FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Seid" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Seid

Seid or seiðr is an Old Norse term for a type of sorcery or witchcraft which was practiced by the pre-Christian Norse. Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... Magic (also called magick to distinguish it from stage magic) is a supposed way of influencing the world through supernatural, mystical, or paranormal means. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... ROSIE IS A GERMN LADYGermanic paganism refers to the religion of the Germanic nations preceding Christianization. ... Norseman redirects here; for the town of the same name see Norseman, Western Australia. ...


Sometimes anglicized as "seidhr", "seidh", "seidr", "seithr" or "seith", the term is also used to refer to modern Neopagan reconstructions or emulations of the practice. The Mjolnir is one of the primary symbols of Germanic neopaganism. ... Polytheistic reconstructionism, or simply reconstructionism, is the practice of re-establishing and practicing historical polytheistic religions in the modern world. ...

Contents

Overview

Seid involved the incantation of spells, which could amongst other things be termed galdrar or galðrar (sing. galdr or galðr, compare Old English: gealdor or galdor). Practitioners of seid were predominantly women (völva, or seiðkona, lit. "seid woman"), although there were male practitioners (seiðmaðr, lit. "seid man") as well. In the Viking Age, seid had connotations of ergi ("unmanliness" or "effeminacy") for men, as its manipulative aspects ran counter to the male ideal of forthright, open behaviour. Freyja and perhaps some of the other goddesses of Norse mythology were seid practitioners, as was Odin, a fact which some believe he was shamed for, as Loki in the Lokasenna used it as an insult. However, others believe that since he was the greatest god he was above such moral laws like gods in the polytheistic religions of other Indo-Europeans. Anglo-Saxon people had words which appear to be cognate with seiðr: siden and sidsa, both of which are attested only in contexts which suggest that they were used by elves (ælfe); these seem likely to have meant something similar to seiðr (Hall 2004, pp. 117-30). Among the Old English words for practitioners of magic are wicca (m.) or wicce (f.), the etymons of Modern English witch, but no connection between wiccan and siden or sidsa is attested. The spell is a magical act intended to cause an effect on reality using supernatural means of liturgical or ritual nature. ... In linguistics, grammatical number is a morphological category characterized by the expression of quantity through inflection or agreement. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... The völva, vala, wala (Old High German), seiðkona, or wicce was a female shaman in Norse mythology, and among the Germanic tribes. ... The Viking Age is the name of the age in Northern Europe, following the Germanic Iron Age. ... Ergi and argr are two Old Norse terms of insult, denoting effeminacy or other unmanly behavior. ... Freyja (sometimes anglicized as Freya), sister of Freyr and daughter of Niord (), is usually seen as a Norse fertility goddess. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology comprises the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Loki and the dwarfs be merged into this article or section. ... Lokasenna (Lokis flyting, Lokis wrangling, Lokis quarrel) is one of the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Polytheism is belief in, or worship of, multiple gods or divinities. ... Indo-Europeans are speakers of Indo-European languages. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Witchcraft. ...


Forms of Seid

As described by Snorri Sturluson in his Ynglinga saga (sec. 7), seid includes both divination and manipulative magic. It seems likely that the type of divination practiced by seid was generally distinct, by dint of an altogether more metaphysical nature, from the day-to-day auguries performed by the seers (menn framsýnir, menn forspáir). Snorri Sturluson (1178 – September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. ... The Ynglinga saga was originally written in Old Norse by the Icelandic poet Snorri Sturluson about 1225. ...


The Practice of Seid

In The Saga of Eric the Red, the seiðkona or völva in Greenland wore a blue cloak and a headpiece of black lamb trimmed with white cat skin; she carried the symbolic distaff (seiðstafr), which was often buried with her; and would sit on a high platform. In Örvar-Odd's Saga, however, the cloak is black, yet the seiðkona also carries the distaff (which allegedly has the power of causing forgetfulness in one who is tapped three times on the cheek by it).[citation needed] The colour of the cloak may be less significant than the fact that it was intended to signify the otherness of the seiðkona. How far the saga's elaborate description reflects pre-Christian practice as opposed to the Christian author's imagination is, however, uncertain. The Saga of Eric the Red is a saga about Eric the Red. ... Evening cloak or manteau, from Costume Parisien, 1823 A cloak is a type of loose garment that is worn over indoor clothing and serves the same purpose as an overcoat—it protects the wearer from the cold, rain or wind for example, or it may form part of a fashionable... Spinning Flax from a distaff As a noun, a distaff is a tool used in spinning. ... Orvar-Odd (i. ...


It has been suggested that during seances the seiðkona would enter a state of trance in which her soul was supposed to "become discorporeal", "take the likeness of an animal", "travel through space", and so on. This state of trance may have been achieved through any of several methods: entheogens, sleep deprivation, sensory deprivation, for instance.[citation needed] To galdra, that is, the chanting of galdrar was also involved in creating the state of trance.[citation needed] The galdr and its Old English counterpart, the gealdor, has evolved into the word yell (modern Scandinavian: gala), and there are a number of kennings which compare the sound of battle to seid chanting. It is probable that this sound was very high-pitched. An altered state of consciousness is any state which is significantly different from a normative waking beta wave state. ... Entheogens are psychoactive substances that have traditionally been used in a religious context, such as psilocybin-containing mushrooms and Peyote cactuses. ... Sleep deprivation is a general lack of the necessary amount of sleep. ... A prisoner at the United States Camp X-ray facility at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba being subjected to sensory deprivation, through the use of ear muffs, visor, breathing mask and heavy mittens. ... A chant is the rhythmic speaking or singing of words or sounds, either on a single pitch or with a simple notes and often including a great deal of repetition or statis. ... This article is about kenning as a poetic notion. ... Pitch is the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound. ...


Seid in Mythology

The goddess Freyja is identified in Ynglinga saga as an adept of the mysteries of seid, and it is said that it was she who taught it to Odin: 'Dóttir Njarðar var Freyja. Hon var blótgyðja. Hon kenndi fyrst með Ásum seið, sem Vönum var títt' ('Njörðr’s daughter was Freyja. She presided over the sacrifice. It was she who first acquainted the Æsir with seiðr, which was customary among the Vanir'). Freyja (sometimes anglicized as Freya), sister of Freyr and daughter of Niord (), is usually seen as a Norse fertility goddess. ... In Old Norse, the Æsir (singular Ás, feminine Ásynja, feminine plural Ásynjur, Anglo-Saxon Ós, from Proto-Germanic *Ansuz) are the principal gods of the pantheon of Norse mythology. ... Vanir is the name of one of the two groups of gods in Norse mythology, the other and more well known being the Æsir. ...


In Lokasenna Loki accuses Odin of practicing seid, condemning it as an unmanly art. A justification for this may be found in the Ynglinga saga where Snorri opines that following the practice of seid, the practitioner was rendered weak and helpless. Lokasenna (Lokis flyting, Lokis wrangling, Lokis quarrel) is one of the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda. ... It has been suggested that Loki and the dwarfs be merged into this article or section. ... The Ynglinga saga was originally written in Old Norse by the Icelandic poet Snorri Sturluson about 1225. ...


One possible example of seid in Norse mythology is the prophetic vision given to Odin in the Völuspá by the völva, vala, or seeress after whom the poem is named. Her vision is not connected explicitly with seiðr, however: the word occurs in the poem in relation to a character called Heiðr (who is traditionally associated with Freyja but may be identical with the völva: see McKinnell 2001). The interrelationship between the völva in this account and the Norns, the fates of Norse lore, are strong and striking. For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... Völuspá (The Prophecy of the Seeress) is the first poem in the Poetic Edda. ... The völva, vala, wala (Old High German), seiðkona, or wicce was a female shaman in Norse mythology, and among the Germanic tribes. ... The Norns spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. ...


Another noted mythological practitioner of seiðr was the witch Groa, who attempted to assist Thor, and who is summoned from beyond the grave in the Svipdagsmál. Groa is a witch and practitioner of seidhr, the wife of Aurvandil the Bold. ... Thors battle against the giants, by MÃ¥rten Eskil Winge, 1872 Thor (Old Norse: Þórr) is the red-haired and bearded god of thunder in Norse Mythology and more generally Germanic mythology (Old English: Þunor, Old Dutch and Old High German: Donar, from Proto-Germanic *Þunraz). ... Svipdagsmál or The Lay of Svipdag is an Old Norse work, a part of the Elder Edda, comprised of two poems, The Spell of Groa and The Lay of Fjolsvith. ...


Origins

Shamanism is a tradition which has been maintained widely throughout the world and it is probably of prehistoric origin. Since the publication of Jakob Grimm's socio-linguistical Deutsches Wörterbuch (p. 638) in 1835, scholarship draws a Balto-Finnic link to seid, citing the depiction of its practitioners as such in the sagas and elsewhere, and link seid to the practices of the noajdde, the patrilineal shamans of the Sami people. However, Indo-European origins are also possible (for references see Hall 2004, 121-22). Note that the word seita (Finnish) or sieidde (Sami) is a human-shaped body formed by a tree, or a large and strangely shaped stone or rock and does not involve "magic" or "sorcery"; there is a good case, however, that these words do derive ultimately from seiðr (Parpola 2004). A shaman doctor of Kyzyl. ... Jacob Ludwig Carl Grimm (January 4, 1785 – September 20, 1863), German philologist and mythologist, was born at Hanau, in Hesse-Kassel. ... The Deutsches Wörterbuch was first compiled by the Grimm Brothers. ... The Nordic countries Sami shaman is named noaydde . ... Patrilineality is a system in which one belongs to ones fathers lineage; it generally involves the inheritance of property, names or titles through the male line as well. ... The Sami people (also Sámi, Saami, Lapps, sometimes also Laplanders) are the indigenous people of Sápmi, which today encompasses parts of northern Sweden, Norway, Finland and the Kola Peninsula of Russia. ... Sami is a general name for a group of Finno-Ugric languages spoken in parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia, in Northern Europe. ...


Contemporary reconstruction

Diana Paxson and her group, Hrafnar, have attempted reconstructions of seid from available historical material, particularly the oracular form. Jan Fries traces seid as an inspiration for his "seething" shamanic technique, though he is less concerned with precise historical reconstruction. See further Blain 2002, which discusses different ways in which seidr is being re-constituted today, in Scandinavia, the UK and the US. Diana L. Paxson (born 1943) is a writer, primarily of fantasy and historical fiction novels and short stories. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


Within British Heathenry, seidr according to Blain (2002) is becoming an intrinsic part of spiritual practice. This is not necessarily 'reconstruction', but may relate more to associations of people, land, and spirits. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Germanic neopaganism. ...


References

  • Blain, Jenny. 2002. Nine Worlds of Seid-Magic: Ecstasy and Neo-Shamanism in North European Paganism (London: Routledge)
  • DuBois, Thomas A. 1999. Nordic Religions in the Viking Age (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press), ch. 6.
  • Hall, Alaric Timothy Peter. 2004. 'The Meanings of Elf and Elves in Medieval England' (Ph.D. University of Glasgow).
  • McKinnell, John. 2001. 'On Heiðr', Saga-Book of the Viking Society, 25, 394-417.
  • Parpola, Asko. 2004. 'Old Norse SEIÐ(R), Finnish SEITA and Saami shamanism', in Etymologie, Entlehnungen und Entwicklungen: Festschrift für Jorma Koivulehto zum 70. Geburtstag, ed. by Irma Hyvärinen, Petri Kallio & Jarmo Korhonen, Mémoires de la Société Néophilologique de Helsinki, 64 (Helsinki: Société Néophilologique), pp. 235-273.
  • Karlsson, Thomas. 2002. Uthark - Nightside of the runes. (Ouroboros)
  • Jan Fries, Seidways

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

See also

Ergi and argr are two Old Norse terms of insult, denoting effeminacy or other unmanly behavior. ... Anglo-Saxon nith, Old Norse níð, Teuton/Gothic nid(d), modern German form Neid, in ancient Germanic mythology was the constituting attribute that qualified people as being suspected of being an evil mythological creature called nithing, Old Norse níðing, Teuton/Gothic nidding, more recent High German Neiding. ... Orvar-Odd (i. ... Völuspá (The Prophecy of the Seeress) is the first poem in the Poetic Edda. ... Lokasenna (Lokis flyting, Lokis wrangling, Lokis quarrel) is one of the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda. ... The Saga of Eric the Red is a saga about Eric the Red. ... The Ynglinga saga was originally written in Old Norse by the Icelandic poet Snorri Sturluson about 1225. ... The shaman is an intellectual and spiritual figure who is regarded as possessing power and influence on other peoples in the tribe and performs several functions, primarily that of a healer ( medicine man). The shaman provides medical care, and serves other community needs during crisis times, via supernatural means (means... satr , also known as Odinism, describes a number of attempts to reconstruct the indigenous religions of Northern Europe. ... Look up Norse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up pagan, heathen in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Norse paganism or Nordic religion is a termed used to abbreviate the religion preferably amongst the Germanic tribes living in Nordic countries under pre-Christian period that are supported by archaeology findings and early written materials. ...

External links

Norse mythology
List of Norse gods | Æsir | Vanir | Giants | Elves | Dwarves | Troll | Valkyries | Einherjar | Norns | Odin | Thor | Freyr | Freyja | Loki | Baldr | Týr | Yggdrasil | Ginnungagap | Ragnarök
Sources: Poetic Edda | Prose Edda | The Sagas | Volsung Cycle | Tyrfing Cycle | Rune stones | Old Norse language | Orthography | Later influence
Society: Viking Age | Skald | Kenning | Blót | Seid | Numbers
People, places and things

  Results from FactBites:
 
Seid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1029 words)
Seid (Old Norse: seiðr, sometimes anglicized as "seidhr", "seidh", "seidr", "seithr" or "seith") was a form of shamanism practised by pre-Christian Norse and arguably other Germanic cultures and continued in modern times by people who practice the reconstructionist beliefs of Ásatrú or heathenry.
The goddess Freya is identified in Ynglinga saga as an adept of the mysteries of seid, and it is said that it was she who taught it to Odin: 'Dóttir Njarðar var Freyja.
One possible example of seid in Norse mythology is the prophetic vision given to Odin in the Völuspá by the völva, vala, or seeress after whom the poem is named.
Seid - definition of Seid in Encyclopedia (635 words)
Seid (also seiðr, seidhr) was the form of shamanism practised by pre-Christian Norse and other Germanic cultures and continued in modern times by people who practice the reconstructionist beliefs of Ásatrú or heathenry.
Practitioners of seid were predominantly women (Volva, or seid-kona, lit seidh-woman), although there were male practitioners (seidhmadhr, lit seidh-man) as well.
The goddess Freya is seen as an adept of the mysteries of seid, and it is said that it was she who initiated Odin into its mysteries.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m