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Encyclopedia > Seductive Poison
Seductive Poison
Paperback Edition
Author Deborah Layton
Country United States
Language English
Subject(s) Destructive cults,
mass suicide
Genre(s) nonfiction
Publisher Anchor
Released November 9, 1999
Media type Paperback, (second edition)
Pages 368
ISBN ISBN 0385489846

Seductive Poison: A Jonestown Survivor's Story of Life and Death in the Peoples Temple is a first-hand account of the incidents surrounding Peoples Temple, written by survivor Deborah Layton. The first edition of the book was published by Doubleday in hardcover on November 3, 1998, and the second edition was published in paperback on November 9, 1999. A survivor/defector of Jonestown who, in a sworn affidavit wrote that during one of the white nights [mass suicide rehearsals], people were told that they would die, and were forced to drink unsweetened Flavor Aid that they thought contained poison. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A destructive cult is a group (often called cult) with strange beliefs (especially religious ones) and which exploits or destroys its own members or others. ... Mass suicide occurs when a number of people kill themselves together with one another or for the same reason and is usually connected to a real or perceived persecution. ... Non-fiction is a truthful account or representation of a subject which is composed of facts. ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Doubleday is one of the largest book publishing companies in the world. ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


Deborah Layton was a high-level member of the Peoples Temple for seven years. When she returned to the United States, Layton submitted an affidavit about the compound in Guyana, which helped convince United States Congressman Leo Ryan to make his unfortunate journey there[1]. Layton is also the sister of Lawrence John (Larry) Layton, who was the only one ever prosecuted for the murders of the congressional team by Temple members[2]. Layton was released on parole in 2002, largely due to the testimony of Vernon Gosney, one of the few survivors of the massacre.[3] The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Leo Joseph Ryan, Jr. ...

Contents

University text

Dr. Philip Zimbardo stated of the book: "Her privileged status as a trusted inner circle member - responsible for depositing millions of dollars in foreign banks - gives her story an untold perspective on this charismatic leader and the transformations of human nature that took place among so many followers under his domination. Layton's is a remarkable narrative that reads like a novel, but sadly is all too true."[4] Philip G. Zimbardo (born March 23, 1933) is an American psychologist, best-known for his Stanford prison experiment and bestselling introductions to psychology. ...


In 2005, Deborah Layton was a guest speaker for Zimbardo's psychology class at Stanford University, where she spoke about her book. The course was entitled: Exploring Human Nature, and Layton was brought in as a guest to share her expertise on cults[5]. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in an unincorporated area of Santa Clara County. ... This article is becoming very long. ...


The book is required reading at California State University of Fresno, California, and is a part of the college curriculum. The book is also a part of the curriculum at Gonzaga University's Doctorate Program for Leadership[6]. The California State University (CSU) is one of three public higher education systems in the state of California, the other two being the University of California system and the California Community College System. ... Nickname: Fresno, the All American City & Raisin Capital of the World Location in the state of California County Fresno  - Mayor Alan Autry Area    - City 271. ... It has been suggested that Gonzaga Bulletin be merged into this article or section. ...


Media coverage

The book was featured as a cover story by the Chicago Tribune, which stated that "Layton's account is clearly the most important personal testimony to emerge from the Jonestown tragedy."[7] The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois. ...


The book was also featured on the front-page of the San Francisco Chronicle, in an article entitled: "20 Years Later, Jonestown Survivor Confronts Horrors". The article stated that the book "..paints a convincing picture of what it was like to spend seven years in the notorious cult, only to escape a few months before the tragedy that gave Jonestown its infamous place in history as the site of the largest mass suicide in modern times."[8] The book was later a part of the tenth annual San Francisco Bay Area Book Festival[9]. The San Francisco Chronicle, the self-described Voice of the West, is Northern Californias largest newspaper. ... USGS satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ...


Fox Television's Documentary Series won an Emmy Award for a program in which Layton was featured discussing the book. The book was also featured on Dateline NBC, The Leeza Show, CNN, and the Arts and Entertainment Network. The Fox Broadcasting Company is a television network in the United States. ... An Emmy Award. ... Dateline NBC title card Current co-anchors Stone Phillips and Ann Curry. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... The A&E Network is a cable and satellite television network based in New York, New York. ...


External Links

The San Francisco Chronicle, the self-described Voice of the West, is Northern Californias largest newspaper. ...

See Also

This article is about the cult leader; for other people named Jim Jones, see Jim Jones (disambiguation). ... Jonestown was a communal settlement built in 1974 in northwestern Guyana by the Peoples Temple, a cult from California led by Jim Jones, for whom the settlement was named. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cover page of the book Jonestown Carnage: A CIA Crime The Jonestown Carnage: a CIA Crime is a book published by Progress Publishers, USSR. S.F.Alinin, B.G.Antonov and A.N.Itskov jointly authored the book in Russian, which was later translated into English by Nadeshda Burova and... Mass suicide occurs when a number of people kill themselves together with one another or for the same reason and is usually connected to a real or perceived persecution. ... Cult suicide is that phenomenon by which some religious groups, in this context often referred to as cults, have led to their membership committing suicide. ... This article is becoming very long. ... A destructive cult is a group (often called cult) with strange beliefs (especially religious ones) and which exploits or destroys its own members or others. ...

References

  1. ^ AFFIDAVIT OF DEBORAH LAYTON BLAKEY, RE THE THREAT AND POSSIBILITY OF MASS SUICIDE BY MEMBERS OF THE PEOPLES TEMPLE
  2. ^ Indiana Jones's Temple of Doom, Bettina Drew, February 1, 1999., The Nation.
  3. ^ “Larry Layton and Peoples Temple: Twenty-Five Years Later” by Frank Bell, “Alternative Considerations of Jonestown and Peoples Temple,” sponsored by the Department of Religious Studies at San Diego State University
  4. ^ Review, Philip Zimbardo, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, Stanford University.
  5. ^ Psych 187, Course Guests, Deborah Layton, bio, Stanford University.
  6. ^ Psych 187, Course Guests, Deborah Layton, bio, Stanford University.
  7. ^ Chicago Tribune, Book Review, Cover-Story, November 22, 1998.
  8. ^ 20 Years Later, Jonestown Survivor Confronts Horrors, San Francisco Chronicle, November 2, 1998
  9. ^ Tilting Toward the Golden Gate: Great minds gather for the S.F. Bay Area Book Festival, David Kipen, Book Editor, October 10, 1999, San Francisco Chronicle

 
 

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