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Encyclopedia > Second City Television
SCTV
Second City Television
Also known as Second City TV (1976–1981)
SCTV Network 90 (1981–1983)
SCTV Channel (1983–1984)
Genre Sketch comedy
Created by Bernard Sahlins
Andrew Alexander
Starring John Candy
Robin Duke
Joe Flaherty
Eugene Levy
Andrea Martin
Rick Moranis
Catherine O'Hara
Harold Ramis
Tony Rosato
Martin Short
Dave Thomas
Country of origin Flag of Canada Canada
Language(s) English
No. of episodes 135
Production
Running time 30 minutes (1976-1981)
90 minutes (1981-1983)
45 minutes (1983-1984)
Broadcast
Original channel Global (1976-1979)
CBC (1980-1983)
NBC (1981-1983)
Superchannel (1983-1984)
Picture format NTSC (480i)
Original run September 21, 1976July 17, 1984
External links
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

Second City Television (SCTV) was a Canadian television sketch comedy show offshoot from Toronto's The Second City troupe that ran between 1976 and 1984. Sketch Show redirects here. ... Bernard Bernie Sahlins is an American writer, director and comedian best known as a founder of The Second City improvisational comedy troupe with Paul Sills and Howard Alk in 1959. ... Second City redirects here. ... John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian comedian and actor. ... Robin Duke (born March 13, 1954 in St. ... Joe Flaherty Joe Flaherty (June 21, 1941) is an American Canadian comedian. ... Eugene Levy (born December 17, 1946) is a Canadian Emmy- and Grammy Award-winning actor, television director, producer, musician and writer. ... Andrea Martin (born January 15, 1947) is a Tony Award-winning American actor and comedienne. ... Frederick Alan Rick Moranis (born April 18, 1953) is a Canadian actor, comedian and musician best known for his comedy work on SCTV and appeared in several Hollywood films including Ghostbusters, Little Shop of Horrors, Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, Spaceballs, and My Blue Heaven. ... Catherine OHara (born March 4, 1954) is a Canadian/American actress and comedian. ... Harold Ramis (born November 21, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American actor, director, and writer. ... Tony Rosato (born December 26, 1954) is an Italian-born actor who appears in television and movies in both Canada and the United States. ... Martin Hayter Short, CM (born March 26, 1950) is a Canadian/American comedian, actor, writer, and producer. ... See the David Thomas disambiguation page for other people with this name. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Global Television Network (more commonly called Global TV or just Global) is a Canadian English language privately owned television network. ... CBC Television is a Canadian English language television network. ... This article is about the television network. ... Movie Central (MC) is a Canadian English language premium television service. ... NTSC is the analog television system in use in the United States, Canada, Japan, Mexico, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, and some other countries (see map). ... 480i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Sketch Show redirects here. ... Second City redirects here. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...

Contents

Premise

The basic premise of SCTV is that it is the television station for the city of Melonville, in an unknown state or province. Rather than broadcast the usual TV rerun fare, the business puts on a bizarre and humorously incompetent range of cheap local programming. This can range from a soap opera called "The Days of the Week", to game shows like "Shoot At The Stars", in which celebrities are literally shot at like targets in a shooting gallery, to full blown movie spoofs like "Play it Again, Bob" in which Woody Allen (Rick Moranis) tries to get Bob Hope (Dave Thomas) to star in his next film. In-house media melodrama was also satirised with characters like John Candy's vain, bloated variety star Johnny La Rue, Dave Thomas' acerbic critic Bill Needle, Joe Flaherty's wheelchair-bound program manager Guy Caballero, and Andrea Martin's flamboyant, leopard-skin clad station manager Mrs. Edith Prickley. The first TIME magazine cover devoted to soap operas, dated January 12, 1976. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ...


History

Seasons 1 & 2: 1976-79

SCTV was initially produced starting in 1976 at the Toronto studios of the Global Television Network, then a small regional network of stations in Southern Ontario. For the first two years of the show, new episodes were seen every second week during the regular TV season from September to March. There were thirteen episodes produced in 1976/77, and another thirteen in 1977/78; these two years of alternate-week programming were considered one 'season' for syndication purposes. All of the original cast (except Harold Ramis) were from the Toronto branch of The Second City theatre improv troupe, and many of them had previously worked together on The David Steinberg Show. Ramis was also a Second City vet, but with the Chicago troupe. Global Television Network (more commonly called Global TV or just Global) is a Canadian English language privately owned television network. ... David Steinberg, born into a Jewish family August 9, 1940, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, is a Canadian comedian, actor, director, writer and author. ...


The original SCTV cast consisted of John Candy, Joe Flaherty, Eugene Levy, Andrea Martin, Catherine O'Hara, Ramis and Dave Thomas. All also served as writers on the show, although Martin and O'Hara did not receive writing credits on the very earliest episodes. Ramis served as SCTV's original head writer, but only appeared on-screen as a regular during the first season. The show also usually employed at least one or two other writers outside of the cast, but throughout its run SCTV's content was largely created by the on-screen performers. John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian comedian and actor. ... Joe Flaherty Joe Flaherty (June 21, 1941) is an American Canadian comedian. ... Eugene Levy (born December 17, 1946) is a Canadian Emmy- and Grammy Award-winning actor, television director, producer, musician and writer. ... Andrea Martin (born January 15, 1947) is a Tony Award-winning American actor and comedienne. ... Catherine OHara (born March 4, 1954) is a Canadian/American actress and comedian. ... Rex David Dave Thomas (July 2, 1932 – January 8, 2002) was an American businessman and philanthropist. ...


SCTV became a weekly series on Global for the 1978/79 season, and was seen in syndication throughout Canada and parts of the United States.


Season 3: 1980-81

The show was temporarily off the air, but returned to production after producer Andrew Alexander and Allarcom-ITV Edmonton owner Dr. Charles Allard struck a deal to produce SCTV in Edmonton, Alberta. In 1980, after a one year hiatus, SCTV moved to CBC for its third season, and the show's production base moved to ITV Studios (Global TV) in Edmonton, where the show was produced for the 1980-1981 season, and part of the 1981-1982 season, wrapping production in December 1981. Candy, O'Hara and Ramis dropped out of the show at this juncture; added to the cast (and writing room) were Tony Rosato, Robin Duke and Rick Moranis. Moranis, a friend of Dave Thomas, would be the only cast member not to have come from the ranks of Second City. Edmonton is the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta, situated in the north central region of the province, an area with some of the most fertile farm land on the prairies. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... CBC Television is a Canadian English language television network. ... Tony Rosato (born December 26, 1954) is an Italian-born actor who appears in television and movies in both Canada and the United States. ... Robin Duke (born March 13, 1954 in St. ... Frederick Alan Rick Moranis (born April 18, 1953) is a Canadian actor, comedian and musician best known for his comedy work on SCTV and appeared in several Hollywood films including Ghostbusters, Little Shop of Horrors, Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, Spaceballs, and My Blue Heaven. ...


Seasons 4 & 5: 1981-83

In 1981, SCTV was picked up as a 90-minute show by NBC as a mid-season replacement (for The Midnight Special), airing first as SCTV Network 90, then as SCTV Network, late Friday nights. For this iteration of SCTV, Rosato and Duke dropped out (and ended up as cast members of Saturday Night Live), and Candy and O'Hara returned. AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... The Midnight Special was a musical television series that ran from 1972 until 1983 on the NBC network. ... SNL redirects here. ...


During its network run, the show garnered 15 Emmy nominations, winning two (both for outstanding writing in a variety or music program). The show continued to air on the CBC in Canada as a full hour, edited down from the NBC shows. An Emmy Award. ...


In 1982, the show moved back to Toronto. Writer/performer Martin Short was added to the cast in late 1982, but several episodes later Catherine O'Hara left again, as did Thomas and Moranis. Martin Hayter Short, CM (born March 26, 1950) is a Canadian/American comedian, actor, writer, and producer. ...


Season 6: 1983-84

In the fall of 1983, NBC wanted the late Friday night timeslot for the new Friday Night Videos. SCTV was offered a slot on early Sunday evenings by NBC, but because they would have had to alter their content to appeal to "family" audiences, they declined. Instead, for their final season, the show moved to pay-TV channels Superchannel in Canada and Cinemax in the United States, changing the name slightly to SCTV Channel. For this final season, the cast consisted solely of Flaherty, Levy, Martin and Short, although Candy, Thomas, and O'Hara all made guest appearances. Additionally, writer/performers John Hemphill and Mary Charlotte Wilcox, though never full cast members, appeared semi-regularly throughout Seasons 5 and 6. For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... Friday Night Videos is a music video show broadcast on the American NBC television network from July 29, 1983 to May 24, 2002, and was considered network television’s answer to MTV. // In the beginning, MTV was still a phenomenon that very few people actually could see in their homes... Movie Central (MC) is a Canadian English language premium television service. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Significance

SCTV initially adapted its comedy from existing sketches and improvisation from the Second City stage show. However, especially after expanding to a ninety minute format, SCTV quickly pushed the envelope on television sketch comedy. While showing some influence from Monty Python's Flying Circus and Saturday Night Live, SCTV eschewed both the live television format and even filming before a live studio audience. This was mostly to save money, but it also allowed more attention and care to be taken in building a premise and supporting it. Second City redirects here. ... This article is about the television series. ...


Having a moderately low budget and limited resources, SCTV got a reputation for making the most out of what it had, reusing sets and particularly taking advantage of expert makeup and hairstyling. With the luxury of being able to take long periods of time in the makeup chair, elaborate characters could be built. Not being bound by expensive and elaborate prosthetics, cast members and makeup artists worked together to create their characters, referring to the process in interviews as "improvisation in the chair."


To add to the feel of the show — which after all was supposed to be a low budget local television station that went national — the SCTV crew recruited their dance troupe from the writers on the show, led by costumer Juul Haalmeyer. The "Juul Haalmeyer Dancers" were spectacularly maladroit, parodying dance teams on variety shows through their sheer ineptness, and ultimately attracting a cult fandom of their own. (Juul Haalmeyer himself reports still being asked for autographs years later.) Juul Haalmeyer is a costume designer, best known for doing costume design on several iterations of SCTV. In addition, he was the leader of the Juul Haalmeyer Dancers, a woefully inept troupe of variety show dancers made up mostly of writers and crew on SCTV. Haalmeyer also worked a costume...


The core premise of the show allowed for tremendous variety in presentation, but unlike Monty Python, which often would cut from one sketch to another without any resolution, the SCTV format required television style bridges. One technique they used was to build premises into "promos" for shows that would never run (such as "Melvin and Howards," a parody of the movie Melvin and Howard which featured Melvin Dummar, Howard Hughes, Howard Cosell, Curly Howard and Senator Howard Baker on a road trip singing old tunes). Another was to take longer pieces that failed and cut them into promos or trailers. These short elements wound up being the equivalent of "blackout" pieces on the Second City stage. However, the internal logic of the series — that this actually was a television station producing low budget programming — was never lost. SCTV's techniques helped inform and influence later shows, with clear influence on The State, the Upright Citizen's Brigade, and The Kids in the Hall. Melvin and Howard was a 1980 movie directed by Jonathan Demme and written by Bo Goldman, based upon the claims of Utah service station owner Melvin Dummar concerning a purported will written by Howard Hughes, leaving Dummar 1/16th of his $2 billion estate, which would have amounted to $156... Melvin Earl Dummar (born August 28, 1944) was a Willard, Utah service station owner who claimed that one evening in December 1967 he had picked up Howard Hughes along a desolate road in the Nevada desert. ... For the Welsh murderer, see Howard Hughes (murderer). ... Howard William Cosell, born Howard William Cohen (March 25, 1918 – April 23, 1995) was an American sports journalist on American television. ... Curly Howard (born Jerome Lester Horwitz) (October 22, 1903 – January 18, 1952), was one of the Three Stooges, along with brothers Moe Howard and Shemp Howard, and their friend Larry Fine, although Curly was more or less the breakout character. ... Howard Henry Baker, Jr. ... The State was a half hour long sketch comedy television show, broadcast on MTV from 1993 to 1995. ... The Upright Citizens Brigade is an improvisational comedy and sketch comedy group that emerged from Chicagos ImprovOlympic. ... For the rap group, see Kidz in the Hall. ...


Later shows built a tight theme, sometimes acting as a metaparody — as in the Emmy-winning "Moral Majority" episode where advertisers and special interest groups forced significant changes to SCTV’s programming, "Zontar" (a parody of the John Agar film Zontar, Thing from Venus) which featured an alien race seeking to kidnap SCTV’s on air talent for "a nine show cycle plus three best-ofs" (which was the actual deal NBC worked out with SCTV that season), and an ambitious parody of The Godfather featuring an all out network war over pay television between SCTV, CBS, NBC, ABC and PBS. (The last featured mafia style hits on the sets of The Today Show, Three's Company and The NFL Today, as well as an extended sequence with guest star John Marley reprising his Godfather role of Hollywood mogul Jack Woltz.) While these shows continued to incorporate the broad range of television parodies the show was known for, they also had a strong narrative thread which set the show apart from other sketch comedy shows of the time. John G. Agar (January 31, 1921 - April 7, 2002) was a successful Hollywood actor who ascended to celebrity shortly after World War II. He is perhaps best remembered for as Shirley Temples first husband (1945-1950) and for starring in the Sands of Iwo Jima alongside John Wayne; however... This article is about the 1972 film. ... “Pay TV” redirects here. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... This article is about the criminal society. ... A gangland killing is a murder carried out by organised criminals. ... The Today Show, officially known as Today, is an American morning news and talk show airing weekday mornings on NBC. Debuting on January 14, 1952, it was the first of its genre, spawning similar morning news and entertainment television programs across the United States and around the world. ... Threes Company is an American sitcom that ran from 1977 to 1984 on ABC. It is a remake of the British sitcom Man About the House. ... The NFL Today is a TV show that precedes the American football program The NFL on CBS on CBS Sports. ... John Marley (October 17, 1907 – May 22, 1984) was an American actor who is best known for his role as Phil Cavalleri in Love Story and as Jack Woltz - who receives a horses head in his bed - in The Godfather. ... Jack Woltz is a fictional character from the novel The Godfather and the 1972 film adaptation. ...


The show would also have a huge influence on The Simpsons. In the DVD commentary for Homer vs. The Eighteenth Amendment (in which Dave Thomas guest-stars), everyone says how much they loved the show and how influential it was because "it was so funny". Matt Groening goes on to say that he was specifically inspired by the town of Melonville, its own little universe with many recurring characters, and that that was the type of universe he wanted for The Simpsons. Both Dave Thomas and Andrea Martin have guest-starred on The Simpsons. Simpsons redirects here. ... Homer vs. ... Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ...


Mystery Science Theater 3000 (another humorous program that also enjoyed a "cult" following like that of SCTV) at times featured references to the show and its characters; for example, during the film Space Mutiny, a character with an outrageous hairdo is said to resemble Ed Grimley and prompted numerous impersonations of said character. In another example, near the end of the film Danger! Death Ray a character throws a watch out of a window, prompting Crow T. Robot to cry, "SCTV is on the air!". Mystery Science Theater 3000 (often abbreviated MST3K, sometimes MST 3000 or MST 3K or just MST) is an American cult television comedy series created by Joel Hodgson and produced by Best Brains, Inc. ... Space Mutiny (also known as Mutiny in Space) is a 1988 science-fiction action film about a mutiny aboard the spaceship known as the Southern Sun. ... SCTV DVD cover, showing Ed Grimley (second from right-top) Edward Mayhoff Ed Grimley was a character introduced on the television series SCTV and later used in Saturday Night Live. ... Danger!! Death Ray, also known by its original Italian title as Il Raggio infernale which translates to “The Infernal Beam,” is a secret agent spy film created in Italy and released in 1967 during the wide popularity of the James Bond films and many subsequently created spy films of the... Crow T. Robot Crow T. Robot is a fictional character from the American science fiction comedy television series Mystery Science Theater 3000 (MST3K). ...


The entire troupe was given a star on Canada's Walk of Fame in 2002. Also, John Candy, Martin Short, Eugene Levy and Catherine O'Hara have individual stars. Canadas Walk of Fame acknowledges the achievements and accomplishments of successful Canadians. ... John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian comedian and actor. ... Martin Hayter Short, CM (born March 26, 1950) is a Canadian/American comedian, actor, writer, and producer. ... Eugene Levy (born December 17, 1946) is a Canadian Emmy- and Grammy Award-winning actor, television director, producer, musician and writer. ... Catherine OHara (born March 4, 1954) is a Canadian/American actress and comedian. ...


Features

SCTV parody shows included Natalie Wingneck, a Tarzan-style spoof in which Martin played a girl raised by geese after her family died in a plane crash. A parody of the popular western drama Grizzly Adams — retitled Grizzly Abrams — depicted the burly wilderness hero as the owner of a wild tortoise which took weeks to lead police to the skeletal remains of its master, trapped beneath a fallen log. For other uses, see Tarzan (disambiguation). ... Capt. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... Theatrical release poster of Life and Times of Grizzly Adams Grizzly Adams is the main character from The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams, a 1974 film. ... For other uses, see Tortoise (disambiguation). ... Skeleton is also a winter sport: see skeleton (sport). ... For other uses, see Log. ...


The TV station concept provided SCTV the ability to lampoon virtually any television genre, as well as commercials, promos, network IDs, and more. Some of the most memorable sketches involved parodies of low-budget late-night ads, like Al Peck's Used Fruit (they enticed viewers to visit by offering free tickets to Circus Lupus, the Circus of the Wolves; mocked-up photos depicted wolves forming a pyramid and jumping through flaming hoops). Equally memorable were the faux-inept ads for local businesses like Phil's Nails and Tex and Edna Boil's Organ Emporium. SCTV can refer to a number of things, including the following: SCTV (Indonesia) from Surya Citra Television, headquartered in Indonesia. ... From the earliest days of the medium, television has been used as a vehicle for advertising in some countries. ... A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ...


Impersonations

Impersonations were also an integral part of the comedy, with almost every cast member playing multiple roles as well-known personalities. Some impressions included:

George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... Julia Child (August 15, 1912–August 13, 2004) was a famous American cook, author, and television personality who introduced French cuisine and cooking techniques to the American mainstream through her many cookbooks and television programs. ... Luciano Pavarotti performing on June 15, 2002 at a concert in the Stade Vélodrome in Marseille Luciano Pavarotti, Cavaliere di Gran Croce OMRI[1] (October 12, 1935 – September 6, 2007) was a celebrated Italian tenor in operatic music, who successfully crossed into popular music becoming one of the most... Divine with dogs Harris Glenn Milstead (born October 19, 1945 in Towson, Maryland - died March 7, 1988) was better known by his drag persona Divine. ... Curly Howard (born Jerome Lester Horwitz) (October 22, 1903 – January 18, 1952), was one of the Three Stooges, along with brothers Moe Howard and Shemp Howard, and their friend Larry Fine, although Curly was more or less the breakout character. ... For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... Thomas Phillip ONeill, Jr. ... Jimmy the Greek Snyder (19 September 1919–21 April 1996) was an American sports commentator and Las Vegas bookie. ... Hervé Jean-Pierre Villechaize (April 23, 1943 – September 4, 1993) was a French actor who achieved worldwide recognition for his role as Mr. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Shelley Winters (August 18, 1920 – January 14, 2006) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Gavin MacLeod (born February 28, 1930) is an American actor, notable for playing Murray Slaughter on The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Captain Merrill Stubing on The Love Boat. ... For other persons named Donald Sutherland, see Donald Sutherland (disambiguation). ... Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, uncertain but presumed correct date[1]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch[1] on December 9, 1916) is an iconic Academy Award-winning American actor and film producer known for his cleft chin, his gravelly voice and his recurring roles as the kinds of characters Douglas himself once described as sons of bitches. He is also father... Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... Harry Lillis “Bing” Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American popular singer and Academy Award-winning actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... This article is about the conservative journalist and commentator. ... Geraldo redirects here. ... For other persons named Charles Bronson, see Charles Bronson (disambiguation). ... Alan Alda (born January 28, 1936) is a five-time Emmy Award-winning, six-time Golden Globe-winning, Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Eugene Gene Kal Siskel (January 26, 1946 – February 20, 1999) was one of the worlds most successful film critics. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Jack Klugman (b. ... Slim Whitman (born January 20, 1924 in Tampa, Florida) is an American country music singer and songwriter. ... Larry Fine is the name of several people: Larry Fine, a US film comedian, and member of The Three Stooges. ... Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marquis of Púbol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter of Catalan descent born in Figueres, Catalonia (Spain). ... Ricardo Montalban (born November 25, 1920 in Mexico City) is a television and film actor. ... Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger on May 27, 1923) is a German-born American politician, and 1973 Nobel Peace Prize laureate. ... Judd Hirsch (born March 15, 1935 in Bronx, New York) is an American actor, best known for playing the character Alex Reiger on the acclaimed television comedy series Taxi. ... John Charles Daly on Whats My Line? John Charles Daly (full given name John Charles Patrick Croghan Daly, generally known as John Daly, February 20, 1914 – February 24, 1991), a native of Johannesburg, South Africa, was a journalist, game show host, radio personality, actor, and author. ... The Andy Griffith Show is an American television series that aired on CBS from October 3rd, 1960 to April 1st, 1968. ... Howard McNear as barber Floyd Lawson Floyd Lawson was a fictional character on the American TV sitcom The Andy Griffith Show. ... Milton Berle (July 12, 1908 - March 27, 2002) was an Emmy-winning American comedian who was born Milton Berlinger. ... Neil Sedaka (born March 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American pop singer, pianist, and songwriter often associated with the Brill Building. ... Howard William Cosell, born Howard William Cohen (March 25, 1918 – April 23, 1995) was an American sports journalist on American television. ... Ralph Stuart Young (September 19, 1889 – January 24, 1965) was a Major League Baseball second baseman. ... Pierino Ronald Perry Como (May 18, 1912 – May 12, 2001) was an Italian-American singer and television personality. ... Gene Shalit Gene Shalit (born March 25, 1932 in New York City) is the film and book critic on NBCs The Today Show. ... Barbra Streisand (pronounced STRY-sand; born April 24, 1942) is an American two time Academy Award-winning singer, film and theatre actress. ... Linda Lavin as Alice Hyatt on Alice. ... Joyce Anne DeWitt (born April 23, 1949) is an American actress perhaps most famous for her role as Janet Wood on the television situation comedy Threes Company. ... A young Indira Nehru and Mahatma Gandhi, during one of the latters fasts Indira Priyadarshini Gandhi (Hindi: ) (19 November 1917 - October 31, 1984) She was the Prime Minister of India for three consecutive terms from 1966 to 1977 and for a fourth term from 1980 until her assassination in... Connie Francis (born December 12, 1938 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American pop singer best known for international hit songs such as Whos Sorry Now?, Where The Boys Are, and Everybodys Somebodys Fool. She is known to have one of the most distinct voices in the... Arlene Francis (born Arline Francis Kazanjian October 20, 1907 - May 31, 2001) was an American actress, radio talk show host and game show panelist of Armenian and Greek descent. ... Ethel Merman (January 16, 1908 – February 15, 1984) was a American star of stage and film musicals, well known for her powerful voice, often hailed by critics as The Grande Dame of the Broadway stage. // Merman was born Ethel Agnes Zimmermann in her maternal grandmothers house at 359 4th... Karen Black (born July 1, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress, screenwriter, singer and songwriter. ... Marsha Mason with Richard Dreyfuss in The Goodbye Girl Marsha Mason (born April 3, 1942, St. ... Brenda Buell Vaccaro (born November 18, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... María del Rosario Pilar Martínez Molina Baeza de Rasten (born March 13, 1951; disputed year 1941) better known in the Latin and Hollywood show business as Charo, is a singer, dancer, comedienne, actress and classical guitar player. ... Mother Teresa (born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu IPA: ) (August 26, 1910 – September 5, 1997) was a Roman Catholic nun who founded the Missionaries of Charity and won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979 for her humanitarian work. ... Mervyn Edward Merv Griffin, Jr. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. ... Gordon Meredith Lightfoot Jr. ... Richard Starkey, MBE (born 7 July 1940), better known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an Academy Award-winning English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Richard Alva Dick Cavett (born November 19, 1936) is an Emmy-winning American television talk show host known for his conversational style and in-depth discussion of issues. ... George Denis Patrick Carlin[15] (born May 12, 1937) is a Grammy-winning American stand-up comedian, actor, and author. ... Brent Woody Musburger (born May 26, 1939 in Billings, Montana) is an American sportscaster for the ABC and ESPN television networks. ... Michael McDonald (born February 12, 1952, in St. ... Albert Samuel Waxman, C.M., O.Ont (March 2, 1935 – January 18, 2001) was a Canadian actor and director of over 1000 productions on radio, television, film, and stage. ... David Brinkley David McClure Brinkley (July 10, 1920 – June 11, 2003) was a popular American television newscaster for two different USA television networks, NBC, and later, ABC. From 1956 through 1970 he co-anchored NBCs top rated nightly news program, The Huntley–Brinkley Report with Chet Huntley. ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Morgan Fairchild (born February 3, 1950) is an American actress. ... Jane Fonda (born December 21, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, writer, political activist, former fashion model, and fitness guru. ... Dorothy Mae Kilgallen (July 3, 1913 – November 8, 1965) was an Irish-American journalist and television game show panelist, perhaps best known nationally for her coverage of the Sam Sheppard trial, her syndicated newspaper column, The Voice of Broadway, and her role as panelist on the television game show What... This article is about the actress. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Lucille Désirée Ball (August 6, 1911 – April 26, 1989) was an iconic American comedienne, film, television, stage and radio actress, glamour girl and star of the landmark sitcoms I Love Lucy, The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, The Lucy Show and Heres Lucy. ... Brooke Christa Camille Shields[1] (born May 31, 1965) is an American actress and supermodel. ... Lou Costello (born Louis Francis Cristillo; March 6, 1906 - March 3, 1959), was an American actor and comedian best known as half of the comedy team of Abbott and Costello, with Bud Abbott. ... Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella and the First Lady of Song, is considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century. ... Louis Jude Ferrigno (born November 9, 1951)[1] is an American bodybuilder and actor. ... Edward Asner (born November 15, 1929) is an American actor known for his Emmy-winning role as Lou Grant on The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and later continued in a spinoff series, Lou Grant. ... Image:Tony Orlando main. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... “Trudeau” redirects here. ... Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... David Steinberg, born into a Jewish family August 9, 1940, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, is a Canadian comedian, actor, director, writer and author. ... This article is about the American actor and comedian; for other people named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ... Mr. ... Kenneth Douglas Ken Taylor, OC , BA , MBA , LL.D (born October 5, 1934 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) was a Canadian ambassador to Iran. ... Harold Henry Pee Wee Reese (July 23, 1918 - August 14, 1999) was an American professional baseball player who played for the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers from 1940 to 1958. ... This article is about the film. ... Jamie Farr (born Jameel Joseph Farah on July 1, 1934) is an American television and film actor and popular game show panelist. ... Scott Vincent James Baio (born September 22, 1961 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American actor, who is perhaps best known for his work on the sitcoms Happy Days and Charles in Charge. ... Howie Michael Mandel II (born November 29, 1955) is a Canadian comedian and actor, primarily for his roles on sitcoms and television. ... Howie Meeker (born November 4, 1924 in Kitchener, Ontario) is a former right winger in the National Hockey League and television sports announcer. ... Tom Hayden outside the 2004 Democratic National Convention Thomas Emmett Tom Hayden (born December 11, 1939) is an American social and political activist and politician, most famous for his involvement in the anti-war and civil rights movements of the 1960s. ... Eugene Luther Gore Vidal (born October 3, 1925) (pronounced and , ) is an American author of novels, stage plays, screenplays, and essays, and the scion of a prominent political family. ... Brian Linehan (September 3, 1943 - June 4, 2004) was a Canadian television host who hailed from Hamilton, Ontario. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... For other persons named Richard Harris, see Richard Harris (disambiguation). ... DeForest redirects here. ... Wladziu Valentino Liberace (May 16, 1919 – February 4, 1987), better known by only his last name Liberace (pronounced [ËŒlɪbəˈrɑːtʃi]), was an American entertainer. ... Bennett Cerf photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1932 Bennett Alfred Cerf (May 25, 1898 - August 27, 1971) was a publisher and co-founder of Random House, also known for his own compilations of jokes and puns, for regular personal appearances lecturing across the United States, and for his television appearances... This article is about the English actor. ... George Gordon Battle Liddy (born November 30, 1930) was the chief operative for U.S. President Richard Nixons White House Plumbers unit. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Neil Simon (1966) Neil Simon (born Marvin Neil Simon July 4, 1927 in The Bronx, New York City), is a Jewish American playwright and screenwriter. ... Lido Anthony Lee Iacocca (born October 15, 1924) is an American industrialist most commonly known for his revival of the Chrysler Corporation in the 1980s[1], serving as President and CEO from 1978 and additionally as chairman from 1979, until his retirement at the end of 1992. ... Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer and astrochemist and a highly successful popularizer of astronomy, astrophysics, and other natural sciences. ... This article is about the American actor. ... Walter Leland Cronkite, Jr. ... Fred Travalena is an impressionist. ... Gomer Pyle on The Andy Griffith Show Gomer Pyle was the simple-minded gas station attendant and later auto mechanic in the American TV sitcom The Andy Griffith Show, played by Jim Nabors. ...

Sketches and characters

Popular sketches and characters include:

  • Mailbag, SCTV's take on a vox populi segment where near-apoplectic host Bill Needle would answer viewer mail. The shows length was continually cut, however, until Needle was down to mere seconds of airtime.
  • Farm Film Report aka Farm Film Celebrity Blow-Up: Two hicks named Big Jim McBob (Flaherty) and Billy Sol Hurok (a spoof of Billie Sol Estes and Sol Hurok, played by Candy) interview celebrities and ultimately encourage them to blow up (creating the catch-phrase "blow'd up good, blow'd up real good!"). Exploding guests included Dustin Hoffman, David Steinberg (both played by Short), Bernadette Peters (Martin), Meryl Streep (O'Hara), and a lispy Neil Sedaka (Levy).
  • Polynesiantown: a parody of modern-day film noir. In its attempt to emulate the movie Chinatown, this extended one-shot sketch ended with a crane shot that pushed the show so over budget that the sketch's producers got in trouble with the network. The shows writers incorporated this behind-the-scenes drama into the shows long-term continuity, causing fictional actor/producer/superstar Johnny LaRue's career to go into a tailspin as a result of this budget mishap.
  • The Sammy Maudlin Show: Joe Flaherty was the afro-coiffed, knee-slapping, overly-effusive host welcoming a panel of "stars" who did nothing but heap lavish praise on each other and applaud their pointless profundities. Originally a parody of Sammy Davis, Jr.'s short-lived gab-fest, Maudlin (the word means overly sentimental, treacly) evolved into a late-night universe all its own. Eugene Levy is "a comic in all seriousness" as egomaniacal funnyman Bobby Bittman (whose younger brother Skip Bittman, played by Moranis, eventually appeared on Maudlin as well, with disastrous results); Andrea Martin skewered Liza Minnelli and Lorna Luft with "real terrific" combo-character Lorna Minnelli; Catherine O'Hara inhabited pill-popping boozer Lola Heatherton, a Joey Heatherton-Lola Falana amalgam who greeted fans with her trademark shriek, "I love you! I wanna bear your children!"; John Candy portrayed constantly-chuckling Ed McMahon-style sidekick/sycophant William B. Williams, who often wound up kneeling on the floor as guests came out and the couch filled up. The Maudlin regulars would later appear together in the Rat Pack movie parody Maudlin's Eleven.
  • Mel's Rock Pile was a knockoff of the Citytv dance show Boogie and closely resembled American Bandstand. Hosted by "Rockin' Mel" Slirrup (Eugene Levy), a nervous, bespectacled nerd who played lame pop songs for surly in-studio teen guests. One memorable episode of Mel's Rock Pile featured an appearance by Sex Pistols-type band The Queen Haters, featuring the entire Short-era cast in perfect '80s punk-band mode.
  • Martin Short's Jackie Rogers, Jr. was an earnestly smarmy albino Las Vegas headliner with a grating, lisping laugh in a manner similar to Sammy Davis, Jr. He's partial to sequined jumpsuits, Jack Jones-style song standards, and "eligible ladies". Later, Rogers would run for political office but drop out of the race when he realizes it's cramping his show-biz lifestyle.
  • Martin Short's somewhat-unclassifiable uber-nerd Ed Grimley (later featured on Saturday Night Live when Short became a regular) was an SCTV fixture, appearing on numerous assorted shows, commercials, promos, and "behind-the-scenes" dramas.
  • Half-Wits and High-Q were parodies of quiz shows College Bowl and Reach For The Top hosted by a highly-irritable Alex Trebek approximation named Alex Trebel (Levy), a thinly-veiled riff on the real-life Jeopardy! host.
  • The 5 Neat Guys, an absurdly clean-cut, '50s style vocal group (á la The Four Freshmen), were portrayed by Candy, Flaherty (as the drunk one), Levy, Moranis, and Thomas. The "5" sang songs like "I've Got a Hickey on My Shoulder", "Pimples and Pockmarks" and other memorable tunes. Several of their songs contrasted with their squeaky-clean image, however, such as "She Does It","Patsy Has the Largest Breasts In Town", and "Who Brought the Egg Salad Sandwiches".
  • Another Martin Short character, talk-show host Brock Linehan was a parody of real-life Canadian interviewer, the late Brian Linehan. Linehan was famous for his overpreparation, which Short satirized by going in the opposite direction: on SCTV's version of the Linehan show, called Stars in One, all the research compiled about any particular episode's guest was totally and completely wrong, making for some unhappy guests and one frustrated, uneasy host.
  • Harry, the Guy with the Snake on his Face (John Candy). Harry ran Melonville's adult book and X-rated video stores.
  • "Video deejay" Gerry Todd (Moranis) hosted an all-night "televised-radio" type of video show. Moranis' turtleneck-sporting, smooth-talking radio-personality parody was perfectly pitched—complete with casually-pronounced "vuddeeo"--and eerily presaged the first group of MTV VJs.
  • Mayor Tommy Shanks (John Candy) is Melonville's "easygoing" (corrupt) mayor who is prone to sudden fits of rage and physical violence, yet gives regular fireside chats on SCTV while a stuffed dog sits motionless by his side. Throwing out one non-sequitur after another, Shanks manages to convey absolutely nothing of relevance during his broadcasts. Eventually, Shanks succumbs to mental illness and is institutionalized. While still in the institution, he runs for re-election with the campaign slogan "Get me outta here!" and wins by a landslide.
  • SCTV News (later Nightline Melonville), anchored by Joe Flaherty as mostly professional (but alcoholic) newscaster Floyd Robertson and Eugene Levy as geeky, clueless Earl Camembert, a model of oblivious self-importance. The members of the SCTV news-team were named after Canadian news anchors Lloyd Robertson and Earl Cameron respectively, but otherwise bore no resemblance to their real-life counterparts. Unlike Saturday Night Live's similar news parody Weekend Update, which typically uses actual news headlines as set-ups for more satirical humour, SCTV News used more absurdist humor, with its news stories often focusing on events happening within the Melonville continuity. Another source of humour for this segment was the contrast between the hapless Camembert (whose name is pronounced "Canenbare") and the more respected Robertson, who usually ended up playing straight man to Camembert's antics. A running gag involved the news team's tendency to give the good news items to Robertson (such as the tiny Republic of Togo's threats against the USSR) and the trivial or poorly-prepared stories to his co-anchor (such as a fire at a doily factory).
  • Monster Chiller Horror Theatre: This fright-film showcase featured laughably non-frightening z-movies like Dr. Tongue's 3-D House of Stewardesses. Dr. Tongue was played by John Candy and Monster Chiller Horror Theatre was hosted by Flaherty character Count Floyd, who was revealed in a later episode to be SCTV News anchorman Floyd Robertson working a second job. This was a tip of the hat to the fact that in the early days of television, a channel's kiddie show host was often a member of the news staff in a clown suit or police uniform.
  • The Shmenge Brothers and their polka band, The Happy Wanderers. Like Bob and Doug McKenzie, the Shmenges were breakout characters and their popularity resulted in the HBO special The Last Polka (a parody of Martin Scorsese's The Last Waltz). (John Candy would go on to play another polka clarinetist in Home Alone, which also starred Catherine O'Hara). In one episode, the Shmenges performed a memorable tribute to composer John Williams.
  • Dave Thomas as actor Richard Harris in a skit where "Harris" sang an extended version of his famous hit "MacArthur Park", then dances endlessly in total agony during the elongated orchestral stretch while the show moves on to other skits. The song finally ends when an audience member hurls a brick at his chest.
  • The famous CCCP1-Russian television episode in which SCTV is taken over by Soviet programming. At first, nothing seems out of the ordinary at the station: on the air, Eugene Levy plays Perry Como in a promo for Still Alive, a TV-special in which Como's trademark relaxed style is taken to ludicrous extremes. The nearly-comatose Como sings one song while propped up against a dancer, another swaddled in bed with the covers pulled up to his chin, and performs a third number sprawled face-down and almost-motionless on the floor, mic lying next to his mouth, one finger moving to the beat. But SCTV is suddenly knocked off the air, replaced by an illegal signal from the Soviet television network. Throughout, the old Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, which is abbreviated USSR in English but CCCP in Russian, is referred to as "three-C-P-one". From there, all the "shows" are Russian-themed spoofs: Tibor's Tractor, a situation comedy about a talking tractor similar to My Mother the Car--only with the voice of Nikita Khruschev; a game-show, What Fits into Mother Russia?, which celebrates the USSR's massive size; Upo-Scrabblenyk; and Hey, Giorgy--"everybody's favourite Cossack"--with the memorable line "Uzbeks drank my battery fluid!", uttered when Rick Moranis's Lada won't start outside an alehouse. (Popping the hood reveals the old-style battery's six cells sporting bendy straws.)
  • A Jazz Singer parody which reversed the story by having musical guest Al Jarreau play a popular jazz singer who wants to become a cantor (hazzan). His father is a disapproving pop-music impresario played by Eugene Levy's befuddled Sid Dithers. Hasidic Dithers, four feet tall and cross-eyed behind Coke-bottle glasses, spoke with a thick early vaudeville-style Yiddish accent ("San Fransishky? So how did you came: did you drove, or did you flew?"). The payoff of this parody made for a classic SCTV moment: Jarreau has become a synagogue cantor, fulfilling his dream against his father's wishes, and he wonders if his father will ever speak to him again – until, during the service, he is interrupted by a disco-clad Dithers standing in the doorway in dancing shoes, spangled jacket, and corn-rowed hair.
  • The episode in which a janitorial union went on strike, forcing stations to broadcast the network feed from CBC Television. Parodies ensued, such as Hinterland Who's Who, Front Page Challenge and It's a Fact, among others. Meanwhile, Eugene Levy's Sid Dithers played the union president, barely able to see over the conference table as he detailed the progress of the strike-talks ("Fifteen minutes for lunsch? Ye can't even blow on your shoop!")
  • Magnum, P.E.I. wherein John Candy plays a savvy private investigator a la Magnum, P.I., chasing his quarry through the scenic potato patches of Prince Edward Island.

Ironically, the most popular sketch was intended as throwaway filler. Bob & Doug McKenzie, dim-witted beer-chugging brothers in a recurring Canadian-themed sketch called Great White North, were initially developed by Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas (Bob & Doug, respectively) as a sardonic response to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) mandate requiring Canadian-based programs to feature two minutes of "identifiably Canadian content" in every episode. The characters ultimately became icons of the very Canadian culture they parodied, spinning off albums, a feature film (Strange Brew), commercials, and numerous TV and film cameos. Bob and Doug helped to popularize the stereotypical Canadian trait of adding "eh" to the end of sentences, a facet of Canadian life that is often gently ridiculed in American shows featuring Canadian characters. Recently, Moranis and Thomas recreated Bob and Doug in the form of a pair of moose in the animated feature Brother Bear from Disney. During Canadian rock band Rush's 2007 Snakes And Arrows tour, Moranis and Thomas reprised their Bob and Doug Mackenzie roles in an introductory clip projected on the rear screen for the song "The Larger Bowl". Previously, Rush used Joe Flaherty in his Count Floyd persona to introduce their song "The Weapon" during their 1984 Grace Under Pressure Tour. Vox Populi redirects here. ... Bumpkin redirects here. ... Billie Sol Estes (born 1924) was a scandal-ridden Texas-based financier best known for his association with US President Lyndon B. Johnson and for accusing Johnson of a variety of crimes, including the assassination of John F. Kennedy. ... Sol Hurok was an music agent and impresario. ... Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... David Steinberg, born into a Jewish family August 9, 1940, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, is a Canadian comedian, actor, director, writer and author. ... Bernadette Peters (born February 28, 1948) is an American actress and singer. ... Mary Louise Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is a two-time Academy Award, Cannes Best Actress, Berlin Best Actress winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... Neil Sedaka (born March 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American pop singer, pianist, and songwriter often associated with the Brill Building. ... This article is about sections of an urban area associated with a large number of Chinese residents or commercial activities. ... This article is about the entertainer. ... Liza May Minnelli (born March 12, 1946 in Los Angeles, California) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ... This image is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Lola Heatherton was a fictional character on the late 70s/early 80s comedy program SCTV, portrayed by Catherine OHara. ... Long Island, New York-born Joey Heatherton was christened Davenie Johanna Heatherton in 1944. ... Lola Falana (born Loletha Elaine Falana on September 11, 1942 in Camden, New Jersey) is an American dancer and actress of Cuban and African American descent. ... Edward Ed Peter Leo McMahon, Jr. ... For other uses, see Sidekick (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... William Brewster Williams (July 28, 1826 - March 4, 1905) was a politician and judge from the U.S. State of Michigan. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Citytv is an English language privately owned television system in Canada. ... Dick Clark, host of American Bandstand American Bandstand was a long-running dance music television show that aired in various versions from 1952 to 1989. ... Sex Pistols are an iconic and highly influential English punk rock band, formed in London in 1975. ... Albinism is a genetic condition resulting in a lack of pigmentation in the eyes, skin and hair. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... This article is about the entertainer. ... Jack Jones may refer to: Jack Jones (banker) Jack Jones (singer) (born 1938) Jack Jones (novelist) (1884–1970) Jack Jones (trade union leader) (born 1913) Lance-Corporal Jack Jones - a character in the sitcom Dads Army Jack Jones (actor) (There have been several actors with this name. ... SCTV DVD cover, showing Ed Grimley (second from right-top) Edward Mayhoff Ed Grimley was a character introduced on the television series SCTV and later used in Saturday Night Live. ... SNL redirects here. ... From the earliest days of the medium, television has been used as a vehicle for advertising in some countries. ... College Bowl is a format of college-level quizbowl run and operated by College Bowl Company, Incorporated. ... Final moments of an episode of the Montreal version of Reach for the Top, as aired on CBMT-6 in the late 1970s. ... George Alexander Alex Trebek (born July 22, 1940) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian-American television personality and game show host. ... Riff is also an alternate spelling of Rif, a region of Morocco. ... Jeopardy redirects here. ... Abba Crosby Stills & Nash Danny & The Juniors Dion & the Belmonts Dixie Hummingbirds Earth Wind & Fire Fifth Dimension Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers Gladys Knight & The Pips Hank Ballard & the Midnighters Jay & the Americans Little Anthony & the Imperials Martha & the Vandellas Peter, Paul and Mary Smokey Robinson & The Miracles Sonny Til and... The Four Freshmen were an American vocal group popular from the 1950s through the early 1960s. ... Main articles: History of Canada, Timeline of Canadian history Canada has been inhabited by aboriginal peoples (known in Canada as First Nations) for at least 40,000 years. ... Brian Linehan (September 3, 1943 - June 4, 2004) was a Canadian television host who hailed from Hamilton, Ontario. ... X-rated, X certificate, X classification or similar terms are labels for movies implying strong adult content, typically pornography or violence. ... A Deejay (sometimes spelled DJ) is a reggae or dancehall musician who sings and toasts to an instrumental riddim (rhythm). ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... A video jockey (usually abbreviated to VJ or sometimes veejay) can mean two things: One describes an announcer who introduces and plays videos on commercial music television such as MTV or VH1. ... FDR shortly after giving one of his famous fireside chats The fireside chats were a series of thirty evening radio talks given by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt between 1933 and 1944. ... Non sequitur (IPA: ) is Latin for it does not follow, third person singular of the present indicative active of the deponent verb sequor. ... A news anchor (US,Can. ... A news anchor (US,Can. ... Lloyd Robertson, LL.D O.C. (born January 19, 1934 in The Middle of the Pacific Ocean) is the Chief Anchor and Senior Editor of The CTV National News with Lloyd Robertson. ... Earl Cameron in 1966. ... SNL redirects here. ... A doily is a small ornamental mat usually made of lace or linen placed underneath a dish or bowl Categories: Food and drink stubs ... Z-movie (or Grade-Z movie) is a term applied to films with an extremely low budget and a miserable quality. ... Count Floyd Count Floyd is a TV character played by comic actor Joe Flaherty. ... Street musicians in Prague playing a polka Polka is a fast, lively Central European dance, and also a genre of dance music. ... Great White North album cover with Bob (left) and Doug McKenzie (right) Bob and Doug McKenzie were a pair of fictional Canadian brothers who hosted The Great White North, a sketch which was introduced on SCTV for the shows third season when it moved to the CBC in 1980. ... Henry Winkler as Arthur Fonzie Fonzarelli in Happy Days, one of the best-known breakout characters in television. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (b. ... The Last Waltz was a concert by the Canadian-American rock group, The Band, held on Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1976, at Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. ... Home Alone is a 1990 comedy film written and produced by John Hughes and directed by Chris Columbus. ... For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ... Richard Harris as Marcus Aurelius in Gladiator. ... MacArthur Park is a song written by Jimmy Webb. ... Pierino Ronald Perry Como (May 18, 1912 – May 12, 2001) was an Italian-American singer and television personality. ... This article is about a genre of comedy. ... Nikita Khrushchev in 1962 Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev (Russian: Ники́та Серге́евич Хрущёв) (nih-KEE-tah khroo-SHCHYOFF) (April 17, 1894 – September 11, 1971) was the leader of the Soviet Union after the death of Joseph Stalin. ... State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ... For other uses, see Lada (disambiguation). ... Alwyn Lopez Al Jarreau (born March 12, 1940) is an American singer. ... Look up cantor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the musical variety theatre. ... Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... The synagogue Scolanova Trani in Italy. ... The Lawrence textile strike (1912), with soldiers surrounding peaceful demonstrators A trade union or labor union is an organization of workers who have banded together to achieve common goals in key areas such as wages, hours, and working conditions, forming a cartel of labour. ... CBC Television is a Canadian English language television network. ... Hinterland Whos Who is a series of 60-second public service ads profiling Canadian animals and birds, produced by Environment Canada in the 1960s. ... Front Page Challenge (aired 1957 - 1995) was a Canadian current events-cum-history program disguised as a game show, in which notable journalists attempted to guess what past news story the hidden guest was linked with by asking questions of the guest, in much the same manner as the American... Magnum, P.I. is an American television show starring Tom Selleck as Thomas Magnum, a fictional private investigator living in Oahu, Hawaii. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Great White North album cover Bob & Doug McKenzie were a pair of fictional Canadian brothers who hosted The Great White North, a sketch which was introduced on Second City Television for the shows third season when it moved to the CBC in 1980. ... The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC, in French Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes) was established in 1968 by the Canadian Parliament to replace the Board of Broadcast Governors. ... Bonhomme Carnaval, mascot of the Quebec winter carnival. ... Strange Brew is also the title of a song by the band Cream (released on their 1967 album Disraeli Gears), and of a compilation album - Strange Brew: The Very Best of Cream Strange Brew is a 1983 film starring the popular SCTV characters Bob & Doug McKenzie, played by Dave Thomas... This article is about a Disney animated feature. ... Disney redirects here. ... Rush is a Canadian rock band originally formed in August 1968, in the Willowdale neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario; presently comprised of bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ...


Special guests and musical guests

The shows NBC years brought with them a network edict to include musical guests (in part because of their use on Saturday Night Live, which NBC executives considered the model for SCTV, despite their being very different shows). At first, the SCTV cast, writers and producers resisted special guests, on the theory that famous people wouldn't just "drop into" the Melonville studios. However, they soon discovered that by actually working these guests into different shows-within-shows, they could keep the premise going while also giving guest stars something more to do than show up and sing a song. As a result, Dr. John became a featured player in the movie "Polynesiantown," John Mellencamp (then still known as John Cougar) was Mister Hyde to Ed Grimley's Doctor Jekyll in "The Nutty Lab Assistant," Natalie Cole was made into a zombie by a cabbage in "Zontar," and the Boomtown Rats were both blown up on "Farm Film Celebrity Blow Up" and starred in the To Sir With Love parody "Teacher's Pet." It reached a point where Hall & Oates appeared on a "Sammy Maudlin Show" segment, promoting a new film called "Chariots of Eggs," which was a parody of both Chariots of Fire and Personal Best, only to show scenes from the faux movie as clips. Even The Tubes and Plasmatics appeared on the "Fishin' Musician." Dr. John is the stage name of Malcolm John Rebennack Jr. ... John Mellencamp, also known as John Cougar and John Cougar Mellencamp, (born October 7, 1951) is a Grammy-winning American rock singer-songwriter and occasional actor. ... SCTV DVD cover, showing Ed Grimley (second from right-top) Edward Mayhoff Ed Grimley was a character introduced on the television series SCTV and later used in Saturday Night Live. ... Natalie Maria Cole (born February 6, 1950), known professionally as Natalie Cole, is an American singer and songwriter. ... The Boomtown Rats The Boomtown Rats (1975-1985) were a punk rock/new wave group headed by Bob Geldof, who was later known for organizing charity rock concerts such as Band Aid (intended to help famine victims in Ethiopia), Live Aid, Live 8, and Hands Across America (intended to help... To Sir, with Love (1967) is a British film which deals with social issues in an inner city school, written and directed by James Clavell and based on a novel of the same name by E.R. Braithwaite. ... Hall & Oates is a popular music duo made up of Daryl Hall & John Oates. ... Chariots of Fire is a British film released in 1981. ... Personal Best is a 1982 movie centered around a group of women who are trying to qualify for the Olympic Games track-and-field team. ... This article is about the band, The Tubes. ... The Plasmatics were an American punk band, formed by Yale graduate and radical anti-artist Rod Swenson, around the late Wendy O. Williams. ...


This, along with SCTV's cult status, led to the show's celebrity fans clamoring to appear. Later on, Tony Bennett credited his appearance on Bob and Doug McKenzie's variety-show debacle "The Great White North Palace" as triggering a significant career comeback. Sketch comedy giant Carol Burnett did an ad for the show in which an alarm clock goes off next to her bed, she rises up suddenly and advises those who couldn't stay up late enough (the NBC version aired from 12:30 to 2 a.m.) to go to bed, get some sleep, then wake up to watch the show. Burnett later briefly appeared in a climactic "courtroom" episode of "The Days of the Week". For other persons named Tony Bennett, see Tony Bennett (disambiguation). ... Bob & Doug McKenzie were a pair of fictional Canadian brothers who hosted The Great White North, a sketch which was introduced on Second City Television for the shows third season when it moved to the CBC in 1980. ... Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933 in San Antonio, Texas) is an Emmy Award-winning actress, comedian, singer, dancer, and writer. ...


Former SNL cast member and film actor Bill Murray also guest-starred on a "Days of the Week" installment, as a photography buff scrambling to make it to the wedding of singer-songwriter Clay Collins (Rick Moranis) and town slut Sue-Ellen Allison (Catherine O'Hara) in time to take pictures of the event. In that same episode, he also played two other roles: Johnny LaRue's biggest fan who is subsequently hired to be LaRue's bodyguard (and who pushes his homemade LaRue t-shirts when possible); and he also appeared as Joe DiMaggio in a commercial for DiMaggio's restaurant, where he promised anyone who could strike him out a free meal (the strikeout challenges then took place in the middle of the dining room, with many patrons injured by speeding baseballs). SNL could mean: Saturday Night Live Scots National League This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... William James Bill Murray (born September 21, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated, Emmy-, Golden Globe-, and BAFTA-winning American comedian and actor. ... Frederick Alan Rick Moranis (born April 18, 1953) is a Canadian actor, comedian and musician best known for his comedy work on SCTV and appeared in several Hollywood films including Ghostbusters, Little Shop of Horrors, Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, Spaceballs, and My Blue Heaven. ... Catherine OHara (born March 4, 1954) is a Canadian/American actress and comedian. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ...


Laugh track

One other point of contention between SCTV and several different networks they were on was the use of laugh tracks. As SCTV wasn't a live show, it paced its comedy accordingly, and several pieces were more outré than standard network fare. The use of a laugh track often stepped clumsily on the punchlines as a result, and there are some reports that the laugh track editor admitted to not getting SCTV's humour and just threw laughs in wherever they would fit[citation needed]. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The laugh track used in early episodes was actually recorded using audience reactions during live performances in the Second City theatre.


Syndication and music rights

In 1984, after production on the series finally ended, the Second City Television syndicated half-hour episodes and SCTV Network 90-minute episodes were re-edited into half-hour shows for a revised syndicated package, which consisted of 156 re-edited half-hours. In 1990, a separate package of 26 half-hours (edited from the pay-TV SCTV Channel episodes) aired on The Comedy Channel (and later Comedy Central) in the United States. Like the original syndicated series, the US and Canadian versions of the 1984 package differed, with the Canadian half-hours a couple of minutes longer; the running order of episodes also differed between the two countries. By the late 1990s, the re-edited SCTV Channel episodes were added to the regular SCTV syndicated package; three additional half-hours (all from the 1980-1981 season) were restored to the package, knocking the episode count up to 185 half-hours.


For years, SCTV was unavailable on video tape (apart from one compilation, The Best Of John Candy On SCTV), or in any form except these re-edited half hour programs. Originally, the producers and editors putting the original shows together never bothered to get clearance to use copyrighted music — for example, the "Fishin' Musician" show ended with Bing Crosby singing "Gone Fishin'", even though SCTV never obtained the clearance rights to use copyrighted music recordings. Harry Lillis “Bing” Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American popular singer and Academy Award-winning actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ...


Whenever anyone uses copyrighted material, such as music in a film, TV program or documentary, clearing the music rights with the copyright owners is a standard procedure. This procedure not only has to be done for TV Broadcasts, but also for any Home Video formats released. Each format, such as VHS or DVD, needs to have the rights cleared all over again for that format. Clearance is negotiated between the producers of, say a program like SCTV and the Music Publishers, such as ASCAP or BMI. These Music Publishers can ask for any amount they wish. There is no regulation on the fees they can ask for.


It has been mistakenly believed that the sole reason for SCTV not appearing on DVD before, is that the series did not originally get clearance for the numerous music cues used throughout the six seasons that SCTV was produced. Although the producers did neglect to clear the music for SCTV during production, this has no legal bearing on the use of the music for the DVD releases. However, this could indeed have had a detrimental effect on how smoothly those rights were granted for the use of music on the DVD releases. The ease of obtaining music clearance rights for a given music cue may depend upon the context in which that music cue is used, as well as the willingness of the copyright holder to allow the use of their music in any shape or form.


The shows couldn't be reproduced on DVD or video tape until after the laborious rights issues were resolved and clearances were received. In some cases (as with the aforementioned Crosby song) clearances couldn't be secured after the fact and new music had to be edited in its place for the 2005 DVD releases of the 90-minute shows. In a few cases where the music is intrinsic to the premise of the sketch (such as the sketches "Stairways to Heaven" and "The Canadian National Anthem") and rights could not be obtained, sketches have been dropped from the DVDs. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


DVD releases

Shout! Factory has released SCTV on DVD in Region 1 for the very first time. To date, all episodes from Season 4 & 5 (which aired on NBC) have been released in 4 Volumes and a Best-of DVD has been released which features episodes from Seasons 2 & 3. It is not known if the remaining episodes (Seasons 1-3,6) will be released at some point. Shout! Factory is an entertainment company founded in 2003 and which was started by Richard Foos (co-founder of Rhino Records), Bob Emmer (former Warner Music Group and Rhino executive) and Garson Foos (former Rhino executive). ... This article is about the television network. ...

DVD Name Ep # Release Date Additional Information
SCTV- Vol 1: Network 90 9 June 8, 2004
SCTV- Vol 2 9 October 19, 2004
SCTV- Vol 3 9 March 1, 2005
SCTV- Vol 4 12 September 13, 2005

Other Releases is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

2008 On-Stage Reunion

On May 5 & 6, 2008 most of the cast reunited for a charity event 'The Benefit of Laughter' at the Second City Theatre in Toronto. Eugene Levy, Martin Short, Andrea Martin, Catherine O'Hara, and Joe Flaherty took part. The event was a fundraiser for The Alumni Fund, which helps support former Second City cast and crew members facing health or financial difficulties. There is no word yet if the performances will be released. is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eugene Levy (born December 17, 1946) is a Canadian Emmy- and Grammy Award-winning actor, television director, producer, musician and writer. ... Martin Hayter Short, CM (born March 26, 1950) is a Canadian/American comedian, actor, writer, and producer. ... Andrea Martin (born January 15, 1947) is a Tony Award-winning American actor and comedienne. ... Catherine OHara (born March 4, 1954) is a Canadian/American actress and comedian. ... Joe Flaherty Joe Flaherty (June 21, 1941) is an American Canadian comedian. ...


The initial press release for this event also included Dave Thomas, but he reportedly bowed out due to illness.


See also

|| There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... UHF (also known as The Vidiot from UHF in Australia, New Zealand and parts of Europe, and Los Telelocos in Mexico) is a comedy film made in 1989. ... This article is about the musician. ...

External links

  • SCTV.org - a de facto, although unofficial, SCTV homepage/fan site
  • SCTV Guide, including a searchable episode guide
  • Edmonton SCTV Locations
  • The Canadian Encyclopedia: SCTV
  • Canada's Walk of Fame: SCTV cast, 2002 inductees
  • CBC Arts. "IN BRIEF: Classic SCTV hits DVD, century-old overdue book returned", CBC News, 8 June 2004. Retrieved on 2007-06-18. 
  • At The Internet Movie Database
    • Second City TV (1976 – 1981)
    • SCTV Network 90 (1981 – 1983)
    • SCTV Channel (1983 – 1984)
  • Audio interview with head writer Dick Blasucci on The Sound of Young America
  • Joe Flaherty talks about the early days of SCTV on public radio program The Sound of Young America
  • Southside Johnny discusses his appearance on SCTV
  • SCTV landing page on Shout! Factory
  • "Pye in the Face" blog review of the "Benefit of Laughter" show and SCTV reunion and after party
Radio-Canada redirects here. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about actors, films, television shows, television stars, video games and production crew personnel. ... The Sound of Young America is a public radio program and podcast based in Los Angeles, Californiaand distributed nationally by Public Radio International. ... Shout! Factory is an entertainment company founded in 2003 and which was started by Richard Foos (co-founder of Rhino Records), Bob Emmer (former Warner Music Group and Rhino executive) and Garson Foos (former Rhino executive). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Second City Theatre (299 words)
Opened December 16, 1959, at 1842 N. Wells St., the Second City cabaret theater was founded by a group of bright young artists, including many University of Chicago alumni, who had worked in such earlier, folded Chicago companies as the Playwright's Theatre Club and Compass Players.
Second City's success became a key factor in establishing the legitimacy of homegrown talent in Chicago theater and prepared the way for the major 1970s expansion of resident theater in the city.
Second City's ownership shifted from cofounder Bernard Sahlins to Canadian Andrew Alexander in 1985.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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