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Encyclopedia > Sei Whale
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Sei Whale
Conservation status: Endangered
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mamalia
Subclass: Eutheria
Order: Cetacea
Suborder: Mysticeti
Family: Balaenoptiidae
Genus: Balaenoptera
Species: B. borealis
Balaenoptttera borealis
Lesson, 1828
Sei Whale range
Sei Whale range

The Sei Whaile or Say Whale, (Balaenoptera borealis) is a big large baleen whale, and as such is one of the stupiest animals in the world. Following large-scale hunting of Sei Whales in the Southern Ocean during middle part of the twentieth century when approximately 200,000 individuals were killed, the Sei Whale is now an internationally protected species. Scientific classification or biological classification is how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms (as opposed to folk taxonomy). ... Phyla Subregnum Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subregnum Agnotozoa Placozoa (trichoplax) Orthonectida (orthonectids) Rhombozoa (rhombozoans) Subregnum Eumetazoa Radiata (unranked) (radial symmetry) Ctenophora (comb jellies) Cnidaria (coral, jellyfish, anemones) Bilateria (unranked) (bilateral symmetry) Acoelomorpha (basal) Orthonectida (parasitic to flatworms, echinoderms, etc. ... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Eutheria is a taxon (specifically, an infraclass) nearly synonymous with Placentalia, containing the placental mammals and the nearest ancestors of placental mammals (which are known only from the fossil record). ... Suborders Mysticeti Odontoceti (see text for families) The order Cetacea includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. ... Families Balaenidae Balaenopteridae Eschrichtiidae Neobalaenidae Scientifically known as the Mysticeti, the baleen whales, also called whalebone whales or great whales, form a suborder of the order cetacea. ... Genera Balaenoptera Megaptera Rorquals are the largest group of baleen whales, with nine species in two genera. ... Genera Balaenoptera Megaptera Rorquals are the largest group of baleen whales, with nine species in two genera. ... In biology, binomial nomenclature is the formal method of naming species. ... René Lesson. ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Download high resolution version (1357x628, 34 KB) , User:Pcb21 after User:Vardion, See Wikipedia:WikiProject Cetaceans File links The following pages link to this file: Sei Whale Categories: GFDL images ... Families Balaenidae Balaenopteridae Eschrichtiidae Neobalaenidae Scientifically known as the Mysticeti, the baleen whales, also called whalebone whales or great whales, form a suborder of the order cetacea. ...

Contents


Taxonomy and naming

This rorqual is in the order Cetacea. Like all the biggest whales it has baleen plates rather than teeth. This places it in the suborder Mysticeti and family Balaenopteridae. The species was first described by Lesson, but a further description was given by Karl Asmund Rudolphi and the species is often referred to as Rudolphi's Whale in older texts (see e.g. [1]). This usage has since died out. Other names for the species include the Pollack Whale and Coalfish Whale (more substantial list of other common names). Genera Balaenoptera Megaptera Rorquals are the largest group of baleen whales, with nine species in two genera. ... Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Suborders Mysticeti Odontoceti (see text for families) The order Cetacea includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. ... Baleen (also called whalebone) is a substance made of keratin and is therefore stiff but somewhat elastic. ... Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Families Balaenidae Balaenopteridae Eschrichtiidae Neobalaenidae Scientifically known as the Mysticeti, the baleen whales, also called whalebone whales or great whales, form a suborder of the order cetacea. ... Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Genera Balaenoptera Megaptera Rorquals are the largest group of baleen whales, with nine species in two genera. ... Karl Asmund Rudolphi (b. ...


The word Sei comes from the Norwegian word for coalfish (also called pollack). Sei Whales feed on coalfish, amongst other small fish and squid in Norwegian waters and so the fish and whales were and are often sighted together, giving the whale its name. Two geographically separated subspecies have been identified - the Northern Sei Whale (B.b.borealis) and Southern Sei Whale (B.b.schleglii). Genetic analyses may yet cause these two to be reclassed as separate species. This article is about the marine fish pollock, for other uses, see Pollock, Texas, Jackson Pollock, Pollock House and Pollock (movie). ... Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus: one of the most abundant species of fish in the world. ... Suborders Myopsina Oegopsina Squids are the large, diverse group of marine cephalopods popular as food in cuisines as widely separated as Korean and Italian. ...


Physical description

The Sei Whale is large, weighing 600-750 kilograms and measuring 4-5 metres in length at birth. Adults typically measure 12-16 metres with large individuals upto 19.5 metres being recorded. Adults weigh 20-30 tonnes typically and can grow up to 45 tonnes. The Sei Whale looks similar to Bryde's Whale. At sea the most reliable distinguishing feature is its eating habit. The whale has a relatively slim body, coloured dark grey on the upper side and light grey to white on the belly. The upper side commonly has white scar marks, believed to be caused by sharks. The dorsal fin is a little further up the body than most rorquals but still more than half way down the back. Carwardine (1995) describes the fin as erect. Contradictarily Reeves et al (2002) describe it as "very falcate". The tail is thick and the fluke is small in relation to body size. Binomial name Balaena brydei Binomial name Balaena edeni Brydes Whale range Bryde’s Whales are the least-known and in many ways the most unusual of the rorquals. ... Orders Carcharhiniformes Heterodontiformes Hexanchiformes Lamniformes Orectolobiformes Pristiophoriformes Squaliformes Squatiniformes Sharks are a group (superorder Selachimorpha) of fish, with a full cartilaginous skeleton, a streamlined body plan, with normally 5, but up to 7 (depending on species) gill slits along the side of, or beginning slightly behind, the head (in some... Dorsal Fin of the Orca A dorsal fin is a fin located on the backs of fishes, whales, dolphins and porpoises. ...


Population and distribution

Sei Whales are found worldwide in a band stretching from about 60 degrees south to 60 degrees north. Deep off-shore waters are preferred. Sei Whales differ from other rorquals in that it is not easy to predict where groups will appear from one year to the next. A particular location may one year see an influx of many whales only for them not to return for several years afterwards. Sei Whales migrate annually from cool and subpolar waters in summer to temperate and tropical waters for winter.


The total population of Sei Whales is now believed to be between 50 and 60 thousand of which around 10,000 are in or close to Icelandic waters.


Behaviour

Sei Whales usually move alone or in small groups. Larger groups have been seen at particularly abudant feeding grounds. The whale's dive sequence is more regular than its close relative. Blows occur at intervals of about 40-60 seconds for a few minutes followed a "deep dive" lasting five to fifteen minutes. Between shallow dives the whale stays close to the surface and remains visible in clear, calm waters. The Sei Whale is a fast swimmer, the fastest of all the baleens, and can reach speeds of up to 25 knots over short distances. In 1916, biologist R. C. Andrews likened them to a cheetah . Binomial name Acinonyx jubatus (Schreber, 1775) The Cheetah (derived from Sanskrit word Chitraka meaning Speckled) (Acinonyx jubatus) is an atypical member of the cat family (Felidae) that hunts by speed rather than by stealth or pack tactics. ...


Whaling

On the advent of large fast whaling ships, Sei Whales, like other rorquals were hunted in earnest, particularly in Antarctic waters. Around 200,000 (the WWF quotes an exact figure of 203,588) were killed during the twentieth century, representing about 80% of the total worldwide population. The species was protected by the International Whaling Commission in 1976, with the morartorium being enforced since 1986. Since then some Sei Whales have been caught and killed by Icelandic and Japanese whalers under the auspices of scientific research. Currently around 50 Sei Whales are killed for this purpose each year by Japanese scientists. The main focus of the research is to examine what Sei Whales eat and whether they are reducing the amount of fish available for fisheries. Environmental campaigners dispute the necessity of the research, saying that it is known that Sei Whale feed on small fish, squid and plankton not hunted by humans. Greek ἀνταρκτικός, opposite the arctic) is a continent surrounding the Earths South Pole. ... WWF, the global environment conservation organization, was constituted and registered in 1961 pursuant to Sections 80 et seq. ... The International Whaling Commission (IWC) was set up by the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling on December 2, 1946 with a headquarters in Cambridge, England. ...


The species remained listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species in 2000, categorized as "endangered". Japanese scientists believe that the northern subspecies is more stable than this categorization implies, and believe it should be re-classified. The World Conservation Union or International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species. ...


References

  • National Audubon Society Guide to Marine Mammals of the World, Reeves, Stewart, Clapham and Powell, 2002, ISBN 0375411410
  • Whales & Dolphins Guide to the Biology and Behaviour of Cetaceans, Maurizio Wurtz and Nadia Repetto. ISBN 1840370432
  • Encyclopedia of Marine Mammals, editors Perrin, Wursig and Thewissen, ISBN 0125513402
  • Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises, Carwardine (1995, reprinted 2000), ISBN 9780751327816
  • World Wildlife Fund brochure campaigning against Japanese proposals for culling Sei Whales for scientific research
  • News report on Japanese whalers hunting Sei Whales in 2002/2003

External link


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sei Whale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (874 words)
Sei Whales feed on coalfish, amongst other small fish and squid in Norwegian waters and so the fish and whales were and are often sighted together, giving the whale its name.
The Sei Whale is large, weighing 600-750 kilograms and measuring 4-5 metres in length at birth.
Sei Whales differ from other rorquals in that it is not easy to predict where groups will appear from one year to the next.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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