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Secession (derived from the Latin term secessio) is the act of withdrawing from an organization, union, or political entity. It is not to be confused with succession, the act of following in order or sequence. Typically there is a strong issue difference that drives the withdrawal. Though the term is often associated with full civil war, there are different degrees of secession, some as minor as a particular neighborhood seeking to become a separate municipality from a larger city, while still maintaining greater local or national ties. Secession is the act of withdrawing from an organization, union, or political entity. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Secessio in historical terms refers to the exercise of power by Romes plebian citizens; who simply abandoned the city en masse and left the patrician order to themselves. ... Succession is the act or process of pooing or of following in order or sequence. ... This article is about the definition of the specific type of war. ... A neighbourhood or neighborhood (see spelling differences) is a geographically localised community located within a larger city or suburb. ...

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Australia

During the 19th century, the single British colony in eastern mainland Australia, New South Wales (NSW) was progressively divided up by the British government as new settlements were formed and spread. South Australia (SA) was separated in 1836, Victoria (Vic) in 1851 and Queensland (Qld) in 1859. A number of proposals for further states of Australia have been made in the past century. ... This article is about a type of political territory. ... NSW redirects here. ... For the song, see South Australia (song). ... VIC redirects here. ... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd...


However, settlers agitated to divide the colonies throughout the later part of the century; particularly in central Queensland (centred in Rockhampton) in the 1860s and 1890s, and in North Queensland (with Bowen as a potential colonial capital) in the 1870s. Other secession (or territorial separation) movements arose and these advocated the secession of New England in northern central New South Wales, Deniliquin in the Riverina district also in NSW, and Mount Gambier in the eastern part of South Australia. Central Queensland is an ambigious geographical division of Queensland (a state in Australia) that centers on the eastern coast, around the Tropic of Capricorn. ... Mayor Margaret Strelow Area 187 km² Population 58,382 (2001) Time zone UTC + 10 Latitude Longitude 23° 22. ... This article is about the peninsula located in the Australian state of Queensland; it should not be confused with either Yorke Peninsula, in South Australia, or Cape York, Greenland. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Deniliquin, known locally as Deni, is a small town (population signposted as 8,000) and Local Government Area in the Riverina region of New South Wales close to the border with Victoria. ... The Riverina is a prosperous agricultural region of south-western New South Wales (NSW), Australia. ... ... For the song, see South Australia (song). ...


Western Australia

Secession movements have surfaced several times in Western Australia (WA), where a 1933 referendum for secession from the Federation of Australia passed with a two-thirds majority. The referendum had to be ratified by the British Parliament, which declined to act, on the grounds that it would contravene the Australian Constitution. Secessionist How To Vote card, 1933 Secessionism has been a recurring feature of Western Australias political landscape since shortly after European settlement in 1829. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural referendums or referenda), ballot question, or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British colonies of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia formed a federation. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... The Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900 (in full, An Act to constitute the Commonwealth of Australia) is the primary constitutional text of the Commonwealth of Australia. ...


Belgium and The Netherlands

Main article: Belgian Revolution

On August 25th 1830, during the reign of William I, the nationalistic opera La muette de Portici was performed in Brussels. Soon after, the Belgian Revolt occurred, which resulted in the Belgian secession from The Netherlands. This article is about the historical Belgian Revolution of the 1830s. ... For other men at some time in history called William I of Orange-Nassau, see William of Orange. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ...

Further information: Partition of Belgium

The partition of Belgium is a political concept promoting the dissolution of the Belgian State through the separation of the Dutch-speaking peoples of the Flanders region from the French-speaking peoples of the Walloon region, granting them either independence or respective accession to the Netherlands and France. ...

Canada

Throughout Canada's history, there has been tension between English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians. Under the Constitutional Act of 1791, the Quebec colony (including parts of what is today Quebec, Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador) was divided in two: Lower Canada (which retained French law and institutions, including seigneurial land tenure, and the privileges accorded to the Roman Catholic church) and Upper Canada (a new colony intended to accommodate the many English-speaking settlers, including the United Empire Loyalists, who had arrived from the United States following the American Revolution). The intent was to provide each group with its own colony. In 1841, the two Canadas were merged into the Province of Canada. The union proved contentious, however, resulting in a legislative deadlock between English and French legislators. The difficulties of the union lead to the adoption of a federal system in Canada, and the Canadian Confederation in 1867. The federal framework did not eliminate all tensions, however, leading to the Quebec sovereignty movement in the latter half of the 20th century. Throughout the history of Canada, there have been movements seeking secession from Canada. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Constitutional Act of 1791 was a British law which changed the government of the province of Quebec to accommodate the many English-speaking settlers, known as the United Empire Loyalists, who had arrived from the United States following the American Revolution. ... Map of Lower Canada (green) Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791-1841). ... The seigneurial system of New France was the semi-feudal system of land distribution used in the colonies of New France. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... The name United Empire Loyalists is given to those American Loyalists who resettled in British North America and other British Colonies as an act of fealty to King George III after the British defeat in the American Revolutionary War. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A map displaying todays federations. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... The province of Quebec shown in red. ...


Other secessionist movements have also existed from time to time in Canada, including anti-Confederation movements in 19th century Atlantic Canada (see Anti-Confederation Party), the North-West Rebellion of 1885, and various small separatism movements in Alberta particularly (see Alberta Separatism) and Western Canada generally (see, for example, Western Canada Concept). HI Eric u suck!!!!!!!!!!!!! from,Trevor and Dalton ... Anti-Confederation was the name used by several parties in what is now Atlantic Canada by movements opposed to Canadian confederation. ... wwwww Combatants Dominion of Canada • Métis Provisional Government •Cree–Assiniboine Natives Commanders Leif Crozier Frederick Middleton William Otter Thomas Bland Strange Sam Steele Big Bear Fine-Day Gabriel Dumont Louis Riel Wandering Spirit The North-West Rebellion (or North-West Resistance or the Saskatchewan Rebellion) of 1885 was a... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... Alberta separatism is a fringe movement that advocates the secession of the province of Alberta from Canada either by forming an independent nation or by creating a new federation with one or more of Canadas other four westernmost provinces. ... This article is about the region in Canada. ... The Western Canada Concept was a Western Canadian political party founded in 1980 to promote the separation of the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia and the Yukon and Northwest Territories from Canada in order to create a new nation. ...


China

  • Currently, the Republic of China (ROC) government, which ruled mainland China from 1911 to 1949, administers Taiwan and a few surrounding islands, while the People's Republic of China (PRC) government administers mainland China. Both sides officially claim sovereignty over both mainland China and Taiwan. There is debate in Taiwan as to whether to create a new Republic of Taiwan to replace the current ROC government. This is supported by many in the Pan-Green Coalition in Taiwan, but is opposed by most in the Pan-Blue Coalition in Taiwan which supports continuing the ROC as is, and by the PRC government which regards Taiwan as a part of its territory. (The pan-blue coalition is essentially the Kuomintang party, the party of Chiang Kai-shek, which came to Taiwan in 1949 and formerly ruled China.) See Taiwan independence.

At the Third session of the Tenth National People's Congress (March 14, 2005) the Chinese government adopted the Anti-Secession Law of the People's Republic of China. It was created for the purpose of 'opposing and checking Taiwan's secession from China by secessionists in the name of "Taiwan independence"'. The Law includes that Taiwan is part of China and that the unification of China "is the sacred duty of all Chinese people, the Taiwan compatriots included." For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... A flag for the proposed independent Taiwan designed in the mid-1990s. ... The Pan-Green Coalition (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) or Pan-Green Force (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is currently an informal political alliance in the Republic of China (Taiwan), consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the minor Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... The Pan-Blue Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝联盟; Hanyu Pinyin: ), or Pan-Blue Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝军; Hanyu Pinyin: ), is a political coalition in Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... Taiwan independence (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: , Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p ūn-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan out of the... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

  • Within the PRC, the two western regions of Xinjiang and Tibet are also the focus of strong secessionist calls, which are strongly suppressed within the PRC. The dispute is a result of the unique ethnic, cultural, and religious characters of the two regions, as well as differences between the two sides in the interpretation of the history, political status, and human rights situation in the regions. See International Tibet Independence Movement and East Turkestan independence movement.
  • Also within the PRC there has been some talk of secession among the people of Inner Mongolia, which is a province of China.[citation needed] Outer Mongolia already is an independent nation.
  • There has been some talk of secession from among the minority peoples of Yunnan province in south central China.[citation needed]

For the county in Shanxi province, see Xinjiang County. ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ... A Free Tibet logo, one of several that exist The International Tibet Independence Movement (ITIM) is a movement to establish historical Tibet, comprising the three traditional provinces of Amdo, Kham, and Ãœ-Tsang as an independent kingdom. ... Flag of the East Turkestan Republic. ... Inner Mongolia (Mongolian: ᠥᠪᠦᠷ ᠮᠣᠨᠺᠤᠯᠤᠨ ᠥᠪᠡᠷᠲᠡᠺᠡᠨ ᠵᠠᠰᠠᠬᠤ ᠣᠷᠤᠨ r Mongghul-un bertegen Jasaqu Orun; Chinese: 内蒙古自治区; Hanyu Pinyin: N i Měnggǔ Z qū) is an Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Outer Mongolia makes up Mongolia (presently a sovereign state) and Tannu Uriankhai (the majority of which is the modern-day Tuva Republic, a federal subject of the Russian Federation), while Inner Mongolia (内蒙古; Nèi MÄ›nggÇ”) is an autonomous region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Yunan redirects here. ...

India/Pakistan

The Constitution of India does not allow Indian states to declare independence, and separatist political parties have been banned. Secessionist movements in Kashmir and Punjab have been suppressed by the military. The Constitution of India lays down the framework on which Indian polity is run. ...


Pakistan and the Kashmiri separatist movement allege that the state of Jammu and Kashmir has the right, under international law, to leave the Indian Union after a plebiscite. India rejects this argument, arguing that the UN resolutions on which this right is based are archaic, on three grounds: 1) Pakistan has not withdrawn its troops from its share of Kashmir-a prerequisite for a referendum; 2) The Kashmiri legislature ratified the union of Kashmir and India; 3) Indian Kashmir has been integrated into India, and secession is literally impossible. This article is about the area administered by India. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ...


In the 1970s and 1980s, some Sikhs began a movement to create a Sikh state known as Khalistan in the Punjab region bordering both India and Pakistan. Indian military forces crushed the violent insurgency in the 1990s, destroying part of the famous Golden Temple during one incident.[1] Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ), founded on the teachings of Guru Nanak Dev and nine successive gurus in fifteenth century Northern India, is the fifth-largest religion in the world. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... Anthem: Deh Shiva Bar Mohe Official languages Punjabi and English Khālistān (East Punjabi: ), official title Sikh Republic of Khalistan, was the name given by Jagjit Singh Chauhan, to a proposed nation-state based on theocratic fundamentalism. ... For the Golden Pavilion Temple in Kyoto, Japan, see Kinkaku-ji. ...


Italy

The northern-Italian party Lega Nord has declared in 15 September 1996 the secession of Padania (Northern-Italy) for the differences of culture and economy between North and South, for opposition to the centralism of Rome. The politics of secession has been turned off by Lega Nord, after the coalition with the Centre-Right parties and the proposals of devolution and federalism. Although, an ineffective Parliament has been conserved into the Party and its regional sections are named as "national". The Lega Nord (Northern League, LN), whose complete name is Lega Nord for the Independence of Padania, is an Italian political party founded in 1991 as a federation of several regional parties in northern Italy, most of which had arisen, and all of which had expanded their share of the... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The Northern Leagues proposed Padanian flag, the Alps star, an ancient Celtic symbol Padania is an alternative name for Northern Italy, which was sparingly used until the beginning of the 1990s, when the Northern League political party (in Italian, Lega Nord) proposed it as the... The Lega Nord (Northern League, LN), whose complete name is Lega Nord for the Independence of Padania, is an Italian political party founded in 1991 as a federation of several regional parties in northern Italy, most of which had arisen, and all of which had expanded their share of the...


Norway and Sweden

Norway and Sweden had entered into a loose personal union in 1814. Following a constitutional crisis, in 1905 the Norwegian Parliament declared that King Oscar II had failed to fulfill his constitutional duties on 7 June. He was therefore no longer King of Norway and because the union depended on the two countries sharing a king, it was thus dissolved. Sweden agreed to this on 26 October. Postcard with photo of Prince Carl of Denmark, candidate for king. ... The Storting main building The Storting, or Stortinget, (the Great Assembly), is the parliament of Norway, and is located in Oslo. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Somalia

Somaliland seceded from Somalia in 1991. To date, it is unrecognized by the UN or any other state. For other territories formerly called Somaliland, see Somaliland (disambiguation). ...


United Kingdom

The United Kingdom has a number of different secession movements:

  • In England there are a number of small movements that call for a separate devolved English parliament or full independence from the United Kingdom, among them the English Democrats and the Campaign for an English Parliament. None of these have made any significant electoral impact. There are also several small secessionist movements, most notably the Sovereign Kingdom of Kemetia which reputedly claimed independence from England in mid-2005.[2]
  • The Principality of Sealand, a small platform off the English Coast has declared its independence, although its legal status is doubtful.

The Republic of Ireland comprises the only territory that has withdrawn from the United Kingdom proper; as the Irish Free State it gained independence in 1922 (independence had been declared in 1916). This article is about the country. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... Scottish independence is a political ambition of a number of political parties, pressure groups and individuals within and outside of Scotland. ... The Politics of Scotland forms a distinctive part of the wider politics of the United Kingdom, with Scotland one of the constituent countries of the United Kingdom. ... The logo of the Governemnt, incorporating the Saltire. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... The Scottish Green Party (Pàrtaidh Uaine na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the Green party of Scotland, and a full member of the European Federation of Green Parties. ... The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP) (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a radical left-wing Scottish political party which campaigns on a socialist economic platform and for Scottish independence. ... The Scottish Enterprise Party, SEP, is a Scottish centre-right pro-business party supportive of Scottish independence. ... This article is about the country. ... Plaid Cymru (IPA:; English: ; often referred to simply as Plaid) is a political party in Wales. ... Location of Wales in the United Kingdom. ... Wales is a constituent part of the United Kingdom. ... The National Assembly for Wales (or NAfW) (Welsh: Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru) is a devolved assembly (not a full legislature) with power to make regulations in Wales, and also is responsible for most UK government departments in Wales. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A devolved English Parliament, giving separate decision-making powers to representatives for voters in England similar to the representation given by the Welsh Assembly, Scottish Parliament and the Northern Ireland Assembly, is currently an issue in British politics. ... The English Democrats Party, previously the English National Party, is a political party in England, which seeks the establishment of a new Parliament for England with at least the same powers as those granted to the Scottish Parliament. ... See also List of Parliaments of England External link Campaign for an English Parliament English Constitutional Convention Categories: English politics | England | Politics of England | Politics of the UK | United Kingdom | European politics | English independence ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Irish republicanism is an ideology based on the Irish nationalist belief that all of Ireland should be a single independent republic, whether as a unitary state, a federal state or as a confederal arrangement. ... Irish nationalism refers to political movements that desire greater autonomy or the independence of Ireland from Great Britain. ... Unionism, in Ireland, is a belief in the desirability of a full constitutional and institutional relationship between Ireland and Great Britain based on the terms and order of government of the Act of Union 1800 which had merged both countries in 1801 to form the United Kingdom of Great Britain... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... Mebyon Kernow (Cornish for Sons of Cornwall, often abbrieviated MK) is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Flag of Cornwall // Overview In July 2000 Mebyon Kernow launched the Declaration for a Cornish Assembly campaign which some three months later led to the creation of The Cornish Constitutional Convention with the objective of establishing a devolved Assembly for Cornwall. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Cornish Flag The Cornish self-government movement (sometimes referred to as Cornish nationalism) is a social movement which seeks greater autonomy for the area of Cornwall. ... The Home Nations is a name to collectively describe the four nations of the United Kingdom: the countries of England, Scotland and Wales, and the province of Northern Ireland. ... The Principality of Sealand is a micronation located on HM Fort Roughs, a former World War II Maunsell Sea Fort in the North Sea 10 km (six miles) off the coast of Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. ... This article is about the prior state. ...


United States

American revolution

According to some secession theorists, the American Revolution, in which thirteen British colonies successfully fought for independence from the British Crown, was a secession, as opposed to a revolution. Revolutions seek to replace current governments, while secession movements merely seek separation from current governments. According to this view, the independence movements of Latin American countries were also examples of secession (from Spain). Other positions emphasize the colonial nature of British rule, and the previous restrictions on participation by colonists in the government. John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... For other uses, see Revolution (disambiguation). ...


Northeast United States and the Hartford Convention

New England most often considered seceding from the union: in 1803 over the Louisiana Purchase, in 1808 over the embargo of British trade, in 1814 over war with Britain, in 1843 over the annexation of Texas, and in 1847 over the Mexican War.[3] Opposition to the War of 1812 (which lasted until 1815) spurred Federalists party members from the north-eastern U.S. to convene informally the 1814 Hartford Convention where there was some discussion of secession from the nation. The war ended soon afterwards, and revelations about the secession discussions politically destroyed the Federalists. This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Secret Journal of the Hartford Convention, published 1823. ...


South Carolina

During the presidential term of Andrew Jackson, South Carolina had its own semi-secession movement due to the "Tariffs of Abomination" which threatened both South Carolina's economy and the Union. Andrew Jackson also threatened to send Federal Troops to put down the movement and to hang the leader of the secessionists from the highest tree in South Carolina. Also due to this, Jackson's vice president, John C. Calhoun, who supported the movement and wrote the essay "The South Carolina Exposition and Protest", became the first US vice-president to resign. South Carolina also threatened to secede in 1850 over the issue of California's statehood. It became the first state to secede from the Union on December 20, 1860 and later joined with the other southern states in the Confederacy. The Nullification Crisis was a sectional crisis during the presidency of Andrew Jackson that arose when the state of South Carolina attempted to nullify a federal law passed by the United States Congress. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... The South Carolina Exposition and Protest, also known as Calhouns Exposition , was written in 1828 by John C. Calhoun,in disguise under the pseudonym Mr. ...


Confederate States of America

One of the most famous unsuccessful secession movements was the case of the Southern states of the United States. Secession from the United States was declared in thirteen states, eleven of which joined together to form the Confederate States of America. The eleven states were Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. Note that these are not listed by order of secession; South Carolina was the first state to secede from the Union, on December 20, 1860; Tennessee was the last, and seceded on June 8, 1861. In addition, in Missouri and Kentucky secession was declared by its supporters but did not become effective, and was opposed by pro-Union state governments. This secession movement brought about the American Civil War. The position of the Union was that the Confederacy was not a sovereign nation but instead a collection of states in revolt. Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union...


West Virginia

The western counties of Virginia making up what is now West Virginia seceded from Virginia (which had joined the Confederacy) and became the 35th state of the U.S. during the course of the American Civil War, and remained separated after the war ended. This is a list of counties in West Virginia: West Virginia county boundaries Barbour County Berkeley County Boone County Braxton County Brooke County Cabell County Calhoun County Clay County Doddridge County Fayette County Gilmer County Grant County Greenbrier County Hampshire County Hancock County Hardy County Harrison County Jackson County Jefferson... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Texas secession from Mexico

The Republic of Texas successfully seceded from Mexico in 1836. In 1845 Texas joined the United States as a full-fledged state. Mexico refused to recognize Texas independence and warned the U.S. that annexation meant war. The Mexican–American War followed in 1846, and the United States defeated Mexico. Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 18,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded...


Recent efforts in the United States

Examples of both local and state secession movements can be cited over the last 25 years. Some secessionist movements to create new states have failed, others are ongoing.


City secession

There was an attempt by Staten Island to break away from New York City in the late 1980s and early 1990s (See: City of Greater New York). Around the same time, there was a similar movement to separate Northeast Philadelphia from the rest of the city of Philadelphia. San Fernando Valley lost a vote to separate from Los Angeles in 2002 but has seen increased attention to its infrastructure needs (See: San Fernando Valley secession movement). This article is about the borough in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The City of Greater New York, both commonly and (since the new City Charter of 1938) corporately described simply as the City of New York or New York City, describes the expanded city created on January 1, 1898 by the incorporation into the city of Richmond County, Kings County, the... Map of Philadelphia County with Northeast Highlighted. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... San Fernando Valley from its southwestern edge. ... San Fernando Valley from its southwestern edge. ...


County secession

In US history, over 1,000 county secession movements existed and only three succeeded in the 20th century: La Paz County, Arizona broke off from Yuma County and the Cibola County, New Mexico effort both occurred in the early 1980s, and the High Desert County, California plan to split the northern half of Los Angeles and eastern half of Kern counties, was approved by the California state government in 2006, but never has officially declared at the mean time. La Paz County is located in the western part of the U.S. state of Arizona. ... Yuma County is located in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Arizona. ... Cibola County is a county located in the state of New Mexico. ... Los Angeles County is a county in California and is by far the most populous county in the United States. ... Kern County is a county located in the southern Central Valley of the U.S. state of California. ...


State secession

Several towns in Vermont including Killington recently explored a secession request to allow them to join New Hampshire over claims that they are not getting adequate return of state resources from their state tax contributions. This article is about the U.S. state. ... Killington, Vermont Killington is a town in Rutland County, Vermont, United States. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ...


Advocates in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, with off and on intensity, have called for it to become a separate 51st state (sometimes with northern Wisconsin) called "Superior". Similarly some in the Little Egypt region of Illinois want to separate due to what they consider Chicagoan control over the legislature and economy. The Upper Peninsula of Michigan is the northern of the two major land masses that comprise the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The Little Egypt region of Illinois Little Egypt is the southern area of the state of Illinois in the United States of America. ...


In November 2006, the Supreme Court of Alaska held that secession was illegal, Kohlhaas vs. State, and refused to permit an otherwise proper Initiative to be presented to the people of Alaska for a vote. The Alaska Supreme Court is the state supreme court in the State of Alaskas judicial department (Alaska Court System). ...


In March 2008, the comptroller of Suffolk County, New York once again proposed for Long Island to secede from New York State, citing the fact that Long Island gives more in taxes to the state than it receives back in aid. Suffolk County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ...


In 1977, The islands of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket, tried to secede from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (they also tried to secede from the United States and become an independent nation) Map of Marthas Vineyard. ... Nantucket is an island south of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, formed of glacial moraine. ... State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ...


Secession from the U.S.

On July 13, 1977, the City Council of Kinney, Minnesota, led by Mayor Mary Anderson wrote a "tongue in cheek" letter to Secretary of State Cyrus Vance informing him of the city's secession from the Union to form the Republic of Kinney. Vance never acknowledged the letter. Kinney is a city located in St. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Kinney, Minnesota. ...


The mock 1982 secessionist protest by the Conch Republic in the Florida Keys resulted in an ongoing source of local pride and tourist amusement. The Conch Republic is a micronation declared as a tongue-in-cheek protest secession of the city of Key West from the United States on April 23, 1982. ...


The group Republic of Texas generated national publicity for its actions in the late 1990s. There have been repeated attempts to form a Republic of Cascadia in the Pacific Northwest. The Hawaiian sovereignty movement has a number of active groupings which have won some concessions from the State of Hawaii. Founded in the 1983, The Creator's Rights Party seeks to have one or more states secede in order to implement "God’s plan for government" and is fielding political candidates in 2007 around the United States. Republic of Texas logo used in some of their documents and Web sites The Republic of Texas is an independence movement that claims that the annexation of Texas by the United States was illegal and that Texas remains an independent nation under occupation. ... One popular proposed flag for Cascadia. ... The Pacific Northwest from space The Pacific Northwest, abbreviated PNW, or PacNW is a region in the northwest of North America. ... Native Hawaiians gather at Ê»Iolani Palace on August 12, 1998 to remember the centennial anniversary of the American annexation of HawaiÊ»i. ...


Efforts to organize a continental secession movement have been initiated since 2004 by members of Second Vermont Republic, working with noted decentralist author Kirkpatrick Sale. Their second "radical consultation" in November of 2004 resulted in a statement of intent called The Middlebury Declaration. It also gave rise to the Middlebury Institute, which is dedicated to the "study of separatism, secession, and self-determination" and which engages in secessionist organizing. Second Vermont Republic (SVR) is a secessionist movement within the U.S. state of Vermont to return the independent status of the Vermont Republic from 1777–91. ... Decentralization is the process of dispersing decision-making closer to the point of service or action. ... Kirkpatrick Sale is an author, technology critic (neo-luddite) and tax resister. ... The Middlebury Institute is a political think tank founded in 2005 dedicated to the study of separatism, secession, and self-determination. ... “Separatists” redirects here. ... Self-determination is a principle in international law that a people ought to be able to determine their own governmental forms and structure free from outside influence. ...


In November 2006 the same group sponsored the First North American Secessionist Convention which attracted 40 participants from 16 secessionist organizations and was (erroneously) described as the first gathering of secessionists since the Civil War. Delegates included a broad spectrum from libertarians to socialists to greens to Christian conservatives to indigenous peoples activists. Groups represented included Alaskan Independence Party, Cascadia Independence Project, Hawaiʻi Nation, The Second Maine Militia, The Free State Project, the Republic of New Hampshire, the League of the South, Christian Exodus, the Second Vermont Republic and the United Republic of Texas. Delegates created a statement of principles of secession which they presented as the Burlington Declaration.[4] The Second North American Secessionist Convention in October, 2007, in Chattanooga, Tennessee received local and national media attention.[5] This article deals with the libertarianism as defined in America and several other nations. ... Socialism is any economic system in which the means of production are owned and controlled collectively or a political philosophy advocating such a system. ... “Greens” redirects here. ... Indigenous peoples are: Peoples living in an area prior to colonization by a state Peoples living in an area within a nation-state, prior to the formation of a nation-state, but who do not identify with the dominant nation. ... The Free State Project (FSP) is a plan to have 20,000 or more liberty-oriented people move to a single state of the United States, with the intent of influencing local politics and policy. ... The League of the South is a Southern nationalist organization whose ultimate goal is a free and independent Southern republic. ... Christian Exodus (the brainchild of a Neo-Confederate financial advisor, Cory Burnell) is a group promoting a mass emigration of Christian fundamentalists to South Carolina in hopes of influencing the governmental process in the United States. ... Second Vermont Republic (SVR) is a secessionist movement within the U.S. state of Vermont to return the independent status of the Vermont Republic from 1777–91. ...


Secession in Former Yugoslavia

In the early 1990s, Croatia, Slovenia, and later Bosnia and Herzegovina decided to secede from the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, which resulted in the bloody Yugoslav wars of secession and the dissolution of Yugoslavia. The Slovenia war was brief and of low intensity, with fewer than 100 deaths on both sides. However, large Serbian minorities in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina fought against secession, sometimes aided by the Yugoslav army, and formed their own secessionist enclaves. However, the secession of Macedonia in 1991 was not resisted. Serbian attempts to repress secessionists in Albanian-majority Kosovo led to the 1999 NATO bombing of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. Kosovo declared independence on February 17, 2008 and was recognized by the United States and some other countries a day later and over the next few days, but remains under United Nations administration. Montenegro peacefully separated from its union with Serbia in 2006. Motto Brotherhood and Unity Anthem Hey, Slavs Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throughout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Yugoslavia was a south-eastern European country in the Balkans, a region with a long history of sectarian and ethnic conflict. ... Combatants Slovenia Territorial Defence SFR Yugoslavia Yugoslav Peoples Army Commanders Janez Janša Veljko Kadijević Strength 16,000 Territorial Defence, 10,000 police 35,200 Yugoslav National Army personnel Casualties 18 killed, 182 wounded (official casualties) 44 killed, 146 wounded 5,000 prisoners (Slovenian Estimates) The Ten-Day War... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... Combatants NATO (USAF, RAF, and other air, maritime and land forces) Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and allied Serb paramilitary and foreign volunteer forces[1] Commanders Wesley Clark (SACEUR), Javier Solana (Secretary General of NATO) Slobodan Milošević (Supreme Commander of the Yugoslav Army), Vojislav Šešelj, Dragoljub Ojdanić (Chief of... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... This article is about the country in Europe. ...


Citations

  1. ^ "Sikhs in Punjab" Military Section article at GlobalSecurity.Org
  2. ^ Micronations (General Reference) (Paperback) by John Ryan (Author), Simon Sellars (Author), George Dunford (Author)
  3. ^ Donald W. Livingston, What Is Secession?, VermontCommons.Org.
  4. ^ The New York Sun and the Philadelphia Inquirer covered the convention.
  5. ^ Bill Poovey, Secessionists Meeting in Tennessee, Associated Press, October 3, 2007; Leonard Doyle, Anger over Iraq and Bush prompts calls for secession from the US, Independent, UK, October 4, 2007; WDEF News 12 Video report on Secessionist Convention, October 3, 2007.

See also: Lists

This is a list of historical autonomist and secessionist movements around the world. ... This is a list of currently active autonomist and secessionist movements around the world. ... The list of unrecognized countries enumerates those geo-political entities which lack general diplomatic recognition, but wish to be recognized as sovereign states. ... This is a list of U.S. state secession proposals; that is, a list of official or otherwise noteworthy proposals for dividing existing U.S. states into multiple states. ... This is a list of county secession proposals in the grass lands; that is, proposed new counties to be formed from existing counties within a given state. ...

See also: Topics

“Separatists” redirects here. ... Self-determination is a principle in international law that a people ought to be able to determine their own governmental forms and structure free from outside influence. ... The process of nullification may refer to: The Hartford Convention, in which New England Federalists considered secession from the United States of America. ... This article is about entities that are not officially recognised by world governments or major international organisations. ... Urban secession is a citys secession from its surrounding region, to form a new political unit (usually a state or district or province of the same country as its surroundings, but not always). ... A homeland is the concept of the territory to which one belongs; usually, the country in which a particular nationality was born. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... The Secret Journal of the Hartford Convention, published 1823. ... Fernando Wood: New York City secession, the secession of New York City (and possibly neighboring areas) from New York State and/or the United States, has been proposed several times in history. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Kinney, Minnesota. ... The Essex Junto was a group of lawyers and merchants from Essex County, Massachusetts. ... The Great Republic of Rough and Ready was a small, short-lived self-declared independent nation that existed in Nevada County in northern California in the United States in 1850. ... One popular proposed flag for Cascadia. ... Second Vermont Republic (SVR) is a secessionist movement within the U.S. state of Vermont to return the independent status of the Vermont Republic from 1777–91. ... The Republic of South Carolina is a term for the State of South Carolina as it existed from December 20, 1860 (when it seceded from the Union) to February 8, 1861 (when it joined the Confederate States of America). ... The League of the South is a Southern nationalist organization whose ultimate goal is a free and independent Southern republic. ... The South Carolina Exposition and Protest, also known as Calhouns Exposition , was written in 1828 by John C. Calhoun,in disguise under the pseudonym Mr. ... Christian Exodus (the brainchild of a Neo-Confederate financial advisor, Cory Burnell) is a group promoting a mass emigration of Christian fundamentalists to South Carolina in hopes of influencing the governmental process in the United States. ... Reference re Secession of Quebec [1998] 2 S.C.R. 217 was an opinion of the Supreme Court of Canada regarding the legality, under both Canadian and international law, of a unilateral secession of Quebec from Canada. ... This article is about the historical Belgian Revolution of the 1830s. ... For the history of the Seceders in Scotland see United Presbyterian Church. ... The European Free Alliance (EFA) is a grouping of various political parties in Europe who believe in either full political independence (statehood), or some form of devolution or self-government for their country or region. ... Map indicating Oranias location Afrikaner cultural celebration at Orania Orania is a South African town located along the Orange River in the Northern Cape province in the arid Karoo region. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
secession - Encyclopedia.com (1127 words)
secession in political science, formal withdrawal from an association by a group discontented with the actions or decisions of that association.
Perhaps the best-known example of a secession taking place within the borders of a formerly unified nation was the withdrawal (1860-61) of the 11 Southern states from the United States to form the Confederacy.
By contrast, the secession (1971) of Bangladesh (formerly East Pakistan) from the state of Pakistan was accomplished successfully with the help of India, the Baltic states regained independence from the USSR immediately before its dissolution, and Eritrea seceded from Ethiopia in 1993 after the overthrow of the latter nation's government.
Secession - LoveToKnow 1911 (372 words)
SECESSION, a term used in political science to signify the withdrawal of a state from a confederacy or composite state, of which it had previously been a part; and the resumption of all powers formerly delegated by it to the federal government, and of its status as an independent state.
To secede is a sovereign right; secession, therefore, is based on the theory that the sovereignty of the individual states forming a confederacy or federal union has not been absorbed into a single new sovereignty.
Secession is a right claimed or exercised by weaker states of a union whose rights are threatened by the stronger states, which seldom acknowledge such a principle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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