FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Seiji Ozawa

Seiji Ozawa (小澤 征爾 Ozawa Seiji?, born September 1, 1935) is a Japanese conductor. He is particularly noted for his interpretations of large-scale late Romantic works. September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... The era of Romantic music is defined as the period of European classical music that runs roughly from the early 1800s to the first decade of the 20th century, as well as music written according to the norms and styles of that period. ...


Biography

Born in Hoten (Shenyang), Manchuria (Manchukuo), he studied at the Toho Gakuen School of Music in Tokyo and graduated in 1959 before travelling to Europe for further study. Charles Munch eventually took Ozawa to the United States of America for lessons at the Berkshire Music Center (now Tanglewood). He won a scholarship to study with Herbert von Karajan and the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, and in 1961 he was appointed an assistant conductor of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra by Leonard Bernstein. He was music director of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra from 1965 to 1970, of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra from 1969 to 1976, and of the Boston Symphony Orchestra from 1973 to 2002. Since then, he has been music director of the Vienna State Opera. Shenyang (Simplified Chinese: , Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ShÄ›nyáng, Manchu: Mukden) is the capital city of Liaoning province in Northeast China. ... Manchuria (Manchu: Manju; Traditional Chinese: 滿洲; Simplified Chinese: 满洲; pinyin: MÇŽnzhōu, Russian: ) is a vast territorial region in northeast Asia. ... Manchukuo (1932 to 1945) (Simplified Chinese: 满洲国; Traditional Chinese: 滿洲國; Pinyin: MÇŽnzhōu Guó Kanji: 満州国) was a former country in Manchuria and eastern Inner Mongolia under the leadership of the Emperor Puyi, the last emperor of Qing Dynasty. ... -1... Tokyo , literally Eastern capital)   is the seat of the Japanese government and the Imperial Palace, the home of the Japanese Imperial Family, and the de facto[1] capital of Japan. ... Charles Münch (September 26, 1891 – November 6, 1968) was a French conductor and violinist. ... Tanglewood is the name of an estate and music venue in Lenox and Stockbridge, Massachusetts. ... Herbert von Karajan (Salzburg April 5, 1908 Anif near Salzburg – July 16, 1989) was an Austrian conductor. ... The Berlin Philharmonic rehearsing in the Berliner Philharmonie. ... The New York Philharmonic is an American orchestra based in New York City. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American composer, pianist and conductor. ... The title of music director is used by many orchestras to designate the primary conductor of the orchestra. ... The Toronto Symphony Orchestra is a leading Canadian orchestra. ... The San Francisco Symphony is a major orchestra based in San Francisco, California. ... The Boston Symphony Orchestra is one of the worlds most renowned orchestras. ... Vienna State Opera (German: Wiener Staatsoper), located in Vienna, Austria, is one of the most important opera companies in Europe. ...


Ozawa has also been an advocate of 20th century classical music, giving the premieres of a number of works including György Ligeti's San Francisco Polyphony in 1975 and Olivier Messiaen's opera Saint François d'Assise in 1983. 20th century classical music, the classical music of the 20th century, was extremely diverse, beginning with the late Romantic style of Sergei Rachmaninoff, Impressionism of Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel, the Neoclassicism of middle-period Igor Stravinsky, and ranging to such distant sound-worlds as the complete serialism of Pierre... György Sándor Ligeti (May 28, 1923 – June 12, 2006) was a Jewish Hungarian composer born in Romania who later became an Austrian citizen. ... Olivier Messiaen. ...


Ozawa is noted to have somewhat of a photographic memory, as he is able to memorize the scores of large works such as the Mahler Symphonies.


On February 1, 2006, Vienna State Opera announced that he had to cancel all his performance commitment for 2006 due to his illness. Reportedly, he suffered a bronchial infection and shingles. Apparently, his eyesight was affected. He returned to the podium at Tanglewood on August 7, 2006, in variable weather, receiving generally favorable reviews. February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vienna State Opera (German: Wiener Staatsoper), located in Vienna, Austria, is one of the most important opera companies in Europe. ...


Ozawa became famous not only for his conducting style, but his sartorial style: he wore the traditional formal dress with a white turtleneck rather than the usual starched shirt, waistcoat, and white tie.


External links

  • Sony Classical: Seiji Ozawa
  • The Jack Robinson Archives, images of Ozawa
  • Decca Classics, biography of Ozawa
  • Seiji Ozawa Says Farewell, NPR, July 14, 2002
  • Conduct(or) Unbecoming the Boston Symphony, op-ed, Wall Street Journal, December 15, 1998
  • International Music Academy – Switzerland

NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 170 days remaining. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...

Books

  • "Seiji: An Intimate Portrait of Seiji Ozawa" (Hardcover) by Lincoln Russell (Illustrator), Caroline Smedvig (Editor) ISBN 0395939437
Preceded by:
Walter Susskind
Music Director, Toronto Symphony Orchestra
1965–1969
Succeeded by:
Karel Ančerl
Preceded by:
Josef Krips
Music Director, San Francisco Symphony
1970–1977
Succeeded by:
Edo de Waart
Preceded by:
William Steinberg
Music Director, Boston Symphony Orchestra
1973–2002
Succeeded by:
James Levine
Preceded by:
Claudio Abbado
Music Director, Vienna State Opera
2002–
Succeeded by:
Incumbent

  Results from FactBites:
 
Seiji Ozawa Hall is an integral part of Tanglewood - The Boston Globe (1295 words)
During most of the season, Ozawa Hall is in use for at least 12 hours a day for rehearsals and concerts by the fellows of the Tanglewood Music Center, the Boston University Tanglewood Institute, chamber-music ensembles from the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and visiting artists.
And Ozawa Hall has made it possible to expand the scope of Tanglewood programming without altering its essential nature; world-famous soloists appear in parity with the Tanglewood fellows, who represent the cream of the crop of the younger generation.
Ozawa Hall was ranked 13th in the world, in the top six constructed in the 20th century, in the top four in the United States, and in the top four built in the last 50 years.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m