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Encyclopedia > Sed festival

The sed festival (or heb sed) was an Ancient Egyptian ceremony held to celebrate the continued rule of a pharaoh. ... Pharaoh (Hebrew פַּרְעֹה (without niqqud: פרעה), Standard Hebrew Parʿo, Tiberian Hebrew Parʿōh, Arabic فرعون) is a title used to refer to the kings (of godly status) in ancient Egypt. ...


Sed festivals were jubilees held after a ruler had held the throne for Thirty Years and then every three (or four in one case) years after that. However, a few [Pharaoh]s violated the traditional 30 year rule particularly in the case of Hatshepsut who celebrated her Jubilee in her 16th Year at Thebes. However, some Egyptologists such as Von Beckerath, in his book Chronology of the Egyptian Pharaohs, speculate that Hatshepsut may have done so to mark the passing of 30 years from the death of her father, Tuthmose I, from whom she gained all of her legitimacy to rule Egypt. If true, then the intervening king, Tuthmose II would have enjoyed a reign of 13 Full Years as Manetho states in his Epitome. The Jubilee in both the Jewish and Christian traditions is a year of celebration and forgiveness originally held every 50 years. ... Jürgen von Beckerath (born 19 February 1920) is a German egyptologist. ...


Sed Festivals contained elaborate temple rituals and included processions, offerings and other acts of religious devotion. The earliest Sed Festival for which we have evidence is that of Pepi I in the South Saqqara Stone Annal document and the most lavish, judging by surviving inscriptions, were those of Ramesses II and Amenhotep III. Sed Festivals were also celebrated by the later Libyan era kings such as Shoshenq III, Shoshenq V, Osorkon I who had his Second Heb Sed in his Year 33 and Osorkon II. Osorkon II himself constructed a Massive Temple at Bubastis complete with a red Granite Gateway decorated with scenes of this Jubilee to celebrate his own Heb Sed. Pepi I Meryre (reigned 2332 - 2283 BC) was the third king of the Sixth dynasty of Egypt. ... Ramesses II, Abu Simbel Ramesses II (also known as Ramesses the Great and alternatively transcribed as Ramses and Rameses) was an Egyptian pharaoh of the nineteenth dynasty. ... nomen or birth name Nebmaatre Amenhotep III (called Nibmu(`w)areya in the Amarna letters) was an Egyptian pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty. ... // Reign Sekhemkheperre Osorkon I was the second king of Egypts 22nd Dynasty and ruled around 922 BC-887 BC. He succeeded his father Shoshenq I who died within 2-3 years of his successful Biblical campaign against both Israel and Judah. ... Osorkons cartouche from his tomb in Tanis Usimare Setepenamun Osorkon II was a pharaoh of the Twenty-second Dynasty Ancient Egypt between 872 BC to c. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Egypt: Grand Festivals in Ancient Egypt (2696 words)
Although festivals were a very important part of the lives of the ancient people throughout Upper and Lower Egypt (many nomes or districts had their own local festivals), there were a few festivals that were known throughout the land.
This festival is known from the Old Kingdom and it grew in importance due to the establishment of Egypt's capital at Memphis during the dawn of Egyptian history.
It should be noted that this festival, associated with Min, was clearly one of fecundity and the virility of rebirth, and therefore the third festival of the year focusing on birth, with the agricultural aspect predominating.
Sed festival - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (354 words)
The sed festival (or heb sed) was an ancient Egyptian ceremony held to celebrate the continued rule of a pharaoh.
Sed festivals were jubilees held after a ruler had held the throne for thirty years and then every three (or four in one case) years after that.
One of the earliest Sed festivals for which we have evidence is that of Pepi I in the South Saqqara Stone Annal document and the most lavish, judging by surviving inscriptions, were those of Ramesses II and Amenhotep III.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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