FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
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Encyclopedia > Second Confederate Congress

The Second Confederate Congress was the second and last regular session of the legislature of the Confederate States of America. Members of the Second Confederate Congress were chosen in elections held in November 1863 and only served one year of their two-year term due to the end of the American Civil War and the defeat of the Confederacy. The Confederate Congress was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861 until captured May... The American Civil War was fought in North America from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ...

Contents


Sessions

All sessions of the 2st Confederate Congress met in the Confederacy's capitol of Richmond, Virginia. Richmond is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the United States of America. ...

May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ...

Members

Senate

Alabama

  • Robert Jemison, Jr.
  • Richard Wilde Walker

Arkansas

Robert Ward Johnson (22 July 1814 - 26 July 1879) was a Democratic United States Senator and member of the United States House of Representatives from the State of Arkansas. ... Augustus Hill Garland (June 11, 1832 - January 26, 1899) was an Attorney General of the United States, Democratic United States Senator, Confederate States Senator, Confederate States Representative, and Governor of the State of Arkansas. ...

Florida

Georgia

  • Benjamin Harvey Hill
  • Herschel Vespasian Johnson

Herschel Vespasian Johnson (September 18, 1812 - August 16, 1880) was an American politician. ...

Kentucky

  • Henry Cornelius Burnett
  • William Emmet Simms

Louisiana

  • Thomas Jenkins Semmes
  • Edward Sparrow

Mississippi

Albert Gallatin Brown (May 31, 1813–June 12, 1880) was Governor of Mississippi from 1844 to 1848 and a United States Senator from Mississippi from 1854 through 1861. ...

Missouri

George Graham Vest (1830-1904) was born in Missouri and practiced law there. ...

North Carolina

William Alexander Graham (September 5, 1804–August 11, 1875) was a United States Senator from North Carolina from 1840 to 1843 and Governor of North Carolina from 1845 to 1849. ...

South Carolina

Robert W. Barnwell Robert Woodward Barnwell (1801-1882) was an American planter, lawyer, and educator from South Carolina who served as a Senator in both the United States Senate and that of the Confederate States of America. ... James Lawrence Orr (May 12, 1822–May 5, 1873) was born at Craytonville, S.C. He graduated at the University of Virginia in 1841. ...

Tennessee

  • Landon Carter Haynes, Sr.
  • Gustavus Adolphus Henry, Sr.

Texas

  • William Simpson Oldham, Sr.
  • Louis Trezevant Wigfall

Virginia

Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter (April 21, 1809 - July 18, 1887), American statesman, was born in Essex County, Virginia. ...

House of Representatives

Alabama

  • William Parish Chilton, Sr.
  • David Clopton
  • Marcus Henderson Cruikshank
  • James Shelton Dickinson
  • Thomas Jefferson Foster
  • Francis Strother Lyon
  • James Lawrence Pugh
  • William Russell Smith

Arkansas

  • Felix Ives Batson
  • David Williamson Carroll
  • Augustus Hill Garland
  • Rufus King Garland, Jr.
  • Thomas Burton Hanly

Augustus Hill Garland (June 11, 1832 - January 26, 1899) was an Attorney General of the United States, Democratic United States Senator, Confederate States Senator, Confederate States Representative, and Governor of the State of Arkansas. ...

Florida

  • Robert Benjamin Hilton
  • Samuel St. George Rogers

Georgia

  • Warren Akin, Sr.
  • Clifford Anderson
  • Hiram Parks Bell
  • Mark Harden Blandford
  • Joseph Hubbard Echols
  • Julian Hartridge
  • George Nelson Lester
  • John Troup Shewmake
  • James Milton Smith
  • William Ephraim Smith

Kentucky

  • Benjamin Franklin Bradley
  • Eli Metcalfe Bruce
  • Horatio Washington Bruce
  • Theodore Legrand Burnett
  • James Stone Chrisman
  • John Milton Elliott
  • George Washington Ewing
  • Willis Benson Machen
  • Humphrey Marshall
  • James William Moore
  • Henry English Read
  • George Washington Triplett

Louisiana

  • Charles Magill Conrad
  • Lucius Jacques Dupré
  • Benjamin Lewis Hodge, died in office; Henry Gray
  • Duncan Farrar Kenner
  • John Perkins, Jr.
  • Charles Jacques Villeré

Charles Magill Conrad (24 December 1804–11 February 1878) was an American political figure. ... Henry Gray (1825?–1861) was an English anatomist and surgeon and also elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) at the extremely young age of 33. ...

Mississippi

  • Ethelbert Barksdale
  • Henry Cousins Chambers
  • William Dunbar Holder
  • John Tillman Lamkin
  • Jehu Amaziah Orr
  • Otho Robards Singleton
  • Israel Victor Welch

Missouri

  • John Bullock Clark, Sr.
  • Aaron H. Conrow
  • Robert Anthony Hatcher
  • Nimrod Lindsay Norton
  • Thomas Lowndes Snead
  • George Graham Vest
  • Peter Singleton Wilkes

George Graham Vest (1830-1904) was born in Missouri and practiced law there. ...

North Carolina

  • Robert Rufus Bridgers
  • Thomas Charles Fuller
  • Burgess Sidney Gaither
  • John Adams Gilmer
  • James Madison Leach
  • James Thomas Leach
  • George Washington Logan
  • James Graham Ramsay
  • William Nathan Harrell Smith
  • Josiah Turner

South Carolina

This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... William Dunlap Simpson (October 1823 - December 26, 1890) was Governor of South Carolina from February 26, 1879, when the previous governor, Wade Hampton, resigned to take his seat in the U.S. Senate, until 1880, when Simpson resigned to become Chief Justice of the South Carolina Supreme Court. ...

Tennessee

  • John DeWitt Clinton Atkins
  • Arthur St. Clair Colyar
  • Henry Stuart Foote, expelled; succeeded by Michael Walsh Cluskey
  • Joseph Brown Heiskell
  • Edwin Augustus Keebel
  • James McCallum
  • Thomas Menees
  • John Porry Murray
  • William Graham Swan
  • John Vines Wright

Texas

  • John Robert Baylor
  • Anthony Martin Branch
  • Stephen Heard Darden
  • Caleb Claiborne Herbert
  • Simpson Harris Morgan
  • Franklin Barlow Sexton

Virginia

  • John Brown Baldwin
  • Thomas Stanhope Bocock
  • Daniel Coleman DeJarnette, Sr.
  • David Funsten
  • Thomas Saunders Gholson
  • John Goode, Jr.
  • Frederick William Mackey Holliday
  • Robert Johnston
  • LaFayette McMullen
  • Samuel Augustine Miller
  • Robert Latane Montague
  • William Cabell Rives, Sr.
  • Charles Wells Russell
  • Waller Redd Staples
  • Robert Henry Whitfield
  • Williams Carter Wickham

John Brown Baldwin, (1820—1873), graduated from Staunton Academy and then the University of Virginia, 1838. ... Robert Johnston was an Irish recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Williams Carter Wickham (September 21, 1820–July 23, 1888) was an important Confederate general who fought in the Virginia campaigns. ...

Territorial Delegates

Arizona Territory

  • Marcus H. MacWillie

Territories in Arizona and New Mexico in 1863. ...

Cherokee Nation

Alternate meanings: Cherokee (disambiguation) The Cherokee are a people native to North America who at time of European contact in the 16th century inhabited what is now the eastern and southeastern United States before most were forcefully moved to the Ozark Plateau. ... Elias Cornelius Boudinot (1835-1890) was a delegate to the Arkansas secession convention, a colonel in the Confederate States Army, and a representative in the Confederate Congress. ...

Creek and Seminole Nations

  • Samuel Benton Callahan

The Creeks are an American Indian people originally from the southeastern United States, also known by their original name Muscogee (or Muskogee), the name they use to identify themselves today. ... Seminole is the name of an American Indian tribe formed in Florida in the 18th century. ...

See also

The Provisional Confederate Congress was the body which drafted the Confederate Constitution, elected Jefferson Davis President of the Confederacy, and designed the first Confederate flag. ... The First Confederate Congress was the first regular session of the legislature of the Confederate States of America. ...

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