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Encyclopedia > Sega 32X
Sega 32X
Sega Genesis 32X
Manufacturer Sega
Type Video game console add-on
Generation Fourth generation
First available NA November 1994
JP December 3, 1994
EU January 1995
CPU 2x SH-2 - 32-bit RISC (23 MHz) [1]
Media Cartridge,
CD-ROM with Sega Mega-CD/Sega CD
Top-selling game Knuckles' Chaotix
Successor Sega Saturn

The Sega 32X (Japanese: セガ スーパー32X) is an add-on for the Sega Mega Drive video game console by Sega. Picture of Sega 32X Picture taken by me (Eike) and licensed under the GFDL. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A console manufacturer is a company that manufactures and distributes video game consoles. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Game console redirects here. ... Hi all! Goog directory <a href=http://tajga. ... Video games were introduced as a commercial entertainment medium in 1971, becoming the basis for an important entertainment industry in the late 1970s/early 1980s in the United States, Japan, and Europe. ... In the history of video games, the 16-bit era was the fourth generation of video game consoles. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... CPU redirects here. ... Cartridge for the VIC 20 homecomputer In various types of electronic equipment, a cartridge can refer one method of adding different functionality or content (e. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... The Sega Mega-CD (Japanese: メガCD) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia, and Japan. ... This is a list of video games that have sold one million copies or more. ... Knuckles Chaotix, in Japan called simply Chaotix, is a platform game in the Sonic the Hedgehog series, developed by the Sonic Team and published by Sega for the Sega 32X. The game was released in North America in March 1995, in Japan on April 21, 1995 and finally in Europe... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... Game console redirects here. ... This article is about the video game company. ...


In Japan, it was distributed under the name Sega Super 32X. In North America, its name was the Sega Genesis 32X. In Europe, Australia, and other countries that use PAL, it was called the Sega Mega Drive 32X. Most gamers, for simplicity's sake, refer to it as just the "32X". The picture to the right is of a Sega 32X mounted on a Sega Genesis V2. The PAL region is a video game publication territory which covers Australasia and the majority of Eurasia. ...

Contents

Market history

With the release of the Super Famicom in Japan and the Super NES in North America, Sega felt the need to leapfrog Nintendo in the technological department. The Sega Mega-CD, known as Sega CD in North America, had not worked as well, in a business sense, as Sega had wanted it to. Sega had various developments underway, and focused most of its energy on the then new Sega Saturn. Some used System 16 technology, as the Sega Mega Drive and other arcade games did. The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... The Sega System 16 is an arcade system board released by Sega in 1985. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ...


The 32X was released in mid-November 1994 in North America for $159, Japan on December 3rd, 1994 for ¥16,800, and Europe in January 1995 for £170 / DM 400. ISO 4217 Code DEM User(s) Germany, Montenegro, Kosovo ERM Since 13 March 1979 Fixed rate since 31 December 1998 Replaced by €, non cash 1 January 1999 Replaced by €, cash 1 January 2002 € = 1. ...


Technical aspects

The Sega 32X can only be used in conjunction with a Mega Drive/Genesis system; it is plugged in where the cartridge bay is. Besides playing its own cartridges, it also acts as a passthrough for Mega Drive games so it can be a permanent attachment (The Sega Virtua Processor based Virtua Racing was the only exception - the game will not run on a Mega Drive with a 32X unit attached due to its processor). Also Sega Power Base Converter (which allows player to play older 8-bit Sega Master System games) could not be used on the 32X. This is because Power base Converter needs a Z80 processor inside the Genesis or Mega Drive, and 32X prevents this. Japanese SVP logo Cartridge of Virtua Racing (Japanese version) Circuit board from the cartridge featuring the SVP in the centre The Sega Virtua Processor (short: SVP) is a DSP introduced by Sega in 1994 to expand the Sega Mega Drives (Sega Genesis in North America) 3D capabilities. ... Virtua Formula 8-machine plus commentator setup at the extinct Sega Virtualand, inside the Luxor Casino, Las Vegas, USA, in 1993. ...


The 32X came with a spacer so it would fit properly with the Mega Drive II. [2] It could be used with the Sega Multi-Mega/Sega CDX system, but the spacer would not accommodate the CDX, which created a number of user-unfriendly conditions in the unit. Without the use of the spacer on a Mega Drive II, some of the 32X hardware was left exposed and vulnerable. The combined unit was also very prone to tipping over, risking damage to the unit and games. In addition to the physical problems, there was also an issue with FCC approval. The Multi-Mega or CDX was a 16-bit video game console released in 1994, combining the Sega Mega Drive (Sega Genesis in North America) and one of its add-ons, the Sega Mega-CD (Sega CD in North America), into a single compact unit as a final attempt by... FCC redirects here. ...


Most 32X games cannot be played unless the distribution region of the game matches the region of the console. A few games are not locked and can be played on a console from any region (e.g. FIFA 96). Two games, Darxide and FIFA Soccer '96, were only released for the PAL 32X. EA Sports FIFA 2006 PSP cover, featuring Wayne Rooney and Ronaldinho FIFA Soccer, also known more recently as FIFA Football, and just FIFA, is a popular series of football (soccer) video games, released yearly by Electronic Arts under the EA Sports label. ...


All but one of the games released for the Japanese market were released in the United States, albeit some had different names. The one Japanese-only game was Sangokushi IV (known as Romance of the Three Kingdoms IV).

Sega Mega-CD 32X
Sega Mega-CD 32X

In addition to regular cartridge-based 32X games, there were also a very small number of CD-ROM games for the 32X. These games were labeled with Sega Mega-CD 32X (Sega CD 32X in North America). As the name suggests, these required both the 32X and Mega-CD/Sega CD addons. The lack of a significant userbase due to the high cost of purchasing all three necessary components saw only five games released, only one of those developed by Sega. [3] The most notable of these was a new version of the infamous Night Trap with 32,768 onscreen colors instead of the 64 found on the regular Mega-CD/Sega CD version. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 485 pixelsFull resolution (955 × 579 pixel, file size: 90 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sega 32X ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 485 pixelsFull resolution (955 × 579 pixel, file size: 90 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sega 32X ... Night Trap is a video game that was released on October 15, 1992. ...


One little-known aspect of the 32X was its vastly improved audio subsystem, known as Q-Sound and developed by QSound Labs. While this theoretically gave the system audio capabilities that outstripped even the Super NES, the sound chipset proved to be poorly documented and exceptionally difficult to program for. As a result, most games ignored the Q-Sound system and used the Mega Drive's on-board sound chip, thus leaving the 32X's audio capabilities largely untapped. To this day, emulators still have difficulty providing sound emulation for the few titles that did make use of the Q-Sound system. QSound is a sound enhancement system from QSound Labs to create 3D audio effects from a stereo source. ... QSound Labs is a supplier of 3D audio effects soft- and hardware. ...


Technical specifications

  • Processor: Two SH2 32-bit RISC processors with a clock speed of 23.011 MHz, approx 20 MIPS each
  • Video RAM: Two linear framebuffers with support for RLE compression and an overdraw mode to simplify compositing objects with transparency. All scaling, rotation, and 3D operations are performed in software on the SH2 processors.
  • ROM (BIOS): 3 Kb
  • Color depth: 32,768 simultaneous colors on screen at standard Mega Drive/Genesis resolution. Video output can overlay Mega Drive/Genesis graphics or vice versa. Mega Drive/Genesis video effects such as shadow or highlight do not affect 32X video.
  • Memory: 256KB (2 MBit) program RAM and two 128KB (1 MBit) framebuffers.
  • Audio: Stereo 10-bit PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) mixing with Mega Drive/Genesis sound for a total of 12 audio channels of varying capability, 22 with the addition of a Mega-CD/Sega CD.
  • I/O: Same as Mega Drive/Genesis.
  • Storage: 32X cartridges are fundamentally the same as Mega Drive/Genesis cartridges with some small differences in the plastic casing. A few CD-ROM games were developed that also required a Mega-CD/Sega CD.
  • Compatibility: Compatible with Mega Drive/Genesis models 1 and 2, JVC Wondermega/X'Eye and the Multi-Mega/CDX. The 32X does not work with the Genesis 3 which lacks some of the necessary interface logic.
  • Size & weight (more or less) : 107x205x110 mm 495 gr [4]

The SuperHichem (or SH) is brandname of a certain microcontroller and microprocessor architecture. ... 32-bit is a term applied to processors, and computer architectures which manipulate the address and data in 32-bit chunks. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Multi-Mega or CDX was a 16-bit video game console released in 1994, combining the Sega Mega Drive (Sega Genesis in North America) and one of its add-ons, the Sega Mega-CD (Sega CD in North America), into a single compact unit as a final attempt by...

History

Development

On January 8, 1994, Hayau Nakayama, then CEO of Sega, ordered his company to make a 32-bit cartridge based console that would be in stores by Christmas 1994. This would at first be named "Project Jupiter", but after Sega found CD technology cheaper, they decided to modify it instead of dropping the cartridge project (that would be called "Project Saturn"). Hideki Sato and some other Sega of Japan engineers came over to collaborate about the project with Sega of America's Joe Miller. The first idea was a new Mega Drive/Genesis with more colors and a 32-bit processor. Miller thought that an add-on to the Mega Drive/Genesis would be a better idea, because he felt that gamers would not buy an improved version of the Mega Drive/Genesis. And so, this project was codenamed Project Mars, and Sega of America was going to shape the project. is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... Sega (&#12475;&#12460;) is a video game software and hardware developer, and a former console manufacturer. ... Sega (&#12475;&#12460;) is a video game software and hardware developer, and a former console manufacturer. ...


The 32X was primarily envisioned as a system which would extend the life of the Sega Genesis and provide revenue while the installed userbase of the Sega Saturn slowly grew. The Mega Drive/Genesis was a 16-bit video game console released by Sega in Japan (1988), Europe (1990) and most of the rest of the world as the Mega Drive. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ...


Launch

The video-gaming public first got a glimpse at the Summer 1994 CES in Chicago. Players highly anticipated the system. The console was unmasked as the 32X, with a price projection of $170 (USD), at a gamers' day, held by Sega of America in September 1994. Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... USD redirects here. ...


The 32X hit the market in North America in November 1994, during the same month the Sega Saturn was released in Japan. Many industry insiders speculated that the 32X was doomed from the beginning as the Sega Saturn hardware was widely regarded as more powerful than the 32X and had the support of many Japanese third party software developers (a necessary resource required for any gaming platform's long term success) which the 32X was sorely lacking.


Only 500,000 consoles had been produced for North American consumption, yet orders were in the millions. The console allegedly had numerous mechanical problems. Games had been rushed for the system in the run up to Christmas 1994. Some early games came with errors in programming, causing crashes and glitches on certain titles. Other games required leaving out parts in order to make the Christmas deadline; for example, the 32X version of Doom is missing almost half the levels present on the PC and even the Super Nintendo version; plus, Doom 32X was criticised for having worse sound than the Super Nintendo version. [5] Many complained that their 32X was not working with their Mega Drive/Genesis or television and Sega was forced to give away adapters. Doom (or DOOM)[1] is a 1993 computer game by id Software that is a landmark title in the first-person shooter genre. ...


Since this was an expensive add-on system, Sega decided to offer a £50 discount on games with the console in Europe. However, the offer came in the form of rebate vouchers, which were difficult to take advantage of. Just like its North American counterpart, this console was initially popular. Orders exceeded one million, but not enough were produced, and supply shortage problems arose.


Decline

By mid-1995, the time the Sega executives realized their blunder, it was too late. Developers and licensees had abandoned this console in favor of what they perceived to be a true 32-bit console, the Sega Saturn. Even though the 32X was a 32-bit system, the games did not appear to take full advantage of 32 bit processing; many games were rushed and produced in 2D. Many were just slightly-enhanced ports of Genesis or old arcade games such as Space Harrier. In reality, as stated by Steve Snake, creator of NBA Jam, NBA Jam T.E. and Mortal Kombat II were seriously pushing the console even though they looked like minor enhancements. He cites that people were expecting far too much from it, and over-hyping from magazines had helped to hurt it. [6] The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... Space Harrier is a forward scrolling shooter game, released by Sega in 1985. ...


Due to successful marketing, customers perceived the Sega Saturn, Nintendo 64, and the Sony PlayStation as the true next-generation consoles, due to their rich launch titles and 3D graphics. Also, customers perceived that Sega abandoned the 32X despite promises to the contrary, due to the launch of the Saturn. The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... The original PlayStation was produced in a light grey colour; the more recent PSOne redesign sports a smaller more rounded case. ...


Console makers, prior to the launch of PlayStation 2, would often abandon platforms and offer no backwards compatibility with older systems. For this reason, Sega's 32X customers felt cheated because of the apparent lower quality of the games, and the inevitability of obsolescence. PS2 redirects here. ...


Store shelves became littered with unwanted Sega 32X systems, and prices for a new one dropped as low as $19.95. (Some have claimed that video game exchange stores became so filled with 32X systems, the stores refused to accept the console--even at no cost.[7]) Sega planned a console named the Sega Neptune, which would have been a Mega Drive/Genesis and 32X in one. However, by the time a prototype was developed, the Sega Saturn was going to be released, and Sega canceled the Neptune.


The last game made for the 32X in the US was Spider-Man: Web of Fire (1996). The last ever 32X game was Darxide, which had been intended by Frontier Developments to be a launch title for the ill-fated Neptune. [8] Both these games now command a high value from collectors — but especially Darxide (up to $1000) due to its scarcity, reputation and auspicious creator (David Braben, co-writer of the groundbreaking game Elite). Nevertheless, it is exceeded in rarity by the European PAL versions of the games Primal Rage and T-Mek. For obscure reasons a mere handful of copies of these games are known to be in circulation - with T-Mek being so scarce that until a copy surfaced on eBay in late 2005, it was widely held that the PAL release was only a rumor. The appearance of a copy has fueled speculation that other rumored but unconfirmed PAL games may also exist, in particular BC Racers. Elite is a seminal space trading computer game, originally published by Acornsoft in 1984 for the BBC Micro and Acorn Electron computers. ... Primal Rage is a versus fighting game developed and published by Atari Games. ... Cabinet Screenshot Cabinet from another angle T-Mek is a 2-player, sit-down, virtual reality fighting arcade game. ... Bc Racers is a racing game released by Core Design in 1993 and released by the company as freeware in 1995 (PC version). ...


For many years prior, console makers promised devices like the 32X (for consoles such as the ColecoVision, Intellivision II, and some Atari systems) that would extend and enhance the original system. The 32X was the first product released that fundamentally altered the original console's abilities. However, deficient in software titles and lacking the 3D capabilities the gaming community demanded, the add-on technology represented a dead end, ultimately punishing early adopters. Ignorant of the idea that console systems' primary strength is in standardization, Sega had created three different platforms (the Sega Mega Drive, and the Mega-CD/Sega CD and the 32X add-ons) all under the same banner, stealing valuable shelf space from itself and confusing both vendors and consumers in the process. The entire episode demonstrated that producing such add-ons is likely to have detrimental effects on a system's brand marketing strategy. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Intellivision is a video game console released by Mattel in 1979. ... This article is about a corporate game company. ... The discipline of brand management was started at Procter & Gamble PLC as a result of a famous memo by Neil H. McElroy. ...


Finally, in October 1995, Sega's CEO Hayau Nakayama ordered that all Sega consoles, except the Saturn, be canceled in order to focus its limited resources on the Saturn system. [6][9]


Sega Neptune

The Sega Neptune was a two-in-one Mega Drive/Genesis and 32X console which Sega planned to release in 1994 or 1995. The proposed retail price for the unit was US$200. 1994 1994 in games 1993 in video gaming 1995 in video gaming Notable events of 1994 in computer and video games. ... 1995 1995 in games 1994 in video gaming 1996 in video gaming Notable events of 1995 in video gaming. ... USD redirects here. ...


Sega had admitted how expensive and problematic the 32X was, so it was decided to make a combined version of the Mega Drive/Genesis and 32X; however, by the time a prototype came out, the Sega Saturn was ready for release. Sega felt that consumers would not be interested in the Sega Neptune, so the project was scrapped. There are several prototypes, and at least one was declared to work.


Electronic Gaming Monthly used the Sega Neptune as an April Fool's Joke in its April 2001 issue. The issue included a small article in which the writers announced that Sega had found a warehouse full of old Sega Neptunes, and were selling them on a website.[citation needed] The site referenced redirected to an online shopping site, where internet users were greeted by an "April Fools!" after adding the product to the cart.[citation needed] Electronic Gaming Monthly (often abbreviated to EGM) is an American video game magazine. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 2001 2001 in games 2000 in video gaming 2002 in video gaming Notable events of 2001 in video gaming. ...


See also

This is a list of games for the Sega 32X video game system, organized alphabetically by their title (there are not games for all letters however). ...

References

  1. ^ [1994] "Mega Drive 32X Hardware Information", Sega Mega Drive 32X instruction manual. Sega Enterprises, 20. 
  2. ^ 32X hardware pack-ins. vidgame.net. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  3. ^ North American 32X/CD 32X releases. gooddealgames.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  4. ^ 32X Specifications. digitpress.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  5. ^ Doom for the 32X. sega-16.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  6. ^ a b Project Mars: Anatomy of a Failure. goodcowfilms.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  7. ^ 32X Info. videogamecritic.net. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  8. ^ DarXide for the 32X. eidolons-inn.net. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  9. ^ 32X history. cyberiapc.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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