The Clip Show, Part 1 is the twenty-first episode of the ninth season of Seinfeld. ... Ludwig van Beethovens Piano Sonata No. ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... The Pez Dispenser is the thirty-first episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 – January 15, 1994) was an American songwriter, singer, pianist, and guitarist, most popular during the 1960s and 1970s. ... The Mom & Pop Store is the 94th episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... This article is about the 1969 film. ... Hello is a song by Lionel Richie. ... Lionel Brockman Richie, Jr. ... The Voice is the one-hundred and fifty-eighth episode of the hit NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Engagement is the seventh season opener (along with the one-hundred and eleventh overall episode) of the popular NBC series Seinfeld. ... The Invitations is the 24th and final episode of the seventh season of Seinfeld (along with the one-hundred and thirty-fourth overall episode). ... Downtown is a pop song composed by Tony Hatch following a first-time visit to New York City. ... Petula Clark, CBE (born 15 November 1932), is an English singer, actress and composer best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... The Bottle Deposit, Part 1 is the 131st episode and 21st episode of the seventh season of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... 9 to 5, with text and lyrics by Florrie Palmer is the title of a popular song recorded by Sheena Easton in 1980, becoming her first major hit. ... Sheena Easton (born Sheena Shirley Orr on April 27, 1959, Bellshill, North Lanarkshire, Scotland) is a Scottish two time Grammy Award-winning pop singer and theatre & television actress. ... The Bizarro Jerry is the 137th episode of the American television sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Butter Shave is the first episode of the ninth season of Seinfeld. ... Shining Star is a song by Earth, Wind & Fire from the soundtrack for the movie Thats the Way of the World. ... For the elements, see classical elements. ... The Little Kicks is the 138th episode of the American television sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Bookstore is the one-hundred and seventy-third episode of the hit NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... Samuel Barber, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1944 Adagio for Strings is a work for string orchestra, arranged by the American composer Samuel Barber from his first string quartet. ... Samuel Barber, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1944 Samuel Osborne Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981) was an American composer of classical music ranging from orchestral, to opera, choral, and piano music. ... The Fatigues is the one-hundred and fourtieth episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... This article is about the Vietnam War film. ... Desperado is a song by the rock-country band Eagles, written by Glenn Frey and Don Henley. ... Witchy Woman is a song written by Don Henley and Bernie Leadon, and recorded by the American rock band Eagles. ... Eagles redirects here. ... The Checks is the 141st episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Greatest American Hero is an American television series which aired for three seasons from 1981 to 1983 on ABC. It premiered as a two hour movie pilot on March 18, 1981. ... Joey Scarbury Joey Scarbury (born June 7, 1955) is an adult contemporary singer who had a hit song, Theme from Greatest American Hero (Believe It or Not), in 1981. ... The Susie is the one-hundred and forty-nineth episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... ... Three Times A Lady is a 1978 hit single for soul band the Commodores, from their album Natural High. ... The Commodores were a highly successful funk/soul band of the 1970s and 1980s. ... The Pothole is the one-hundred and fiftieth episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Blood is the 160th episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... Slow Ride is a song composed by Lonesome Dave Peverett and recorded by the rock band Foghat, appearing on their fifth album Fool for the City (1975). ... Foghat are a British rock band who had their peak success in the mid- to late-1970s. ... THE SLICER The Slicer is Eleanor’s younger sister “The Slicer” is one beautiful and tough little lady. ... In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida is a seventeen-minute ten second rock song by Iron Butterfly, released on their 1968 album In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, occupying the entire second side of the album. ... For other uses, see Iron Butterfly (disambiguation). ... THE SLICER The Slicer is Eleanor’s younger sister “The Slicer” is one beautiful and tough little lady. ... Mexican Radio is a novelty song by the band Wall of Voodoo. ... Wall of Voodoo is a New Wave art - punk group from Los Angeles best known for the 1983 hit Mexican Radio. ... The Reverse Peephole is the one-hundred and sixty-eighth episode of the hit NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... Good Riddance (Time of Your Life) is a popular song by the American pop punk band Green Day. ... This article is about the band Green Day. ... The Clip Show, Part 2 is the twenty-first episode of the ninth season of Seinfeld. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Luigi Denza (February 24, 1846 - January 26, 1922), was an Italian composer. ... The Maestro is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... Michael Jacksons Visionary chronology Thriller (2006) Dont Stop Til You Get Enough (2006) Rock with You (2006) Off the Wall track listing Dont Stop Til You Get Enough (1) Rock with You (2) HIStory track listing Remember the Time (12) Dont Stop Til You Get Enough... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... The Clip Show, Part 2 is the twenty-first episode of the ninth season of Seinfeld. ...

See also

Must See TV was the name given to NBCs popular Thursday-night prime time television lineup during the mid and late 1990s. ... Seinfeld logo The following is an episode list for the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ...

References

  1. ^ a b CNN- Seinfeld to end show. CNN (1997-12-26). Retrieved on 2007-12-18.
  2. ^ "TV Guide Names Top 50 Shows", Associated Press, 2002-04-26. Retrieved on 2007-11-15. 
  3. ^ Wezzo (2006-01-03). Channel 4's Ultimate Sitcom. Listology. Retrieved on 2008-02-25.
  4. ^ "Seinfeld and nihilism", 1999-12-03. Retrieved on 2007-12-12. 
  5. ^ "About Seinfeld". Retrieved on 2008-01-22. 
  6. ^ Seinfeld Cast and characters - Jerry. Sony pictures. Retrieved on 2007-12-11.
  7. ^ Seinfeld Cast and characters - George. Sony pictures. Retrieved on 2007-12-11.
  8. ^ Seinfeld Cast and characters - Elaine. Sony pictures. Retrieved on 2007-12-11.
  9. ^ Seinfeld Cast and characters - Kramer. Sony pictures. Retrieved on 2007-12-11.
  10. ^ Miller, Patrick D. (July 1998). Editorial: Good-bye Seinfeld. Theology Today. Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  11. ^ Erickson, Hal. Seinfeld: Overview. All Movie Guide. Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  12. ^ Seinfeld. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  13. ^ a b Grenz, Stanley J. (February 1996). A Primer on Postmodernism. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.. ISBN 0-8028-0864-6. 
  14. ^ Hurd, R. Wesley (June 1998). Postmodernism: A New Model of Reality. McKenzie Study Center. Retrieved on 2007-06-30.
  15. ^ CNN-Seinfeld. CNN. Retrieved on 2007-12-22.
  16. ^ Caryn James. Goodbye! Already. New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-12-22.
  17. ^ Seinfeld influence. People.com. Retrieved on 2007-12-22.
  18. ^ http://www.sonypictures.com/tv/shows/seinfeld/episode_guide/?sl=episode&ep=212
  19. ^ http://www.sonypictures.com/tv/shows/seinfeld/episode_guide/?sl=episode&ep=910
  20. ^ http://www.sonypictures.com/tv/shows/seinfeld/episode_guide/?sl=episode&ep=315
  21. ^ http://www.sonypictures.com/tv/shows/seinfeld/episode_guide/?sl=episode&ep=908
  22. ^ Boudreaux, Jonathan (2004-11-24). Seinfeld: Season 1 & 2 DVD Review. tvdvdreviews.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-22.
  23. ^ Handy, Bruce (January 12, 1998). It's All About Timing. Time. Retrieved on 2008-03-26.
  24. ^ TIME Magazine Cover: Jerry Seinfeld (1998-01-12). Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  25. ^ The 'Seinfeld' e-mail for April 8, 1998. CNN.com (1998-04-08). Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  26. ^ Ryan, Joal (1998-03-27). Clues to "Seinfeld" Sign Off. E! News. Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  27. ^ Forbes list. Retrieved on 2007-12-18.
  28. ^ Oprah and Seinfeld top TV's richest. Retrieved on 2007-12-18.
  29. ^ Seinfeld and advertising. Retrieved on 2007-12-22.
  30. ^ TV Ratings: 1992–1993. ClassicTVHits.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  31. ^ TV Ratings: 1993–1994. ClassicTVHits.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  32. ^ TV Ratings: 1994–1995. ClassicTVHits.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  33. ^ TV Ratings: 1995–1996. ClassicTVHits.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  34. ^ TV Ratings: 1996–1997. ClassicTVHits.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  35. ^ TV Ratings: 1997–1998. ClassicTVHits.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  36. ^ Hall, Sarah (2006-08-27). Emmys Clock into "24," "Office". E! News. Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  37. ^ "Kramer's" Racist Tirade -- Caught on Tape. TMZ.com (2006-11-20). Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  38. ^ Baerg, Greg (2002-03-05). 'Curb's' Larry David: 'Seinfeld' Curse 'Idiotic'. Zap2it.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  39. ^ [Seinfeld on The Daily Show]. 2007-11-01.
  40. ^ "A look at some of the biggest hits in film and TV product placement", The Hollywood Reporter, 2005-04-28. Retrieved on 2007-11-10. 
  41. ^ Season 3 DVD: Inside Look of 'The Note'
  42. ^ Season 3 DVD: 'The Note' commentary
  43. ^ The Greatest American Hero.

For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... All Movie Guide is a commercial database of information about movie stars, movies and television shows. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Stanley Grenz Stanley James Grenz (January 7, 1950 Alpene MI _ March 11, 2005) was an American Christian theologian and ethicist in the Baptist tradition. ... Wm. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CNN.com is the news website maintained by CNN. The website debuted on August 30, 1995, and it describes itself as the first major news and information website on the Internet. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... E! News is the E! networks nightly entertainment news show. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... E! News is the E! networks nightly entertainment news show. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TMZ.com is a celebrity gossip and news website, the result of a collaboration between AOL and Telepictures Productions, a division of Warner Bros. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

General references

  • Fretts, Bruce. The Entertainment Weekly Seinfeld Companion. New York: Warner Books. 1993. ISBN 0-446-67036-7.
  • Dawson, Ryan (2006). "Seinfeld: a show about something" Cambridge University.
  • William Irwin (Ed.). Seinfeld and Philosophy: A Book about Everything and Nothing. Peru, Illinois: Open Court Publishing Company. 1999. ISBN 0-8126-9409-0.
  • Gantz, Katherine. "Not That There's Anything Wrong with That": Reading the Queer in Seinfeld. In Calvin Thomas (Ed.). Straight with a Twist: Queer Theory and the Subject of Heterosexuality. Champaign. Illinois: University of Illinois Press. ISBN 0-252-06813-0.
  • Gattuso, Greg. The Seinfeld Universe: The Entire Domain. New York: Citadel Press. 1996. ISBN 0-8065-2001-9.
  • Rosenthal, Phil (November 18, 2004). Gold, Jerry! Gold! Chicago Sun Times.
  • Seinfeld, Jerry. Sein Language. Bantam. 1993. ISBN 0-553-09606-0.
  • Weaver, D.T. & Oliver, M.B. (2000) Summary of the paper,"Television Programs and Advertising: Measuring the Effectiveness of Product Placement Within Seinfeld."

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
This article is about the comedian. ... Jason Alexander (born Jason Scott Greenspan on September 23, 1959) is a Jewish American television, cinema and musical theatre actor, best known for his role as George Costanza on the hit television series Seinfeld. ... This article is about the American actress. ... For other persons named Michael Richards, see Michael Richards (disambiguation). ... Lawrence Gene David, (born July 2, 1947 in Brooklyn, New York) better known as Larry David, is an Emmy-winning actor, writer, comedian, producer and film director. ... George Shapiro, left, in 2006 George Shapiro is an American Talent Manager and multiple Emmy and Golden Globe winning television producer. ... Tom Cherones is a director and producer of several TV series including Seinfeld and The Pitts. ... Image credit: Tom Keller Andy Ackerman is a director and producer who is best known for his work on Seinfeld and the HBO series Curb Your Enthusiasm. ... For the actor, see Jerry Seinfeld. ... George Louis Costanza is a fictional character in the United States-based television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Jason Alexander. ... Elaine Marie Benes is a fictional character on the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus. ... Cosmo Kramer is a fictional character on the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Michael Richards. ... Seinfeld logo The following is an episode list for the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... Seinfeld logo The Seinfeld Series consists of several main seasons, this guide is to organize the episodes of Season 1 which was originally aired through 1989-1990. ... Seinfeld logo The Seinfeld Series consists of several main seasons, this guide is to organize the episodes of Season 2 which was originally aired through 1991. ... Seinfeld logo The Seinfeld Series consists of several main seasons, this guide is to organize the episodes of Season 3 which was originally aired through 1991-1992. ... Seinfeld logo The Seinfeld Series consists of several main seasons, this guide is to organize the episodes of Season 4 which was originally aired through 1992-1993. ... Seinfeld logo The Seinfeld Series consists of several main seasons, this guide is to organize the episodes of Season 5 which was originally aired through 1993-1994. ... Seinfeld logo Season 6 of Seinfeld was originally aired through 1994-1995. ... Seinfeld logo The Seinfeld Series consists of several main seasons, this guide is to organize the episodes of Season 7 which was originally aired through 1995-1996. ... Seinfeld logo The Seinfeld Series consists of several main seasons, this guide is to organize the episodes of Season 8 which was originally aired through 1996-1997. ... Seinfeld logo The Seinfeld Series consists of several main seasons, this guide is to organize the episodes of Season 9 which was originally aired through 1997-1998. ... All seasons of Seinfeld have been released on DVD by Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. ... Festivus is an annual holiday invented by Readers Digest writer and editor Dan OKeefe. ... Cosmo Kramer, Elaine Benes, George Costanza and Jerry Seinfeld at a theater in The Movie This is a list of fictional films on the Emmy Award-winning American sitcom Seinfeld. ... Kenny Kramer Kenny Kramer was the basis for the character of Cosmo Kramer in the sitcom Seinfeld. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Regifting is the act of taking a gift that has been received and giving it to somebody else in the guise of a new gift. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Seinfeld - Official Site (55 words)
Season 9 includes a four disc set packed with all new special features created in partnership with Jerry Seinfeld.
Join the official Seinfeld Facebook group and play games, discuss the show and make friends.
Explore iconic Seinfeld landmarks and watch classic clips in this interactive map.
FOXNews.com - Peak 'Seinfeld' Seasons Set for Release - Celebrity Gossip | Entertainment News | Arts And Entertainment (1093 words)
Louis-Dreyfus cringes at some of her outfits and hairstyles, and is quick to correct Seinfeld's claim that her clothes have aged more than his.
After the show ended, Seinfeld, 51, mostly went back to standup, a journey chronicled in the documentary "Comedian." The other three have tried new shows: Alexander with last season's canceled "Listen Up," Richards with the failed "The Michael Richards Show," and Louis-Dreyfus on "Old Christine," which debuts at midseason on CBS.
They say they rarely watch their old show, though Alexander, 46, recounts the fun of watching "Seinfeld" with his children, who were surprised what a jerk their father was.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m