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Encyclopedia > Segesta

Segesta was the political center of the Elymian people. It is placed in the northwestern part of Sicily, in the province of Trapani and in the vicinity of Alcamo and Gibellina. The Elymian people (Greek Elymoi, Latin Elymi) were an ancient civilization located in Sicily. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian and Sicilian, Σικελία in Greek) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,700 sq. ... Torre della Colombaia Trapani (2004 population 67,456) is a city in the west coast of Sicily in Italy. ... Alcamo is the second largest city in the province of Trapani, in north-western Sicily, Italy. ... Gibellina is a small city in the mountains of central Sicily, Italy. ...

The temple of Segesta seen from the site of the ancient town
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The temple of Segesta seen from the site of the ancient town

According to the tradition used in Virgil's Aeneid, Segesta was founded jointly by the territorial king Acestes (who was son of the local river Crinisus by a Dardanian woman) and by those of Aeneas' folk who wished to remain behind with Acestes to found the city of Acesta. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x1028, 405 KB) Description Temple of Segesta Seen from the site of the ancient town Source Photographer Bernhard J. Scheuvens aka Bjs Date August 2004 Permission photographed by myself Camera Canon EOS 300V with Canon Zoom Lens EF 28-90mm Scan... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x1028, 405 KB) Description Temple of Segesta Seen from the site of the ancient town Source Photographer Bernhard J. Scheuvens aka Bjs Date August 2004 Permission photographed by myself Camera Canon EOS 300V with Canon Zoom Lens EF 28-90mm Scan... A sculpture of Virgil, probably from the 1st century AD. For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... For the group of nine Ancient Egyptian deities, see Ennead. ... In Roman mythology, Acestes (pleasing goat) was son the river Crinisus by a Dardanian woman. ... Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Mythology stubs ... ÉžDardania in Greek mythology is the name of a city founded on Mount Ida by Dardanus from which also the region and the people took their name. ...


The belief that the name of the city was originally Acesta or Egesta and changed to Segesta by the Romans to avoid its ill-omened meaning in Latin is disproved by coins showing that Segesta was indeed the earlier name.


Segesta (Egesta to the Greeks) was one of the major cities of the Elymian people, one of the three indigenous peoples of Sicily. The other major cities of the Elymians were Eryx and Entella. The Elymian people (Greek Elymoi, Latin Elymi) were an ancient civilization located in Sicily. ... ERYX Type anti-tank Nationality France Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA Date of design Production period 1989 Service duration 1994 Operators Canadian, French, Norwegian armies Variants Number built Specifications Type Diameter 0. ... Entella, the modern Contessa Entellina, is an ancient Elymian city. ...


The population of Segesta was mixed Elymian and Ionian Greek, though the Elymians soon Hellenized and took on external characteristics of Greek life.


Segesta was in eternal conflict with Selinus (modern Selinunte), which probably tried to assure itself a port on the Tyrrhenian Sea. The first clashes were in 580-576 BC, and again in 454 BC, but later the conflict would have repercussions for all of Sicily. Selinunte is an ancient Greek archaeological site in the south province of Trapani, in the island of Sicily. ... Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 620s BC - 610s BC - 600s BC - 590s BC - 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC Events and Trends 589 BC - Apries succeeds Psammetichus II as king of Egypt 588 BC _ Nebuchadnezzar II of... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 620s BC 610s BC 600s BC 590s BC 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC 550s BC 540s BC 530s BC 520s BC Events and Trends 579 BC - Servius Tullius succeeds the assassinated Lucius Tarquinius Priscus as king of Rome. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC Years: 459 BC 458 BC 457 BC 456 BC 455 BC - 454 BC - 453 BC 452 BC...


In 415 BC Segesta asked Athens for help against Selinunte, leading to a disastrous Athenian expedition in Sicily (415-413 BC). Later they asked Carthage for help, leading to the total destruction of the city of Selinunte by the hands of Carthage. Segesta remained an ally of Carthage, it was besieged by Dionysius of Syracuse in 397 BC, and it was destroyed by Agathocles in 307 BC, but recovered. Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC - 410s BC - 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC Years: 420 BC 419 BC 418 BC 417 BC 416 BC - 415 BC - 414 BC 413 BC... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα, Athína IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Greece and the birthplace of democracy. ... The Sicilian Expedition was an Athenian expedition to Sicily from 415 BC to 413 BC, during the Peloponnesian War. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC - 410s BC - 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC Years: 420 BC 419 BC 418 BC 417 BC 416 BC - 415 BC - 414 BC 413 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC - 410s BC - 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 418 BC 417 BC 416 BC 415 BC 414 BC - 413 BC - 412 BC 411 BC 410... Ruins of Carthage Carthaginian settlements in the western Mediterranean in the early 3rd century BC. The term Carthage refers both to an ancient city in North Africa — located on the eastern side of Lake Tunis across from the center of modern Tunis in Tunisia — and to the civilization which developed... This page is about Dionysius the tyrant of Syracuse. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC - 390s BC - 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC Years: 402 BC 401 BC 400 BC 399 BC 398 BC - 397 BC - 396 BC 395 BC... For the grindcore band, see Agathocles (band) Agathocles (361 BC - 289 BC), tyrant of Syracuse (317 BC - 289 BC) and king of Sicily (304 BC - 289 BC). ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 312 BC 311 BC 310 BC 309 BC 308 BC 307 BC 306 BC 305 BC 304...


In 276 BC the city was allied with Pyrrhus, but changed side in 260 BC when it surrendered to the Romans. The city was not punished by the Romans for its long alliance with Carthage, but owing to the mythical common origin of the Romans and the Elymians (both descendants of refugees from Troy) it was granted the state of a "free and immune" city. Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC Years: 281 BC 280 BC 279 BC 278 BC 277 BC - 276 BC - 275 BC 274 BC... Pyrrhus of Epirus Pyrrhus (312-272 BC) (Greek: Πυρρος; Latin Pyrrhus) (Latin pronunciation: «PIHR uhs»), king of the Molossians (from ca. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC - 260s BC - 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC Years: 265 BC 264 BC 263 BC 262 BC 261 BC - 260 BC - 259 BC 258 BC... This article is becoming very long. ... Walls of the excavated city of Troy Troy (Ancient Greek Τροία Troia, also Ίλιον Ilion; Latin: Troia, Ilium) is a legendary city and center of the Trojan War, as described in the Trojan War cycle, especially in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. ...


In 104 BC the slave rebellion led by Athenion started in Segesta. Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC - 100s BC - 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC Years: 109 BC 108 BC 107 BC 106 BC 105 BC - 104 BC - 103 BC 102 BC... The Second Servile War was an unsuccessful slave uprising against the Romans on the island of Sicily. ...


Little is known about the city under Roman rule, but it is probable that the population gradually moved to the port city of Castellammare del Golfo due to the better trading opportunities. Castellammare del Golfo is a town in the Trapani Province of Sicily. ...


The city was finally destroyed by the Vandals. It was never resettled. The Vandals sacking Rome, by Heinrich Leutemann (1824-1904) Vandal and Vandali redirect here. ...


The ruins of the city are located on the top of Monte Bàrbaro at 305m above the sea. The city was protected by steep slopes on several sides and by walls on the more gentle slope towards the temple.


From the hilltop there is a splendid view over the valley towards the Gulf of Castellamare. The city controlled several major roads between the coast to the north and the hinterland.


Very little is known about the city plan. Aerial photography indicate a regular city plan, built in part on terraces to overcome the natural sloping terrain. The current remains might be from the reconstruction after the destruction of the city by Agatocles.


The Temple

The unfinished hexastyle doric temple of Segesta, (late 5th century BC) is built on a hilltop just outside the ancient city of Segesta with a commanding view of the surrounding area. It is one of the best-preserved Greek temples, partly because of its isolation— there was never any temptation to dilapidate it for local building materials— and never desecrated because it had never been completed. It would be a peripteral temple if it had ever had an enclosed cella within it. But it was never roofed over, and its columns stand in the rough, waiting to be fluted. The uncompleted Doric temple at Segesta, Sicily, has been waiting for finishing of its surfaces since 430–420 BC The Doric order was one of the three orders or organizational systems of Ancient Greek or classical architecture; the other two orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. ... The Greeks began to build monumental temples in the first half of the 8th century BC. The temples of Hera at Samos and of Poseidon at Isthmia were among the first erected. ... A cella, in Ancient Greek and Roman temples was the central room that housed cult statues. ...


It was built by the Elymian people, probably around 430-420 BC, but it was never completed. The Elymian people (Greek Elymoi, Latin Elymi) were an ancient civilization located in Sicily. ...


It is a Doric temple of a peripteral type with 6×14 columns on a base measuring 21×56m and three steps high. The structure of the temple is intact with entablature and tympana in place, but it was clearly never finished. The columns are unfluted, the tabs used for lifting the blocks are still present on the base, and there are no traces of a cella or a roof. Bahut a dwarf-wall of plain masonry, carrying the roof of a cathedral or church and masked or hidden behind the balustrade. ...


The temple of Segesta is, in its construction, style, and size, a standard product for the late 5th century BC, but its unfinished state and its remarkable state of conservation makes it one of the most important surviving Hellenic temples in the world. (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 5th century BC started on January 1, 500 BC and ended on December 31, 401 BC. // Overview The Parthenon of Athens seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ...


The Theater

The theater

The theater is in a beautiful place, in the top of a mountain, from which site a vast and scenic panorama can be seen to the north. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 589 KB) Description Segesta (Trapani, Sicilia), Teatro greco Author Alec File links The following pages link to this file: Segesta Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 589 KB) Description Segesta (Trapani, Sicilia), Teatro greco Author Alec File links The following pages link to this file: Segesta Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ...


External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Segesta

Coordinates: 37°56′N 12°50′E Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Segesta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (817 words)
According to the tradition used in Virgil's Aeneid, Segesta was founded jointly by the territorial king Acestes (who was son of the local river Crinisus by a Dardanian woman) and by those of Aeneas' folk who wished to remain behind with Acestes to found the city of Acesta.
Segesta was in eternal conflict with Selinus (modern Selinunte), which probably tried to assure itself a port on the Tyrrhenian Sea.
Segesta remained an ally of Carthage, it was besieged by Dionysius of Syracuse in 397 BC, and it was destroyed by Agathocles in 307 BC, but recovered.
Station Information - Segesta (624 words)
Segesta is an ancient Hellenistic city in the northwestern part of Sicily, in the province of Trapani and in the vicinity of Alcamo and Gibellina.
Segesta was in eternal conflict with Selinunte, which probably tried to assure itself a port on the Tyrrhenian Sea.
Segesta remained an ally of Carthage, it was besieged by Dionysius of Syracuse in 397 BC, and it was destroyed by Agatocles in 307 BC, but recovered.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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