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Encyclopedia > Second Council of Nicaea
Second Council of Nicaea
Date 787
Accepted by Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy
Previous Council (Catholic) Third Council of Constantinople
Previous Council (Orthodox) Council in Trullo
Next Council Fourth Council of Constantinople
Convoked by Empress Irene
Presided by Irene
Attendance 350 (two papal legates)
Topics of discussion Iconoclasm
Documents and statements veneration of icons approved
chronological list of Ecumenical councils

The Second Council of Nicaea was the seventh ecumenical council of Christianity; it met in 787 AD in Nicaea (site of the First Council of Nicaea) to restore the honoring of icons (or, holy images), which had been suppressed by imperial edict inside the Byzantine Empire during the reign of Leo III (717 - 741). His son, Constantine V (741 - 775), had held a synod to make the suppression official. This article is about the year 787. ... This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. ... ... The Sixth Ecumenical Council met on November 7, 680 for its first session; it ended its meetings, said to have been eighteen in number, on September 16 of 681. ... Both the Fifth Ecumenical Council and the Sixth Ecumenical Council failed to produce disciplinary norms, for which reason the emperor Justinian II convoked an assembly in 692 to meet in Constantinople in the same domed hall where the Sixth Council had been held, called in Trullo (=under the dome). ... The Fourth Council of Constantinople is considered an ecumenical council by Roman Catholics and met from October 5, 869 to February 28, 870. ... This solidus struck under Irene reports the legend bASILISSH, Basilissa. ... This solidus struck under Irene reports the legend bASILISSH, Basilissa. ... Illustration of the Beeldenstorm during the Dutch reformation Literally, iconoclasm is the destruction of religious icons and other sacred images or monuments, usually for religious or political motives. ... In Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, an ecumenical council is a meeting of the bishops of the whole church convened to discuss and settle matters of Church doctrine and practice. ... In Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, an ecumenical council is a meeting of the bishops of the whole church convened to discuss and settle matters of Church doctrine and practice. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament writings of his early followers. ... This article is about the year 787. ... Nicaea (now İznik) is a city in Anatolia (now part of Turkey) which is known primarily as the site of two major meetings (or Ecumenical councils) in the early history of the Christian church. ... The First Council of Nicaea, which took place during the reign of the emperor Constantine in 325 AD, was the first ecumenical (from Greek oikumene, worldwide) conference of bishops of the Christian Church. ... The Savior (1410s, by Andrei Rublev) An icon (from Greek , eikon, image) is an image, picture, or representation; it is a sign or likeness that stands for an object by signifying or representing it, or by analogy, as in semiotics; in computers an icon is a symbol on the monitor... Imperial - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... An edict is an announcement of a law, often associated with monarchism. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centred at its capital in Constantinople. ... Leo III (disambiguation). ... Events March 25 - Leo III usurps the throne of Byzantium August 15 - Muslama begins the Second Arab siege of Constantinople. ... Events June 18 - Constantine V succeeds Leo III as emperor of the Byzantine Empire. ... Constantine V Copronymus (The Dung-named) was Byzantine emperor from 741 to 775. ... Events June 18 - Constantine V succeeds Leo III as emperor of the Byzantine Empire. ... Events Leo IV succeeds Constantine V as Byzantine Emperor. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine or administration. ...


Although the veneration of icons had been finally abolished by the energetic measures of Constantine V, whose iconoclastic tendencies were shared by his son, Leo IV, after the latter's early death, his widow Irene, as regent for her son, began its restoration, moved thereto by personal inclination and political considerations. Constantine V Copronymus (The Dung-named) was Byzantine emperor from 741 to 775. ... Illustration of the Beeldenstorm during the Dutch reformation Literally, iconoclasm is the destruction of religious icons and other sacred images or monuments, usually for religious or political motives. ... Leo IV, called Chozar or the Khazar (c. ...


When, in 784, the imperial secretary Patriarch Tarasius was appointed successor to the Patriarch Paul IV, he accepted on the condition that intercommunion with the other churches should be reestablished; that is, that the images should be restored. However, a council, claiming to be ecumenical, had abolished the veneration of icons, so another ecumenical council was necessary for its restoration. Pope Adrian I was invited to participate, and gladly accepted. However, the invitation intended for the oriental patriarchs could not even be delivered to them. The Roman legates were an archbishop and an abbot, each named Peter. Events August 31 - Paul IV abdicates as Patriarch of Constantinople December 25 - Tarasius elected Patriarch of Constantinople The Japanese capital moved away from Nara. ... Saint Tarasius (mid-8th century-February 25, 806) was Patriarch of Constantinople from 784 until his death in 806. ... Originally a patriarch was a man who exercised autocratic authority as a pater familias over an extended family. ... Pope Paul IV Paul IV, né Gianni Carafa (June 28, 1476 - August 18, 1559) was Pope from May 23, 1555. ... In a narrow sense, intercommunion is the same thing as open communion: the practice of serving communion to all Christians rather than only to those of ones own denomination. ... A church building is a building used in Christian worship. ... Adrian, or Hadrian I, (died December 25, 795) was pope from 772 to 795. ... The term the Orient - literally meaning sunrise, east - is traditionally used to refer to Near, Middle, and Far Eastern countries. ... The Roman Catholic Church, also called the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian body in the world. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ... Abbots coat of arms An abbot (from the Hebrew ab, a father, through the Syriac abba, Latin abbas (genitive form, abbatis), Old English abbad, ; German Abt; French abbé) is the head and chief governor of a community of monks, called also in the East hegumenos or The English version...


In 786, the council met in the Church of the Apostles in Constantinople. However, soldiers in collusion with the opposition entered the church, and broke up the assembly. As a result, the government resorted to a stratagem. Under the pretext of a campaign, the iconoclastic bodyguard was sent away from the capital — disarmed and disbanded. Events A council is organized in Constantinople, but disturbed by soldiers Beatus of Liébana, Spanish monk, publishes his Births Emperor Saga of Japan Emperor Junna of Japan Deaths Other 786 is the total value of the letters of Bismillah al-Rahman al-Rahim. In Arabic there are two methods... Map of Constantinople. ...


The council was again summoned to meet, this time in Nicaea, since Constantinople was still distrusted. The council assembled on September 24, 787. It numbered about 350 members; 308 bishops or their representatives signed. Tarasius presided, and seven sittings were held in Nicaea. Proof of the lawfulness of the veneration of icons was drawn from Ex. xxv.17 sqq.; Num. vii. 89; Heb. ix. 1 sqq.; Ezek. xli., and Gen. xxxi. 34, but especially from a series of passages of the Church Fathers; the authority of the latter was decisive. September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years). ... This article is about the year 787. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... The Church Fathers or Fathers of the Church are the early and influential theologians and writers in the Christian church, particularly those of the first five centuries of Christian history. ...


It was determined that "As the sacred and life-giving cross is everywhere set up as a symbol, so also should the images of Jesus Christ, the Virgin Mary, the holy angels, as well as those of the saints and other pious and holy men be embodied in the manufacture of sacred vessels, tapestries, vestments, etc., and exhibited on the walls of churches, in the homes, and in all conspicuous places, by the roadside and everywhere, to be revered by all who might see them. For the more they are contemplated, the more they move to fervent memory of their prototypes. Therefore, it is proper to accord to them a fervent and reverent adoration, not, however, the veritable worship which, according to our faith, belongs to the Divine Being alone — for the honor accorded to the image passes over to its prototype, and whoever adores the image adores in it the reality of what is there represented." // Jesus, or Jesus of Nazareth, also known as Jesus Christ or Christ Jesus, is Christianitys central figure, both as Messiah and, for most Christians, as God incarnate. ... The term Virgin Mary has several different meanings: For the historical and multi-denominational concept of Mary, see Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. ...


The clear distinction between the adoration offered to God, and that accorded to the images may well be looked upon as a result of the iconoclastic reform. The twenty-two canons drawn up in Constantinople also served ecclesiastical reform. Careful maintenance of the ordinances of the earlier councils, knowledge of the scriptures on the part of the clergy, and care for Christian conduct are required, and the desire for a renewal of ecclesiastical life is awakened. The holy Jewish scripture: The Torah. ...


The papal legates voiced their approval of the restoration of the veneration of icons in no uncertain terms, and the patriarch sent a full account of the proceedings of the council to Hadrian, who had it translated (the translation Anastasius later replaced with a better one). Emperor Hadrian Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76-July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was Roman emperor from 117-138, and a member of the gens Aelia. ... Anastasius is part of the name of: Pope Anastasius I -- Pope from 399-401 Pope Anastasius II -- Pope from 496-498 Pope Anastasius III -- Pope from 911-913 Pope Anastasius IV -- Pope from 1153 to 1154 Anastasius I of the Byzantine Empire -- (c. ...


This council is celebrated in the Eastern Orthodox Church as "The Sunday of the Triumph of Orthodoxy" each year on the first Sunday of Great Lent, the fast that leads up to Easter. ... Great Lent is the greatest fasting period in the church year in Eastern Christianity, which prepares Christians for the greatest feast of the church year, Easter (or Holy Pasch). Although it is in many ways similar to Lent in Western Christianity, there are important differences in the timing of Lent... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus from the dead after his death by crucifixion (see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year around AD 30-33. ...


This article includes content derived from the public domain Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge, 1914. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge is a 1914 religious encyclopedia, published in thirteen volumes. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Second Council of Nicaea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (562 words)
The Second Council of Nicaea was the seventh ecumenical council of Christianity; it met in 787 AD in Nicaea (site of the First Council of Nicaea) to restore the honoring of icons (or, holy images), which had been suppressed by imperial edict inside the Byzantine Empire during the reign of Leo III (717 - 741).
In 786, the council met in the Church of the Apostles in Constantinople.
Careful maintenance of the ordinances of the earlier councils, knowledge of the scriptures on the part of the clergy, and care for Christian conduct are required, and the desire for a renewal of ecclesiastical life is awakened.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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